Issuu on Google+

tiaonline.org

TIA BENEFITS

An overview of the ICT market, technologies, and policies that drive innovation and investment

INDUSTRY OUTLOOK

TIA2012 PLAYBOOK

TIA POLICY PRIORITIES

Manufacturers and suppliers of Information and Communications Technology present‌


KEY CO N TACTS

LEADERSHIP GRANT SEIFFERT

President +1.703.907.7701 gseiffert@tiaonline.org CHERYL BLUM

Vice President, Technology & Standards +1.703.907.7436 cblum@tiaonline.org EILEEN BRAMLET

Vice President, Marketing & Communications +1.703.907.7749 ebramlet@tiaonline.org HERB CONGDON

Associate Vice President, Technology & Standards +1.703.907.7703 hcongdon@tiaonline.org

JOHN JACOBS

Sr. Vice President, Membership, Marketing & Business Development +1.703.907.7747 jjacobs@tiaonline.org ANDREW KURTZMAN

Vice President & Corporate Counsel +1.703.907.7413 akurtzman@tiaonline.org T A LY W A L S H

Vice President, Networking & Intelligence +1.703.907.7744 twalsh@tiaonline.org M A R Y P I P E R W AT E R S

Sr. Director, Operations +1.703.907.7701 mwaters@tiaonline.org

For more information on TIA’s public policy positions and activities, please contact one of the TIA government affairs staff members below:

GOVERNMENT AFFAIRS DANIELLE COFFEY

BRIAN SCARPELLI

Vice President & General Counsel, Government Affairs +1.202.346.3243 dcoffey@tiaonline.org

Manager, Government Affairs +1.202.346.3251 bscarpelli@tiaonline.org

JOSEPH ANDERSEN

Director, Legislative & Government Affairs +1.202.346.3248 dsrihari@tiaonline.org

N I CO L A S A . F E T C H KO

Director, Regulatory & Government Affairs +1.202.346.3244 muncapher@tiaonline.org

Director, Technology & Innovation Policy +1.202.346.3249 jandersen@tiaonline.org Director, International & Government Affairs +1.202.346.3246 nfetchko@tiaonline.org

DILEEP SRIHARI

MARK UNCAPHER


I ND U S T RY O U T L O O K

TELECOMMUNICATIONS INDUSTRY ASSOCIATION CONNECTIVITY, INNOVATION, LEADERSHIP, AND RESPONSIBILITY are Core Values of TIA. Our

mission is to turn those values into initiatives that benefit our membership and the manufacturers and suppliers of global networks. Companies that join TIA share a common vision for the future of the Information and Communications Technology industry—a vision that informs their strategic planning and satisfies their business goals. TIA members gain exclusive access to the latest intelligence on information and communications technologies and participate as industry leaders IF YOU THOUGHT to create standards and advise on government and THE WORLD WAS SHRINKING, industry policy. YOU HAVEN’T SEEN ANYTHING YET.


TIA P O LICY P R IO R ITIES

INNOVATION LEADS TO JOB AND ECONOMIC GROWTH ADVANCE GLOBAL COMPETITIVENESS THROUGH:

j Market Access

and Trade j Research and

Development j Education and Talent j Tax Reform

4TIA 2012 PLAYBOOK

DRIVE INVESTMENT THROUGH:

ENABLE FORWARD-LOOKING TECHNOLOGIES WITH:

j Tax Incentives

j Spectrum Availability

j Market-Based

j Global Cybersecurity

Regulations

j Green ICT and Smart Grid j Accessibility


INNOVATION REAPS BENEFITS THE TIA ROADMAP will drive investment in broadband networks and applications, accelerating social and economic development by:

j CONNECTING

communities and enterprise customers with the essential 21st century infrastructure.

j SUSTAINING,

redefining, creating, and multiplying jobs.

j ENHANCING productivity, enabling teleworking.

j INCREASING

eco-sustainability and smart grid deployments through intelligent technologies.

j OFFERING new tools for public safety and homeland security.

j IMPROVING

public health facilities through telemedicine, digital hospitals, and e-records.

j FACILITATING

e-government.

j FOSTERING

powerful educational tools in the classroom and boosting distance-learning capabilities.

j MAKING the power of communications accessible to all.

TIA 2012 PLAYBOOK 5

TIA POLICY PRIORITIES

TIA I ND P OULSIT CRY Y PO RIUOTRI LO T IOEK S


TIA POLICY PRIORITIES

TIA P O LICY P R IO R ITIES

INNOVATION DRIVES JOBS j ICT COMPANIES ACCOUNTED for 3.5 million jobs in 2009, with average compensation for ICT workers more than 80 percent higher than for the workforce overall. j ICT FIRMS CONTRIBUTE about $1 trillion to the U.S. GDP through both direct and indirect contributions — about 7 percent of the U.S. economy. j ICT’S DIRECT CONTRIBUTIONS to GDP have increased nearly 25 percent since the 1990s, growing from 3.4 percent per year in 1991-1993 to an average of 4.2 percent per year in 2005-2009 — gains unmatched by any other industry.

6TIA 2012 PLAYBOOK

j THE PRESIDENT’S PROPOSAL to fund the development and initial deployment of a nationwide wireless broadband data and communications network for public safety agencies would lead to the creation of an estimated 100,000 new jobs in ICT industries and, over time, produce indirect or spillover benefits of an estimated $4 billion to $8 billion per year.


TIA I ND P OULSIT CRY Y PO RIUOTRI LO T IOEK S

RECAPTURE GLOBAL COMPETITIVENESS LAWMAKERS CAN RECAPTURE GLOBAL COMPETITIVENESS THROUGH: j MARKET ACCESS & TRADE — Securing access to international markets by promoting trade liberalization and a market-based, technology-neutral approach to regulation in international markets. j RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT — Strategic and robust U.S. investment in telecommunications research, including a permanent R&D tax credit, multi-year federal research plans, and a commitment to long-term research will enable the United States to remain a technology industry leader.

j EDUCATION & TALENT — The future of the ICT industry in the United States depends on providing the necessary support for education in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) for our students while enacting immigration reforms to allow companies to attract and retain the best and brightest minds from around the world. j TAX REFORM — Comprehensive tax reform will affect the competitiveness of U.S. firms, which are already disadvantaged by virtue of the fact the U.S. corporate tax rate is the second highest in the world. TIA will press for reform that will cut the effective U.S. corporate tax rate to a level that will enhance the international competitiveness of U.S. firms.

TIA 2012 PLAYBOOK 7


TIA P O LICY P R IO R ITIES

U.S. MUST ACHIEVE LEADERSHIP IN BROADBAND Broadband Penetration 2011 (Percent)

j THE U.S. LAGS BEHIND

Source: TIA’s 2012 ICT Market Review and Forecast

OTHER DEVELOPED NATIONS in broadband

Switzerland Netherlands Iceland Denmark South Korea Norway France Luxembourg Sweden Germany Belgium United Kingdom Canada Hong Kong Malta Finland United States Japan Bahrain Estonia

deployment.

j THE U.S. RANKED 17th

in broadband deployment in 2011, rising from its 18th place ranking in 2010.

j THE U.S. MUST NOT BE

OUTPACED by major trading partners in deployment of cutting-edge technologies and networks.

j LACK OF BROADBAND CONNECTIVITY INHIBITS JOB CREATION in the U.S. 0

5

10

15

8TIA 2012 PLAYBOOK

20

25

30

35

40


TIA I ND P OULSIT CRY Y PO RIUOTRI LO T IOEK S

MARKET ACCESS AND TRADE TIA POLICIES SECURE ACCESS TO INTERNATIONAL MARKETS by promoting trade liberalization and a market-based and technology-neutral approach to regulation in international markets: j BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT OPPORTUNITIES for U.S. suppliers should be facilitated by promoting full, fair, and open competition in international markets. j TRADE AGREEMENTS should be promoted that eliminate or reduce traditional marketaccess and technical barriers to trade. j EXISTING COMMITMENTS by signatories to the World Trade Organisation (WTO) Border Tax Adjustment (BTA), Information Technology Agreement (ITA), Government Procurement Agreement (GPA), and Technical Barriers to Trade (TBT) should be enforced. j COMMUNICATIONS SERVICES must be liberalized on a technology-neutral basis.

j BILATERAL AND MULTILATERAL TELECOM agreements should provide transparency, independent regulatory authority, nondiscrimination against foreign suppliers, and technology neutrality. j THE DEVELOPMENT AND IMPLEMENTATION of export control mechanisms that enhance the abilities of companies to export their products overseas should be supported. j THE U.S. EXPORT CONTROL REGIME should be modernized to increase transparency and clearly delineate jurisdiction between the Commerce and State Departments. TIA 2012 PLAYBOOK 9


TIA P O LICY P R IO R ITIES

TOP TRADE DESTINATIONS FOR U.S. EQUIPMENT j IN 2010, EUROPE WAS THE LARGEST MARKET for U.S. equipment exports, followed by Latin America and Asia Pacific. j IN 2010, THE TOP 10 EXPORT DESTINATIONS together, which comprised 59 percent of all U.S. telecommunications equipment exports, accounted for $9.6 billion in telecommunications equipment purchases from the United States. j MEXICO WAS THE LEADING DESTINATION for the export of American telecommunications equipment in 2010, accounting for $2.5 billion, a six-year high. Middle East/Africa 7.9%

U.S. Exports of Telecommunications Equipment by Region 2010

Canada 11%

Asia Pacific 23.9% Europe 32.8%

Source: TIA’s 2012 ICT Market Review and Forecast

Latin America 24.5% 10TIA 2012 PLAYBOOK


TIA I ND P OULSIT CRY Y PO RIUOTRI LO T IOEK S

CHINA: SECTOR SNAPSHOT 859

950

1,050

1,150

1,250

1,350

Telecommunications Subscribers in China (Millions)

547

Source: TIA’s 2012 ICT Market Review and Forecast

366

340

314

294

275

260

250

245

240

2007

2008

2009

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

393

461

350

368

2005

2006

641

747

Wireless Landline

j CHINA HAD THE LARGEST

TELECOMMUNICATIONS MARKET in Asia

Pacific at $388 billion in 2011.

j CHINA IS THE LARGEST FIXED BROADBAND MARKET in the world, with 135 million subscribers in 2011. j BY 2015, CHINA WILL HAVE 195 MILLION BROADBAND SUBSCRIBERS, representing 56 percent of the Asia Pacific region’s total subscriber growth.

j CHINA HAS THE LARGEST WIRELESS MARKET in the world, with 950 million wireless subscribers in 2011. By 2015, it is expected to grow by another 400 million subscribers to 1.35 billion subscribers. j IN CHINA, THE GOVERNMENT IS LOOKING TO EXPAND INTERNET reach to 45 percent of the population by 2015 from 29 percent at the end of 2009. TIA 2012 PLAYBOOK 11


TIA P O LICY P R IO R ITIES

INDIA: SECTOR SNAPSHOT Telecommunications Subscribers in India (Millions)

752

Source: TIA’s 2012 ICT Market Review and Forecast

90 50 2005

39

41 2006

950

2007

2008

37

35

34

33

32

32

2009

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

j INDIA WILL BE THE FASTEST-GROWING telecommunications market during the next four years, with projected compound annual increases of 12.2 percent, overtaking Japan in 2014 to become the second largest telecom country in the region. j IN 2011, INDIA HAD THE SECOND LARGEST wireless market in Asia Pacific with 850 million subscribers, projected to reach 1.25 billion by 2015. 12TIA 2012 PLAYBOOK

1,250

Landline

347 38

1,150

Wireless

525 234

166

850

1,050

31 2015

j INDIA ADDED AN AVERAGE of more than 8 million wireless subscribers per month in 2011. j FIXED BROADBAND REMAINS LIMITED in India — penetration was 1.1 percent in 2011 — because of poor infrastructure in rural areas, where 70 percent of the population lives.


TIA I ND P OULSIT CRY Y PO RIUOTRI LO T IOEK S

RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT STRATEGIC AND ROBUST U.S. INVESTMENT IN TELECOMMUNICATIONS RESEARCH

including a permanent R&D tax credit, multi-year federal research plan, and a commitment to long-term research will enable the United States to remain a technology industry leader. j INCREASED FEDERAL RESEARCH FUNDING MUST BE ALLOCATED for network- and communicationsspecific, precompetitive, basic research. j THE U.S. GOVERNMENT MUST MAKE LONG-TERM COMMUNICATIONS RESEARCH A PRIORITY, and funds need to be directed to key areas: universal broadband; security; interoperable mobility; and homeland security-related fields including interoperability, security, survivability and encryption.

TIA 2012 PLAYBOOK 13


TIA P O LICY P R IO R ITIES

EDUCATION & TALENT THE FUTURE OF THE ICT INDUSTRY IN THE U.S. depends on providing the necessary support

for education in science, engineering, and technology for our students while enacting immigration reforms to allow companies to attract and retain the best and brightest minds from around the world. j ENACTMENT OF IMMIGRATION REFORMS should facilitate the retention of engineers and scientists in the United States, especially recent graduates from U.S. universities, to improve and strengthen our domestic workforce.

j CONGRESS MUST FUND THE AMERICA COMPETES ACT (PL 111-358) and maintain a commitment to invest in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) education to help ensure that America is educating the workforce of the future.

14TIA 2012 PLAYBOOK


TIA I ND P OULSIT CRY Y PO RIUOTRI LO T IOEK S

TAX REFORM COMPREHENSIVE TAX REFORM will affect the competitiveness of U.S. firms, which are already disadvantaged by virtue of the fact that the U.S. corporate tax rate is the second highest in the world. TIA will press for reform that will cut the effective U.S. corporate tax rate to a level that will enhance the international competitiveness of U.S. firms. j CONGRESS MUST PASS LEGISLATION TO REDUCE THE OVERALL CORPORATE TAX RATE

and to create a lower tax rate for repatriated funds, which will encourage domestic investment and boost our nation’s economy.

TIA 2012 PLAYBOOK 15


TIA P O LICY P R IO R ITIES

DRIVE INVESTMENT LAWMAKERS SHOULD DRIVE INVESTMENT

in broadband networks and services through:

j TAX INCENTIVES — Through incremental tax credits, expensing, and bonds, the U.S. government can increase investment in our nation’s future and domestic prosperity. j MARKET-BASED REGULATIONS — A continued light-touch approach to regulation, as well as certainty in the marketplace, will ensure continued investment in a technology-neutral manner.

16TIA 2012 PLAYBOOK


TIA I ND P OULSIT CRY Y PO RIUOTRI LO T IOEK S

TAX INCENTIVES TIA ENCOURAGES the U.S. government to increase investment in our nation’s future and domestic prosperity through the enactment of incremental tax credits, expensing, and bonds. j TAX POLICIES SHOULD BE IMPLEMENTED THAT WILL DRIVE INVESTMENT IN BROADBAND

through tiered tax incentives that accelerate as the speed offered by such service increases, recognizing differing tiers and floors depending on the technology deployed.

j THE UNITED STATES MUST ENACT A PERMANENT R&D CREDIT, which will allow companies to make long-term research plans while being assured that the credit will continue for the life of the project.

TIA 2012 PLAYBOOK 17


TIA P O LICY P R IO R ITIES

MARKET-BASED REGULATIONS A CONTINUED LIGHT-TOUCH APPROACH TO REGULATION, as well as certainty in the marketplace, will ensure continued investment in a technology-neutral manner. j GOVERNMENT MUST ENHANCE EFFORTS to stimulate investment and innovation in next-generation broadband. j NETWORK OPERATORS should have the ability to engage in reasonable, pro-competitive network management. j TECHNOLOGY AND SERVICE NEUTRALITY ARE CRITICAL, and when regulation is necessary, it should be structured to promote competition among existing and emerging platforms and providers.

18TIA 2012 PLAYBOOK

j GOVERNMENT SHOULD ENSURE UNIFORMITY in regulation for IP-enabled services through exclusive federal jurisdiction of these services by the Federal Communications Commission, which will lead to increased certainty and investment in the marketplace. j TECHNOLOGY MANDATES by the government hamstring innovation and increase consumer costs.


TIA I ND P OULSIT CRY Y PO RIUOTRI LO T IOEK S

ENABLE FORWARD-LOOKING TECHNOLOGIES TIA CALLS ON POLICY MAKERS to enable forward-looking technologies through: j SPECTRUM AVAILABILITY — Innovative, next-generation wireless devices, applications, and services require spectrum availability and mobile broadband use. The FCC and the Administration should move quickly to reallocate spectrum and conduct voluntary incentive auctions using the new authority provided by Congress, while avoiding burdensome regulations. j GLOBAL CYBERSECURITY — Global approaches to cybersecurity policies in the U.S. and internationally are necessary to avoid policies that could negatively impact market access, interoperability, and global security.

j SUSTAINABLE ICT — Appropriate federallevel policies are critical to driving ICT’s potential to reduce energy consumption in ICT energy-intensive sectors. Smart grid, smart buildings, and travel substitution are key to energy efficiency and sustainable practices. j ACCESSIBILITY — By encouraging collaboration among stakeholders and the use of voluntary, consensus-based standards, the U.S. government can increase the accessibility of technology to those with disabilities and encourage innovation, and in doing so will open up new employment opportunities for this vulnerable community. TIA 2012 PLAYBOOK 19


TIA P O LICY P R IO R ITIES

CONSUMERS QUICKLY ADAPT j CONSUMERS EXPECT CONNECTIVITY and access to voice, video, and data services any time, any place, with any device, over any network. j NEXT-GENERATION NETWORKS are revolutionizing the way we share information and communicate, for example, through broadband video and VoIP. j APPROXIMATELY ONE THIRD of Americans subscribe to VoIP services.

IPTV Subscribers in the U.S. (Millions) Source: TIA’s 2012 ICT Market Review and Forecast

4.4

0.3

0.9

2006

2007

11.5 8.5

2.0 2008

2009

2010

2011

Source: TIA’s 2012 ICT Market Review and Forecast

17.1

25.2

27.2

19.9

2012

1.8 2.1

29.0

2013

30.6

2014

2015

31.9

33.3

Residential Subscribers Business Subscribers

8.6 3.8

17.5

6.2

VoIP Subscribers in the U.S. (Millions)

14.0

13.5

15.5

3.0

3.6

3.7

4.1

4.5

4.9

5.4

5.9

2008

2009

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

1.6 2005

20TIA 2012 PLAYBOOK

2006

2007


TIA I ND P OULSIT CRY Y PO RIUOTRI LO T IOEK S

BROADBAND GOALS TIA CALLS ON THE ADMINISTRATION, CONGRESS, and other government bodies

to adopt a framework that supports the following goals: j UNIVERSALLY AVAILABLE, high-quality, and affordable broadband connectivity. j CONSUMERS’ ABILITY TO CONNECT to and access content over the Internet. j NETWORK OPERATORS’ ABILITY to engage in reasonable, pro-competitive network management. j TECHNOLOGY-NEUTRAL COMPETITION among existing and emerging platforms and providers.

j INCREASED AVAILABILITY of unencumbered spectrum in large and contiguous blocks for commercial services, located adjacent to like uses. j UTILIZATION OF MARKET-BASED MECHANISMS to drive spectrum to its highest and best uses. j UNIFORMITY IN REGULATION, where appropriate, including federal rules wherever possible. j ELIMINATION OF REGULATORY BARRIERS to investment and innovation.

TIA 2012 PLAYBOOK 21


TIA P O LICY P R IO R ITIES

SPECTRUM AVAILABILITY TIA’S SPECTRUM POLICIES ARE FOCUSED ON UNIFYING Congress, the Administration, and the FCC in making more spectrum available for wireless broadband, allowing innovators to speed products to the market while ensuring maximum efficiency in use and global spectrum harmonization. j THE FCC AND THE ADMINISTRATION should promptly reallocate spectrum and expedite voluntary incentive auctions using their new authority from Congress. These auctions will facilitate increased efficiency in frequency use, encourage sharing arrangements where necessary, and will allow current licensees and the federal government to reap financial benefits from making spectrum available for wireless broadband. j GOVERNMENT SHOULD ADOPT FORWARD-LOOKING, market-oriented spectrum management policies, seek additional spectrum allocations for mobile broadband services, and finalize any remaining issues regarding deployment of an interoperable public safety communications network as soon as possible. j GLOBAL HARMONIZATION AND COORDINATION of spectrum allocations should be a priority. j TECHNOLOGY AND SERVICE NEUTRALITY ARE KEY — service providers must be given the flexibility to choose technologies and platforms independently based on commercial and competitive considerations. 22TIA 2012 PLAYBOOK


TIA I ND P OULSIT CRY Y PO RIUOTRI LO T IOEK S

SPECTRUM AVAILABILITY, CONT. j GOVERNMENT POLICIES SHOULD ENCOURAGE A STABLE regulatory environment that relies primarily on market forces and avoids government intrusion into new and evolving services. j GOVERNMENT SHOULD MAXIMIZE THE PUBLIC BENEFITS of spectrum use by controlling harmful interference, fostering competition, and quickly implementing the recommendations of the National Broadband Plan calling for 300 MHz of spectrum availability by 2015 and a total of 500 MHz available by 2020, as well as the Presidential Memorandum ordering 500 MHz of federal and nonfederal spectrum that is suitable for both mobile and fixed wireless broadband use to be made available over the next 10 years. j RESPONSIBLE GOVERNMENTAL AGENCIES SHOULD COORDINATE to ensure that additional spectrum for advanced wireless services is made available in a timely manner. j SPECTRUM ALLOCATION AND ASSIGNMENT should be made by open and transparent processes that are market-driven and provide for government/ industry consultation. Forward-looking management of radio spectrum is essential to the goals of making telecommunications services accessible and of ensuring that the public derives maximum benefit from spectrum use. TIA 2012 PLAYBOOK 23


TIA P O LICY P R IO R ITIES

CONSUMER DEMAND WILL REQUIRE SPECTRUM j EACH OF THE MAJOR CARRIERS is introducing 4G services on a retail basis, and they will be expanding their networks significantly in the next few years.

4000 3500 3000

Traffic Growth (Percent) Source: FCC Report – Mobile Broadband: The Benefits of Additional Spectrum

j DATA WILL ACCOUNT FOR 65 PERCENT of overall wireless services spending in 2015. The growth of the data segment is being driven by the explosion in the number of smartphones, whose owners generate more than 10 times the data traffic of standard cellphone owners.

Average Data Growth

2500

Traffic Growth per Site* Tech-Adjusted Traffic per Site**

2000 1500 1000 500 0

2009

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

* Data demand adjusted for additional cell sites. ** Data demand adjusted for spectral efficiency improvements.

24TIA 2012 PLAYBOOK

j ACCORDING TO ESTIMATES FROM THE FCC, the average demand for mobile data will exceed capacity by nearly 300 MHz by 2014 — an increase of 3,506 percent relative to 2009.


TIA I ND P OULSIT CRY Y PO RIUOTRI LO T IOEK S

GLOBAL CYBERSECURITY TIA WILL CONTINUE TO ENCOURAGE GOVERNMENT TO WORK SEAMLESSLY WITH INDUSTRY to secure our nation’s networks, businesses, and consumers, calling for policies that enhance trade and promote communications security as a driver of innovation. j GOVERNMENT AND INDUSTRY MUST PARTNER to increase dialogues between industry and government (domestic and foreign) experts to discuss international best practices. Nations should use international best practices when developing cybersecurity policies. j CYBERSECURITY POLICIES that keep markets open and minimize barriers to trade must be supported.

j ANY EXPANSION OF THE COMMUNICATIONS ASSISTANCE FOR LAW ENFORCEMENT ACT (CALEA) must

not stifle innovation and must ensure technology neutrality.

j THE UNITED STATES MUST SERVE AS A LEADER in developing national cybersecurity priorities, risk assessments, and security recommendations for use by both the private sector and government entities.

TIA 2012 PLAYBOOK 25


TIA P O LICY P R IO R ITIES

SUSTAINABLE ICT AND SMARTER POWER APPROPRIATE FEDERAL-LEVEL POLICIES DRIVING ICT’S POTENTIAL to reduce energy consumption in other more energy-intensive sectors through smart grid, smart buildings, and travel substitution are key to creating jobs and helping U.S. industry compete successfully in global markets. j PROMOTE THE ROLE OF ICT in sustainable technologies that reduce energy consumption and carbon emissions for new buildings and existing buildings.

j SUPPORT FUNDING for both R&D and deployment of green ICTs such as smart grid, telepresence, guiding automations, and more.

j STOP “SMART GRIDLOCK� to unlock the full potential of the smart grid through private and secure access to energy supply and usage data.

j ENCOURAGE GREATER ADOPTION of telework and videoconferencing to reduce urban sprawl, ease traffic congestion, and facilitate travel substitution.

j PROMOTE TECHNOLOGY NEUTRALITY in smart grid policy to encourage competition and innovation. j EMPOWER COMPLEMENTARY PROGRAMS, like the Sustainable Technology Environments Program (STEP), that go beyond construction into the lifetime operation of new and existing buildings. 26TIA 2012 PLAYBOOK

j EDUCATE POLICY MAKERS ABOUT the role ICT can play in improving energy efficiency through substitution of ICT for outdated technologies.


TIA I ND P OULSIT CRY Y PO RIUOTRI LO T IOEK S

ACCESSIBILITY TIA ENCOURAGES COLLABORATION AMONG STAKEHOLDERS and the use of voluntary, consensus-based standards to increase the accessibility of technology for those with disabilities and to encourage innovation, and in doing so open up new employment opportunities to this vulnerable community. j GOVERNMENT MUST ADOPT

PRO-COMPETITIVE POLICIES that

encourage marketplace solutions and rapid deployment of accessible technologies while incorporating technical feasibility. j UNIVERSAL SERVICE FUND PROGRAMS, such as the Lifeline discount, should be extended as efficiently as possible to fund broadband services and equipment for low-income Americans, because many consumers with disabilities live on a fixed income.

j PROACTIVE CONSULTATIONS WITH THE DISABILITY COMMUNITY and other stakeholders will lead to the incorporation of accessible solutions into member companies’ product development process. j THE GOVERNMENT SHOULD PROMOTE THE DEVELOPMENT OF VOLUNTARY, CONSENSUS-BASED INDUSTRY standards

to address accessibility needs, repeating successes such as TIA-1083, which reduces magnetic interference on digital cordless phones for users with hearing aids.

TIA 2012 PLAYBOOK 27


IN DU S TR Y O U TLO O K

NEW U.S. TRENDS, GROWTH DRIVERS j AGGRESSIVE FIBER DEPLOYMENT during the past two years will limit incremental growth during the next four years. j GROWING PENETRATION of smartphones and tablets and rollouts of 4G wireless networks will boost data traffic. j SURGING INTERNET AND MOBILE TRAFFIC will require high levels of ongoing infrastructure investment. j SPENDING ON WIRELESS DATA will propel overall wireless services spending even as subscriber growth slows. j IN THE ENTERPRISE, investment in more bandwidth to accommodate surging data traffic requirements and increased storage needs will stimulate spending.

28TIA 2012 PLAYBOOK

j CLOUD COMPUTING will open up the market to increased use of applications by more companies. Growth in equipment spending to support these applications will offset the substitution effect of shifting premises-based equipment to the cloud. j DATA CENTER CONSTRUCTION will grow in the near term and remain high throughout the forecast period. j COST SAVINGS AND PRODUCTIVITY GAINS will continue to stimulate the conferencing market. j AN EXPANDING ECONOMY will support growth in telecommunications spending during the next four years. For more information contact: FLORENCE SUMARAY

Director, Marketing +1.703.907.7471 fsumaray@tiaonline.org

Statistics in this publication can be found in TIA’s 2012 ICT Market Review and Forecast.


I ND U S T RY O U T L O O K

TELECOMMUNICATIONS

Telecommunications Spending in the U.S. ($ Billions) Source: TIA’s 2012 ICT Market Review and Forecast

847

2005

932

2006

1,021

2007

1,062

2008

976

986

2009

2010

1,043

2011

1,103

2012

1,165

2013

1,226

2014

1,283

2015

TIA 2012 PLAYBOOK 29

INDUSTRY OUTLOOK

j THE UNITED STATES TELECOMMUNICATIONS MARKET WAS AFFECTED BY GLOBAL ECONOMIC CONDITIONS MORE THAN OTHER REGIONS and experienced only 1.0 percent growth in 2010, but rebounded with a 5.9 percent increase in 2011. International spending rose 6.5 percent in 2011, less than the 7.6 percent increase in 2010. In 2012, spending in the United States is expected to exceed the level reached in 2008.


IN D U S TR Y O U TLO O K

NETWORK EQUIPMENT

INDUSTRY OUTLOOK

j THE INFRASTRUCTURE MARKET RECOVERED in 2011 with a 23.7 percent advance following the modest decline of 0.3 percent in 2010. Spending growth will increase 3.6 percent compounded annually, reaching $41.8 billion in 2015. Spending by Carriers on Telecommunications Equipment in the U.S. ($ Billions)

j CUMULATIVE BACKBONE SPENDING DURING THE NEXT FOUR YEARS will total an estimated $78.4 billion compared with $50.8 billion during the past four years, a 54 percent increase. j A PICKUP IN FIBER DEPLOYMENT, the early stages of spending related to the stimulus package, a stabilized economic environment, and the need for increased network capacity have contributed to the surge in backbone equipment spending.

Source: TIA’s 2012 ICT Market Review and Forecast

34.3 26.4

2005

29.3

2006

2007

32.5

2008

30TIA 2012 PLAYBOOK

36.3 29.4

29.3

2009

2010

2011

38.5

39.4

40.9

41.8

2012

2013

2014

2015


I ND U S T RY O U T L O O K

WIRELESS EQUIPMENT j WIRELESS EQUIPMENT SPENDING ROSE to $54 billion in 2011 and will be more than $60 billion annually through 2015. j WIRELESS INFRASTRUCTURE EQUIPMENT SPENDING WILL GROW at an 8.1 percent compound annual rate; and wireless device spending will grow 2.4 percent compounded annually between 2012 and 2015, totaling a combined $70.7 billion in 2015. 38.6

Wireless Equipment Spending in the U.S. ($ Billions)

17.4 16.9 13.7

17.8

25.3

24.0

22.7

21.0

20.0

33.1 32.3 32.4

32.2 29.1

Source: TIA’s 2012 ICT Market Review and Forecast

32.1

28.9 24.9

20.1 17.6 Handsets

12.1

2005

35.7

Infrastructure

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

TIA 2012 PLAYBOOK 31


IN DU S TR Y O U TLO O K

CABLE j CABLE OPERATORS ARE INCREASING

j THE COMBINATION OF NEW SERVICE

BANDWIDTH TO OFFER BI-DIRECTIONAL SERVICES, including high-speed

Internet, which has been augmented by installing DOCSIS 3.0 to deliver Internet speeds of up to 50 Mbps.

OFFERINGS BY MULTI-SERVICE OPERATORS,

including cable, stimulated increased fiber deployments in 2011 to 18.5 million fiber miles. Fiber deployments are forecast to decline at a 4.5 percent compound annual rate to 15.4 million fiber-miles in 2015. 18.5

16.8

15.8 13.8

14.2

14.2

18.2 16.0

14.4

15.4

Single-Mode Fiber Deployed in the U.S. (Fiber-Miles, Millions)

11.0

Source: TIA’s 2012 ICT Market Review and Forecast

2005

2006

2007

2008

32TIA 2012 PLAYBOOK

2009

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015


I ND MAURK S TERY T O OVE U TRVI L OE OW K

TELECOMMUNICATIONS SERVICES j OVERALL LANDLINE SPENDING GREW 4.1 PERCENT IN 2011, after declining three consecutive years. Wireless services grew 10.0 percent. SMS, photos, music, games, and wireless Internet access are growing rapidly.

j INTERNET ACCESS AND IPTV WILL OFFSET the decline in the landline voice services market. j DEVICE MANUFACTURERS WILL OFFER CONTENT-BASED SERVICES and applications, which are fueling the demand for wireless service.

Transport Services Spending in the U.S. ($ Billions)

Wireless Services

Source: TIA’s 2012 ICT Market Review and Forecast

Landline Services

192.8

113.5

2005

185.8 125.5

2006

184.1 138.9

2007

180.7 148.1

2008

152.6 159.4 159.9 150.2

2009

2010

175.9 147.9

2011

146.9

2012

220.3

210.3

199.9

188.6

146.9

2013

146.7

2014

145.9

2015

TIA 2012 PLAYBOOK 33


M A RKET O V ER V IEW

EMERGING NETWORK SERVICES EMERGING NETWORK SERVICES — unified communications, videoconferencing, public room services, audioconferencing service bureau spending, Web conferencing, and IT-based cloud computing — are the fastest-growing components of the telecommunications market. Spending rose 16 percent to $11.9 billion in 2011, led by a 28.4 percent increase in cloud computing and 18.8 percent growth in Web conferencing. j UNIFIED COMMUNICATIONS ROSE 7.7 percent to $1.6 billion. j VIDEOCONFERENCING PUBLIC ROOM SERVICES INCREASED 3.3 percent to $1.3 billion. j AUDIOCONFERENCING SERVICE SPENDING GREW 5.1 percent to $3.2 billion. j WEB CONFERENCING ROSE 18.8 percent to $2.0 billion. j IT-BASED CLOUD COMPUTING INCREASED 28.4 percent to $5.8 billion. 34TIA 2012 PLAYBOOK


I ND MAURK S TERY T O OVE U TRVI L OE OW K

SPECIALIZED SERVICES Spending on VoIP, IPTV, Web Conferencing and IT-Based Cloud Computing in the U.S. ($ Billions) 20 Source: TIA’s 2012 ICT Market Review and Forecast 18

VoIP

16

Cloud Computing IPTV

14

Web Conferencing

12 10 8 6 4 2 0

2008

2008

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

TIA 2012 PLAYBOOK 35


M A RKET O V ER V IEW

INTERNATIONAL MARKET THE INTERNATIONAL MARKET COUNTINUED TO REBOUND in 2011, reflecting stabilizing economic conditions

following the global recession in 2009.

j NATIONAL BROADBAND PLANS throughout the world are generating investment in broadband infrastructures and extending the broadband reach to rural and other unserved areas through fixed and mobile technologies. j LARGE GAINS in broadband and wireless penetration will fuel growth in Asia Pacific, with most of the growth generated by China and India. j MIDDLE EAST/AFRICA will again be the fastest-growing region during the next four years, averaging 10.0 percent growth compounded annually through 2015, fueled by double-digit gains in fixed broadband, wireless services, and equipment.

36TIA 2012 PLAYBOOK


I ND MAURK S TERY T O OVE U TRVI L OE OW K

INTERNATIONAL MARKET International Telecommunications Revenue by Region ($ Billions) 1,800

Source: TIA’s 2012 ICT Market Review and Forecast

Canada Europe Middle East/Africa Latin America Asia Pacific

1,600 1,400 1,200 1,000 800 600 400 200 0

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

TIA 2012 PLAYBOOK 37


TE CH N O LO G Y & S TAN D AR D S

TIA STANDARDS PROGRAM ACCREDITED BY THE AMERICAN NATIONAL STANDARDS INSTITUTE (ANSI)

to develop voluntary consensus industry standards for a wide variety of telecommunications products and systems, creating specifications for public safety radio equipment, cellular towers, data terminals, satellites, telephone terminal equipment, accessibility, VoIP equipment, structured cabling, data centers, mobile device communications, multimedia multicast, vehicular telematics, machine-to-machine communications, and smart utility mesh networks, among others.

j SUPPORTS 12 PRODUCT-ORIENTED

ENGINEERING COMMITTEES, consisting of:

• 70+ subcommittees and working groups; • Representatives from manufacturers, service

providers, consultants, and end users, including federal, state and local government.

j PROVIDES SECRETARIAT SERVICES to groups that develop international standards, such as Third Generation Partnership Project 2 (3GPP2) and Technical Advisory Groups (TAGs) for forums such as IEC, ISO, and JTC-1.

38 TIA 2012 PLAYBOOK

ENGINEERING COMMITTEES TR-8: Mobile and Personal Private Radio Standards TR-14: Point-to-Point Communications Systems TR-30: Multi-Media Access, Protocols and Interfaces TR-34: Satellite Equipment and Systems TR-41: User Premises Telecommunications Requirements TR-42: User Premises Telecommunications Cabling Infrastructure TR-45: Mobile and Personal Communications Systems TR-47: Terrestrial Mobile Multimedia Multicast (TM3) TR-48: Vehicular Telematics TR-49: Healthcare ICT TR-50: Smart Device Communications (SDC) TR-51: Smart Utility Networks


TEC H NOI LND OG UY S T&RY S TO AU ND T LAORD OK S

TIA STANDARDS MISSION SUPPORT STANDARDS DEVELOPMENT PROCESSES that are timely, cost effective, open, transparent, fair, and nondiscriminatory and driven by commercial interests to find technical solutions to communications needs. PROMOTE PRIVATE-SECTOR SOLUTIONS and commercially-oriented

decisions for technology deployment.

WORK WITH TIA POLICY TO:

j Participate in the standards process as an end user. j Procure equipment based on industry-developed standards. j Work with Congress and executive agencies to ensure a level playing field for all standards worldwide. j Provide assistance to trade officials to resolve standards-related and other technical barriers to trade.

For more information contact: CHERYL BLUM

Vice President, Technology & Standards +1.703.907.7436 cblum@tiaonline.org

TIA 2012 PLAYBOOK39

TIA BENEFITS

Learn more about TIA’s standards activities at tiaonline.org/standards.


IN D U S TRMYMO TELECO UU NTLO ICATIO O K N S IN D U S T RY A S S O C I A T I O N

INSIDE THE NETWORK

JUNE 5–7, 2012 DALLAS, TEXAS TIA 2012 puts the focus on the people, the products and the companies driving innovation and optimization of The Network.

TIA BENEFITS

Visit tia2012.org and get on the Keep Me Informed list.

This is your industry event — one strong community of technology suppliers and service providers that form the foundation of the global communications experience.

MEANINGFUL AND ENGAGING EDUCATIONAL CONTENT! j Optical — Are You Part of the 100G Ecosystem? j Green ICT — Energy-Efficient Equipment, Innovation and New Thinking on Network Architecture. j Multiscreen TV — Transition to the New World of IP-Based Three-Screen Delivery. j M2M + Cloud + Standards = The Internet of Things. j Visual Communications and Conferencing.

40TIA 2012 PLAYBOOK

j Cloud Optimization — Monetizing the Enterprise Rush to the Cloud. j Network Convergence. j Who’s Who in the Industry, Including AT&T, Verizon and Alcatel-Lucent. For more information contact: MICHELLE MELSOP

Event Manager +1.703.907.7002 mmelsop@tiaonline.org


TELECO M M U N ICATIO N S I ND IUND S TU RY S TARY SSOC U ITALTOI O N K

April 27-29, 2012 • CAmbridge, mArylAnd As network convergence and the worldwide reach of the Internet spur technological advancement and new business models, it is critical for companies to work with Members of Congress, the White House, the FCC, and other agencies to develop policies that drive innovation and open markets. TIA’s annual Spring Policy Summit brings decision makers from all of these venues, together with industry and other key influencers, to discuss and debate the top policy priorities of the information and communications technology industry. To register for this year’s Spring Policy Summit, go to tiaonline.org.

The 2012 Spring Policy Summit brings decision makers from all these forums, together with industry and other key influencers to discuss and debate the top policy priorities of the ICT industry. TIA 2012 PLAYBOOK 41


IN DU TE LECO S TRMYMO UU NTLO ICATIO O K N S IN D U S TRY A S S O C I A T I O N

Latest ICT Insights and Trends

Hottest Issues • Influential Guests • Leading Programs TIA Now is the industry authority analyzing the ICT World: j Delivering engaging content to an audience of 90,000 ICT executives and decision makers. j Offering a unique position within the industry on all ICT issues. Featured programming includes: All The Angles DC Beat From the Top Innovating Standards The List

Markets in Motion Member Spotlights TIA Now Webinar Series TIA Now Documentary Series

42TIA 2012 PLAYBOOK

j Providing compelling programming that spans policy, news, emerging technologies, and evolving business strategies. j Ensuring strategic lead generation and branding opportunities for your firm.

If you are interested in sponsoring any of our featured programs or would like us to create a customproduced video in the TIA Studio, please contact: ABE NEJAD

ICT Journalist/Anchor +1.703.907.7004 anejad@tiaonline.org


TELECO M M U N ICATIO N S I ND IUND S TU RY S TARY SSOC U ITALTOI O N K

TIA continues to lead the way for Manufacturers and Suppliers of Global Networks — and remains the clear choice for your company! Currently in its 88th year, the Telecommunications Industry Association (TIA) represents the global information and communications technology (ICT) industry through: j TECHNOLOGY AND STANDARDS DEVELOPMENT

j NETWORKING j MARKET ANALYSIS

j POLICY AND ADVOCACY j BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES

j WORLDWIDE ENVIRONMENTAL REGULATORY ANALYSIS

Hundreds of companies like yours work through TIA to enhance the business environment for telecom, broadband, mobile wireless, information technology, network, cable, satellite, emergency communications, and sustainable technologies.

Learn more at tiaonline.org ANCILLA BRADY

Director, Member Relations +1.703.907.7713 abrady@tiaonline.org TIA 2012 PLAYBOOK 43


Induc tele st ormymo uu ntlo Icat oIk o n s In d u s try a s s o c I a t I o n

tIa MeMbers The TelecommunicaTions indusTry associaTion’s member companies include Thousands of information and communications technology (ICT) professionals

participating in standards, government affairs, market intelligence, and product-oriented environmental compliance.

Discover how you can gain a competitive advantage in the broadband economy by leveraging TIA’s full range of services by contacting TIA’s Membership Department at +1.703.907.7713 or membership@tiaonline.org. 2M Companies, Inc. Accedian Networks Access Partnership ACS Adax, Inc. ADTRAN Aegis Mobility Inc. Aeris Communications Inc. Aeroflex Airvana, Inc. AirWalk Communications Alcatel-Lucent

Allen Tel Products Allied Telephone and Data Corp. Alpha Technologies Alteryx LLC Altior Inc. American Roamer Amplicom USA, LLC Anagran, Inc. Anritsu MTBU Anue Systems Apple

44 tIa 2012 PlayBook

Applied Communication Sciences AST Technology Labs, Inc. Astrolab Inc. ATDI Inc. AttivaCorp Avtec Inc. Baxter Enterprises Bechtel Power Corp. Beecher Communications Consultants Bel Stewart Connectors Berk-Tek

Blind Creek Associates Bridgewater Systems Inc. BTECH, Inc. BTR Netcom Inc. C Faulkner Engineering C Link CABA CALTROP Construction Service Canoga Perkins Corp. Capitol Technology Affairs, LLC Carrier Digit Computer Software


TELECO M M U N ICATIO N S I ND IUND S TU RY S TARY SSOC U ITALTOI O N K Cassidian Communications, Inc. CCT TECH USA Inc. CDMA Development Group Cellular Networking Perspectives Chatsworth Products, Inc. Cisco Systems, Inc. CJ Barber Consulting ClearSounds Communications CME Consulting CML Microcircuits (USA) Inc. CommScope Network Solutions Communications Solutions Group Comprion GmbH Connectivity Technologies, Inc. Converlogic Coptex International Core NAP, LP Corning Incorporated CRIQ CSF Corporation CSI Telecommunications, Inc.

CTA Communications, Inc. Cyan Dan-Chief Enterprise Co., Ltd. Datron World Communications DBSD North America DDB Unlimited Dell Inc. Diamond USA, Inc. Digital Voice Systems, Inc. Dolby Laboratories Inc. Douglas Battery Dow Electrical & Telecommunications Draka Comteq Optical Fibre DSET Corporation DTC (UK) Limited DY-Link Engineering & Technologies DYMO RHINO E.F. Johnson Elite Electronic Engineering Co. Erico, Inc., Caddy Fastener Division Ericsson Inc.

ERT-Electronic Recycling & Trading ESRI Inc. Etherstack Experior Laboratories, Inc. Fairfax County Economic Development Authority FAL Associates FiberSource Inc. Fluke Networks Frye-Comm Consulting LLC FTR&D LLC Furukawa Industrial S.A. Future Call LLC Gallery IP Telephony Gemalto Inc. GENBAND Inc. Georgia Institute of Technology Globalstar Goodman Networks Inc. Gray Beards Consulting Graybar Harger, Inc.

Hargis Engineers Inc. Harris Corporation HellermannTyton Henkels & McCoy Inc. Hitachi Cable Manchester Hitachi Telecom Inc. USA HK Engineering and Services Hostway Corporation Hughes Network Systems, LLC ICC Icom America Inc. Ideal Industries, Inc. Ifbyphone, Inc. IHS ILS Technology IncrediTek Institute of Telecom Resellers Integra Networks Intel Corporation Inteligroup Global InterNetworking Link LLC Interop Technologies Intersect Inc.

TIA 2012 PLAYBOOK 45


IN DU TE LECO S TRMYMO UU NTLO ICATIO O K N S IN D U S TRY A S S O C I A T I O N Intertek Testing Services Intrado IP Fabrics ISE Incorporated J&M Consultants, Inc. J. Upton Consulting Jenne Distributors JPMorgan Chase & Co. Juniper Networks, Inc. KEITI Kenwood USA Corp. Kong Profit Technology Limited KGP Logistics Leviton Network Solutions LG InfoComm U.S.A., Inc. Lightwave Magazine Littelfuse Inc. Lockheed Martin Corporation Management Resources International McAfee, Inc. McObject LLC Mediatech Design Group

MegaSys Computer Technologies Megger Microsoft Corporation Midland Radio Corp Minuteman UPS/Para Systems, Inc. Mitsubishi Electric Automation MJ Lynch & Associates MobileAccess Networks, Inc. Motorola Mobility Inc. Motorola Solutions MRV Communications, Inc. Mu Dynamics, Inc. MUTI National Circuit Assembly National Technical Systems NEI NetIG LLC Nexans - NIES NICT Nokia Inc. Nokia Siemens Networks

46TIA 2012 PLAYBOOK

Northwest Information Services Notor Research Novatel Wireless Inc. Noyes Fiber Systems Numerex Corp. Occam Networks, Inc. OFS Omnitron Systems Technology, Inc. One2many B.V. OneChip Photonics Optelian Access Networks Optical Cable Corporation Optical Interconnect OptoTest Corp. Ortronics, Inc. Oscilloquartz USA Outside Plant Magazine Overture Networks, Inc. PacketStorm Communications, Inc. Panasonic Corp. of North America Panduit Corporation

Phoenix Contact Phoenix Optix Photon Kinetics, Inc. Pitney Bowes Business Insight Power & Telephone Supply Co. PowerTrunk PPC Quabbin Wire & Cable Co., Inc. Qualcomm R.J. Enterprises RAD Data Communications RAM Network Services, LLC Raytheon Reliance TM TCO RELM Wireless Corp. Research In Motion RIT Technologies Inc. Rohde & Schwarz, Inc. RTKL Associates Inc. Samsung Telecommunications America Sandvine Incorporated Satra-Peru SAE


TELECO M M U N ICATIO N S I ND IUND S TU RY S TARY SSOC U ITALTOI O N K Schweizer Engineering Laboratories, Inc. SDT - Southern Diversified Technologies Sector Supply LP Sencore Sensata Technologies SEVEN Networks SGS Wireless US, Inc. Shenzhen Sanmy Technology Co. Sierra Wireless America, Inc. Sigma Delta Communications, Inc. Signamax Connectivity Systems, Inc. Silver Spring Networks, Inc. Sisvel US Inc. Solaris Technologies Inc. Sony Wireless Tech Division SPATIALinfo

Spinnaker Wireless Inc. SS8 Networks, Inc. SSC Streakwave Wireless Inc. Sumitomo Electric Lightwave Corp. SUNA LLC Suncall America, Inc. Surtec America Synaptyk Tait Radio Communications TANGOTEC Taqua Tarana Wireless Inc. Tatara Systems TE Connectivity Technisonic Industries Ltd. TechOne Progressive Solutions Telcordia Technologies TeleCommunication Systems, Inc.

Tellabs, Inc. Thales Communications, Inc. The Fiber Optic Association The Siemon Company TMC Radio Pty Ltd Transtelco TranSwitch Corporation Tridium Inc. Tseng InfoServ, LLC TWI Group, Inc. Twisted Pair Solutions TX RX Systems, Inc. UL Underwriters Laboratories Inc. Unicom Electric, Inc. Uniden America Corporation US Conec Ltd. Valid8 Vector Structural Engineers Vertek

VIA Telecom Vital Communications Inc. VPISystems VTech Communications Walker and Associates Whitesell Consulting Wilkofsky Gruen Associates Wiltec Technologies WireFreeCom Inc. WirelessCraft WISP-Router, Inc. WK3C Wireless LLC Wonderful Hi-Tech Wyless Inc. Ygomi LLC Zetron, Inc. ZTE Corporation

TIA 2012 PLAYBOOK 47


TELECOMMUNICATIONS INDUSTRY ASSOCIATION GOVERNMENT AFFAIRS

HEADQUARTERS

2500 Wilson Blvd., Suite 300 Arlington, VA 22201-3834 USA Phone: + 1.703.907.7700 Fax: + 1.703.907.7727 tiaonline.org

10 G Street NE, Suite 550 Washington, DC 20002-4213 USA Phone: + 1.202.346.3240 Fax: + 1.202.346.3241

AFFILIATE OFFICE

United States Information Technology Office (USITO) Room 516 Beijing Fortune Plaza Office Tower No. 7 Dongsanhuan Zhong Lu Chaoyang District, Beijing, 100020 China Phone: + 86.10.6530.9368/69/70 Fax: + 86.10.6530.9367 usito.org usito@usito.org

tiaonline.org


TIA Playbook