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JOHNATHON DOE myname@email.com 1-234-567-8910


Johnathon Doe

#111, 2222 Name St, 1A1 A1A City PR myname@email.com; 1-234-567-8910

I am a graduate of the Environmental Design program at UBC. I have experience competitively, academically and professionally in design. I have a large deal of international experience, and I have a strong interest in the conceptual and cultural roles of architecture.

Education:

DESIGN & RESEARCH Pavilion Explorations

2

Industrial Lunch Room

3

JAD Competition Entry

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The Social Condenser Thurlow + Alberni

5 6

The MPLWD: Frame The MPLWD: Swatch

8 9

2007 - 2012

Bachelors of Environment Design – Honours School of Architecture and Landscape Architecture, University of British Columbia

2007

High School Exchange; Somewhere, Faraway

Work experience: April - August 2011

Design Assistant (Full-time) Somewhere Engineering; Somewhere, Faraway • Designed and produced construction drawings for a proposal of two lunchrooms for workshop staff. Assisted with space planning for the placement of industrial equipment.

June - August 2010

Cashier (Part-time) Astore; Somewhere, Faraway • Assisted customers, including arranging home deliveries, cash-and-carry orders, and customer distribution orders.

June - August 2009

Seminar Assistant (Full-time) English Language Program; University of Somewhere; Some, Place • Organized and chaperoned educational, cultural excursions, including overnight trips. Acted as an English conversation partner with Japanese university students. Prepared course materials, assisted with course registration.

Awards: 2009

Finalist - Joong Ang Design International Design Competition

2007, 2008

Jason Lang Scholarship

2007

Rutherford Scholarship

Relevant Skills: AutoCAD, 7 years; Microsoft Office, 7 years; Adobe Creative Suite, 4 years; Rhinoceros 3D 5.0, 3 years; Flamingo 3D, 3 years; Penguin 3D, 3 years; Google Sketchup, 3 years; Cinema 4D, 1 year. Basic Mandarin Language Proficiency; Intermediate Korean Language Proficiency; Intermediate Japanese Language Proficiency

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DIGITAL EXPLORATIONS

The second pavilion was an exploration of cylindrical geometries. I worked with a partner, ----------, for this project.

As a formal exploration, we had the project brief to design a number of different pavilions over a semester. These pavilions were meant to expand our architectural vocabulary and to develop our understanding of how digital media can enable unique opportunities. These were unprogrammed designs, with the only limitations being to focus on two of: shelter, field and enclosure. I chose shelter and enclosure, to help guide me in my design explorations.

A form was created by first revolving a curve 180 degrees, splitting it, and flowing it around a circle. The result was a circular hall of arches, with a irregular courtyard within. This ring-like structure is porous yet at the same time gives a sense of protection. If one inhabits the arcade, the feeling of shelter is significant, whereas in the courtyard enclosure is felt, with the space open to the sky.

A’ Create a point grid...

Revolve a curve into a surface... B’

...pull control points; individually and as groups...

...split and pull it apart...

B

Plan ...in order to create a variety of spaces.

The first pavilion was an exploration of how one may deform a simple grid to develop a complex, porous space. A sort of tent-like form. Starting with a point grid, a succession of exclusively vertical deformations was implemented. The result offers a variety of spaces, with a uniform feeling of vertical shelter from the sky above. In several areas, the roof dips low to the ground, offering a sense of enclosure.

2

A

Plan ...flow the resulting pieces around a circle. Section A - A’

Section B - B’


INDUSTRIAL LUNCH ROOM

Heavy industrial sheds in the industrial town of ----- are not without their challenges. Although ideal for large-scale production, in the cold Canadian winters the interior of these sheds is largely the same temperature as the outdoors, due to the need for the large garage doors to be constantly open. As a respite from these conditions, the decision was made to make a study on how the elevated lunch spaces of the shops at ------------ might be enclosed and therefore made more comfortable.

Considering the difficulty of constructing a complete frame a top such a small surface, and considering the easy access to talented welders, the decision was made to pre-fabricate each wall and the roof as individual frames, and to assemble them a top the exisiting structure. It was necessary then to make each individual component independently structurally sound, as it would be lifted by crane to it’s final position. On Right: An exploded axonometric of the lunch room; the panels and framing are the essential elements. Below: The completed assembly drawing, with notes on construction.

A

A’

Plan

3

3'-0 1/2"

LEFT VIEW

TOP VIEW

REMOVE BOTTOM SPACER BEFORE DOOR INSTALLATION

FRONT WALL FITS IN BETWEEN L. AND R. WALLS

A further advantage of this material is how it is suitable within the context of an aluminum industrial shed. The aesthetic and nature of the material matches well. Overall, the design aims for simple functionality as a lunch room. The biggest challenge was to navigate the surrounding equipment, including a fan on the wall and a large crane above.

CENTER W/ SHIMS, FASTEN & CAULK/INSULATE AS NEEDED

DOOR FRAME FLUSH TO INSIDE EDGE OF 2x4"

17'-2"

ALL NAILING FINS SIT OUTSIDE OF WINDOW FRAMES

BACK WALL AND ROOF TRUSS FIT IN BETWEEN L. AND R. WALLS 16'-1"

(STICKING OUT)

FRONT VIEW

1 5/8"

RIGHT VIEW

A

4"x 14 " FLAT BAR RUNS ALONG UNDERNEATH LOWER TUBING

BACK VIEW

Section A - A’ *NOTE: INSTALL WINDOWS/DOORS BEFORE PANELS

1'-10 1/2"

Thye have 2 inches of insulating foam, and are also easily assembled. These panels offer the insulating skin, which is to be placed upon a solid structural frame. They are also well-suited to surviving the constant firehazards and general risks of a heavy industrial context.

A

5'-9 1/4"

Due to the industrial nature of the site, and the extremely low temperatures (below 20 degrees C at times), heavily insulated pre-made AD-LOC panels are ideal.

SECTION A-A'

NOTES: 1. ALL STRUCTURAL MATERIAL G40.21-44W. 2. ALL TUBING MATERIAL G40.21-50W. 3. ALL PLATE MATERIAL G40.21-44W. 4. ALL PIN MATERIAL 4140 H.T. & S.R. (MIN. YIELD 100 KSI) 5. ALL NUT AND BOLT MATERIAL GRADE 8. 6. ALL ELECTRODE E7018. 7. MINIMUM FILLET SIZE 1/4". 8. ALL WELDING TO CWB-W59. 9. FABRICATION TOLERANCE ±1/16". 10. SEAL WELD ALL TUBING. 11. CAP ALL OPEN BEAMS AND TUBING ENDS. 12. IF IN DOUBT, ASK!

C

1/32"=1'-0" AUG 24/2011 DRAWN SC SCALE

DATE

2314-5 STREET, NISKU, AB T9E 7W9 PH: (780) 955-3780

CHECKED JOB NO.

LUNCH ROOM SHOP #3 - FRAME ASSEMBLY DRAWING NO.

REV.

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JAD 2009 COMPETITION ENTRY

Throughout history, architecture has never been interactive on the large scale. Our potential for interacting with our built settings has been very limited. On the small scale, our environments are interactive: furniture, windows, and doors can be moved about at will. On the larger scale, however, we are limited to slow, expensive, and permanent interactions: renovation, demolition, construction. Now, with the current spirit of innovation in architecture, I propose a system which will allows us to control our built environments, dependent on our demands and whims.

The system I propose is essentially one of moving walls. The exterior walls of the building are divided into a number of panels along each facade. They are then mounted into roof tracks which run orthogonal to the panel surfaces, with wheels and a small motor for each panel. Finally, by connecting these panels into a central control system, the users of the building gain full control over the organization of their space.

They can expand, contract, or reorganize the building’s form in order to satisfy the demands placed upon them, or to simply make their lives more enjoyable. They can even add (or remove) additional panels to the tracks in order to make enclosed interior spaces. Rather than staying a static entity, the building becomes a dynamic, flexible one. It can adapt to any number

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Second, it allows for adaptation depending on the external environment’s conditions. In summer, the sun is bright and the weather, fair. So, the southerly spaces can be converted to balconies: rather than sitting with the sun in their eyes, users can work inside, and go out and enjoy the summer breeze on breaks. Or, the intermediary spaces can be made entirely outdoors, allowing one to catch a breath of fresh air while walking about the office.

The panels are anchored to a grid of tracks in the ceiling above.

Small wheels move the panels along the tracks when specified with the control panel.

This system is discreet, yet simple and effective.

Last, it allows tenants the ability to personalize their spaces depending on their desires. If a firm wants an open-plan office, they can leave the walls be. If they want enclosed offices and meeting rooms, they can add additional panels and slide them into place. And even, if they want to create a temporary office for a weeklong project? That option is open to them.

An open-plan office space with adjoining project rooms.

Two open-plan spaces for separate companies, with a communal balcony.

Small office spaces interspersed with outdoor spaces.

Ultimately, with this movable panel-wall system, the shape of the building is up to the user. The next level of architectural functionality has been staring us in the face this whole time... the writing’s on the walls!

Possible configurations: On Left: During a recession. On Right: During an economic boom.


THE SOCIAL CONDENSER

The term “social condenser” can be understood to be just as much a physical technique as an abstract concept. Originally coined by the Russian Constructivist Moisei Ginzburg as “a mechanism for transforming habits”, the idea has been evolving over the past century. Here, I break the concept down into its’ “moving parts”, to understand the nature of the concept in practice.

The physical context of a building imposes limitations on the connectivity between programs.

On Left: Section of the Downtown Athletic Club: Random vertical social condensation.

By the physical context in this case I mean primarily whether there are vertical or horizontal spatial constraints. This decides the types of mechanisms (elevators, paths, etc.) which can be used for social condensation.

Below: Section of the Bibliotheque Jussieu: choreographed vertical social condensation.

Specific mechanisms and arrangements offer different opportunities for the type of interaction. More random relationships can be designed with the use of elevators or a patchwork of programs, or more choreographed ones with more rigid circulation and spaces.

Mixed-use buildings can be understood to exist in two varieties: the capitalist Hybrid and the communist Social Condenser. As well, both varieties can be broken down further according to the degree in which they coerce its inhabitants to interact. The hybrid expresses the ideal of freedom; programs are free from unwanted mixing with other programs under the same roof. Social condensers instead involve the active mixing of these programs and people through design. The mechanism of social condensers can be established through a variety of spatial means. The three main types I stuied are adjacency, overlap and circulation. Each depends on how specific spaces are programmed, for example whether there is a space in use by both programs at once (overlap.) For example, Koolhaas’s hedonistic baths from “Voluntary prisoners of Architecture” epitomize the use of adjacency. The practice cells and arenas are visible from the meeting space: there is social condensation due to visibility and direct access been the three programs.

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Social Condensation via adjacency.

Social Condensation via overlap.

Below: Plan of OMA’s Parc de Vilette proposal: random horizontal social condensation.

On Right: Plan of “a communal house of 1929”: choreographed horizontal social condensation.

Social Condensation via circulation.

Koolhaas’s baths: a simple yet profound social condenser. The meeting space is bordered by practice cells and arenas.

Below: Narkomfin unit plans. The interface of resting spaces and social spaces dictates the degree of social condensation.

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THURLOW + ALBERNI: URBAN ACCOMODATION Is it possible for one to allow for a variety of livable spaces within extreme density? This project aims to achieve just that: a mixeduse residential building at one of the densest, most urban street corners in Vancouver. Across the street from the 62-story Shangri-La, and a block from the busy commercial axis of Robson Street, it was a challenge to accomodate for high quality residential experiences.

Fourth Floor The massing is oriented away from the traffic noise, towards the sunlight to the South, and are thin for cross ventilation.

Fifth Floor

The ground level public spaces form a variety of streets branching off the courtyard, and connecting to the lane.

The void of the ground-level public space was drawn and designed first, with further refinements being added as the massing of the upper floors and community spaces came into focus. The facade is treated as a response to the intimacy and liveability of its orientation: the inner facades are transparent towards the comfortable courtyard, whereas the outer facades are more reserved, buffering the residences inside from the barrage of urbanism on Thurlow and Alberni.

Second Floor In order to adapt to this setting, I focussed on a strict set of criteria to ensure the quality of the residences: privacy, daylight, cross-ventilation, views and access to both community and public space.

Third Floor

A’ C

B’

B

As well, it was a priority to bring the vital public life of the surrounding area into the building, but to subdue it and create a sense of relative intimacy and calm.

Ground Floor C’

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A


The main design move which aims to accomodate for the fulfillment of these criteria was simple: an open courtyard which faces away from the massive and loud intersection towards a more intimate and quiet space: the alleyway behind the building.

The commercial programming is on the first two floors, with the residential program above. The community spaces are mixed throughout.

The complex is diverse in the sense that it encloses within itself public, private and community spaces. The public spaces are accessible directly from the street, and are comprised of the ground level outdoor spaces as well as commercial program on the first and second floors.

The private residences float above on the third, fourth and fifth floors. This positioning grants some physical and metaphorical distance from the traffic and urban life on the streets below. The community spaces which serve the condo residents consist of 2 roof-top gardens as well as a space for the resident’s association. These spaces are located quite centrally relative to the surrounding units, to facilitate regular use.

Elevation A - A’

The one bedroom units and two bedroom units are located at more public locations, while the three bedroom units are further removed from the streetscape and public life.

Section B - B’

Section C - C’

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THE JOY OF WORK: THE MPWD AS LIVE / WORK DISTRICT

MAIN

CAMBIE

GRANVILLE

BROADWAY

Within the bounds of Broadway, False Creek, Cambie and Main is the island of space which is the heart of Mount Pleasant Work District. The district represents a unique workplace within Vancouver, the last holdout of industrial fabric in the city. For the Frame assignment, I aimed to enhance the legibility of the district, and to improve the connection between its’ live and work functions.

My first proposal is to fashion Columbia Street and Manitoba Street into “green streets” which connect the Olympic Village with the southern industrial area, reaching all the way to Broadway.

The proposed changes: intensifying the north-south connection with two main streets, while providing legibility with local landmarks.

These roads will be reduced to a single lane in each direction, with street trees and crosswalks all along. They will be the preferred method of navigating the district on foot, and will offer an opportunity for restaurants and services to cluster around.

NEIGHBOURHOOD LANDMARK

South of 2nd Ave, Mount Pleasant Work District is comprised overwhelmingly of light-industrial and commercial fabric. North of 2nd Ave is residential; containing the site of the new Olympic Village. This is a significant issue in that 2nd Avenue bisects the district, segregating the live and work functions. Currently it is as if they are entirely different neighbourhoods. Both areas are made up of relatively low buildings within a regular grid of small local streets. As such, there is a distinct lack of visual and functional hierarchy. The district can be understood as being a uniform field of built fabric atop the slope of Mount Pleasant.

DISTRICT LANDMARK

The grey networks of the MPWD: a field of small streets bisected by 2nd avenue.

ARTERIAL COLLECTOR LOCAL LANE

GREEN STREET LANDMARK VISIBILITY

My second layer of intervention is the creation of multiple landmarks at key sites throughout the district. There are many under-used parking lots, and many are strategically located. I propose that 3 should be fashioned into “district landmarks”; structures which can be seen throughout the district and beyond. They will play the role of giving visual hierarchy, and will provide specific images that identify the district as a unique entity.

A’

A

Plan

The remaining sites have the potential to be “neighbourhood landmarks”; smaller structures which provide hierarchy on a more local scale, and improve ease of navigation.

With a closer look at the specific programming of the district, it is clear there exists the possible for productive mixing between the different functions. As the young Olympic Village is somewhat an island of condominiums, it would greatly enhance the quality of life if the residents were to make use of restaraunts and small workshops south of 2nd Avenue. As well, it would benefit the entire district if living and working entirely within the area was a more attractive option.

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The grey fabric of the district: a large variety of functions, yet live and work are segregated by 2nd avenue. RESIDENTIAL COMM/RESIDENTIAL COMMERCIAL ARTIST LIVE/WORK INDUSTRIAL CIVIC OFFICE MIXED-USE

Section A - A’


MPWD SWATCH: LANDMARK AT FOURTH AND COLUMBIA

CAMBIE

4TH AVE

MANITOBA

COLUMBIA

2ND AVE

The 2 sets of workshops are easily accessible from the courtyard and 4th Avenue, respectively. Each has a public front, and a functional back with a small garage door.

For the Swatch assignment, our goal was to design a component of our overall vision for the district. I focused on the potential district landmark at 4th and Ontario. This lot is sited along the Ontario green street and is close to 2nd Avenue, so it is instrumental in tying the northern residential area with the southern work area.

Between them and the incubator, there is an atrium: a social space for casual interaction and small gatherings. Behind the atrium is a single loading dock, primarily for workshop use.

Third Floor

On Ontario, there is a small cafe to help draw the public into the complex. My overall strategy for the project relies on creating both a visual landmark and a face for local industry. To achieve this, the complex is anchored by a business incubator, and includes both workshops and residences for start-up companies or artisans. The natural site for the landmark is on the corner of the intersection, where - at 9 stories tall - it is visible form across the district. The working functions of the building center around a small courtyard which faces Ontario St. THE OLYMPIC VILLAGE (FALSE CREEK)

The residential tower and cafe front onto the street. Behind lie the business incubator and workshops. The atrium ties the arrangement together, acting as a central social hub.

Second Floor

BROADWAY

A’

C

A

Above: The focal point is visible from the farthest reaches of the Mount Pleasant Work District; a local landmark. B’

B

C’ Ground Floor

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It was my goal to craft the landmark into a unique image, one which could be singularly identifiable and symbolic of the district’s character.

Structurally, the lower buildings are comprised of 20-foot bays between thick CMU masonry walls, with floors and roofs supported with steel joists. CMU’s are used extensively throughout the district, often in a structural fashion.

On Right: An illustration of the vertical structural elements.

In order to achieve this, I abstracted the steep topography of the district as a means of creating a distinct profile for the building. I first magnified the topography by a factor of 10, and then abstracted it into a smooth geometry.

The tower is supported by reinforced concrete, with 2 circulation cores and 4 columns on the outer corners. Overall, the complex is self-sufficient due to the internal synergy between its’ programs and yet it is also inviting for the public to interact with.

The landmark is clad in exposed corrugated aluminium, a common material for industrial roofs in the district. It is matte on the West and East sides and reflective on the North side.

Section B - B’

Above: The abstraction of topography into roof.

Elevation A - A’

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Section C - C’


My MArch application draft portfolio