Page 1

THUNDERSPORT GB

CHAMPIONSHIPS 2017 ROUND 6 29th & 30th July 2017

THE HOME OF SPORTSMAN RACING

Premier Motorcycle Protection


TIMETABLE OF EVENTS

SATURDAY

Premier Motorcycle Protection

9.00am

15 Minutes Qualifying

Thundersport 500 Freshman & Thundersport Superteens

9.18am

15 Minutes Qualifying

Super/Stocktwins/RRV450 & Golden Era Steelsport

9.36am

15 Minutes Qualifying

Pre-National 600 Sport & Freshman

9.54am

15 Minutes Qualifying

Golden Era Superbike/Supersport & GP1 Classic / FM

10.12am

15 Minutes Qualifying

Thundersport 500 Elite & Seniors

10.30am

15 Minutes Qualifying

Thundersport 600 Sportsman & Elite

10.48am

15 Minutes Qualifying

Thundersport GP1 Sportsman & Elite

11.10am

RACE 1

Thundersport 500 Freshman & Superteens

9 Laps (18.5 miles)

11.32am

RACE 2

Supertwins/Stocktwins & Aprilia RRV450GP

9 Laps (18.5 miles)

11.54am

RACE 3

Pre-National 600 Sport & Freshman

9 Laps (18.5 miles)

12.16pm

RACE 4

Golden Era Superbike & GP1 Classic / FM

9 Laps (18.5 miles)

12.38pm

RACE 5

Thundersport 500 Elite & Seniors

9 Laps (18.5 miles)

1.00pm

RACE 6

Golden Era Supersport / Steelsport

9 Laps (18.5 miles)

LUNCH BREAK 2.10pm

RACE 7

Thundersport GP1 Sportsman & Elite

14 Laps (28 miles)

2.35pm

RACE 8

Thundersport 500 Freshman & Superteens

9 Laps (18.5 miles)

2.57pm

RACE 9

Thundersport 600 Sportsman & Elite

14 Laps (28 miles)

3.22pm

RACE 10

Supertwins/Stocktwins & Aprilia RRV450GP

9 Laps (18.5 miles)

3.44pm

RACE 11

Pre-National 600 Sport & Freshman

9 Laps (18.5 miles)

4.06pm

RACE 12

Golden Era Superbike & GP1 Classic / FM

9 Laps (18.5 miles)

4.28pm

RACE 13

Thundersport 500 Elite & Seniors

9 Laps (18.5 miles)

4.50pm

RACE 14

Golden Era Supersport / Steelsport

9 Laps (18.5 miles)

5.12pm

RACE 15

GB Racing British Military Inter Services

9 Laps (18.5 miles)


TIMETABLE OF EVENTS

SUNDAY

Premier Motorcycle Protection

9.00am

10 Minutes Warm Up

Thundersport 500 & Superteens

9.13am

10 Minutes Warm Up

Supertwins/Stocktwins & Golden Era Steelsport

9.26am

10 Minutes Warm Up

Pre-National 600 & Sportsman 600

9.39am

10 Minutes Warm Up

Thundersport GP1 & Elite 600

9.52am

10 Minutes Warm Up

Golden Era Superbike GP1 Classic & Golden Era Supersport

10.10am

RACE 1

Thundersport 500 Freshman & Superteens

9 Laps (18.5 miles)

10.32am

RACE 2

Supertwins/Stocktwins & Aprilia RRV450GP

9 Laps (18.5 miles)

10.54am

RACE 3

Thundersport GP1 Sportsman & Elite

12 Laps (25 miles)

11.19am

RACE 4

Pre-National 600 Sport & Freshman

9 Laps (18.5 miles)

11.41am

RACE 5

Golden Era Superbike & Gp1 Classic / FM

9 Laps (18.5 miles)

12.03pm

RACE 6

Thundersport 500 Elite & Seniors

9 Laps (18.5 miles)

12.25pm

RACE 7

Golden Era Supersport / Steelsport

9 Laps (18.5 miles)

12.47pm

RACE 8

Thundersport 600 Elite & Sportsman

12 Laps (25 miles)

LUNCH BREAK 1.50pm

RACE 9

Thundersport 500 Freshman & Superteens

9 Laps (18.5 miles)

2.12pm

RACE 10

Supertwins/Stocktwins & Aprilia RRV450GP

9 Laps (18.5 miles)

2.34pm

RACE 11

Thundersport GP1 Sportsman & elite

12 Laps (25 miles)

2.59pm

RACE 12

Pre-National 600 Sport & Freshman

9 Laps (18.5 miles)

3.21pm

RACE 13

Golden Era Superbike & GP1 Classic / FM

9 Laps (18.5 miles)

3.43pm

RACE 14

Thundersport 500 Elite & Seniors

9 Laps (18.5 miles)

4.08pm

RACE 15

Golden Era Supersport / Steelsport

9 Laps (18.5 miles)

4.30pm

RACE 16

Thundersport 600 Sportsman & Elite

12 Laps (25 miles)

4.55pm

RACE 17

GB Racing British Military Inter Services

9 Laps (18.5 miles)


THUNDERSPORT GB (Affiliated to the ACU as Club Thundersport Ltd) This meeting is held under a European OPEN Road Race Permit, complying with the National Sporting Code and the Standing Regulations for Road Races of the ACU, the Supplementary Regulations of the above organisation, and in accordance with the ACU / FIM Environmental Code. Permanent Course Licence No. 097 ACU Permit No. ACU 49127 Outline Flags and other signals used at this meeting: (full details are shown in the ACU Handbook a copy of which is available for inspection in the Race Administration).

OUTLINE FLAGS AND OTHER SIGNALS

RED LIGHTS - May be extinguished as the signal to start races. May be illuminated to stop races or practice NATIONAL FLAG - May be used as the signal to start races GREEN FLAG - Indicates that the track is clear YELLOW FLAG - This Flag indicates that there is danger ahead. Overtaking in this sector is forbidden YELLOW /RED STRIPED FLAG - This indicates a lack of adhesion in this sector. Oil, Water or another substance (debris) on track RED FLAG - The race or practice session is stopped. Riders must return slowly to the pits or as directed by the marshals YELLOW I BLACK CROSS - This flag is shown at the startline at the beginning of the last lap. CHEQUERED FLAG - Indicates the end of the race or practice session

NOTICE: MOTOR SPORTS CAN BE DANGEROUS! Despite the organisers taking all reasonable precautions, unavoidable accidents can happen. Please comply with all instructions of marshals and notices and remain in permitted areas only. THEY ARE CONCERNED WITH YOUR SAFETY

Premier Motorcycle Protection


ROCKINGHAM MOTOR SPEEDWAY

RACE DIRECTOR Dave Stewart

SECRETARY OF THE MEETING Dave Stewart 10 Hemington Lane Lockington Leicestershire. DE74 2RJ

RACE SECRETARY Bernadette Stewart

CLERK OF THE COURSE Dave Stewart DEPUTY CLERKS OF THE COURSE Phil Page Kyle Tansley Joanne Lumb Samantha Page / Janet Day

OFFICIALS & ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

ASSISTANT RACE SECRETARY CHIEF TECHNICAL STEWARDS Stuart Bailey (Chief)

CHIEF MARSHAL John Pedersen

CHIEF INCIDENT OFFICER Mark Lumb

SOUND CONTROL

Rodger Wadey (Senior)

STARTLINE OFFICIALS Dave Richardson (Chief) Yorke Wilson (Deputy)

RACE CONTROL Joanne Page

ASSEMBLY AREA

Norman & Margaret Lowes

PODIUM CREW Thundersport Syd Alison Osler

RECOVERY TEAM

Dan & Natalie Wesley Keith Goldsmith / Alan McFarlane

ACU STEWARD John Ward

TIMEKEEPERS TSL Timing

CHIEF MEDICAL OFFICERS Ellen Rawlinson Steve Ready Steve Goodyear

AMBULANCE SERVICE Inter County Paramedic

COMMENTATORS

Robin Murphy - John Ward

CIRCUIT MANAGER

Nick Breed - 01536 271523


OH NO, CRAZY DAVE is off on one again!!....

The Shame of Motorsport holding out the begging bowl!

In my youth I was fairly well known for being a pretty fiery character, but as I’ve got older I’d like to think that I’ve calmed down and I now have a temperament more fitting for a middle aged man. I rarely get agitated with others and I now confine myself to just shouting at the more ridiculous breakfast TV news features whilst struggling to put my socks on, before getting on with my day in reasonably chirpy form. Yes, I’ve got to that stage of life where I’m very content just having a casual grizzle at the latest Health & Safety lunacy. Or, worse still, the latest bunch of spongers telling me what a hard life they have queuing up for their monthly dole cheque because all the immigrants have taken their jobs. Those would of course be the jobs that this lot are too lazy to get out of bed for, preferring to live off of the taxes that those very same immigrants (and the rest of us) are paying. This will of course be in a pre-recorded piece, because they obviously don’t want to get up at 7am to do the interview live, because that would involve effort.... I can live with all that stuff without it making me want to chew anyone’s head off, or start the next civil war, because it’s just the normal irritating stuff that the modern world is made of. When it comes to our own industry bleating about how we need government help to retain a rich boys motor race though, it really gets under my fingernails! I’m not against government support for our industry per se, but it should really be directed at motorsport apprenticeships and building our industry from the bottom up. I just don’t think you can make a justifiable case for putting tax revenues into the pockets of the rich, when there are people sleeping rough on the streets of our cities and others waiting

There are over £1,000,000.- worth of tickets in this picture alone. for life saving surgery because there isn’t enough money in the system. The top echelons of all motorsport are the reserve of the extremely rich few, not the transit van and caravan struggling racer. However, it is the very tax money that the struggling club racer pays every month though that would go towards subsidising the lifestyles of the Monaco and Andorran tax dodging residents and their Saville Row dressed buddies at the gentlemens clubs that control the ‘money go round’ that is Formula 1. Bernie Ecclestone isn’t on my Christmas card list, but he does know the value of a quid and, more importantly, he has a clear insight into the finances surrounding the running of the British Grand Prix. Some of the questions he has posed over the years have never had satisfactory answers and our biased motorsport press has simply glossed over them with the “It’s just money grabbing Ecclestone being greedy” excuse, without ever examining the question.

Everybody seems to swallow the line that Silverstone is being treated unfairly in regard to how much they have to pay in order to host a Grand Prix, but that is simply not true. Many other GPs are priced at over double the price that Silverstone pays and the fact that many get government support is actually irrelevant. Some governments see high profile events as a way of promoting what their particular nation has to offer. Others have enormous petro-chemical industries that effectively underpin the entire economy, so motors and motorsport are acutely and intrinsically linked to their economic output. Governments all have to prioritise funding and I’m sure that the Azerbaijan government got decent value for money by the promotion of the Baku GP. I would guess that 90% of the worlds tourists had never even heard of the place, let alone considered travelling to Baku, or the rest of Azerbaijan, until they saw the F1 GP coverage and realised what a beautiful


destination it might be. The statistics say that tourists spend around £1,350 on their travels, so the Azerbaijan government only need to attract around 35,000 visitors over the course of a whole year to their country in order to make a profit on the deal, so for them it’s good business. With the UK it is very much the other way around, pretty much 90% (or probably even more) of all tourists worldwide have already heard of Great Britain and they aren’t going to change their holiday decisions based on us having a Grand Prix or not. The British GP crowd is predominantly British – surprise, surprise! No boost to the economy there then and therefore no return on any investment for our government. So why would we expect them to spend public money on a frivolous rich mans sport that 90% of taxpayers don’t give a damn about? You might ask, what about the seven F1 teams that are based in the UK and all the money they bring in? What about them? They’re all making a profit, some of it out of the very event they want subsidised. Being based close to a GP track used to be an advantage when testing was unlimited and in season updates didn’t incur grid penalties, but that is no longer the case. I can well remember running events on the Silverstone National Circuit and hearing F1 cars being tested on the Southern Circuit. It was almost the normal state of affairs and it was clearly very useful for the teams and at the same time very lucrative for the venue. That is no longer the case, as F1 team

I’ll leave it to you to add up the car parking charges @ £50 per car testing is severely restricted and engine suppliers are keen to reduce running hours anyway. The teams can all remotely test on any circuit in any conditions on their in house simulators, so it wouldn’t matter if a team was based 1 mile from a circuit or on an island in the Arctic Ocean. Those teams are all based in the UK because the skilled personnel are here, plus the facilities are already built here and that won’t change whether a British GP exists or not. None of them are going to up sticks and move premises from their current locations, because it doesn’t make sense to go to the expense of doing so. As a matter of fact, not having a GP for a year or so might give the space and time for Silverstone to have a new look at how to plug the holes in their leaky management bucket that they say is currently making it not financially viable to continue with the event. Now, I’m just a poor lad from Tooting who left school at the age of 13 with no

These events used to not only pay for themselves, but they paid for everything else throughout the year too.

mathematical qualifications to speak of, but I’m not actually that dim. Having had a look at the figures they have published themselves (and a look at their audited accounts), I just can’t make the sums add up to a loss. Perhaps I’m a bit dimmer than I thought and I’m getting confused by all the zeros - because there are a lot of zeros. Or perhaps there is a lot of number juggling going on for the sake of convenience, there are some big numbers involved after all. The fee is £17,000,000.- which is a pretty big number. Silverstone claim to have had 350,000 visitors over the 3 days and a Race Day crowd of 120,000. The cheapest General Admission ticket was £179 (no grandstand seat). Grandstand seats started at £249 and the car parking charge was £50 (if paid in advance). Without including the more upmarket ticket deals, the hospitality deals, the Silverstone Club deals, VIP deals and all the other more expensive stuff, the lowest possible income figure I can get to is £28,500,000.- which is a really big number. In order to have made a net loss of £4,800,000.- they would have to have had event operating costs of £16,300,000.- which would make that the most impressive big number of all. If that loss figure is accurate, the management team should all be stacking shelves at Tesco. Any normal business would be asking their management team some serious questions about that and taking a very close look at all the outside suppliers


they were using. The companies that are supplying those services all seem to be making a very tidy profit out of the GP. Likewise the security providers and local suppliers. If the only party not making a profit out of the deal is the host venue, it makes me think that someone isn’t doing their sums right. I actually do know what it costs to run events of a similar size – I have done it at Donington Park with Moto-GP when we had 84,000 race day spectators and nowhere near the same level of accessibility that Silverstone enjoys. So I genuinely know the policing costs, traffic management costs, security costs, crowd medical costs, local authority costs, ticketing costs, Ad control costs, logistical costs and all the other stuff that goes with it that the general public don’t see. Whilst the Silverstone crowd is larger, and to an extent slightly more cumbersome from a vehicle movement perspective, it isn’t £12,600,000.- more expensive to cater for even in your wildest dreams. So why do I care enough to write this all out in a motorcycle publication (and why should you care)? Mainly because it offends me when a bunch of very privileged, mainly rich, boys put out the begging bowl for something they could very easily fund themselves and hide behind the rest of us, saying that all of motorsport in this country depends on the fate of this single event. To the outside world it makes us all look like a bunch of unprofessional scroungers and I don’t like that. They do not speak for me. The BRDC has many, many millionaires amongst its number and many of those do not pay any taxes in this country, so why should we pay for their event so that they can take the profit? I also understand the other side of the equation for all of the clubs that hire venues, including Silverstone, and the knock on effect that will inevitably follow when they realise that without their precious GP they are in an even bigger financial hole. I say that because the whole place is set up in a way that means it is dependent on having the GP. If it hasn’t got it, it needs to attract at least 250 new customers (or at least sell 250

extra activities) just to keep the vast place ticking over. Where are they going to come from? The answer is the other 16 permanent circuits and the loss of that business will have an inflationary effect on hire prices. For all of the honest, hard working clubs out there this can only serve to put more pressure on already wafer thin margins and that inevitably affects the poor racers at the bottom of the chain. We work very hard to keep our prices to the end user, that’ll be you ordinary racers, at an absolute minimum. We haven’t changed our prices for 10 years, despite being squeezed ever harder by increased circuit hire costs, insurance costs, medical provision costs, timekeeping costs and all the other ancillary costs that go with running events. Yet, in a world of next to zero inflation over at least 9 of those years, our buying in costs have gone up by 26.4% as price increases are just an annual reality for us. We don’t bitch or moan about it, we just increase our efficiency in order to absorb the extra costs, but that has to end eventually. Next year may have to see a small increase in Entry Fees, but we will only pass on a fraction of our actual costs and we will still be the most cost effective organiser of motorsport events. The words “Unfair Contract” have been bandied about quite often in relation to this GP dross. Let me tell you what an unfair contract looks like. If you hire a venue (often at extortionate rates) and have to pay the bulk of the fee 6-8 months in advance, don’t get any of the spectator revenue, aren’t allowed to place any advertising anywhere, have your customers treated as though they might steal the

furniture, bars & restaurants that do not open “for the likes of you” and if you should dare ask for any simple and minor safety upgrades be greeted with “If it’s good enough for F1, it’s good enough for you!”, you’ll have a rough idea of what an unfair contract looks like. The circuits have worked out pretty accurately what a hiring clubs income is likely to be and over the years they have squeezed any potential margin so hard that the pips are squeaking right now. Paying so far in advance means that the hirer is taking 100% of the risk, so forgive me for not crying crocodile tears when I see a venue on the other end of that deal. Whilst some of those terms are pretty much standard fare in our industry, and we accept them on that basis, the attitude and approach of venues varies enormously. The attitude of venue staff towards their customers is the thing that makes the running of events pleasurable or difficult and is a great influence on whether you look forward to returning or not. There are in fact some places that we (Bernadette & I) wouldn’t go to even if they were free due to poor staff attitudes. We refer privately to the management at such venues as being the products of the “Basil Fawlty School of Leadership” and I’m sure most of you have come across the sort of people we are talking about. You might think that the dominant player in the circuit hire market (MSV), would be the most difficult to deal with in this respect, but that isn’t actually the case. The venue staff at Brands Hatch and Cadwell Park are actually some of the most accommodating and welcoming people in the business, sitting

Ah, that’s better. Some proper two-wheeled racing.


comfortably alongside those here at Rockingham as well as the excellent people at Donington Park and Anglesey. As with most other businesses, the staff generally have to take their lead from their immediate boss on site and that means that a good working management attitude leads to an all round positive experience. A positive experience means that re-booking happens almost without the vendor having to press for the sale. Price becomes far less important when value for money is perceived as being good. The elemental fact is that quality is remembered long after price is forgotten. Good service in our industry leads directly to customer satisfaction and that is the single most important thing that leads to good profits...................... Do you see where I’m going with this? Success doesn’t happen by accident, it is a function of good leadership, hard work and careful planning.

Why are we at Thundersport GB successful? It certainly isn’t because we are rich kids, or because we have any kind of monopoly, or because we get special deals from any of the venues, or because we wield any influence over the governing body or because we have any government subsidies. I truly believe that the main part of our success is primarily due to the attitude of everyone involved with the organisational side of our business. We try very hard to say ‘Yes’ to any reasonable request and we are willing to listen to all suggestions in our efforts to make our events as enjoyable as possible for everyone involved. We try very hard to keep any stress we may be experiencing away from our customers and just get on with the job. This time though, I felt it was important to speak out, because most others within our industry are afraid to do so for fear of repercussions.

The “top flight” venues often tell us that we need to accept that we must run certain events at a modest loss, as the prestige of running at those venues is a good investment for us as organisers. When did that suddenly cease to be good advice? Could it have changed the moment that particular bitter pill was served up on their gilt edged plate next to their solid silver knife & fork? Less money coming into our business at any level means that the closed pool of customers have to take up the slack. That means we all end up paying more and getting less and THAT is why it matters to you. I don’t see why we should all end up picking up the tab for something that is a product of many years of mismanagement on every level, do you?

Crazy Dave Of course it is said by the very top people in the motorsport establishment that only Silverstone could host a British Formula 1 Grand Prix, because there isn’t another circuit that has enough run off to accomodate Formula 1 safety standards. Not being an expert on such things, I had to use Google to help me out with some graphic examples of these enormous run off areas and high tech safety criteria they were referring to. I give you here just two examples (Monaco & Canada) that popped straight up from the current venues on the championship calendar for the current season. Yeah, I guess they’ve got a point. (not)


RACE−PROVEN, PULSE−RAISING.

THE CLOSEST YOU’LL GET TO A PRO LEVEL TYRE.

Derived from the legendary D212 GP Pro, the road legal GP Racer D212 delivers the kind of handling, performance and endurance that until just a few years ago was only available to factory-backed teams.

www.dunlop.eu


DUNLOP TYRES THUNDERSPORT SUPERTEENS & 500 FRESHMAN

11

THE KIDS ARE ALRIGHT

It’s been very well documented that the worlds longest running one make championship – the Aprilia Superteen Challenge – has been the launch pad for a multitude of British and World Championship racers. That was no accident, but it wasn’t exactly rocket science either. The premise for developing young talent isn’t really solely about the machinery they are using, the important thing – the only really important thing in fact – is getting the entire pool of talent in the same place, at the same time. Any of us could be conceited and say that we are teaching them, but there is no point in lying about it – these youngsters are teaching each other. They look at another rider of similar age, ability and size to themselves and just think “If he can do that, so can I!” and once they’ve made it happen once, it goes straight into their skill set. The more kids you can get together on track at the same time, the more opportunity there is for them all to learn at a faster rate. When Casey Stoners parents brought him half way across the world to pitch him against the other youngsters in the Aprilia Superteens, it started a chain of events that culminated in Cal Crutchlow becoming the first British premier class Grand-Prix winner since Barry Sheene. If you think that is the end of the line, you’re not looking at the true picture though. There are a whole host of riders still working their way through the system that have the potential to replicate that success and perhaps go even further. Cal was a Superteen in 2000 and went on to win the championship in 2001, so there are another 14 years worth of exactly that kind of talent already in the pipeline. OK, so Casey only took 7 years after leaving the Aprilia Superteens to get into a position where he was able to take his first MotoGP race win, whereas it’s taken Cal 14 years, but I think that just goes to prove the point that there is no great rush as British riders tend to benefit from a little more time in the development stages. Rory Skinner, Charlie Nesbitt, Max Cook and Lewis Rollo – make a note of their names as they are all on the same upward escalator that brought Cal, Bradley Smith, Sam Lowes, Danny Kent, Danny Webb and Alex Lowes into the Moto-GP paddock. The biggest hindrance to youth development in the UK over the past 2 years has been that the young riders have been forced to choose between three separate championships that have all been catering for the same thing. The KTM RC390 Cup has attracted a regular 15 riders, the Kawasaki Junior Cup is at about the same level and even the Aprilia Superteens has dropped down to similar levels recently from its peak of 54 riders back in 2009. Get those riders all together on track at the same time and you would have a true British Youth Motorcycle Academy once again. It should be no shock to anyone, that just 3 weeks after the above was first written, WSB launched the World Supersport 300 Cup.

No

Rider

Hometown

Team

6

Luke Verwey

Silverstone

Team XG Group

7

Kade Verwey

Silverstone

Team XG Group

8

Cameron Hall

Barnsley

FIS Racing

Machine

cc

Class

KTM

390

ST

KTM

390

ST

Aprilia

125

ST

16

James Bailey

Melton Mowbray

JB Racing

Honda

500

F

18

Jodie Fieldhouse

Worle

Go Pink Racing

Aprilia

450

ST

21

Franco Bourne

Crook

Franco Bourne Racing

Kawasaki

300

ST

35

Jeremy Knight

Newbury

Jeremy Knight Racing

Aprilia

125

ST

51

Adam Campion

Hucknall

Campion Racing

Honda

500

F

58

Matthew Postlethwaite

Carlisle

Wasp Racing

Honda

500

F

59

Lee Wharton

Basingstoke

Two Lees Racing

Honda

500

F

64

Liam Bassett

Durham

Liam Bassett Racing

KTM

390

ST

69

Dave West

Lincoln

West Racing

Honda

500

F

74

Daniel Black

Lincoln

RD Racing

Honda

500

F

78

Matthew Bower

Sheffield

MD Racing

Aprilia

450

ST

88

Harry Leigh

Hathern

Double 8 Racing

Aprilia

450

ST

93

Stewart Hoare

Stockton on Tees

Stewarts Racing

Honda

500

F

97

Laurence Edgeley

Bolney

Team Edge RST

Yamaha

300

ST

102

Charlie Farrer

Easington

Farrer Racing

Kawasaki

300

ST

141

Andrew Batner

Swindon

Batner Racing

Honda

500

F

178

Steven Shrubsall

St Leonards

Bexhill Gearboxes

Honda

500

F

261

Liam Silvain

Bury St Edmunds

That'll Do Racing

Honda

500

F

292

Ryan Meaden

Sandford

RD Racing

Honda

500

F

444

Karl Finch

Lincoln

KF Racing

Honda

500

F

Thundersport 500 Freshman 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

Adam Campion Steve Shrubsall Daniel Swift Ryan Meaden Andrew Batner Karl Finch Simon Burgess Lee Wharton Dave West Craig Goodall

385 216 208 204 167 140 131 125 106 98

Thundersport Superteens 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

Charlie Farrer Matt Bower Scott Ogden Jodie Fieldhouse Franco Bourne Jake Clark Kade Verwey Liam Bassett Laurence Edgeley Cameron Hall

352 277 261 230 217 189 183 146 139 120

CLASS LAP RECORDS Superteens 1.35.207 - Edmund Best Thundersport 500 1.33.167 - Joe Barton


The Donington 500 is the brainchild of Bob Adams, the Donington Park Director of Racing. He has long been conscious of the seemingly ever increasing costs associated with getting into racing. Some of those costs are real and others are just perceived, but the fact that getting into the sport has an aura of large expense is a very good reason for addressing the issue. Back in the day there were a plethora of one day race meetings that were completely stand alone – no practice day, no pre-event qualifying – the whole thing was accomplished between 9.00am & 5.00pm on race day. Of course there are a few such events still around, but none of them take place on the premier circuits like Donington Park, Brands Hatch or Silverstone. The Donington 500 is designed to recreate that 1990s style of race meeting, but with 21st century safety standards. This event will be going back to the old school style of 3 races per class on the single day, so everyone will go home tired and happy having had a busy days racing. So let’s wind the clock back to 1992 (25 years ago). Bob was also keen to firmly establish the link between cheap racing and kids racing. Although most racing caters for adults, Bob is acutely aware that the link between youth racing and the future health of our sport is inescapable. Therefore, for the first time in modern racing, the Cool Fab Racing Conti & Metrakit GP50s & GP70s will be sharing equal billing with the adult classes at an ACU sanctioned event with 3 races for these mini Grand Prix bikes. Central to the event will be a 250 mile endurance race for CB500 machines - The Donington 250 - with teams of 2 or 3 riders. This will be “true endurance” style with just one bike shared between the riders. This re-introduces the integral teamwork element that is missing from modern Tag-style endurance. Fuel stops, pad changes and getting the bike to the finish requires a level of teamwork not present in multiple machine races where swapping the transponder from one bike to another has eliminated much of this aspect of endurance. The team spirit engendered by this is awesome to be a part of. The GB Racing Military Races are already an established part of the Thundersport GB set up, but this event will showcase the serving military riders with a full set of 3 championship races. These lads could be racing here at Donington Park one weekend and then risking their lives the very next week in order to protect the freedoms we all take for granted. Finally, we will be running The Thundersport 21st Century Challenge. This is an event for any rider born in the 21st Century riding a production based machine up to & including a 650cc twin. So Aprilia RS125s, Kawasaki ZX300s, KTM RC390s, Aprilia RRV450s, Honda CB500s, Suzuki SV650s, Kawasaki ER6s and any Formula 400 machine. The results will be based on a sealed handicap which will weight a riders performance assessed on the ultimate lap time possible on his/her machine. As well as having Mini-Moto bikes on the Melbourne Loop a full days race action will be taking place simultaneously on the National circuit. For those who have never sampled the thrill of riding on twowheels, the Ron Haslam Race School will be on site to give information and take bookings for their world renowned Honda Riding Skills courses. They supply everything you need to sample track action – helmets, boots, gloves and top quality race suits – so there is no initial outlay in finding out about the exciting world of motorcycle sport. The full programme of events will include:The Donington 500 Two-Fifty Endurance GB Racing British Military Inter Services Challenge Cool Fab Racing GP70 & GP50 The 21st Century Challenge That’s 200 racing laps plus practice – all for just £5 admission The event takes place on Sunday 13th August, so for a real taste of the nostalgic 1990s, make a special note in your diary.

Premier Motorcycle Protection


AVON TYRES SUPERTWINS

13

- STOCKTWINS & APRILIA RRV450GP SUPERTWINS THE ORIGINAL GP2 FOR THE MASSES!

CLASS LAP RECORDS Supertwins - 1.27.135 Paul McClung Stocktwins - 1.28.946 Matt Truelove Aprilia RRV450 - 1.28.025 George Stanley WHAT’S SUPER ABOUT SUPERTWINS?

Thundersport GB started out with what is now our Supertwin class back in 2009 (it was called GP2 back then) and it has since appeared in Irish Road Races, the North-West 200 and more recently the TT Races. These light and manouverable 650cc twin cylinder 4-strokes can be built for around half the cost of a 600cc Superstock machine and open up a route for the home tuner to get re-involved in the modern racing scene. The British Superbike package is missing out on this middleweight category at the moment and I can’t understand why. It would fill in that elusive rung on every budding young racers ladder to success.

STOCKTWINS ARE SUPERTWINS ON A BUDGET

Whereas the Supertwin category has no tuning restrictions, we also compliment that with our more cost concious Stocktwins Championship. Cost control was always designed to be a core principal of Stocktwins and the rules are designed to allow most things that are NOT performance enhancing.

APRILIA RRV450GP

These are designed to be as close as you can get handling wise to the old 250GP bikes, but with the elegantly engineered Aprilia / Rotax 4-stroke V-twin unit that powers the world beating SXV Supermotard machines.

No

Rider

Hometown

Team

Machine

cc

CL

2

Stephen Taylor

Oakham

STR Racing Team #2

Suzuki

650

S

3

Ryan Redman

Blackpool

9

Alex Taylor

Southwater

British Army Race Team

Suzuki

650

S

Scott Racing M/cycles

Aprilia

450

RRV

Kawasaki

650

T

Suzuki

650

S

17

Jonny Towers

Coton in Elms

Team Edge RST

18

Matt Powell

Swansea

UWTSD Orthrus Racing

19

Neil Schofield

Barnsley

Schofield Racing

Suzuki

650

S

21

Nicole Lynch

Clondalkin ROI

Medlar Racing

Suzuki

650

T

26

Daniel Taylor

Kirton Lindsey

S Brocklehurst Transport

Suzuki

650

T

32

Marc Harrison

Burbage

Harrison Racing

Aprilia

450

RRV

39

Thomas Burnett

Ramsey IOM

Tru Racing

Suzuki

650

T

43

Alex Platt

Lincoln

B&B Motorcycles

Suzuki

650

S

52

Ash Bryant

Nantwich

Bryant Racing

Suzuki

650

T

54

Lara Small

Bristol

Knight Road Race Team

Ducati

796

T

55

Ben Rainbow

Plymouth

RAF MSA

Suzuki

650

S

58

Ben Russell

Collyweston

Ben Russell Racing

60

Greg Madero

Towcester

Madero Racing

66

Rhys Irwin

Letterkenny

Oasis Bar Letterkenny

76

Mark Kirkby

Hexham

MK Racing

77

Eleri Crowly

Corsham

86

Thomas Jennings

90

Rishon Hickey

Suzuki

650

S

Kawasaki

650

T

Aprilia

450

RRV

Kawasaki

650

T

AVL Motorsport

Suzuki

650

S

Hinckley

TJ Racing

Aprilia

450

RRV

Burntisland

Rishon Racing

WK

650

T

91

Emma Field

Barton u Humber

EF Racing

Suzuki

650

S

96

Jason Markham

Salisbury

British Army Race Team

Suzuki

650

S

101 Chris Asquith

Bradford

Asquith Racing

Suzuki

650

S

133 Ben Tolliday

Scarborough

Team Tolly Racing

Suzuki

650

T

Avon Tyres Supertwins Points

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

Jonny Towers Greg Madero Ben Tolliday Dan Taylor Alex Platt Alex Taylor Jonathan Perry Alex Wood Neil Schofield Charlie King

431 345 213 204 170 163 142 113 110 109

Avon Tyres Stocktwins Points 1 1 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

Alex Platt Neil Schofield Joe Thomas Jason Markham Stephen Taylor Ian McGann Paul Williams Matt Powell Ben Rainbow Richard Molnar

431 321 242 219 177 148 145 123 101 93

Alex Taylor Rhys Irwin Alex Wood Kade Verwey Thomas Jennings Ben Ashcroft Kasey Wyatt Luke Verwey Laurence Edgeley Max Lofthouse

399 303 279 189 186 180 115 95 50 41

Aprilia RRV450GP Points


Hyper competitive pricing on spot and forward FX conversions. Our model allows us to make thinner margins than corporate banks. The very best advice, forecasting and analysis. Bloomberg consistently ranks our company as a Top 10 global currency forecaster. Tel: +44 20 3650 6300 www.monexeurope.com

$160BN GROUP FX TURNOVER


MICHELIN TYRES THUNDERSPORT GP1 ELITE & MONEX GP1 SPORTSMAN

15

THUNDERSPORT GP1 THE BADDEST BULLETS ON THE BLOCK!

CLASS LAP RECORD 1.22.663 Lee Williams CAREFUL WITH THAT AXE EUGENE!

These bad boys are the most sophisticated and powerful bits of kit in the paddock. When you start racing, everyone secretly wants one, but the first time you ride one in anger reminds you very forcefully that they can bite! It is a reminder of how fast technology has advanced in just a few years when you consider that all of the bikes on this grid have more advanced electronics than even the most sophisticated Grand Prix machines had before the 4-stroke Moto-GP era started. It’s even more amazing to consider that if a decent standard club rider were on one of these machines in any Grand Prix before around 1991, he would probably have won! That is a little factoid that both astounds and offends people like me that grew up with Wayne Rainey and Eddie Lawson as their racing heroes (because NOBODY could have smoked the tyres like they did - could they?)................ This race has 2 categories within one race - all riders contest the main Thundersport GP1 Elite category and that can be won outright by a Sportsman rider if he is good enough. There is also a “Freshman” category (page 11) for riders who are yet to obtain their Full Clubman Licence.

No

Rider

Hometown

Team

Machine

cc

CL

9

Paul Charman

Accrington

Seton Tuning

Yamaha

1000

E

10

Ben Scranage

Bolton

Scranage Racing

Kawasaki

1000

E

12

Luke Hedger

Bristol

Scott Racing M/cycles

Aprilia

1000

E

17

Gary Woodward

Burton on Trent

Team Able

BMW

1000

S

Honda

1000

E

Kawasaki

1000

S

18

Joe Faragher

Onchan IOM

Faragher Racing

28

Gary Hutchinson

Ripon

Red's True Barbeque

33

Michael Neeves

Peterborough

Prime Factors Racing

BMW

1000

E

34

Don Gilbert

Nutbourne

Nutbourne Landscapes

Honda

1000

E

38

Andrew Pollard

Belper

RPM Bikes

BMW

1000

S

40

Jack Gover

Southampton

TH Racing

Kawasaki

1000

S

49

Paul McClung

Haddington

McClung Racing

BMW

1000

E

62

Nick Edgeley

Bolney

Team Edge RST Racing

BMW

1000

E

67

Michael Brown

Stourport

Team Edge RST Racing

Kawasaki

1000

E

73

David Brook

Bradford

Team Arkoni Racing

BMW

1000

E

75

Jamie Tibble

Southampton

Team Tibble

Kawasaki

1000

S

76

Matt Pearce

Wellington

Matt Pearce Racing

Kawasaki

1000

E

77

Anthony Van Looy Corsham

RAF MSA

Yamaha

600

S

87

Billy Mellor

Barnsley

Team Able

BMW

1000

E

88

Rob Heritage

Rushden

Car Shop

Kawasaki

1000

S

92

Mark Sykes

Grimsby

Mark Sykes Racing

Kawasaki

1000

E

94

Lee Williams

Bootle

Team Willo/ Hi-Tech

Kawasaki

1000

E

96

Callum O'Shea

Port Soderick IOM

Monarch Honda

Honda

1000

E

99

Ben Crowe

Carnforth

Team 99 Racing

BMW

1000

S

111

Sonny Martin

Wirral

Guildford Audio

Kawasaki

1000

S

115

Sam McFarlane

Wellingborough

MSG Racing Suzuki

Suzuki

1000

S

122

Terry Merritt

Swindon

Rideworx TDM Racing

BMW

1000

S

157

Charlie Morris

Potters Bar

MSG Racing Suzuki

Suzuki

1000

E

188

Scott Billingham

Kingswinford

SB Racing

BMW

1000

S

All categories of GP1 rider may use any tyre, slick or treaded and even 16.5 inch rims if desired. There is an open tyre policy in most classes at Thundersport GB and Michelin, Dunlop, Avon, Continental and the other brands all put a lot of effort into getting their men onto the podium. If one brand dominates the podium, the rest of the riders very swiftly switch to that brand. This is a VERY big marketing exercise, because over 1,200 tyres will be used at pretty much every Thundersport GB meeting. That’s well over £1,000,000 worth of tyres each season without even counting tyres used for out of season testing!

Thundersport GP1 Elite Points 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

Lee Williams Dave Brook Billy Mellor Paul McClung Phil Crowe Mark Sykes Michael Neeves Ben Crowe Jamie Tibble John Ingram

238 170 134 126 123 116 96 84 74 70

Thundersport GP1 Sportsman Points 1 Ben Crowe 301 2 Jamie Tibble 214 3 Gary Woodward 187 4 Gary Hutchinson 150 5 Sonny Martin 141 6 Sam McFarlane 141 7 Ash Stone 115 8 Sam Osborne 81 9 Richard White 77 10 Jack Gover 67


MEMORIES OF M

Premier Motorcycle Protection


MALLORY PARK


A&R RACING - CONTINENTAL PRE-NATIONAL 600 Sport & Freshman

19 13

PRE-NATIONAL 600 PASSION PUT INTO ACTION!

CLASS LAP RECORDS

Sport 1.26.965 - Harry Truelove F/man 1.28.761 - Alex Laureys INTO THE FIRE

The world of motorcycle racing can be an intimidating place for newcomers. If you want to start on a 600cc machine, you’ll quickly discover that everyone else on the grid is a budding Axe-Murderer in the making. In order to ease the transition into this fiercely competitive category, we created the “Pre-National Sport 600” class for riders who have yet to gain a National Licence. It was originally made up of a mix of pure novices and riders who are generally in their second season of racing. It tends to work slightly better than a pure “Novice” or “Rookie” grid because the new riders have some slightly more experienced riders around them that they can learn from - rather than the fastest newcomer being left to his own devices. This is hugely beneficial when it comes to things like lapping slower riders, or dealing with temporary course changes such as No Rider Hometown Team Machine cc CL lack of adhesion flags being utilised on parts of the track. Of course those things 6 Paul McDonald Bracknell Mac Racing Triumph 675 S can be learnt by trial and error, but having 8 Tom Hill Chesham BDR Yamaha Yamaha 600 S someone who has done it before just 10 Jonathan Atkinson York RNRMRRT Honda 600 F ahead of you takes the guesswork out of 11 Will Harper Desborough MSG Racing Suzuki Suzuki 600 S it. We also have a “Freshman” category 15 Joseph Addy Gilberdyke Addy Racing Yamaha 600 F within this race, which is for riders on a 21 Stephen Thomas Salisbury British Army Race Team Triumph 675 F Novice licence with very little experience. 23 Andrew Evans Carnforth AE Racing Yamaha 600 S The bikes themselves are pretty much 24 Lee McLaughlin Leeds Lee Mc Racing Suzuki 600 F the same specification machines as those on the Sportsman Elite grid, but 27 Brian Fuidge Poole RNRMRRT Suzuki 600 S at this learning stage of the process any 28 Michael Coxon Stockton British Army Race Team Suzuki 600 F small differences are immaterial. As with 29 William Griffin Falkirk RNRMRRT Yamaha 600 F all 600cc production based formulae, 34 Chris Lavisher Newbury LBR Racing Triumph 675 S the Pre-National 600 Sport & Freshman 35 Daniel Greenwood Plymouth RNRMRRT Honda 600 F classes races on “Road-Legal” treaded 38 Jeremy Watson Hemel Hempsted JW Racing Yamaha 600 S tyres unless a “Wet Race” is declared, 42 Martin Farrelly Hinckley FAF Racing Triumph 675 F in which case tyre choice is free. There 45 Chris Curtis Stoulton MSG Racing Suzuki Suzuki 600 S are no restrictions on the brand of tyre used and all major manufacturers are 46 Alistair Wright Liskeard AW Racing Yamaha 600 S represented. 47 Zac Oultram Manchester Konect Racing Kawasaki 600 S

48 49 52 58 59 62 63 64 76 77 79 80 81 85 86 89 91 96 100 113 119 179 212 300

Martin Palmer AJ McDaniel Samuel Mousley Liam Warren Ben Wales Sam Cartwright Thomas Holmes Pete Riches Luke Verwey Gary Hignett Nick Barnes Stephen Kimmings Rich Baker Neil Goodson Luke Turner Liam Dale Ian Norris Cemal Oram Steven Bentley Nige Pitt Alun Brooks Lee Silvain Adam Sanders Kingsan Ho

Liphook Huntingdon Swansea Spalding Knottingly Corsham Walsall Gosport Silverstone Spalding Peterborough Orsett Crewe High Wycombe Bedford Bradford Holmer Green Bristol Norwich Bury Welshpool Bury St Edmunds Worcester Nantwich

Martin Farrier Services RS Racing UWTSD Orthrus Racing South Lincs Leisure BW Racing British Army Race Team TH Racing PR Racing Team XG Group RAF MSA Park Electric SK Racing Bakers Cabinets BDR Yamaha LT Racing Barrett Steel Racing Nozza Racing RNRMRRT Rock Racing Pittys Custom Vinyls Brooks Boyz Racing That'll Do Racing British Army Race Team UK Racehomes

Triumph Honda Yamaha Triumph Yamaha Honda Yamaha Triumph Kawasaki Honda Yamaha Yamaha Triumph Yamaha Kawasaki Yamaha Suzuki Suzuki Triumph Triumph Honda Yamaha Suzuki Honda

675 600 600 675 600 600 600 675 600 600 600 600 675 600 600 600 600 600 675 675 600 600 600 600

S F S S S F S F S S S S S S S S F S F S S S F S

Pre-National 600 Sport Points

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

Zac Oultram Paul McDonald Liam Warren Jeremy Watson Alun Brooks Will Harper Sean Kenyon Liam Dale Pete Riches Ben Bailey

382 255 182 177 169 156 127 115 112 110

Pre-National 600 FreshmanPoints 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

Michael Coxon Lee McLoughlin AJ McDaniel Stephen Thomas Pete Riches Joseph Addy Ian Norris Karl Seaton William Griffin Martin Farrelly

320 257 241 235 188 135 125 104 83 77


www.avonmotorcycle.com

Avon Tyres is proud to sponsor the Thundersport Supertwin/Stocktwin series for 2017.

Photo supplied by Ian Boldy Superbike Photography

CHRIS HELLEWELL 2016 THUNDERSPORT GB GOLDEN ERA SUPERSPORT CHAMPION

Xtreme

RACE COMPOUNDS

JAMIE HODSON 2016 MANX GRAND PRIX SUPERTWIN RACE CHAMPION

The 3D Ultra Xtreme is recommended for trackday use and quickly reaches working temperatures. It offers a large footprint at extreme lean angles and its 3D siping is designed to improve stability and grip and limit tread flex. For further information on the Avon Tyres range, visit www.avonmotorcycle.com


AVON TYRES GOLDEN ERA SUPERBIKE & ALTO DIGITAL GP1 CLASSIC/FM

21

CLASS LAP RECORD Golden Era Superbike 1.26.861 John Dieterman

GOLDEN ERA NO GIMMICKS - SUPERBIKES OF THE 90s WHEN TRACTION CONTROL WAS ALL IN THE WRIST ACTION

Some of the most memorable race action came from a time before the electronics geeks interferred with the direct relationship between the twist grip and the throttle slides. Seeing Yasutomo Nagai, Scott Russell, Giancarlo Fallappa, Aaron Slight and Anthony Gobert not only backing it in on high speed sections, but also squirming out of corners whilst the chassis tied itself in knots may not have been as fast as modern Moto-GP bikes - but it looked a whole lot faster and infinitely more exciting. Golden Era Superbikes is our version of this classic era of motorcycle racing, before 1000cc across the frame 4 cylinder bikes displaced the “real” Superbikes of the 750cc era. Just looking at these homologation specials on their paddock stands invokes memories of that era and when they fire up, the chatter of the flatslides just makes me grin - I can’t help it. This year we welcome the GP1 Classic bikes to the grid. Tyres on both classes are any make, any pattern, any type - including slicks. Rims are also free and even carbon wheels can be used. No

Rider

Hometown

Team

Machine

cc

CL

1

Mark Biswell

Aylesbury

Bizzle Bikesport

Triumph

955

SBK

5

Jamie Pearson

Alvaston

TWP Racing

Yamaha

1000

GP1C

9

Ross Dunning

East Grinstead

RD Racing

Suzuki

750

GP1C

10

Jason Dixon

Grantham

Team Dixon

14

Brad Davey

Abingdon

Moto 14

Yamaha

750

SBK

Ducati

998

GP1C

19

Paul Stonebanks

New Romney

Tagg Racing

Yamaha

1000

GP1C

20

Andy Challis

Peterborough

Team CT Racing

Suzuki

750

SBK

25

Ben Webster

Southampton

Team Hopeless

Yamaha

1000

GP1C

31

Mateasz Dankowski

Crewe

MD Racing

Kawasaki

750

SBK

35

Shane Pearson

Borrowash

TWP Racing

Yamaha

1000

GP1C

37

Vince Carlton

Market Rasen

Moto46 / VCR

Suzuki

1000

GP1C

40

Michael Gover

Southampton

TH Racing

Yamaha

1000

GP1C

41

Adrian Ottewell

Derby

AJ Plumbing

Suzuki

750

GP1C

42

Thomas Arkell

Kettering

RNRMRRT

Kawasaki

750

SBK

Honda

1000

GP1C

Kawasaki

1000

FM

49

Kevin Howdle

Cannock

Alpha Hair Academy

55

Kirt Powell

Spalding

Powell Racing

57

Ryan Strafford

Mirfield

Strafford Racing

Honda

1000

SBK

65

Andrew Meachen

Barnsley

RS Racing

Honda

1000

SBK

71

Ritchie Thornton

Surbiton

Team 71

Kawasaki

750

SBK

77

Julyan Pilloy

Reading

JP Racing

Suzuki

750

GP1C

89

Chris Ganley

Clevedon

G-Rex Racing

Yamaha

1000

FM

96

Kieran Smith

Messingham

Corkie Racing

Kawasaki

750

SBK

114 Jon Wright

Shrewsbury

Jon Wright Racing

Suzuki

750

GP1C

121 Martin Stanier

Stoke

MS Racing

Yamaha

1000

GP1C

182 Andrew Barling

Allenton

Racing Lines Derby

Aprilia

1000

SBK

221 Ryan Leadbitter

Ash

Rideworx TDM Racing

BMW

1000

FM

775 Robert Smith

Reading

RJS Racing

BMW

1000

FM

Golden Era Superbike Points 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

Ritchie Thornton Ryan Strafford Mark Biswell Andy Challis Jordan Watling Jason Dixon Andy Meachen Andrew Windsor Colin Mooney

Rick Allman

451 405 274 240 189 122 106 79 74 73

Thundersport GP1 C Points 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

Shane Pearson Jon Wright Martin Stanier Michael Gover Ben Webster Brad Davey Jack Yorke Ross Dunning Steve Brittain Julyan Pilloy

415 293 238 212 168 149 149 138 80 73

Thundersport GP1 FM Points 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

Robert Smith Ryan Leadbitter Roman Grendel Kirt Powell Sam Cartwright Luca Licheri Donatas Balciunas Chris Ganley Nikolai Lakovic Steve Bryson

375 339 164 161 88 81 72 68 35 13


Tel:- 01673 885888 or 07733 324640


HMT RACING

23

THUNDERSPORT 500 ELITE & SENIORS

THUNDERSPORT 500

WHERE THE RIDER COUNTS! THE BIGGEST BANG FOR YOUR BUCK!

The Thundersport 500 and Thundersport 500 Seniors championships are the absolute cheapest possible way to go road racing on this planet. A whole race package can be picked up for less than the price of a top of the range helmet & gloves. That said, the racing is hard and close - bordering on the frantic at times. The talent of a racer needn’t be judged by the value of the bike he/she happens to be sitting on, some of the most gifted riders in the country ride these humble parallel twins. The predominant choice of bike here is the Honda CB500, but once you’ve watched a couple of these races you’ll never look at one of these staid commuter bikes in quite the same way again. The 500 Seniors championship caters for riders of 40 years of age or older on 1st March of any given racing season. Some of these lads are fulfilling a long term ambition to race that they simply didn’t have the resources to satisfy when they were younger. When you see the level of skill displayed by some of them, you have to think that they could have made a pretty good living at it if circumstances had been different. No 2 5 17 19 21 22 27 28 34 49 54 55 56 68 71 72 73 79 87 92 97 108 111 116 121 133 142 162 167 179 194 199 222

Rider Elliott Humphrey Matthew Ratcliffe Angus Gough Kev Burton James Lee Martin Campion John O'Toole Jonathan Hunt Adrian Teasdale Steve Waring Brett Haley James Wilmot Oscar Smith Clive Mindham Roddy Taylor Bobby Campbell Daniel Swift Lee Silvain Jodie Chalk Gary Cutts Lee Howarth James Butcher Paul Anyon George Williams Josh Leaning John Wilson John Bolsover Daniel Otter Chris Cooper Anthony Johnson Jordan Ashington Sam Smith Peter Bardell

Hometown Scunthorpe Shaftesbury St Neots Thetford Stockton Hucknall Derby Portsmouth Carlisle Chester Halifax Macclesfield Newbury Kettering Aldershot Coningsby Rotherham Bury St Edmunds Rosyth Mansfield Westbourne Hook End Neston St Neots Scunthorpe Sheffield Chesterfield Lincoln Rawmarsh Tenterden Bradford Leighton Buzzard Shefford

Team Rat Out Racing MR Racing G Fab Racing K.Racersshed Fibrelyte Honda Campion Racing Clip'n Climb Racing RNRMRRT Van-Glass.co.uk R-Kid Racing Brett Haley (Wood) Racing James Wilmot Racing Berkshire Pallets Fermac Racing Taylor Racing RAF MSA Danny Swift Racing That'll Do Racing Chalky Moto GC Racing RNRMRRT Triple Js Racing Dee Banks Unique School GW Racing Leaning Racing Machado Racing Black & White Bikes Otters Racing Motoz Racing Bexhill Gearboxes Jordz Racing Smithstix Racing RP Motorsport

Machine Honda Honda Honda Honda Honda Honda Honda Honda Honda Honda Honda Honda Honda Honda Honda Honda Honda Honda Honda Honda Honda Honda Honda Honda Honda Honda Honda Honda Honda Honda Honda Honda Honda

cc 500 500 500 500 500 500 500 500 500 500 500 500 500 500 500 500 500 500 500 500 500 500 500 500 500 500 500 500 500 500 500 500 500

CL E E E S E S E E S E S E E S S S E E E S E E S E E S S E S E E E E

Elite 500 Points

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

Peter Bardell Josh Leaning Will Leaning Graeme Frear John O’Toole Alan Tanton Daniel Otter James Lee Lee Howarth Adrian Teasdale

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

Alan Tanton John Bolsover Adrian Teasdale Roddy Taylor Brett Haley Clive Mindham Martin Campion Richie Connole Mark Leaning Bobby Campbell

Seniors 500 Points

398 276 268 245 152 136 131 111 109 107 357 325 286 179 160 139 125 118 114 111

CLASS LAP RECORD 1.33.167 - Joe Barton


For all your motorcycle needs! | 01621 785202 | www.sparklightracing.co.uk Based in Burnham on Crouch, but serving the whole of the UK, we offer not only Servicing, Valeting, Repairs, Dyno in Burnham onand Crouch, Valeting, Repairs well as Based onBased Crouch, but serving thewe of the we offer not only Service and a in fullBurnham range of top quality Leathers, Helmets Boots - whole Weoffer also Servicing, offer a fullUK, Race Preparation andas Support Servicing, Repairs, Dyno Service and a full range ofmuch, top quality Leathers, our selling Leathers, Spares and much more! Service at allValeting, Thundersport GBstore events. Don’t struggle onHelmets, your own, come and see us to discuss your needs Helmets and Boots - We also or offer a full Race Preparation and Support Service at all just ring Garry on 07984 412131

Thundersport GB events. We offer standard packages as well as tailored packages designed - by you - to suit you, come and see us to discuss your needs or just ring Garry on 07984 412131 Unit 7, The Mayfield Centre, Springfield Road, Burnham on Crouch. CM0 8UB

Sparklight is your one stop shop for all your SBS requirements.

WE ARE “THE EQUALISERS” IF YOU’RE IN TROUBLE FOR ANYTHING, AT ANY EVENT, COME AND SEE OUR TEAM AND WE’LL GET YOU BACK ON TRACK WITH THE MINUMUM OF FUSS & EXPENSE.

Let us put the SPARK

into your race season!

Don’t struggle on your own at race meetings. Let our experienced team of mechanics & technicians look after you from the professional and comfortable surroundings of the Sparklight Racing awning. We cater for everything from a simple “Warmers & Stands assist” package right through to a complete “Arrive & Ride” deal. Be part of our friendly team and feel like a GP star.

Race Meeting Packages:-

Silver Package - just £100 per race meeting. Gold Package - just £250 per race meeting. Platinum Package - tailored to suit you (please ask)

FULL MACHINE PREPARATION SERVICE ALSO AVAILABLE

Let us put the SPARK into your race season!


SPARKLIGHT RACING GOLDEN ERA SUPERSPORT & STEELSPORT

25

GOLDEN ERA MANIC - SUPERSPORTS OF THE 90s WHEN TRACTION CONTROL WAS ALL IN THE WRIST ACTION! As with the corresponding Superbike class, some of the most memorable race action came from a time before the electronics geeks interferred with the direct relationship between the twist grip and the throttle slides. The term “Mad Axe-Murderers” was actually coined by James Whitham when he did a couple of Wild Card rides in the World Supersport Championship and watching it from trackside you simply couldn’t argue the accuracy of that label. If Ghengis Khan rode a motorcycle it would have been an R6 or ZX6RR from this era (he might have struggled getting his helmet through Technical Control, but who’s going to argue with him?). Golden Era Supersport is our version of this classic era of motorcycle racing, before traction control took over from pure fearless determination. These classes are not Pre-Injection or Pre-2000, they are tailored to the bikes that actually raced in that iconic era. The technical regulations allow all and any modifications that were used in period and ban anything that wasn’t around or allowed at the time. Tyres are any make, any pattern, any type - as long as they have a road legal designation. Full wets are permitted only when a Wet Race has been declared. GOLDEN ERA STEELSPORT Since we started running the Golden Era Supersport class, many riders asked us about creating a parrallel series for the Steel-Framed bikes of a similar period and that now forms the basis for Golden Era Steelsport. No

Rider

Hometown

Team

Machine

cc

CL

1

Mark Biswell

Aylesbury

Bizzle Bikesport

Honda

600

SF

3

Adrian Bridges

Solihull

Sparklight Racing

Yamaha

600

SS

4

Richard Harrison

Cleasby

RAP Racing/P&C Pavers

Yamaha

600

SS

5

Robert Goodall

Chichester

My Security Systems Ltd

Yamaha

600

SS

Yamaha

600

SS

Ducati

748

SF

7

Dave Grace

Derby

DG Racing

14

Brad Davey

Abingdon

Motovation

15

John Jay

Bristol

Team Langoustine

Kawasaki

600

SS

16

Luke MacRae

Billingshurst

MacRae Racing

Yamaha

600

SS

22

Ross Danbury

Aylesbury

IMO Jack Surridge

Yamaha

600

SS

30

Andrew Windsor

Chichester

Windsor Racing

Yamaha

600

SS

31

Steve Chadwick

Milnthorpe

SC Racing

Yamaha

600

SS

32

Chris Froggatt

Chichester

Froggatt Racing

Yamaha

600

SS

43

Rob Vickerman

Willerby

Airtech Racing / RAF

Yamaha

600

SS

51

Paul Debnam

Wellingborough

Maverick Racing

Yamaha

600

SF

65

David Langley

Dereham

RAF MSA / Ashtons

Honda

600

SF

66

Liam Vella

Lincoln

Vella Racing

Yamaha

600

SS

73

Oliver MacRae

Billingshurst

MacRae Racing

Yamaha

600

SS

74

Nick Turner

Kettering

Fermac Racing

Honda

600

SF

75

Max Wilmot

Gosport

RNRMRRT

Yamaha

600

SS

93

Liam Palmer

Kettering

British Army Race Team

Yamaha

600

SS

95

David White

Barnstaple

Royal Navy Motorsport

Yamaha

600

SS

96

Ian Evans

Chepstow

British Army Race Team

Honda

600

SF

97

David Williams

Louth

Boz Racing

Honda

600

SS

114 Jon Wright

Shrewsbury

Jon Wright Racing

Honda

600

SF

197 Julien Liguori

Southampton

Liguori's Pizza

Honda

600

SF

315 Ashley Thompson

Market Rasen

Moto46

Yamaha

600

SS

Golden Era Supersport Points 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

Rob Goodall Luke MacRae Richie Harrison Andy Scanlon Rob Mawbey Adam Darnell Oliver MacRae Chris Hellewell Rob Vickerman Sam Nicholson

318 296 266 242 189 160 118 114 97 96

Golden Era Steelsport Points 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

Jon Wright Dave Langley Brad Davey Nick Turner Ian Evans Mark Biswell Robert Dodd Adam Charlesworth Julian Liguori Danny Wright

426 390 249 221 168 147 68 46 42 28

CLASS LAP RECORDS Supersport = 1.29.447 Adam Sherrif Steelsport - 1.30.414 Mark Biswell


GB RACING SPORTSMAN & ELITE 600

Premier Motorcycle Protection

27 Pr

em

ELITE CLASS LIGHT TOUCH PAPER - STAND BACK!

ier

M

ot

or

cy

cle

Pr

ot

ec

tio

n

Premier Motorcycle Protection

ELITE BLEND

Modern Superstock 600 specification bikes are now so good that what was almost unthinkable 10 years ago is now true. In the right hands, a Superstock bike could set a lap time good enough for a front row start in British Supersport. Bearing in mind the ÂŁ25,000 price gap between the two bikes, that is an amazing testament to how closely the manufacturers are able to replicate what their race departments are learning from racing and putting it into their production lines. With lap times so close, it seems mildly pointless creating two different races and therefore splitting up the pool of talent, so we combine the two different machine specifications into one (very exciting) race. We now run two classes in this race, but they are no longer split on machine specification, they are divided based on rider experience and licence grade. This reflects the lesser experience of some riders who contest the Sportsman class, rather than the Elite. This is our first season using this format, which was introduced because we felt that some riders moving up from the Pre-National classes would like to be able to contest a championship against riders with a similar level of experience. The Elite class is the main championship and it is the fastest 600 racing class No Rider Hometown Team Machine cc CL anywhere outside of the BSB paddock 1 Charlie Morris Potters Bar MSG Racing Suzuki Suzuki 600 E itself. If you can cut the mustard in this tremendously competitive class, you can 2 Jordan Rushby Beverley Rushers Racing Yamaha 600 E acquit yourself well anywhere! Whatever 5 Chris Hellewell Rotherham Phoenix CFS Kawasaki 600 E happens the action will be as frantic as 6 Brendan Mallinder Rotherham Team Mally Yamaha 600 E only 600cc racing can be.

10

Sam Holme

Elvington

CMB Motorsport

Kawasaki

600

S

18

John Dieterman

Preston

Team Baxi

Triumph

675

E

19

Lloyd Shelley

Burntwood

JLS Access Bookings.com

Triumph

675

S

22

Zak Corderoy

Blewbury

Zak Racing

Kawasaki

600

E

32

Ben Bailey

Bourne

Ben Bailey Racing

Yamaha

600

S

38

Steven Procter

Wakefield

Rigsby Racing

Yamaha

600

E

46

Ross Walker

Lincoln

Ross Walker Racing

Honda

600

E

47

William White

Watford

Get Low Racing

Triumph

675

E

48

Alex Laureys

Balham

APL Racing

Kawasaki

600

S

50

Lewis Barnes

Swindon

Barnes Haulage

Yamaha

600

E

62

Nick Edgeley

Bolney

Team Edge RST Racing

Triumph

675

E

64

Danny Booth

Preston

DB Racing

Yamaha

600

E

65

Ashley Milburn

Newhall

Phoenix CFS

Kawasaki

600

S

69

Caolan Irwin

Letterkenny ROI

Oasis Bar Letterkenny

Yamaha

600

E

72

Max Wadsworth

Halifax

Specialised Group

Kawasaki

600

E

74

Curtis Wright

Stoney Stanton

Pallet Bros

Triumph

675

E

77

Kade Verwey

Silverstone

Team XG Group

Kawasaki

600

S

84

Ben Wotton

Sleaford

Wotton Racing

Triumph

675

S

99

Stephen Kaplan

Wallingford

RAF MSA

Kawasaki

600

E

101 Kurtis Drew

Cirencester

KD Racing

Yamaha

600

E

144 Jamie Boyce

Aylesbury

MSG Racing

Suzuki

600

E

808 Robert Varey

Preston

Colin Sanderson Racing

Yamaha

600

S

Thundersport 600 Elite Points 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

William White Zak Corderoy Brendan Mallinder Lloyd Shelley Jordan Rushby Caolan Irwin Max Wadsworth Robert Varey Arnie Shelton Danny Booth

217 164 130 124 119 114 106 92 92 79

Thundersport 600 Sportsman Points 1 Lloyd Shelley 220 2 Robert Varey 195 3 Ben Wotton 173 4 Ashley Milburn 157 5 Aaron Bradley 155 6 Sam Holme 145 7 Alex Laureys 140 8 Ryan Cooper 110 9 Tony Waistnage 76 10 Dan Parker 66

CLASS LAP RECORD 1.25.226 William White


THUNDERSPORT GB

“THE HOME OF SPORTSMAN RACING”

2017 CHAMPIONSHIP DATES & VENUES Premier Motorcycle Protection

DAY

DATE

LOCATION

EVENT

FRIDAY

17TH FEBRUARY

DONINGTON PARK

ACU-CTC COURSE

SATURDAY 18TH FEBRUARY

DONINGTON PARK

ACU-CTC COURSE

FRIDAY

3RD MARCH

BRANDS HATCH (INDY)

TESTING

SATURDAY 4TH MARCH

BRANDS HATCH (INDY)

INVICTA CHALLENGE

SUNDAY

5TH MARCH

BRANDS HATCH (INDY)

INVICTA CHALLENGE

FRIDAY

24TH MARCH

DONINGTON PARK (GP)

TESTING

SATURDAY 25TH MARCH

DONINGTON PARK (GP)

ROBERT FEARNALL TROPHY

SUNDAY

DONINGTON PARK (GP)

ROBERT FEARNALL TROPHY

SATURDAY 29TH APRIL

SNETTERTON (200)

TESTING

SUNDAY

30TH APRIL

SNETTERTON (200)

ACE OF CLUBS

MONDAY

1ST MAY

SNETTERTON (200)

ACE OF CLUBS

SATURDAY 27TH MAY

CADWELL PARK

TESTING

SUNDAY

28TH MAY

CADWELL PARK

KING OF THE MOUNTAIN

MONDAY

29TH MAY

CADWELL PARK

KING OF THE MOUNTAIN

THURSDAY 22ND JUNE

MALLORY PARK

TESTING

SATURDAY 24TH JUNE

MALLORY PARK

MASTER OF MALLORY

SUNDAY

25TH JUNE

MALLORY PARK

MASTER OF MALLORY

FRIDAY

28TH JULY

ROCKINGHAM (INT)

TESTING

SATURDAY 29TH JULY

ROCKINGHAM (INT)

THUNDER AT THE ROCK

SUNDAY

ROCKINGHAM (INT)

THUNDER AT THE ROCK

26TH MARCH

30TH JULY

SATURDAY 26TH AUGUST

ANGLESEY COASTAL

TESTING

SUNDAY

27TH AUGUST

ANGLESEY COASTAL

MOTO SUPER-PRIX OF WALES

MONDAY

28TH AUGUST

ANGLESEY COASTAL

MOTO SUPER-PRIX OF WALES

FRIDAY

22ND SEPTEMBER OULTON PARK

TESTING /QUALIFYING

SATURDAY 23RD SEPTEMBER OULTON PARK

ADAM BOYLE TROPHY

FRIDAY

20TH OCTOBER

DONINGTON PARK (NAT) TESTING

SATURDAY 21ST OCTOBER

DONINGTON PARK (NAT) CHAMPIONSHIP FINALS

SUNDAY

DONINGTON PARK (NAT) CHAMPIONSHIP FINALS

22ND OCTOBER

All above rounds count towards the Thundersport GB Championship and Thundersport GB Cup for all classes. www.thundersportgb.com

01509 678888

Dave Stewart - 07738 355186 jamiestewart9@googlemail.com Bernadette Stewart - 07711 721638 stewartbernadette9@googlemail.com Media/Sponsorship Enquiries Richard Day (Syd) – 07836 589666 / thundersportsyd@gmail.com

THUNDERSPORT GB - Come & Join Us! and be part of the BEST RACING ORGANISATION in the world.


Premier Motorcycle Protection

29 13

GB RACING BRITISH MILITARY INTER SERVICES

Pr

em

ie

rM

ot

or

cy

cle

Pr

ot

ec

tio

n

GB RACING SUPPORTING OUR ARMED FORCES The GB Racing British Military Inter Services Championship enters its 6th season with Thundersport GB in 2017. In the current political climate, it is very difficult for any of our military personnel to plan out a full seasons racing. International conflicts flare up remarkably quickly in the modern world and these guys can find themselves posted to danger zones anywhere in the world with as little as 48 hours notice. Therefore we have attempted to design a very flexible championship that is both spread across a whole season, yet at the same time has events that can be opted out of without penalty or danger of rendering a normal championship challenge practically unviable. You don’t have to agree with decisions made by our armed services political masters in order to appreciate the risks that the personnel face in order to protect and preserve our way of life. These are just ordinary, real people who put themselves in harms way on a fairly regular basis on our behalf. This year, instead of riders scoring points in their own individual classes, they all come together on one grid for a spectacular shoot out race on five separate occasions during the course of the season. Points scoring for this race is based on 1 point for last place and an additional point for every place in front of that. There are bonus points for the podium places – 3 points for 1st, 2 points for 2nd and 1 point for 3rd – as well as an extra point for the fastest lap of the race. The teams are:Royal Navy Royal Marines Motorsport our current champions. British Army Race Team who were victorious in 2013 and 2014. Royal Air Force MSA who were champions back in 2012.

No 3 10 21 27 28 29 35 42 43 54 55 62 65 75 77 93 95 96 97 99 128 177 196 212 961

Rider Ryan Redman Jonathan Atkinson Stephen Thomas Brian Fuidge Michael Coxon William Griffin Daniel Greenwood Thomas Arkell Rob Vickerman Lara Small Ben Rainbow Sam Cartwright David Langley Max Wilmot Anthony Van Looy Liam Palmer David White Jason Markham Lee Howarth Stephen Kaplan Jonathan Hunt Gary Hignett Cemal Oram Adam Sanders Ian Evans

Hometown Blackpool York Salisbury Poole Stockton Falkirk Plymouth Kettering Willerby Bristol Plymouth Corsham Dereham Gosport Corsham Kettering Barnstaple Salisbury Westbourne Wallingford Portsmouth Spalding Bristol Worcester Chepstow

Team British Army Race Team RNRMRRT British Army Race Team RNRMRRT British Army Race Team RNRMRRT RNRMRRT RNRMRRT RAF MSA British Army Race Team RAF MSA British Army Race Team RAF MSA RNRMRRT RAF MSA British Army Race Team RNRMRRT British Army Race Team RNRMRRT RAF MSA RNRMRRT RAF MSA RNRMRRT British Army Race Team British Army Race Team

Machine Suzuki Honda Triumph Suzuki Suzuki Yamaha Honda Kawasaki Yamaha Ducati Suzuki Honda Triumph Yamaha Yamaha Yamaha Yamaha Suzuki Honda Kawasaki Honda Honda Suzuki Suzuki Honda

cc 650 600 675 600 600 600 600 750 600 796 650 600 675 600 600 600 600 650 500 600 500 600 600 600 600

CL S M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M

Rounds:Brands Hatch (March) Snetterton (May) Mallory Park (June) Rockingham (July) Donington Park (August) Donington Park (October)

Premier Motorcycle Protection

Individual Rider Points 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

Michael Coxon (Army) Dave Langley (RAF) Mike Russell (RAF) Antony Van Looy (RAF) Jason Markham (Army) Cemal Oram (Navy) Steve Thomas (Army) Stuart Goodson (Navy) Ben Rainbow (RAF) Max Wilmot (Navy)

72 59 57 56 52 48 48 44 42 40

Overall Team Points 1 British Army Race Team 2 RAF MSA 3 Royal Navy / Marines

380 364 337


THESE ARE THE BEST DAYS OF OUR LIVES Savour them and store these memories There are no mugs in a modern race paddock, because in order to be here you need to have a reasonable income and a desire to follow your dreams. You also have to have a certain mental strength in order to take the knocks when things don’t go according to plan and it is this quality above all others that helps to make you all even more successful in your normal life. This is true for riders, team personnel, marshals and officials. We all have to develop these special strengths in our own environments, because if one link in the chain fails, the whole thing goes to hell in a handcart. We all go back to our normal jobs on Monday morning, very slightly better at everything we do because of the challenges we have taken on over the weekend. You can’t get that boost from a trip to the garden centre or Costa Coffee. Whether you know it or not, you are all better people for having taken on the challenge of being involved with racing motorcycles. It isn’t like any other sport, because on the one hand it is a very individual thing and on the other hand it is very much a team effort. The individual side of it is because once you are out on track on the bike, you are very much on your own and you can only do your best and you know that the results sheets will give a definitive and factual assessment of your performance. Excuses can be made, but in your own mind you will KNOW whether you performed at your best or not and you can’t hide from that knowledge. For the rider it’s also a very selfish thing. You are getting the main thrill and no matter how much you might want to, you can’t adequately share that with anyone else. You are also the one taking the risks and whilst that is entirely your absolute right, others are bearing the burden of the anxiety that goes with it because you are the most

On days where it all comes together, it just can’t get any better! important thing in the world to them. The team part of it is much more difficult to quantify, but equally vital to any rider who wants to get the best out of the whole experience. Whilst you’re on the bike you’re not thinking about your supporters egging you on, wanting you to do your best, get a top result and at the same time often squirming with the fear that something might conceivably go wrong. It is possible to go racing without any support from others, but it is a far more stressful and a much less enjoyable experience. Having others to share your joy when things go right is even better than having their support when you are disappointed with your results. On days where it all comes together, nothing else comes close in terms of the buzz you all get. The only other sport that I can think of that has a similar dynamic is the Tour de France, because the lead rider in each team needs to be both selfish and reliant on the rest of the squad. For the trackside team it is a very similar experience. Nobody wants

to have a crash-fest in their sector, but you have to be alert and 100% ready for it at all times. Working the startline or the first few corners, you have to mentally work out exactly what you are going to do in a huge variety of scenarios and be in the starting blocks ready to leap into action during every race start. There needs to be an intrinsic and natural sense of trust in those around you, because the next few moments could require decisions that have life & death consequences. That’s pressure. It isn’t just the families on the pit wall that are holding their breath at that critical period of each race, believe me. The rest of the course is also keyed up, but in a slightly different way and the latter sectors in each lap have a sense of heightened tension as the last lap approaches, ready for that last chance lunge that just could go wrong. We all train hard in our own ways, the riders for optimum speed of course, but the trackside staff train for optimum performance on another level altogether and we all want to


When it all goes “Pete Tong” we’ve got it covered get it right for each other. It is this mutual professionalism that makes the whole thing work in the way it does and just being a part of it is fantastic. Just over 23 years ago, when I first crossed over from being a rider to being an organiser, I saw all the barriers between competitors and officials that made it almost impossible to achieve that. The vast gaps in that interaction were all man-made and I wanted more than anything to change it for the better. Everyone within the establishment at the time said that I was just a jumped up riders representative with big ideas who wouldn’t last 5 minutes in Race Control when the situation got heated. Well I guess someone forgot to turn the thermostat up high enough.... If you really believe in something you can make it happen, no matter what obstacles are put in your way. True belief in yourself and your chosen project shine through and more often than not, that enthusiasm and confidence is infectious and makes others believe too. The downside to that approach is that you just can’t fake it, if you’re trying to put on a confident front but deep down you have your doubts, people can smell it a mile away. When, after 10 years, I lost that special feeling back in 2005-2006 I didn’t try to hide it, I was honest about the fact that I thought I had taken things as far as I possibly could within the constraints of my contract. Just being the best without continuing to

improve is not a rewarding feeling. So I left the sport with the intention of going off to do something completely different in other countries. I never thought I could get that passion back, but a random conversation with an old friend changed all that just over a year later. I knew that I had unfinished business and that it would be possible to build something that would be the new benchmark for all other organisers. I just needed to find someone who had the same ambition and faith in my vision, plus enough spare cash to follow it through. Syd was the man for the job and he has been a great partner, never doubting that what I said was possible could be achieved with our limited funding. At times it was a close run thing financially, but

we got through the dire straits without having to sell our souls and it all came good in the end. Right from the start people knew which one of those descriptions above best described the Thundersport GB team and the belief grew and spread until it almost had a life of its own. You could literally feel it, on the track, in the paddock and around the venues generally, it had a crackle and a buzz that was almost tangible and it’s still there today just as fresh as it was right at the start. So 23 years later, I still have that desire to keep improving things and I now have the benefit of being surrounded by the best team of volunteers I have ever worked with. Trust me when I say you are in the hands of the best team in the business, because I’ve worked with just about everyone else in the business too. All of us are here to help our current crop of riders to fulfil their dreams and as you all achieve those elusive highs, we share them too, because we all know that we were a part of it. That’s the thing we all share, that little residual crackle of adrenalin that is still there with us when we go to work on Monday morning. Ordinary people who have had a weekend where the pinnacle of excitement was getting a two for one deal at the garden centre just don’t understand and they never will. That is what sets all of you above the mundane, safe, boring world. Enjoy it, because these are the best days of your life.

He might look like an extra from Crocodile Dundee, but John Pedersen is the best Chief Marshal in the sport today


New - R.C.S. 352 321 285 - 16070237 - MICHELIN - R.C.S. 855 200 507 - Photo credits: Michelin, Gregory Favre, GettyImages - 11/2016

Rockingham full programme 2017  
Rockingham full programme 2017  

Race Day Programme 29th & 30th July 2017

Advertisement