Page 1

DECEMBER 2013

the

Sanity Clause

Prepare Yourself for a Joyful

first person

with Everett Schram of Walnut Grove

December 2013

Making

Spirits Bright Thrive Magazine for Better Living

Holiday Holiday Gift Guide 2013 in the Holiday Section www.thriveswla.com

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Rehabilitation Hospital

of Jennings

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• Brain Injury

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• Amputations

• Neurological Disorders

• Burns

• Spinal Cord Injury

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• Rheumatoid Arthritis

• Systemic Vasculidities

• Joint Replacements

Others who can benefit from inpatient rehabilitation are postoperative patients, accident victims and cancer patients. 24 Hour Nursing Care • Physical Therapy • Occupational Therapy Speech Therapy • Nutritional Counseling and Monitoring Case Management Call for a free assessment today. One Hospital Drive, Ste. 101 • Jennings, LA 70546 • Phone: (337) 821-5353 • Fax: (337) 821-5355 or 5366 jenningsrehab@yahoo.com • www.jenningsrehab.com 2 www.thriveswla.com

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December 2013


December 2013

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Contents 54

30

14 In This Issue

Home & Family

6 - 25 holiday section COVER STORY:

Happy holidays, right? the Sanity Clause

Money & Career

30

The Ins and Outs of Corporate Gift Giving 32 SEED Center Incubator Clients Learn and Grow Their Business 34 A Smart Approach to Year-End Investments

Regular Features 5 By the Numbers 2 36 Business Buzz 44 First Person with Everett Schram 60 Who’s News 71 Horoscopes 80 Ready to Wear 82 Community Contributors 83 Solutions for Life! 84 McNeese Corral 86 Happenings

48

Places & Faces 48 54 56

Making Spirits Bright Athlete Trey Quinn Is the Axiom of Calm Local Artist Designs Christmas Ornaments for National Display

Mind & Body 62

You Better Watch Out for Seasonal Health Risks 64 Managing the Work/Life Balance with Corporate Wellness 74 The Power of Hope

COVER BY Erik Jessen

Mark your Calendar for a New Calendar

Style & Beauty

The end of 2013 is quickly approaching, meaning it’s time to secure a new wall calendar

76 Cool Accessories to Complete Your Every Holiday Look 78 Giving the Gift of Jewelry

hitting racks just after the first of the year. This special poly bagged issue will be packed with

for 2014. Thrive has got this covered for you. Be on the lookout for our January 2014 issue,

our 2014 calendar and great tips on making 2014 your best year yet.

DON’T JUST LIVE, THRIVE!

Editors and Publishers

Kristy Armand Christine Fisher

Creative Director/Layout

Barbara VanGossen

Assistant Editor

Katie Harrington

Business Manager

Katie McDaniel

Assistant Designers

Shonda Manuel Kris Roy Mandy Gilmore

Advertising Sales Mitch Viator and Kasen Mire ads@thriveswla.com 337.310.2099

Thrive is designed for people focused on living a happy, healthy life, one that is balanced, full of energy and contentment. Thrive readers want to make the most of every day and be successful in all areas of their lives – family, health, home and career. 4 www.thriveswla.com

Submissions edit@thriveswla.com Submitted articles and photos are welcome. Thrive assumes no responsibility for unsolicited materials and does not guarantee any submissions.

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December 2013


All our wonderful dogs are available for adoption through 4Paws Society. Call 287-3552 for more information and to learn about other programs that are available.

Whatever your health problem . . . Childhood Immunizations

Cold or Fever

Yoko Broussard, MD

Internal Medicine & Pediatrics

Todd Peavy, MD

Family Medicine Physician

This precious furry pooch is a multipoo who would love some children to romp with. He is one-yearold and is housetrained. How can you resist that face?

CARTER

Type 1 Diabetes Sports Injury

DUNCAN

Timothy Gilbert, MD Endocrinologist

George “J.” Trappey IV, MD Orthopaedic Specialist

We’ve got a doc for that. This one-yearold little ball of fire is a dashund mix, very playful, housetrained and great with other dogs. He also loves giving kisses!

We’re Imperial Health, the region’s largest, independent multispecialtiy medical group, with over 40 doctors ready to care for you and your family. Just as parts of the human body work together to function as a whole, our primary care physicians and specialists work as a team, sharing resources and expertise to provide excellent care, from minor illness and injuries to more serious, ongoing health conditions. When you need a doctor, choose one you know and trust at Imperial Health.

www.imperialhealth.com

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Home & Family

Happy Holidays, right? How to Make Your Holidays Merry by Following theSanity IF YOU WANT A JOLLY HOLIDAY, BE PREPARED.

PREPARE YOURSELF FOR THE OBNOXIOUS UNCLE WHO INSISTS ON TALKING POLITICS AT THE DINNER TABLE. PREPARE FOR THE HUSTLE OF HOLIDAY SHOPPING. PREPARE FOR THE ADDITIONAL COSTS OF PARTIES AND PRESENTS. PREPARE FOR A LESS-THAN-PERFECT HOLIDAY HAM, A DISASTER IN THE KITCHEN, NOISY CHILDREN AND BICKERING ADULTS. IF YOU ANTICIPATE WHAT’S COMING, YOU CAN TAKE IT ALL IN STRIDE AND AVOID PITFALLS THAT TURN HOLIDAY MERRIMENT INTO AN OVERWHELMING TEST OF PATIENCE. “TRY TO DO HOLIDAY PREP AND THEN GIVE YOURSELF TIME FOR SELFCARE ACTIVITIES—A MASSAGE, MEDITATION, YOGA, AN ACTIVITY

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Clause by Erin Kelly

WITH YOUR CHILDREN THAT ISN’T ABOUT CONSUMERISM BUT ABOUT SPENDING TIME TOGETHER AND ENJOYING EACH OTHER,” SAYS DIANA WINSTON, DIRECTOR OF MINDFULNESS EDUCATION AT UCLA’S MINDFUL AWARENESS RESEARCH CENTER. MOST OF US HAVE SURVIVED ENOUGH HOLIDAYS AND RELATIVES TO KNOW WHAT TO EXPECT DOWN THE ROAD, AND THAT’S A HUGE ADVANTAGE AS WE BRACE OURSELVES FOR THE WEEKS TO COME. THE FOLLOWING PAGE OFFERS SOME COMMON ROADBLOCKS TO SANITY, AND TIPS ON HOW YOU CAN OVERCOME THEM WITH GRACE.

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Uncle Obnoxious Comes to Town

We all have them. Despite the unspoken societal rule that politics and religion are taboo topics in mixed company—especially at a time that’s designed for joyful family togetherness—there’s always at least one person who can’t help but speak up. Unfortunately, their goal isn’t to foster meaningful conversation. More often than not it’s to push an agenda and push people’s buttons.

Sanity Clause:

“Try to redirect the discussion by bringing up other appropriate topics,” says Amy Vueleman, instructor of communications at McNeese State University. “Acknowledge the other person’s feelings—no one wants to be ignored. Then make suggestions to focus on more positive and appropriate topics.” If you know Uncle Obnoxious is coming to family dinner, you can also try a more proactive approach, Vueleman says: “Pre-plan some events or conversations that could lead more to positive memory-making. You can pull out old photo albums or family videos to watch together. You can also plan on playing familiar games. You want bonding to take place so that conflict is the last thing on anyone’s mind. Conflict, however, will always exist.”

It’s perfectly common for you to feel overwhelmed by all the demands of the holidays. Travel, dinners, parties, gifts, finances, kids, Santa, people, cards, stamps, traffic— it doesn’t take much for the season to slip into chaos. The good news is you know what’s ahead, so you have time to brace yourself emotionally, mentally and spiritually.

You’re at the Breaking Point

regardless of background or religion,” says Winston. “The biggest misconception I hear is that you are supposed to stop your mind from thinking—like it’s supposed to go blank. This does not happen. Instead we learn to be aware of being lost in our thoughts and gently guide our attention back to the moment.”

For some families, jovial conversation comes with the territory. For others, it’s an awkward mix of hidden resentments, clashing personalities and a sense of obligation—none of which makes for a fun time. This can turn a twohour dinner into an endless chore. But it doesn’t have to be that way. Your family may not be the Cleavers, but you can still have jovial conversation. Unfortunately, awkward conversation certainly isn’t limited to the family dynamic. Holiday parties, office get-togethers and gift-exchange games can make for a weird atmosphere, as well. But with a few basic convo skills, you can survive.

The Land of Awkward Conversation

Sanity Clause:

If you want to have fulfilling conversation, “make sure you always listen to the other person in the conversation and respond to them personally,” Vueleman says. “Don’t always make yourself the topic of conversation. No one likes a stage hog.” If you find yourself in a weird confrontation with an old friend or family members, “always share feelings honestly making sure to use the word ‘I’ to accept responsibility for them.” Also: No matter what the conversation is, don’t multi-task. “Be involved in the conversation. Put down the phone, get off the computer, and turn off the TV. There is no way you can concentrate on the conversation at hand with technology in your face.”

You’re Missing the Point

Holidays are supposed to be about appreciating the things you have, giving to others, and spending time with the people you love. For the vast majority of Americans, it’s also a devout religious holiday that’s meant for reverence and respect. But somewhere along the way, all these things got jumbled into holiday hams, Black Friday specials and obligatory invitations. Don’t forget what it’s all about. Don’t let the jumble get in the way of the moment.

Sanity Clause:

Learn to appreciate every moment. Don’t let this time get lost. “It’s so difficult to live in the moment because we live in a culture that’s about the opposite of this. We are taught to always look in the future or be lost in the past. Plus, we’re juggling so many responsibilities and so much information,” says Winston, co-author of Fully Present: The Science, Art and Practice of Mindfulness. “The ability to become more present is something you can do at any moment in the day. When you notice your mind is lost in anxiety, worry, irritation, just come back to your breath. Take a mindful breath. Notice your feet on the floor. Our bodies are always in the present moment and if we can be mindful of our bodies—feeling what is happening right now—we are in the present moment.” When we put ourselves on automatic pilot, life passes us by, Winston notes. “This happens all the time. We’re so busy being lost in our thoughts that we don’t listen to our best friend tell us an important story. Or we are barely present for our children because we’re on our cell phones.”

Sanity Clause:

“During the holiday itself, take mini breaks. Go out for a walk. Go into a quiet room and try a few minutes of meditating. It’s important,” Winston says. Even if you can only get away for three or five minutes, it’s worth it. Those five minutes will have a cumulative effect. And don’t think meditation means you have to sit with your legs crossed in front of burning incense. Meditation can be whatever you want it to be; it’s not necessarily a religious experience. It’s just a way to relax, refocus and breathe. “Anyone can meditate

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Home & Family | Happy Holidays

So You Think You Look Like Santa Claus by Lauren Jameson

THIS TIME OF YEAR, YOU WILL SEE LOTS OF GUYS DRESSED IN PLUSH RED SUITS AND WEARING FAKE WHITE BEARDS. BUT EVERY NOW AND AGAIN, YOU WILL SEE A MAN WHO WILL MAKE YOU DO A DOUBLE TAKE AND SAY, “HEY, HE REALLY LOOKS LIKE SANTA CLAUS!” THERE ARE PLENTY OF “CLAUS CLONES” IN THE LAKE AREA. HERE’S WHAT SOME OF THEM THINK ABOUT THEIR UNCANNY RESEMBLANCE TO THE YULETIDE ICON.

Santa Stage Fright

These days in Charlotte, Milligan poses for Santa photos with pets and their owners at a pet supply store. The money raised from the photos goes toward a spay and neuter fund at the Charlotte animal shelter. “I’m told that it has a huge effect in reducing the number of unwanted strays that turn up at the shelter, so I feel great about doing it. And I’ve discovered that dogs don’t bite or pee any more often than kids do,” he said.

Skinny Santa Ralph Milligan, a longtime Lake Charles resident who now lives Charlotte, N.C., said he was a wreck the first time he walked in Santa’s shoes. “I was scared to death. The kids all knew what the drill was, but I didn’t,” he said. It didn’t take him long to get over that. Now, he enjoys every minute of his “Santa time.” Milligan said he relishes “the absolutely transforming smiles of children in public— especially when I get direct eye contact from a child... A wink will often get me a shy grin.” Milligan has countless fond memories. One is the time a boy was told by his church pastor to sit on Milligan’s lap and pull his beard — if the beard stuck, then he was the “real Santa.” “He suddenly reached up and tugged my (very real) beard — then jumped down and ran down the hall yelling, ‘They got the real one!’” Milligan said. Another time, he ran into a little girl at a toy store. She was thunderstruck. The two stared at each other. Then, Milligan waved at her. “She very slowly waved back at me. Then I ducked around the end of the aisle and ‘disappeared,’” he said. “I will never forget her beautiful, open-mouthed, transfixed stare — a moment I will always treasure. For a moment we each had magic — for two different reasons.”

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Steven Hill has to watch his weight. Unlike the real Santa, Hill has been shedding the pounds— he has lost about 100 in the past year. Just recently, he decided to give dieting a rest so he would look good in his Santa suit.“Next year, I might need to use a pillow,” he joked. Hill, a Lake Charles resident, looks so much like St. Nick that he was chosen as this year’s official Santa for the local Toys for Tots campaign.“I love the idea people think I am Santa Claus,” he said. It’s a perfect fit for Hill — he adores Christmas almost as much as he adores children. “I enjoy kids. I love them so much. The smiles you get from them is worth it,” he said. He remembers a 4-year-old girl who was petrified of Santa, to the dismay of her mother. Every time the little girl would see a Santa, she’d cry.

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“Her mom said if she sat on my lap, she could have a Barbie car,” Hill said. And she did it. “By the time it was over, she was smiling,” he said. “If I could make one kid smile, then I did what I needed to do,” he said. As Santa, Hill is happy to embody the spirit of Christmas — and help keep it alive. “Santa lives in your heart — if you believe. I do,” he said.

Those Darned Kids Randal Owen, owner of Owen and Associates Realtors in Lake Charles, said he never ceases to be amazed at the things kids say to him as Santa. At an event in Houston, a little boy came and sat on his lap.“I asked him, ‘Have you been good this year?’ He said, ‘No sir.’ It was just before Christmas, so I asked him, ‘Do you think you can be good for five more days?” He looked at his mom, then at me and said, ‘No, I can’t.’” Owen told the boy he would be rewarded for his honesty. Owen started looking and dressing as Santa about a dozen years ago — but only for his grandchildren. Now, wearing his custom-made suit, he is a Santa stand-in at events all over Louisiana and Texas. He remembers the time his oldest great grandson, Tyler, ratted on him when he visited his school as Santa.

December 2013


The kids were all oohing and aahing over Santa when Tyler said, “That’s my Paw Paw!” “He blew my cover,” Owen said. Hunter also fondly remembers another time he visited a school as Santa. Unbeknown to the students, the teacher had compiled a “cheat sheet” of the children’s photos, names and some information about them. Owen told one little girl that he knew her mother worked at the school and he asked about her little sister. He said he will never forget the look of shock, awe and amazement on her face. “I love kids. I love dealing with them and getting all kinds of answers from them.” And Owen said he has always loved Christmas. Being Santa definitely helps fuel his spirit. This spirit is contagious. So much so, that Owen’s wife, Pat, has assumed the role of Mrs. Claus and now accompanies her husband to events. And Owen still dresses as Santa for his six grandchildren and five great grandchildren.

Santa & His Elves Warren Hunter of Gillis stays busy this time of year. “We have fun; we’re always on the go,” he said. “I love everything about Christmas.” For the past 15 years, he has played Santa in the Lake Charles and Moss Bluff Christmas parades, and at various area church hospital, school and nursing home events. And like the real Santa, he always brings some extra gifts.

He started out making Santa appearances at Gillis Elementary School, where several of his grandchildren went to school and it grew from there. Now, every Santa appearance has turned into a family affair. “The whole family helps out,” said Hunter’s wife, Peggy. “We all give out gifts and food.” This Santa has plenty of elves — his family consists of seven children, 20 grandchildren and 14 great grandchildren. Like the other local Santas, Hunter gets a kick out of all the children who flock around him. One little boy told Hunter he didn’t believe in Santa Claus. “I said, ‘Pull my beard.’” The boy did and was shocked. “OMG, it’s real!” he said. Another little girl sat on his lap and told him she had some money she wanted to give to less fortunate kids. “She gave me 6-cents. I still have that money,” he said. Hunter, too, relishes his part in keeping the spirit and wonder of Christmas alive.“I keep my Santa beard all year long. It’s my special thing to do. I want children to believe in Santa,” he said. This time of year, he gets stopped often by people who ask him if he’s Santa. His reply: “You just never know. Santa is checking up on you all year long.”

though. “I love it when kids think I’m Santa, but I just tolerate it when older people say, ‘Hey it’s Santa!’ because when children call me Santa, it’s because they really believe that’s who I am. It’s so fun to see the look on children’s faces when they think I am Santa.” Stahl said people tell him he looks like Santa “at least two or three times a week,” but it’s more frequent during the holiday season. Stahl said children don’t always approach him. “It’s not always that they say something to me. They mostly talk to their parents about me. When I’m in a store, I can hear them telling their parents in an excited voice that Santa’s in the next aisle over. Or, (I will be) walking down a Mardi Gras parade line and a 2-or-3-year-old will want to hug me,” he said. He likes to psyche the children out sometimes — playfully. “I have walked by children when they are in a store pitching a fit and asked them, “Are you sure you want to be doing that this close to Christmas?’ They get real good, real fast,” he said.

Soft Spoken Santa Robert Stahl is definitely a ringer for Santa, but this quiet and soft-spoken Lake Charles man is a little more low-key than the other Santa look-alikes. He rarely dons a Santa suit or takes pictures with children sitting on his lap. Still, he doesn’t mind looking like St. Nick — or the attention he gets this time of year. ”It makes you feel good when you leave others with a happy feeling,” he said. He much prefers the attention of children

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Meaningful Gifts by Austin Price

Antiques, Interiors, and Jewelry THERE MAY BE NO ART MORE DELICATE THAN THAT OF GIFT-GIVING. SOME OF US HAVE THE MAGICAL ABILITY TO PICK THE BEST GIFT POSSIBLE FOR OUR LOVED ONES, BUT THE REST OF US FALL IN ONE OF THE OTHER CATEGORIES: WELL-INTENTIONED BUMBLER, LAZY-BUT-WELL-MEANING GIFT-CARD GIVER OR THE PERSON WHO HANDS OFF WHATEVER THEY FIND CLUTTERING THEIR SHELVES. Pass something along to someone you love. To clarify, this is not a suggestion to hand down an old shirt or beloved family dish; rather, try giving a copy of a favorite book, movie or album that you find deeply meaningful and have good reason to believe they will, too. These simple gifts mean more because they demonstrate that you have genuine insight into the recipient’s character and are willing to open yourself up by giving them something you care deeply about. Consider donating in the name of a loved one to a cause they support. If you’re uncertain where to donate, use charitynavigator.org to research and get your bearings.

Open House – Saturday, December 7th. Gift Ideas for Your Shopping List. . . French bath products and candles Italian trays, shelves and candle holders Audubon Prints - matted and framed Staffordshire Dogs, Lamps and chandeliers 100” stand of fresh water pearls and much, much more!!! Now Open! The Market on Louie featuring Homestead and Farmhouse collections.

If you’re a parent who isn’t eager to dish out money for the latest distracting gadget, think in the long-term. Gently nudge your children in the direction of a hobby with lessons (on an instrument, in a sport or any number of creative outlets), or give them a time-lapse gift, one that begins in their childhood but builds up over the years. Consider the story of the father who buys her daughter a necklace with a single pearl on it but adds another each year at Christmas time. It’s a simple gesture that repays itself each and every year and creates something of a story that becomes as meaningful to the gift as the pearls themselves. No matter what you’re considering giving to your loved ones, make certain that it’s a gift worth their time and attention. More than anything, make certain it’s a gift that establishes your relationship. Then, you can’t go wrong.

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Home & Family | Happy Holidays

An

Elf is Comin’ to Your Shelf by Katie Harrington photos by Shonda Manuel

It’s that time of year again. The time where kids everywhere are on their best behavior in hopes that Santa Claus will bring them something special for Christmas. Parents are getting some help keeping an eye on their children’s behavior thanks to some sneaky, magical little elves sent from the North Pole to report back to the big man in red. The elves, whose story is told in the book Elf on the Shelf, will go on some magical adventures in the coming weeks and no one really knows what they’ll find when they wake up in the morning. Check out some past adventures of one mischievous elf named Jingles.

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December 2013


At Crawford Orthodontics, We’ll Give You one More Reason to Smile this Holiday Season: a Beautiful Smile. The end of the year is a great time to begin orthodontic treatment, allowing you to take advantage of flexible benefit account deadlines, as well as annual insurance deductibles that have been met. We also offer affordable, convenient payment plans to fit any budget. Remember, a healthy, beautiful smile is one of the most important investments you can make.

(337) 478-7590 701 West College Street, Lake Charles www.drcrawfordorthodontics.com

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Home & Family |

Happy Holidays

Holiday Gift Guide 2013 by Ellen Frazel

YOU’VE MADE YOUR GIFT RECIPIENT LIST AND CHECKED IT TWICE. NOW IT’S TIME TO TACKLE THE SHOPPING. IF YOU’RE WONDERING WHAT TO BUY THAT SPECIAL SOMEONE ON YOUR LIST, LOOK NO FURTHER. WE’VE GOT THIS YEAR’S TOP GIFT TRENDS FOR MEN, WOMEN, CHILDREN, TEENS AND IN-BETWEENS.

Men

Women

exercise

healthy kitchen

beauty & relaxation

1 BLENDER The Vitamix seems to be all the rage 2 SET OF 3 SEASONAL PRODUCE CALENDARS For fruits, herbs, and vegetables

1 BIRCHBOX Get a subscription and receive a box once a month of sample beauty products 2 PERFUME Popular options are Chanel no. 5 or Burberry London

1 NIKE FUEL SE BRACELET Tracks movements and fitness goals

3 JUICER Try Ninja or GNC

2 WAHOO FITNESS RFLKT BIKE COMPUTER A sleek interface for GPS and fitness tracking 3 DIGITAL CORDLESS JUMP ROPE An alternative to the trusty jump rope that’s good for working out in small places

grooming 1 SHAVER Try Philips All-In-One Head-To-Toe Grooming Kit 2 KIEHL’S SKINCARE KIT Including face wash, body wash, shaving cream, and lip balm 3 COLOGNE Some good options are Calvin Klein or Guess

technology 1 IPAD MINI Super portable and user-friendly

3 AROMATHERAPY ASSOCIATES ULTIMATE COLLECTIONS Relax with the scent of these indulgent bath and shower oils 4 DAY AT THE SPA Who wouldn’t love it!

technology 1 E-READERS & TABLETS Kindle or iPad mini 2 CANON EOS REBEL T3 Perfect for great photography

Kiddos

young children

2 PEBBLE SMARTWATCH A watch with apps for everything

stuffed animals & dolls

downtime

1 BIG HUGS ELMO

1 TIVO A modern-day TV-watching necessity 2 BREAKING BAD COMPLETE SERIES One of the most popular shows of 2013

2 FURBY BOOM This digital stuffed Furby can develop a personality of its own

3 ENO DOUBLENEST HAMMOCK Can be rolled up and brought anywhere

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GIFTS FOR HIM OR HER A membership to a monthly club – these clubs range from craft beer/wine/coffee/ hot sauce/beef jerky/salami/ pickles/bacon/spirits/cigars/ olive oil/cheese/salsa/and popcorn of the month clubs!

3 BOO The World’s Cutest Dog stuffed animal 4 AMERICAN GIRL DOLL OF 2013 SAIGE 5 FLUTTERBUY FLYING FAIRY DOLL

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games & gadgets 1 NERF REBELLE HEARTBREAKER BOW A new take on the typical Nerf gun 2 LEAPFROG LEAPPAD ULTRA A kids’ tablet for playing games and learning

Give Santa a Surprise this year.

3 DOC MCSTUFFINS TOYS The veterinarian that operates on stuffed animals

tweens

fun with DIY

1 DIY CUPCAKE DECORATING KIT Kit includes cute cupcake holders, sprinkles and frosting 2 DIY LIP BALM KIT OR PERFUME

sports & outdoor 1 NERF FIREVISION SPORTS FOOTBALL

You’ll find something for everyone on your gift list at Crave: flavored olive oils and balsamics, specialty foods, wine, fine cheeses, luxurious lotions and much more. We can put together a gift basket of your favorite items, or you can get a Crave gift certificate and let them choose their own favorites.

Satisfy

Every Taste at

2801 Ryan Street, Suite 100 l 421-0040 l crave-foods.com l

‘Tis the

2 EZIP E-450 ELECTRIC SCOOTER 3 BASKETBALL ARCADE Two-person arcade-style game by Escalade Sports

Season

art & science 1 THAMES & KOSMOS CRYSTAL GROWING KIT 2 SHOWTIME KARAOKE IPAD DOCK WITH MICROPHONE 3 EDIBLE CHEMISTRY SET 4 IOPTRON LIVESTAR MINI PLANETARIUM Projects consellations onto ceilings

Wishing you a holiday trimmed with all the blessings of this beautiful season.

Merry Christmas & Happy New Year!

teens music & technology 1 HEADPHONES Parrot Zik and Beats are popular brands 2 MERKURY INNOVATIONS IS2510 DJ MIXING STATION FOR IPOD 3 TABLETS Samsung Galaxy, iPad mini, Microsoft Surface continued on p16

December 2013

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Home & Family | Gift Guide

more teens video games & consoles

jewelry & accessories

1 PLAYSTATION 4, XBOX ONE 2 CALL OF DUTY GHOSTS 3 FIFA 14

1 INSPIRATIONAL JEWELRY b.u. charm necklaces for things like courage, luck, growth; Alex and Ani bangle bracelets and charm bracelets 2 MONOGRAMMED CASHMERE SCARF

4 CABELA’S DANGEROUS HUNTS 3 KATE SPADE NEW YORK LONG NECKLACE In Pink/Red/Gold 4 TORY BURCH AMANDA SMART PHONE WALLET

Reap the Rewards of Shopping Local by Chris LeBlanc

Shopping locally is the best choice economically, practically and philanthropically. It’s obvious that shopping locally keeps community money in the community. Local communities benefit most via employment. According to a study published in the Journal of Urban Economics in 2008, the presence of large chain stores decreases the total number of retail stores in an area, thus creating fewer jobs. Logically, one would think, “But, according to the relationship of supply and demand, if there are fewer jobs in a particular field in a particular area, the wages in that industry should then be higher, right?” Wrong. In fact, huge chain stores typically cut costs wherever they can, including their employees’ wages and benefits. On average, Wal-Mart’s hourly retail employees make 12.4 percent less than their locally employed counterparts, according to a University of California, Berkley Center for Labor Research and Education. Local merchants also give a lot back to the community. An American Express survey reported that 75 percent of small and medium-sized businesses contribute to charities, accounting for six percent of profits.

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teachers 1 GIFT BOX OF TOFFEE FROM TOFFEEBOX 2 SPA/PEDICURE GIFT CERTIFICATE 3 HANDMADE BOOKMARK Can also be given with a gift certificate for a book 4 PERSONALIZED STATIONERY OR CARDS 5 DIY S’MORES PACKAGE This charming gift can say, “We need s’more teachers like you!”

Here are a few new and unique local merchants that may pique your interest this holiday season:

CRAVE | 2801 Ryan St. Suite 100 This boutique style specialty food store puts an interesting twist on the shopping experience. Boasting more than 40 flavored extra virgin olive oils and balsamics from around the world, Crave offers a unique culinary shopping experience. Crave’s tasting bar also allows patrons a “trybefore-you-buy” option before they bottle your choices for you. For the most discerning palates on your list this holiday season, they also offer a wide range of specialty foods, cheese and wine. Gift items, bath products, custom gift baskets and gift certificates are also available. FROM THE ATTIC | 3505 Country Club Rd. From the Attic specializes in interior design and seasonal decorating. The spirit of the season is alive and well at From the Attic. An enormous Christmas tree, decorated top to bottom with a kaleidoscopic array of ornamental balls, lights and decorative reindeer dominates the store’s main showroom. From the Attic offers a wide

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array of ornaments, floral arrangements and vignettes to help you get your home ready for the holidays. Gift cards are also available for the decorating enthusiast who seems to have everything.

LULU’S DOWNTOWN | 520 Seventh St. From classy to casual, the ladies of Lulu’s offer stylish women’s garments for all occasions. With its weathered wood furnishings and subdued stone colored tile floors, Lulu’s Downtown’s modern fashion offerings are contrasted by the rustic feel of the space. It is in this subdued atmosphere that the proprietors of Lulu’s dispense fashionable clothing, jewelry, watches, handbags and accessories. A unique gift idea for the social butterfly in your life, Lulu’s also offers custom hand-painted “party cups.”

CATINA COUTURE | 2706 Hodges St. Welcoming women of “all shapes and sizes,” Catina Couture offers a trendy shopping experience at an affordable price. Staying true to the classic style of “White House Black Market” (with a bit more color) Catina Couture focuses on sleek lines and boutique-style offerings, while

December 2013


adding a touch of flair and originality. Located in the Cottage District, the store offers seasonal clothing, shoes, bags, jewelry and accessories.

THIS DECEMBER AT

Bite Into a New Local Venue

Thursdays

by Jacob Fuselier

LATE NIGHT SHOPPING CoCktail hours 5pm - 8pm

Three owners of a new entertainment venue in Lake Charles took the phrase “great things come in threes” to the street with 3Topia, a new bar and grill located at 409 Prien Lake Rd. Accented by blue neons, warm colors, and calm lighting, you can step into the sleek, clean, non-smoking atmosphere for a drink, a bite to eat or to lounge and socialize with friends. The lounge areas are loaded with leather couches, two large flat screen TVs, up-to-date game consoles, sports and event channels, and personal servers. According to co-owner Pablo Mejia III, the menu includes classic Cajun, paninis, burgers and pulled pork. “We are offering options like karaoke, live music and comedy nights, just to name a few,” Mejia says. “We are also bringing new events to the area like speed dating, video games launches and tournaments.” Making it a point to find something for everyone and develop new ideas in interactive socializing, 3Topia hopes to bring a wonderfully unique style and vibe to nightlife socializing to area.

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Home & Family |

Happy Holidays

by Ann McMurry

Don’t Lose Sight of True Holiday Light

BY NOW FAMILIES HAVE MADE THE TRANSITION FROM FALL WREATHS TO BOUGHS OF HOLLY. AS PEOPLE PREPARE FOR THE HOLIDAYS— MAKING THEIR LISTS AND CHECKING THEM TWICE, SHOPPING FOR THE PERFECT GIFT, BUYING THE RIGHT GIFT WRAP, AND MAKING MEAL PLANS—IT’S EASY TO GET SWEPT UP IN COMMERCIALISM AND LOSE FOCUS ON WHAT’S MOST IMPORTANT TO YOU. WHEN WE LOOK BACK ON HOLIDAYS PAST, THE GIFTS WE GAVE OR RECEIVED TYPICALLY AREN’T THE BRIGHTEST LIGHTS OF NOSTALGIA. FOR MOST OF US, THE MOST IMPORTANT MEMORIES ARE THOSE OF FAMILY, FAITH AND TRADITION.

Stay in Step Licensed professional counselor Koni Bridges said it’s important to set boundaries during the holiday season, especially if you felt drained and overextended in prior seasons. “We can’t do it all and we need to realize that ahead of time,” she said. “Sometimes saying ‘no’ occasionally or at least not saying ‘yes’ every time will be the first step in keeping your focus on the things that are most important, such as being with those you love, helping those in need and sharing the small things in life that help us be a little more selfless instead of selfish. It’s usually when we try to pack too many things into the holiday season that we end up feeling so depleted, and holidays that could bring such joy and fulfillment can end up bringing despair, frustration and emptiness.” This time of year is celebrated as sacred for some and secular for others, but all of those celebrations can be meaningful. “Being together with the ones

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we love is so important and fulfilling during the holiday season as we continue family traditions, gatherings and celebrations,” Bridges said. “It is also important to look for ways to extend ourselves beyond our family to reach out to others that may be in need, not have family close, or are just hurting during the holidays.”

Cut the Commercialism The hustle and bustle of the commercialized holidays, occasional isolation, changes in routines with regard to sleep, diet, and exercise can contribute to increased stress and holiday blues. Managing these factors more efficiently will be the key to maintaining emotional and physical balance and health during this time, Bridges said. “Keeping things more realistic with the finances will decrease the feelings of regret that often start off the New Year. Another important strategy to better coping is to actually seek some help to learn more effective coping skills and to surround yourself with others who can provide validation and are celebrating life.” Sunday School teacher Sue Brinkley of Henning Memorial United Methodist Church stays grounded with her favorite Christmas music. “Some of the songs I love at Christmas are not even carols, but are songs about the Christmas story. They help me get back to what is important.” Brinkley and her family also donate food and toys for families in need. “Whatever I’m willing to spend on a grandchild, I should be willing to spend that amount on at least one other child,” she said. According to Brinkley, this form of giving can be a family affair. She suggests including children in the effort. “Have them be a part of that. Let them help pick out the gift and wrap the gift,” she said. Amy Bruce, minister to children at First Baptist Church in Sulphur, agreed that these types of

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activities help families resist some of the materialism that permeates the holidays. Children in her community are writing notes for service men and women as part of Holiday Mail for Heroes, volunteering in food drives, and participating in Operation Christmas Child for less-fortunate children around the world.

Keep the Faith For the nation’s more than 224 million Christians, this time of year is meant to be one of reverence, but increased commercialization can detract from that. Attending worship services, taking part in giving programs, reflecting on the music of the season, and participating in other Christmas activities at church can help people better deal with worldly distractions, Brinkley said. She also suggested reading the Christmas story together as a family and allowing nativity scenes to bring the story to life. According to Bruce, worship must remain at the heart of the Christmas season for Christian families. “As things pile up on our calendars and we try to make sure we have the right gifts for people, we have to remember the gift God gave to us at Christmas,” Bruce said. Bruce said it’s important for families to keep their focus on the birth of Jesus, and various activities enable them to do that. Sometimes it’s as simple as getting together with others to go caroling.

Ashton Warren designed this year’s winning card at Henning Memorial United Methodist Church.

December 2013


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December 2013

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Home & Family The Safety Council of Southwest Louisiana reminds you that safety never takes a holiday. We wish everyone in our community a joyous and safe Christmas and New Year.

Deck the Halls by Leslie Fain

YOU CAN ADD A LOT OF HOLIDAY SPARKLE AND MAGIC TO YOUR HOME THIS YEAR WITH JUST A FEW SIMPLE STEPS, ACCORDING TO AREA VETERAN DESIGNERS

1201 Ryan Street, Lake Charles

(337) 436-3354

safetycouncilswla.org

Holi day S afety • Buy C • Pla fresh tree, hec c k a • Use e tree away nd keep w list ater in from indo or lig firepl stand ligh h a

t t • Ch s only out s only ind ces and oth base. doors oors, eck li e and o r heat sou plugs ghts for . utdoo r frayed r ces. • Tur . w i r n li es, loo se plu house ghts off be g s and fore g • Ext . brok oing t ingui en o b s e h d or lea all lig or go i h n v ing th • Ens g to bed ted cand e ure to . les be • Do fore l ys are eavin n a g the • At ot overloa ppropriat room partie e for c d elec s h t , prov rical o i l optio d ide no utlets ’s age. ns an n. d for in toxica be sure rid alcoholic b es ted gu e ests. are provid verage ed

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A simple way to kindle holiday warmth in your home is to create a focal space, whether it’s the fireplace, a credenza, the foyer, or an archway, according to Lindsay Dubrock, owner of Details Design in Lake Charles. “Create and focus your design on

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that spot,” she said. “Fireplaces are wonderful. I always encourage people to build up and out. Sometimes people will put a single garland on there and call it a day.” Instead, bulk garland with mesh, large ornaments, and large florals, she suggested. “Pouf it up,” she said. “Hanging smaller ornaments from the garland with large fishing wire adds more dimensions, and reflects the glow of the fireplace.” If you want to make your foyer the focus of holiday decorating, Dubrock suggests hanging ornaments from the ceiling, mirror, or entry table. She highly recommends using command strips, which won’t leave nail holes, to do the job. Chris Allen, owner of Paradise Florist, said live poinsettias, Christmas cacti, cyclamens, and amaryllis are all good choices for your holiday home. “They bring a sense of joy, and they are an element that is not common to your home the rest of the year,” he said.

December 2013


Happy Holidays

Another simple way to bring cheer to the home is by appealing to the senses. “Fragrance is very important,” he said. “Make good use of seasonal candles, bowls of fresh citrus fruit or apples, and fresh evergreen cuttings throughout the home.” Dubrock’s biggest and probably simplest tip for the holidays is to rearrange your furniture. “It is a simple change that will be super high impact,” she said. “Move your furniture closer together in order to create conversation areas, which are so important for family dinners and get-togethers.” Allen added that including family memories, such as treasured family decorations, are simple and important touches during the holidays. “A touch of nostalgia always brings the memories of Christmas past to your current holiday.”

Traditions Sharing special moments in special places with those you love is what creates treasured holiday traditions. It’s also the spirit behind Walnut Grove. Spread over 60 scenic acres in the historic heart of Lake Charles, Walnut Grove is a traditional neighborhood development that seamlessly blends time-honored design with modern amenities to create a unique, welcoming haven that fosters neighborhood togetherness and lifelong friendships. As you celebrate the joy of the season, imagining celebrating future holidays in a place where community is more than just a word—it’s a way of life.

From the Walnut Grove family to yours, Merry Christmas and Happy New Year. A variety of home styles and commercial properties are available.

West Sallier Street, Lake Charles www.walnutgrovetnd.com Call (337) 497-0825 for more information.

December 2013

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Home & Family |

Happy Holidays

Creative Christmas Cocktails by Chris LeBlanc

AT A LOSS FOR CREATIVE COCKTAIL IDEAS THIS HOLIDAY SEASON? TO HELP GET YOU ON THE FAST TRACK TO ROSY CHEEKS AND VISIONS OF DANCING SUGARPLUMS, A FORMER BARTENDER PRESENTS TO YOU, THE 12 DRINKS OF CHRISTMAS.

cajun eggnog

candy cane

A regional twist on an old favorite, this rich mixture is a perfect desert drink for your holiday party. - 1 scoop French vanilla ice cream - 6 oz. eggnog - 2 oz. bourbon - 2 oz. brandy Blend until smooth and garnish with cinnamon stick.

As the name suggests, this minty drink tastes like liquid Christmas candy. - 3/4 oz. berry vodka - 3/4 oz. peppermint schnapps - 3/4 oz. crème de cacao - 1/4 oz. grenadine - 1 oz. half-and-half - 1 oz. soda Stir and serve over ice, garnish with actual candy cane.

santa’s hammer

“HO HO … whoah …” This little concoction is silky, smooth and sweet. But be careful, it’s called “hammer” for a reason. - 2 oz. crème de cacao - 1 oz. triple sec - 4 oz. eggnog Shake and serve over ice.

holiday toddy A traditional home remedy for cold and flu symptoms, the “toddy” is, for many, a comforting favorite of yesteryear. A fragrant mixture of old and new, this cocktail will keep you toasty this holiday season. - 2 oz. bourbon - 1 tbsp. honey - 1 lemon wedge (squeezed) - 1 cup hot apple cider Stir contents and serve hot, garnish with cinnamon stick.

St. Nick Nog A family recipe that dates back hundreds of … days. St. Nick Nog tastes like a coke float mixed by Christmas angels. - 8 oz. eggnog (flavored is fine) - 2 oz. whipped cream flavored vodka - 1 oz. (a splash) of cola Stir and serve over ice.

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christmas cookie This sneaky little concoction is sweet, but packs a powerful punch. Don’t overindulge if you wish to enjoy the next six days of Christmas. - 1 oz. peppermint schnapps - 1 oz. coffee liqueur - 1 oz. Irish cream liqueur Shake.

gingerbread martini Picture this: A liquid gingerbread man dancing across your tongue. Unbeknownst to you, you just imagined the “Gingerbread Martini.” This sublimely sweet and spicy cocktail will certainly get you into the spirit. - 2 oz. ginger liqueur - 2 oz. vanilla citrus liqueur - 2 oz. whipping cream - 1/2 oz. honey - crushed ginger snaps Shake. Serve chilled, garnish with cinnamon.

the poinsettia This fresh, light champagne cocktail would be as at home by a beach as it would at your holiday party. - 3 oz. cranberry juice - 1/2 oz. triple sec - fill with champagne Stir and garnish with slice of orange

the grinch The Grinch – or as I like to call him, “the Hero of Whoville” – is perhaps the most misunderstood of all the Christmas figures. To honor his literal change of heart, he’s got a tangy, sweet and appropriately green drink named after him. - 2 oz. Midori Melon liqueur - 1/2 oz. lime juice - 1 tsp. simple syrup - fill with sprite Stir. Serve over ice, garnish with cherry.

white christmas This is what Bing Crosby was singing about. That is all. - 4 oz. eggnog - 1/2 oz. chocolate liqueur - 1 oz. bourbon Shake and serve over ice. Garnish with chocolate flakes. continued on p24

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November 30-December 23 5:30-9:00pm ~ LARC’s Acadian Village Lafayette, LA

Half-a-Million Lights ~ Live Entertainment ~ Carnival Rides Holiday Shopping ~ Photos with Santa & More! $7 Advance Tickets Available at Acadiana Shop Rite Stores $9 at Gate & Online Kids 4 & Under Free & Military Free with I.D.

The Village Christmas Store & Art Gallery Open Nightly During Noel Acadien au Village

Local Crafts ~ Artwork ~ Cajun Gifts ~ Holiday Decor

Visit www.acadianvillage.org for All Festival Details

200 Greenleaf Dr. ~ Lafayette ~ 337-981-2364 December 2013

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Home & Family

christmas cocktails

snowball I’m not sure why this drink is called a snowball. It tastes like ice cream, cinnamon and happiness… not a snowball. - 3 oz. cream liqueur - 3 drops vanilla - crushed ice - 1 oz. evaporated milk - 1/2 oz. coffee liqueur Blend until smooth. Garnish with cinnamon

red snapper Let’s face it. After 12 days of high octane, sweet delicious cocktails, you’ll want to take it easy. So… a recovery cocktail it is. The “Red Snapper” is an aromatic and piney take on the traditional Bloody Mary. - 6 oz. V8 - 2 oz. gin - 2 tbsp. lemon juice - 2 tsp. Tabasco - 2 tsp. Worcestershire sauce - 1/4 tsp. celery salt - 1/4 tsp. black pepper - dash ground cumin - dash onion powder - dash garlic powder Shake, serve over ice, garnish with every pickled vegetable in your fridge (it helps a little).

24 www.thriveswla.com

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December 2013


BY THE NUMBERS

December 2013

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25


Home & Family

Braving a Winter Vacation by Erin Kelly

Winter in Southwest Louisiana is mild, so you may not feel the need to escape the bitter cold. Instead, you might be compelled to find it. Ski destinations and winter wonderlands are popular destinations for warm-blooded Southerners who want to experience a change of seasons. For those who don’t want to make friends with Jack Frost, winter means beaches on a budget. Summer sun with an extra chill, but no extra cost. No matter what brand of vacation you choose, you may want to pack a few extra tricks in your bag.

Cold Destinations

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Unless you’re a transplant from colder destinations, you probably aren’t accustomed to high altitudes, brutal winds and consistent freezing temperatures, so if you’re planning a ski trip to the mountains or a week in a lodge, you may want to prepare yourself for the higher altitudes. Remember: Atmospheric pressure decreases as you ascend. It not only gets colder, it gets drier. You’ll also experience stronger sunrays. All of these things will have affects on your body. Here are some ways to prepare for colder temperatures and higher altitudes: • Stay hydrated. Before you start your day’s activities, drink at least 10 ounces of water. • Avoid caffeine and alcohol, which can contribute to dehydration. Same goes for eating too much salt. • Get a good night’s sleep. Thrive Magazine for Better Living

• If you’re not a regular skier, snowboarder, mountain lodger, or mountain driver, modify your activities. Don’t over-do it. Your body needs to adjust to the abrupt change in environment. • Make sure you pack everything you need. • Going into the mountains? Don’t forget your sunscreen. Just because you’re not sprawled on a tropical beach doesn’t mean you don’t need it. You’ll want to apply sunscreen at least thirty minutes before going outside and reapply every three hours. Also: Protect your eyes. • Dress in layers.

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Last Minute Road Trips South Louisiana may not benefit from the joys of white Christmases, but mild winters make for good lastminute road trips. Luckily, there are several stops in a day’s drive where folks are leaving the lights on for you. The Christmas lights, that is. In less than four hours you and the family can drive into the unique, charming town of Jefferson, Texas, where the lights burn bright and the ghosts roam at night.

Seeing is Believing LASIK at The Eye Clinic

Photo By LES HASSELL/AP/Marshall News Messenger

Often dubbed one of the most haunted cities in the U.S., Jefferson has appeared on several paranormal television shows and in paranormal literature for its infamous ghosts and haunted hotels. But at Christmastime the town shows up to celebrate Santa and all things red and green. You can take a walk through the Enchanted Forest—a collection of beautifully decorated Christmas trees and wreaths—before settling down in the gazebo. Then, listen to Christmas carols and say hello to Santa. Equally enchanting: The town’s Historic Jefferson Railway Train, which will take you and the family on the Rail of Lights Train Ride. Enjoy lighted vignettes and hear the story of celebrations around the world as you embrace an old-fashioned Christmas in the country. The train circles the piney woods along Big Cypress Bayou and gives passengers a glimpse of scenes representing Alaska, Russia, China and Australia, as well as the simply decorated barelimbed Sourwoods reminiscent of Appalachia. The Christmas overdose doesn’t end there, however. You can enjoy an authentic life-sized 90-year-old Christmas card as well as a whimsical teddy bear tree and Charlie Brown’s forlorn tree. If you want a side of creepy with your Christmas, book your stay at one of Jefferson’s famous haunted hotels. Intrigued? Visit www.jefferson-texas.com or call (903) 665-6449. continued on p28 December 2013

Make a dream of clear vision come true for yourself or someone you care about this holiday season with the gift of sight: LASIK from The Eye Clinic’s Laser Center.

LASIK can correct most vision problems, including nearsightedness, farsightedness and astigmatism, and with Custom LASIK, we’re able to restore clear vision for many people who were once told they weren’t candidates for laser vision correction. The end of the year is the perfect time to schedule LASIK, allowing you to take advantage of available health savings account or flexible spending account funds. We’re making it even easier with these special offers*:

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Home & Family | Winter Vacation In Louisiana, it’s impossible to talk about Christmas without mentioning Natchitoches. The beautiful and historical town brightens the holidays every year with its astonishing Christmas Festival, and this year is extra-special because it’s a tri-centennial celebration. It’s worth the short drive to Natchitoches to partake in Christmas delight. Watch fireworks over Cane River. Take a guided walking tour of the historic district with park rangers from Cane River Creole National Historic Park. Listen to live entertainment on the riverbank. Take a stroll along the water. Have a nice lunch and dinner in one of the town’s many notable restaurants. Most of all: enjoy the thousands of lights. Visit www.christmasfestival.com. New Orleans has embraced the holidays with Caroling in Jackson Square, bonfire tours, lights, restaurant specials and plantation tours. Don’t forget the Crescent City as you consider a brief getaway. Visit holiday. neworleansonline.com for more.

Your Holiday Home Awaits

If you’re dreaming of a new home this holiday season, whether you’re buying or selling, CENTURY 21 Bessette Realty, Inc. has the keys you need. Our experienced agents can help sort through the listings and locations to find the perfect one. And, don’t worry, we’ll give Santa the new address!

Tips for the Road Make sure you have a smooth ride with these tips from AAA: • Ensure your vehicle is properly maintained. Have your car and tires inspected before you take a long drive. • Map your route in advance and be prepared for busy roads during the most popular times of the year. If possible, consider leaving earlier or later to avoid heavy traffic. • Keep anything of value in the trunk or covered storage area. • If you’re traveling with children, remind them not to talk to strangers. Go with them on bathroom breaks and give them whistles to be used only if the family gets separated. • Have roadside assistance contact information on hand. • In case of an emergency, keep a cell phone and charger with you at all times. AAA and many other companies offer smartphone applications that enable motorists to request help without making a phone call.

Tips for the Plane Leaving on a jet plane? Winter is one of the most stressful times of year for air travel. Follow these tips from the American Society of Travel Agents: • Leave at least an extra hour earlier. Give yourself more time than usual in order to anticipate the peripheral delays that could occur. Remember to bring some reading material while you wait in the security line or at your departure gate. In cities with snow or ice, arrival delays can exceed two to three hours and de-icing procedures can take an hour before takeoff. • Get your flu shot. • Stretch. Take some time to walk around and stretch your arms and legs once every hour to give yourself a break from cramped travel conditions. 28 www.thriveswla.com

Bessette Realty, Inc. 474-2185 | century21-bessette.com | live chat 3025 Lake Street, Lake Charles Each office independently owned and operated.

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December 2013


nationally ranked in 12 specialties. the difference between practicing medicine and leading it. When a diagnosis can affect your life, how far would you travel for the best? As one of the best hospitals in America, according to U.S. News & World Report, Houston Methodist is the choice of patients from around the country for their critical health needs. That’s why we offer complimentary medical and concierge services for out of town patients, making it as easy as possible for patients to access the best. For appointments, trip-planning assistance and more, call 877.790.DOCS. houstonmethodist.org/usa

December 2013

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Money & Career

The Ins and Outs of Corporate Gift Giving

For

the

Bos

s

by Katie Harrington

‘Tis the season of gift giving. While you’re scratching your head trying to select the perfect gift for your friends and family members, don’t forget about your employees, clients, vendors and customers. There is no better time to show your gratitude than during the season of giving. Keeping Good Company If you’re making plans to give gifts that sport the company logo, make sure that your tokens of appreciation are well made, tasteful and understated. You want it to look like a gift, not an advertisement. Consider making a charitable contribution in the recipient’s name. This is a win-win solution as the recipient is glad to be recognized and the company making the donation is able to show its appreciation. Both parties contribute to the greater good of society.

It’s the Thought that Counts Many companies forbid any corporate gift giving or only allow employees to accept gifts valued at

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less than $25. Be sure to follow your own company’s rules and check with the HR department at the intended recipient’s company first. Sending a gift to a client who is unable to accept it is awkward for both parties. Also, it’s wise to steer clear of giving a gift to an outside business associate who is either currently involved in a bidding process with your company or receiving a bid from your company.

Managers may want to reward their assistant personally. This gift choice often depends on length of service. If it is less than five years, then a gift valued at $25 is sufficient. For a longer-term assistant, a more generous gift is acceptable. Be sure that your gift choice is appropriate and not too personal. Stay away from lingerie, perfume and jewelry. Books, personal organizers and gift certificates are good options.

Interoffice Gift Giving It can be tricky to give a gift to your boss that is just from you. Other employees may resent what they see as an effort to gain favor with the boss. Instead, get together with your department and pitch in for a group gift.

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Holiday Office Etiquette by Rose Klein

Q: Every year the same member of our staff organizes the effort to get our boss a Christmas gift. This staff person is really liked by all and has no problem getting $5 from the 20 members of our office. Unfortunately, in my opinion, the gift this staff person has selected over the last couple of years has been rather lame. Plus, I’d rather get our boss something on my own. How can I make this happen without offending anyone? A: I can appreciate your position; however, it may look like you are “brown-nosing” if you give something separately. If the group gift choice is truly your issue, then why not thank the person who has done it for so long and offer to either handle it this year or assist him/her in the selection process. Go into the conversation with some gift ideas that you believe your boss would appreciate. That way you will feel better about the gift and still remain a team player. Q: As a manager, I feel uncomfortable receiving gifts from the people I supervise. I believe the gifts should go down the chain of command, not up. Am I wrong? A: I was brought up to believe that the act of giving is a gift in itself. I appreciate that you may feel uncomfortable knowing those who report to you spend money on you; however, let’s hope it is because they genuinely wish to do so and not because for some unknown reason they feel obligated. Be positive and appreciative. As awkward as it can be to receive and not have something to give in return, a sincere “thank you” is all most wish to hear.

December 2013

Q: We do a “Secret Santa” gift exchange at work and a spending limit is agreed upon. Do I have to adhere to that limit? A: Actually, yes, you do, or should. It’s not nice to spend more or less because the cap is set for a reason and that is to equalize the gift exchange. I would say that if you find a gift that would really please the person whose name you drew and it causes you to go over by only a couple of bucks, then I would risk it. Q: My boss is Jewish. As we give him a holiday group gift from the entire office staff, should we give it to him at our holiday party or on the first day of Hanukkah? A: It is kind of you to acknowledge his faith and remember “his” holiday; however, I would suggest you do what you think he would prefer. If there are other gifts exchanged at your holiday party, perhaps giving it to him then would be better as those who celebrate Christmas will be getting their gifts at that time and I’m betting your holiday party will not be on December 25th. You might consider wrapping his gift in Hanukkah paper and give him a Hanukkah card with his gift so he knows you are respecting his holiday.

READY. SET.

WORK. Over $46 billion worth of industrial expansion in Southwest Louisiana is planned for the next few years—the most growth our area has ever seen. As the umbrella organization for the local industries, Lake Area Industry Alliance is ready with resources, information and support for our member industries and our community. Southwest Louisiana is set to have the highest job growth in the state. To apply for industry jobs, go to www.laworks.net; it’s the central location for all industrial applications.

We’re ready to help SWLA get to work.

Q: Are email invitations appropriate for a casual office gathering?

www.laia.com

A: Yes, they are. Q: I can’t afford to participate in the office gift exchange this year. We usually draw names. How can I gracefully get out of this when everyone else is participating? A: Hopefully, this is not a mandatory process in your office so participating should not be obligatory. I would suggest you privately talk with the person who actually prepares the names for drawing and state that you prefer to not be included.

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Money & Career

SEED Center Incubator Clients Learn and Grow their Businesses

Entrepreneurs with businesses located inside the SEED Center enjoy the opportunity to brainstorm ideas and network.

The entrepreneurs who currently build their businesses inside the Southwest Louisiana Entrepreneurial and Economic Development Center’s Business Incubator spend their hours working at computers, talking to clients, or exchanging ideas. Amid the action, they find time to attend seminars, talk to mentors and expand their business education. That’s the life for new business owners accepted into the SEED Incubator at 4310 Ryan St in Lake Charles.

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The Business Incubator, which opened this summer and currently houses 12 clients, is a support process that accelerates the successful development of startup and fledgling companies by providing an array of targeted resources and services. Services include Internet, utilities, telephone equipment, conference rooms, a receptionist, professional address, building security, private parking, copiers and printers, office furniture along with an assortment of training programs. “I love being here,” said Tracy Clark, co-publisher of Team Publications, which produces The Voice. “I like being able to network with people here in the incubator and with all the other organizations.” Clark and co-publisher Brenda Hill attend classes and seminars provided at the SEED Center, where they also have an office to discuss content, advertising and operations. “This has lived up to our expectations and beyond,” Clark said. “Everything offered here is a dream come true for a startup.” Before the Incubator opened, both Hill and Clark attended the Kauffman FastTrac classes organized by the Southwest Louisiana Economic Development Alliance. The program helps people develop business plans and learn how to obtain capital. Hill explained that “support” has been one of the primary assets provided at the SEED Center, which is Thrive Magazine for Better Living

led by executive director Adrian Wallace. She says that anyone starting their own business should investigate the Center’s opportunities and services. Liz Fuselier, owner of Sassy Oil and Vinegar, Derek Champagne, owner of Fit For Business, and Nicolas Villaume, owner of The Dev Department, all share a communal workspace and are grateful for the opportunity to run businesses in a success-driven environment. “This is good for nurturing, mentoring and providing structure,” Fuselier said. “It has really been awesome. I’ve met great people and everyone on the staff and the business owners are supportive. We all lift each other up and encourage.” Champagne will graduate from McNeese State University in December. He intended to start his business on his own, then heard about the Incubator and learned his monthly rent for an office space would be just $300. “What is offered in the Incubator is way more than I thought initially,” he said. “You have access to table top computers, classes and publicity. Every day there are more assets added to the program.” Villaume moved back to Lake Charles after a stint in Atlanta, where he saw firsthand how business incubators function. While growing his new venture, Villaume intends to positively impact the local community’s information technology sector. He was December 2013


encouraged to apply for spot in the workspace by George Swift, president/ CEO, of the Southwest Louisiana Economic Development Alliance. “The Incubator here is every bit as sophisticated as the one I was familiar with near Georgia Tech University. I’m excited about this. I want to take advantage of the opportunity and lend myself as a resource for the clients that are here.” Daniel Edwards, owner of Sunfunnel Media, operates a computer technology business specializing in photography. “(Executive Director) Adrian Wallace told me that 80 percent of startups fail, but 80 percent of startups that begin in an incubator succeed. That convinced me to apply,” Edwards said. As he makes plans to expand the business, Edwards benefits from networking, small business development advice, Chamber SWLA functions, and face-to-face business mentoring.

Incubator Clients Bookstoop.com founded by Ben Nguyen Sunfunnel Media owned by Daniel Edwards Sassy Oil and Vinegar owned by Liz Fuselier Fit For Business owned by Derek Champagne SSA Disability owned by Earline Marchand Ally-Gator Book Bites owned by Tommie Townsley GoGoGrocer owned by Tyson Queen and Matt Lundmark Team Publications owned by Brenda Hill and Tracy Clark Accufast Order and Katalog owned by Russell Dawdy, John Henning and Michael Van Dyke Top Knotch Limousine owned by Dwaine Joseph The Dev Department owned by Nicolas Villaume Sit-n-Cool founded by James Dimmitt

For more information about the Business Incubator, located at 4310 Ryan St. inside the SEED Center, call 337-433-0977 or visit www.seedcenterswla.com.

Let’s go HOLIDAY SHOPPING!! Relax. . . You’ve got this. . .

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Our Oak Park

Banking Center is OPEN!

While some big banks are closing and leaving neighborhoods throughout Southwest Louisiana, Lakeside is migrating to new areas to serve you better. We are proud to announce the opening of our new location on Oak Park Blvd. in Lake Charles.

Stop by and meet our friendly staff and experience superior, local service. Be sure to ask about our FREE checking and other fee-free services and learn why Lakeside is the “Home of the Free!”

Lyles McDaniel

Senior Vice President, Branch Manager

2132 Oak Park Blvd., Lake Charles • (337) 502-4314 • lakesidebanking.com • December 2013

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Money & Career

A Smart Approach toYear-End Investments by Erin Kelly

Well, you survived another year. Reviewing your finances and making investment decisions may not seem like the jolliest way to celebrate the end of 2013, but you may want to set aside a block of time to run your numbers before you ring in the New Year.

“Year-end investment planning isn’t the most exciting task to tackle at this time of year, but it’s worth it,” according to Certified Financial Planner Denise Rau, president of Rau Financial Group. “Spending even a short chunk of time with your paperwork could save you headaches in 2014 and strengthen your bottom line.” Rau gave the following tips to jumpstart your financial assessment and make it as painless as possible: The first thing you need to do is review your entire portfolio. “Take out the paperwork, don’t just assume you know what’s been going on with your finances because you’ve perused statements over the year. There are probably little details that fell through the cracks, or clauses you forgot about, or gains and losses that you didn’t factor into your overall mental picture,” Rau said. “Investing is a detail-oriented business, so you need to take a detail-oriented approach.” Have a solid understanding of investments that have done well, and those that underperformed. Ask yourself if you should rebalance your portfolio; if so, should you do it before December 31? What are the tax repercussions? Review your goals. Your goals may have changed—if so, your investments may need to reflect that. Perhaps you invested aggressively and now retirement is around the corner and you want to be more conservative. Maybe you’ve decided that you approached your portfolio with too much hesitancy, and now you want to make more bold moves. Other life changes can make a big difference in how you invest, as well—new babies, new houses, sold houses, children in college. “Our portfolios should reflect our goals and those things that are most important to our lives. The whole point of investing is to create a cushion to offset some of life’s heftiest price tags,” Rau said. “Most of the time we can anticipate those price tags and tweak our personal finance decisions accordingly.”

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Consider your financial situation. Has your tax bracket changed? If so, you may want to reconsider some of your investments. “Tax rates can definitely affect a portfolio, especially when you consider things like capital gains rate,” Rau said. “Most investors are in the 25 percent to 35 percent tax brackets, where long-term capital gains are taxed at 15 percent. Once you get into higher tax brackets, the capital gains rate increases.”

Although wading through these financial details can become overwhelming, especially during the hectic holiday season, Rau says avoiding or putting off this task is something you’ll likely regret later. “That’s where a trusted financial advisor can help you get focused and get it done.” For more information on any financial planning concern, call Rau Financial Group at (337) 480-3835 or visit www.raufinancialgroup.com.

Understand the tax consequences—both good and bad—of your investment decisions. “Taxes shouldn’t be the primary driver of your investment choices. Investments should be based on long- and short-term goals, personal beliefs and temperaments and overall vision,” Rau said. “But that doesn’t mean taxes aren’t a significant consideration. There are several things to think about: Is this investment tax-free or not? If so, what are the positive and negative aspects of this? Investors should also ask themselves how they can minimize their tax impact.” Thrive Magazine for Better Living

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December 2013

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Money & Career All you need to know to stay in the know! Lakeside Bank Holds Ribbon Cutting at New Branch

Local F.E.M.A. Board Announcement

Sleep Disorder Center of Louisiana Earns Reaccreditation Lakeside Bank hosted a ribbon cutting and open house at their new banking center, located at 2132 Oak Park Boulevard in Lake Charles. Lyles McDaniel, Senior Vice President with Lakeside, will be the Branch Manager for this new location, which offers full-service personal and commercial banking services. For more information, call (337) 502-4314.

Dr. Carl Fastabend Presents Information at National Conference Carl P. Fastabend, M.D., local cardiologist, vein expert and owner/medical director of The Vein Center of Southwest Louisiana, presented an informative session on Intravascular Ultrasound in Pelvic Vein Compression at the 2013 “The Veins” Venous Endovascular Interventional Strategies Conference held in Chicago. The conference was attended by cardiologists, vascular medicine physicians and other medical specialists from around the globe.

City Holds Dedication Ceremony The City of Lake Charles and the Mayor’s Committee for the First Lieutenant Douglas B. Fournet Memorial hosted a dedication ceremony for the First Lieutenant Douglas B. Fournet Memorial at Veterans Memorial Park, Veterans Memorial Parkway. Family members of the dedication honoree participated in the well-attended ceremony in which the statue of First Lieutenant Douglas B. Fournet was officially unveiled.

Dr. Springer Now Accepting Patients Local Family Medicine Physician, Dr. Steve Springer with Springer Family Medical Clinic, an affiliate of Imperial Health, is continuing to accept new medical Medicare patients until the end of the year. For more information, or to schedule an appointment, call (337) 436-1370. 36 www.thriveswla.com

BioLab Lake Charles Wins SAFE Award

United Way of Southwest Louisiana will serve as fiscal agent for $56,017 in federal funds through the Local Federal Emergency Management Agency Board, which will be given to local emergency food and/or shelter programs. The program is operated by local, non-profit agencies. For more information on United Way’s programs or services, call (337) 433-1088.

The Sleep Disorder Center of Louisiana has successfully completed the American Academy of Sleep Medicine’s (AASM) reaccreditation process. The center was awarded reaccreditation for five years with no provisos. It is the only sleep medicine provider in Southwest Louisiana to be accredited by the AASM. For more information, call 310-7378 or visit www.sleepdisordercenterofla.com.

Enhanced Penny Slot Destination to Offer Unprecedented Bonus Opportunities Delta Downs Racetrack Casino Hotel has announced the launch of “Penny Lane”, a new gaming destination combining the hottest new penny slot titles with a wealth of bonus opportunities for players. For further information on Penny Lane, B Connected and Boyd Gaming, visit www.boydgaming.com, www.pennylaneslots.com.

Sowela Receives Gold Marcom Award SOWELA Technical Community College was awarded a Gold MarCom Award for its 2013-2018 Strategic Plan brochure. The MarCom Awards is an international creative competition that recognizes outstanding achievement by marketing and communication professionals. Entries come from corporate marketing and communication departments, advertising agencies, and Public Relations firms. For more information, visit www.sowela.edu.

Lake Charles Awarded City of the Year Lake Charles was awarded “City of the Year” by Acadiana Profile at their 45th anniversary celebration. Lake Charles was the first awardee for City of the Year, but the publication intends to honor a different city each year. To read the story as well as additional stories generated through travel media hosted by the bureau, visit www.visitlakecharles.org/extra.

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The Lake Charles facility of BioLab was named Best in Louisiana for its safety record in the 1 – 100 employees category by the Louisiana Chemical Association’s SAFE awards. The program, which stands for Serious About Fostering Excellence, is a voluntary initiative by the LCA designed to promote evaluation, monitoring and improvement of environmental and safety performance.

Calcasieu Parish Transit Co-locates with the City of Lake Charles The Calcasieu Parish Transit Department will be re-locating their offices to co-locate with the City of Lake Charles Transit office. This collaboration will provide a centralized location where rural residents will be connected to urban areas and based on the citizen’s transportation needs. For more information about the Calcasieu Transit program, contact (337) 721-4040. For more information about the City of Lake Charles Transit Department, contact (337) 491-1253.

Second Edition of Abita Beer Cooking Louisiana Cookbook Announced The True Second Edition of Abita Beer Cooking Louisiana has been released. The cookbook includes recipes from famous, local chefs and Abita Beer fans who love to cook. Also in this edition is an outdoor cooking section. For more information, call (985) 377-7161.

Memorial for Women Laboratory Receives CAP Accreditation The Lake Charles Memorial Hospital for Women Laboratory has been granted accreditation by the College of American Pathologists (CAP). During the CAP accreditation process, inspectors examine the laboratory’s records and quality control of procedures for the preceding two years. For more information, visit www.cap.org.

December 2013


Mayor Manufacturing Proclamation

In recognition of the vital role American manufacturing plays on the local economy, the local Manufacturing Day Committee, consisting of Amber Mize with Sam Hebert Financial Group, Becky Franks of Manpower, and Erin Davison of Business Health Partners, celebrated National Manufacturing Day by hosting a reception to honor the hardworking men and women that make the American manufacturing industry thrive. Lake Charles Mayor, Randy Roach, proclaimed the first Friday in October Manufacturing Day for our local community.

Thrive-LC-Team3.qxp:Layout 2

7/17/13

Arts Council Releases Grant Deadlines for 2014-2015

CHRISTUS St. Patrick Hospital Named Consumer Choice

With the investments of regional partners, the Arts Council of SWLA distributes nearly $150,000 in grants each year to schools, nonprofits, libraries, and civic groups throughout the five parish region, and these allocations are awarded through four competitive grant programs that are available to qualified applicants February through June. For more information or to schedule a personalized consultation, contact the Arts Council at (337) 439-ARTS or visit www.artsandhumanitiesswla.org.

National Research Corporation announced that CHRISTUS St. Patrick Hospital has been named a 2013/2014 Consumer Choice Award Winner for the fifth consecutive year. The categories evaluated for the award are best overall quality, doctors, nurses and image. Winners are determined by consumer perceptions on multiple quality and image ratings collected in the company’s Market Insights Survey.

Our Lady School Students are Care Helpers Executive Director, Jody Farnum welcomed Our Lady School students to a morning at Care Help. The students came to Care Help with their Prayer Buddies of 8th and 2nd Graders volunteering working towards the second grader’s first Communion. Teachers Beth Mouton and Erica O’Quinn were helping out right along with the children. For more information, call (337) 528-2273.

1:53 PM

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United Way Launches New Online Volunteer System United Way of Southwest Louisiana recently launched “Get Connected,” a tool for volunteers to match their preferences with the needs of nonprofit agencies throughout the region. “Get Connected,” which can be reached through www.unitedwayswla.org, connects individuals with volunteer opportunities, in-kind needs, events and advocacy issues of various nonprofits in Southwest Louisiana. The system allows potential volunteers to go online and create custom profiles, helping them find opportunities that meet their interests and availability. Local nonprofits can also create online profiles for their organizations, and users can then “follow” those nonprofits and receive updates whenever a new volunteer opportunity is posted. “We want to create a stronger community and are delighted to continue on in the long and proud tradition of volunteering by helping to directly connect people who want to volunteer to a need in our community,” said Denise Durel, president and CEO of United Way of Southwest Louisiana.

“Get Connected” will also be an additional free tool for area ® nonprofits to get the word out about what they do and what needs they have. “This is an awesome opportunity for our agency,” said Dana Forrest, executive director of Big Brothers Big Sisters of Southwest Louisiana. “We have the opportunity with very UnitedWaySWLA.org little to no marketing budget to “The United Way has now provided a new utilize United Way’s website and “Get Connected” to gateway of service for all volunteer organizations,” highlight the services we have and the opportunity said Ferrington. “Axiall Partners, in partnership with for volunteers.” the United Way, will be incorporating this new tool In addition to individual volunteer opportunities, of focus to diversify, optimize, and increase our Get Connected allows groups to sign-up for community involvement where most needed.” activities, including schools, civic and church groups, and businesses. For more information on “Get Connected,” Nathan Ferrington, Axiall Partners Board president, also believes “Get Connected” will make a contact Melissa Hill at 337-433-1088 or mhill@unitedwayswla.org. big impact on his volunteer organization’s efforts.

United Way of Southwest Louisiana

Sam Hebert Financial Group #1 Agent in the Country in Sales with New York Life Insurance Co.

Sam Hebert of Sam Hebert Financial Group was ranked as the number one agent in the country in sales for New York Life Insurance Company in 2013! He is on the Family and Youth Counseling Foundation Board. He was recently named Philanthropist of the Year by Family and Youth Foundation. Sam Hebert Financial Group is also a “Partner-in-Education” with College Oaks Elementary School. Sam Hebert Financial Group’s client base includes individuals, couples, and small business owners. He has the unique ability to translate the complicated world of finances into easy to understand terms.

“Perhaps We Should Talk” 790 East Bayou Pines Drive Lake Charles, LA 70601 p. (337) 436-7797 f. (337) 436-6336

www.samhebertfinancialgroup.com Samuel L. Hebert. Registered Representative offering securities through NYLIFE Securities LLC Member FINRA/SIPC, A License Insurance Agency (225)387-9300 2431 | S Acadian Thruway, Suite 350 Baton Rouge, LA 70808 | Financial Adviser offering investment advisory services through Eagle Strategies, LLC | a Registered Investment Adviser. Sam Hebert Financial Group is not owned or operated by NYLIFE Securities LLC or its affiliates.

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December 2013


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NOVEMBER 2013

Thrive celebrated it’s 10th Year with a Bang! On Thursday, November 21, Thrive hosted the November Chamber Business After Hours at the Cash and Carry in celebration of our 10th birthday. Thank you to everyone who came out and helped us celebrate and thank you to all of you, our readers and advertisers, for your support over the years. Bring on the next 10 and beyond!

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December 2013

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December 2013


Injured?

by Erin Kelly

Be Prepared, Just in Case

Accidents happen. But when they have shortor long-term consequences, whether it’s a lasting injury or missed pay, how do you know if you have a personal injury claim? “Just because you’re in an accident doesn’t mean you’re automatically entitled to file a claim to recover damages, but sometimes a claim is an effective and logical step to legitimate reimbursement for injury or loss,” says attorney T-Claude Devall with Hoffoss Devall Law Firm. “Personal injury lawsuits have been given a bad name because some people view them as easily abused, as if people only file them to make ‘big bucks’ they don’t deserve. For the past 20 years, insurance companies have constantly supported multi-million dollar marketing campaigns trying to make us believe that. In reality, there are great laws already in place that protect against frivolous lawsuits. We have a right to be made whole when we’ve been injured due to the carelessness or negligence of another. It’s simply being accountable for your actions – one of the most basic rules we all teach our children.” In some cases, the fault and resulting legal action is clear. In others, you may be unsure whether it’s in your best interests to file. Devall gave the following tips when deciding whether or not you have a case: Always take notes after an accident or injury. Write down all the details and get as much information from witnesses as you can. “If possible, do this right away, while the details are fresh in your mind,” Devall says. “Memory is a tricky thing. If you try to write everything down later, you may have more trouble than you think.” If possible, gather evidence. “Take pictures, if you can. By all means, collect the contact information of anyone who witnessed the accident,” Devall says. “If it’s a car wreck, write down license plate numbers.” December 2013

Have a clear understanding of the circumstances. Who was at fault? If this was a car wreck, be sure you understand which traffic laws were violated. Don’t assume the other person is liable until you know this for a fact. “Sometimes we assume that we followed all traffic laws, only to discover later that the traffic light didn’t allow right turns on red, or some other caveat that changes the circumstances of the accident,” Devall says. Keep track of all medical records. This documentation may provide critical evidence if you do pursue a claim. Devall adds that most attorneys offer a free consultation. “If you think you have a case, you have nothing to lose by taking advantage of this service,” he says. “Just make sure you’re clear about what the consultation provides. Usually it means you get to meet with the attorney, discuss the details of the case, and get feedback on the best course of action. Bring all the information you’ve gathered, and listen to their legal advice about whether or not you have a case. Then you can decide on the best course of action – if any – for your particular situation.”

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For more information about personal injury law, call Hoffoss Devall at (337) 433-2053 or visit www.hdinjurylaw.com.

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Places & Faces

first person with

Everett Schram

by Kristy Armand photo by Shonda Manuel

First Person is a monthly Q&A that features compelling people who excel in their chosen endeavors. Ideas for future Q&As? Email edit@ thriveswla.com.

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December 2013


H

ere’s the assignment: Design a 60-acre community, including homes, commercial buildings, public areas, green spaces and all the required infrastructure. Showcase and protect the natural estuary. Incorporate the principles of new urbanism, along with modern convenience and amenities, but make sure everything looks like it’s been here for a hundred years. It’s quite a daunting task, but for Everett Schram, it was a challenge he’d been preparing for his entire life. Originally from Lake Charles, he has lived in Baltimore, Maryland, for the last three years. His background includes training and experience in urban planning, classical architecture, and historical restoration, but his interest in design is rooted in his childhood in South Louisiana. It’s these deep roots that made him the perfect choice to sit at the design helm for Tell us about your career path – what led you to be an architect? When I was a young boy, I was inspired by the home of my parent’s good friends, Jack and Holly Lawton. They had commissioned architect A. Hayes Town to design their home. Town is renowned for his distinctive Southern architectural style, which was heavily influenced by the Spanish, French and Creole history of Louisiana. I still remember the first time I visited their house, as a child, and thinking, “I want to create special places like this when I grow up.” I also traveled with my grandmother when I was young, to visit plantation houses around South Louisiana, and I was fascinated with them. I’d have to say that it was the combination of these experiences that really molded my future career path and the foundation of my architectural style. What training did you complete? I earned a Professional Bachelor of Architecture from Louisiana Tech University. I also studied urban planning at the Imperial College in London, and classical architecture at the Institute of Classical Architecture & Art in New York City. I took extra classes in business management and interior design while at Tech. I am a registered professional architect and a member of the American Institute of Architects (AIA), as well as several other professional organizations. I am also licensed by the State of Louisiana Board of Architectural Examiners. You have a special interest in restoration. Why is that? My whole life, I was inspired by all the special places around Louisiana, whether that be Jackson Square in New Orleans as an urban condition or a plantation home along the Mississippi River. These places deserve to be preserved and protected and the new places we create should pay some homage to that and

December 2013

the Walnut Grove traditional neighborhood development (TND), the first-of-its-kind community in Lake Charles. Located just off of W. Sallier Street, Walnut Grove will consist of approximately 180 homes and 92,000 square feet of commercial and retail space, spread over 57 buildable acres. Walnut Grove’s model home, sales office and design center opened last month. Several homes and commercial buildings are under construction and the first commercial tenants, Jack Lawton Companies and Walnut Grove Development, LLC, moved into the Lawton Building, the development’s first professional building in October. Thrive sat down with Everett to learn more about him and the vision he and the developers have for Walnut Grove.

connect themselves to the history of this place so they hold some architecturally intrinsic value. Tell us about some of the restoration you’ve worked on in other places? Most of the restoration work I’ve done in other locations has been on historic residences, anything from a Georgetown townhouse to a historic farmhouse out in the countryside. The thing I think is most exciting about restoration work is the idea of maintaining something for future generations to enjoy. You always hear the phrase, “They don’t build it like they used to,” and there is some truth to that. I think preserving those things for future generations to understand and learn from, to live in or near, is an exciting opportunity, not just for the person doing the restoration or preservation work, but for generations to come. Oak Alley photo courtesy of Louisiana Office of Tourism

Schram was inspired by visits to plantations like Oak Alley

Where did the idea of Walnut Grove come from and how did you become involved? It actually came about as the result of Hurricane Rita. The Burton Building in Sulphur was destroyed by the storm, and Jack and Holly Lawton began looking at sites for a new building to house the offices of Jack Lawton Companies.

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Their COO, Gus Scharam, suggested the possibility of doing a real estate development around their new office, to create more than just a building. After much discussion and research, the idea for Walnut Grove was born. The Lawtons and their executive team conducted a national search for a design firm to bring their idea to life. They interviewed multiple firms, including the one I was with at the time in Washington D.C. They wanted a team with a depth of experience in the areas of new urbanism and traditional and classic architecture, and we offered a wide breadth of knowledge regarding both. I’m originally from Lake Charles, so I was also wellversed in local vernacular architecture. This gave our firm a unique combination of skill sets that was ideal for the Walnut Grove project. What is the best way to describe Walnut Grove? There are so many ways to describe everything about this neighborhood, but the simplest is probably the best: Walnut Grove is intended to be a cherished, walkable neighborhood that embodies a true sense of community and feels as if it’s always been a part of the Southwest Louisiana landscape. What is the architectural style of Walnut Grove? It’s actually a mixture of different architectural styles. We wanted to connect the architecture to the Lake Area, and to ensure that it looks and feels like a place that’s always been here, so we’ve used a lot of different

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Places & Faces A rendering of Contraband Alley in Walnut Grove, a shopping area inspired by Pirate’s Alley in New Orleans.

Pirate’s Alley, New Orleans

Creole and Acadian influences throughout most of the buildings. We have also incorporated what are called “spice styles,” which is an eclectic mixture of different design styles, in our case, honing in on popular traditional styles that were prevalent from the 1880s-1920s. These are mainly prominent revival styles of architecture that you’d see in any Garden District area throughout the South. Where did you get your inspiration for Walnut Grove? From several areas. I have primarily drawn from my background in traditional architecture. Also, partly from the success and support that River Ranch received in Lafayette. This was the first new urbanist development in the state and it was very well received, which was encouraging to us. Beyond that, we wanted to create a special place, something that would be appreciated and upheld for generations to come here in Lake Charles. What role does local history play in Walnut Grove’s design? A huge one. In an effort to connect Walnut Grove to Southwest Louisiana, our team looked into the history of the region, trying to come up with a name for the development. We discovered details about an original Walnut Grove on the Calcasieu riverfront, very near our property. From the Victorian era in the late 1800s, through the year 1926, the first Walnut Grove was one of the most significant social gathering places for residents of Lake Charles. After finding out about that, we also connected the names of streets, parks and buildings to people and places that impacted the area in meaningful ways. William Street, for example, was named to honor W. T. Burton, a wellknown businessman and philanthropist, and the great-grandfather of Jack Lawton Jr.. Charleston Park is named to commemorate the original

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name of the town that later was renamed “Lake Charles.” Contraband Alley, named for Pirate’s Alley in New Orleans, is a beautifully planned pedestrian retail streetscape. We also use historical and regional vernacular architectural styles to further connect Walnut Grove to the local history. People may not recognize the historical names, but architectural style is something people can immediately relate to. The buildings throughout the neighborhood, for the most part, will appear, iconically, part of Louisiana’s architectural history. Describe some of the design styles and construction processes that make Walnut Grove unique. The blend of traditional architectural and design styles with modern amenities and convenience are a big part of what make Walnut Grove unique. In addition, we’ve gone above and beyond standard building codes and regulations. For example, we’re building everything at least a foot minimum above the required flood plain elevations – over 1.5 feet higher than the highest flood water Lake Charles has ever experienced – to make sure this neighborhood is protected here for the long term. We’ve also used many details in residences and commercial buildings that you would more commonly see in high-end customs home. The quality of construction and the materials and products and vendors are all things you don’t normally see being done by developers. Our team, including our design coordinator Holly Lawton, and myself as the village architect, and our in-house interior and architectural designers, have worked to simplify the custom home process. You’ll get the quality of a high-end custom home without the inordinate

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number of decisions and time commitment you would normally have in this type of construction process. We’ve created a design center to help you narrow down your options and we’ve found all the skilled craftsmen who we want to work with us to take the burden off of homeowners. What has been the most challenging part of getting the development to this stage? The most challenging part of creating a community like this, especially when it’s the first one in a given area, is getting people to understand the concept and vision. We are very fortunate that Jack and Holly Lawton, along with their executive team, had this great vision and commitment to creating a special place and doing it right. It really takes a village to create a village, and not to mention, a great deal of time, patience and unwavering commitment. What you are seeing now is the result of over seven years of planning and repeated returns to the drawing board. Educating people about exactly what we are trying to create, and why, has been challenging throughout the process, but that is also an exciting aspect – we’re bringing something completely new here; something we believe will have a lasting positive impact on the region. What have you enjoyed the most about working on Walnut Grove? Working on Walnut Grove is a dream-come-true for me. I know that sounds like a cliché, but it really couldn’t be more true. Every path I’ve taken has led me to this point, from growing up in South Louisiana, traveling to plantation homes and to New Orleans and Natchitoches and other places with my grandmother, then going off and studying in London, New York and living in

December 2013


The Lawton Building

Washington D.C. All of these different experiences, including studying urban planning and classical architecture, inspired me to want to be part of creating a special place like this. I started studying new urbanism when I was in high school and was fascinated by the types of neighborhoods and places that were being created. Working here at Walnut Grove is an amazingly unique opportunity, especially for someone my age. I feel like I’ve been given the chance to give back to my home town and do something that is really special; that really matters. Describe what Walnut Grove will be like in 10 years. It will be a fully built-out and cherished neighborhood; a place that is home not just to its residents, but to visitors from across Lake Charles and the surrounding areas who enjoy being a part of a traditional, connected way of living. It will be an integral part of the community; a hub of activity – shopping, dining, events, gatherings and more. I truly think that Walnut Grove is a neighborhood that will stand the test of time.

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A rendering of a residential street, Jabez Drive, in Walnut Grove. Marion Park is on the right.

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December 2013

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Places & Faces

Making

Spirits Bright

by Katie Harrington photos by Shonda Manuel and Katie Harrington

Louisiana’s culinary traditions are no secret. People flock from the world over to sample rich, spicy Cajun and Creole concoctions. A new division of Louisiana culinary excellence is starting to turn heads, as craft beer breweries, spirit distilleries and vineyards are popping up across the state. American craft beer is booming and Louisiana is benefiting big time thanks to a road that was paved by the Abita Brewing Company, located in the small town of Abita Springs. Malt and hops are flourishing along the bayous of south Louisiana, where seven breweries are now open for business. The state’s spirits industry is also experiencing growth, with the recent opening of Louisiana Spirits Distillery in Jeff Davis Parish. Aiming to put Louisiana on the map for its rum, the company provides free tours of its distillery in hopes of drawing in those travelling Interstate 10. Even though the differences between brewing beer and distilling rum are many, both companies are celebrating the uniqueness of Louisiana’s roots by using Louisiana’s finest as a foundation for their products.

THERE’S SOMETHING IN THE WATER, CHER Located in St. Tammany Parish, just north of New Orleans, Abita Springs is a town boasting a population of just over 2,300 at the 2010 census. Originally a Choctaw Indian Village, it got its name from the nearby medicinal springs. Legends of the spring’s healing properties drew New Orleanians to the area at the turn of the 20th century as families took the train to Abita Springs to escape the yellow fever epidemic plaguing New Orleans at the time. The city’s elite sipped water from the famous springs while playing croquet beneath the tall cedar trees. Legend or not, today Abita Brewing Co. is using that very water to create one of the nation’s fastest growing craft beers. The brewery was founded in 1986 by two guys who were passionate about brewing their own beer. That continued on page 50

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December 2013


United Way of Southwest Louisiana

CITGO United Way solicitors serving lunch at Abraham’s Tent.

FUELING OUR COMMUNITY BY CITGO EMPLOYEES

BACK TO UNITED WAY SWLA

CITGO employees are generous contributors to United Way. Every year, our employees host an internal campaign to give back to the community we love. This year, CITGO employees gave $597,390 during the CITGO United Way Fueling our Community by Giving campaign. Because of their generosity, CITGO employees were able to contribute 15 percent of the United Way’s entire SWLA region goal of $4 million, supporting needs represented in Southwest Louisiana through the holiday season and into the New Year. THANK YOU CITGO employees for giving to make this holiday season a bright one.

CITGO United Way solicitors visiting CARC

CITGO Vice President & General Manager Tomeu Vadell, CHEMTURA Plant Manager and United Way SWLA Chairperson Robert Gelinas, and CITGO Government & Public Affairs Manager Dana Keel at the CITGO United Way Appreciation Celebration in September.

CITGO United Way solicitors assisting at Oasis (Women’s Shelter).

2013 © CITGO Petroleum Corporation

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Places & Faces | Spirits

year 1,500 barrels of beer were brewed. By 1994 the original brew house became too small and the operation was moved to a new location just up the road. Today 151,000 barrels of beer and 9,100 barrels of root beer leave this state-of-the-art facility that is the 14th largest craft beer brewery in the country. Their seven flagship beers and five seasonal brews are much acclaimed. Perhaps what is most shocking, however, is the simplicity of the process used to create the various brews. Four ingredients—water, barley, hops and yeast—are the base of each flavor. In addition to these four ingredients, fresh, local produce such as strawberries are used to make the flavored and seasonal beers. In craft brewing, water quality is key, so Abita

Trey Litel and Skip Cortese display Bayou Rum Silver Label and Spiced Bayou Rum at their LA Spirits Distillery in Jeff Davis Parish.

draws its water from a deep artesian well in the Southern Hills Aquifer that is more than 3,000 feet deep in some areas. The water is kept pristine in underground structures dating back 5 million years. They say barley is to beer as grapes are to wine, and that is a sentiment taken seriously at Abita. The barley used at the brewery is carefully chosen and it’s what gives the beer its color and flavor. The hop is a flower of the hops plant and it plays the role of a balancer in brewing. Its bitterness balances the natural sweetness of beer. Finally, the yeast is used to aid in the fermentation process. At the Abita Brewery, protecting the environment is important. It was the first brewery in North America to install the energy-efficient Merlin Brewhouse. The Merlin system reduces boiling time and carbon dioxide emissions and

actually improves the brewing process. It uses 70 percent less energy than traditional methods and the system’s vapor condenser also captures and reduces steam from the process. Taking its commitment to the community a little further, the company’s goal is to become one of America’s most energy-efficient breweries and it is well on its way. It is now using a 340-panel rooftop solar panel system to power the brewhouse. In addition to reducing energy usage, Abita’s bottles use 12-percent less glass than traditional longneck bottles and their six packs are wrapped instead of placed in a carrier. For more information or to tour the Abita Brewing Co., visit www.abita.com.

FROM GRASS TO GLASS In most places sugar is a staple and sweet finisher as it’s stirred into coffee or baked into a number of desserts, but in Louisiana it’s more of a foundation than a finale. It’s a required ingredient in kitchens, but also a driving force in the state’s colorful history, economy and character. Louisiana Spirits Distillery in Lacassine, makers of the all-new Bayou Rum, hopes to capitalize on the prominence of this sweet crop. To understand, “Why rum?”, Trey Litel, president of Louisiana Spirits, says you have to understand the history of sugar in Louisiana. “Prior to the Civil War, there were 1,271 sugar mills in Louisiana. They were a result of a boom that kicked off in 1795.” This was the year Etienne de Bore was able to successfully convert Louisiana cane juice into sugar crystals at his plantation in what is now New Orleans. Sugar quickly became the region’s most important crop and during the antebellum period, most of the United States-grown sugar came from Louisiana. “Even today, Louisiana is still the nation’s second-largest sugar producer. We are talking about a $2.7 billion industry that touches 27,000 people,” Litel adds. “It was in these early days that sugar cane farmers learned to make tafia, a rum-like drink produced from the cane juice. With 11 raw sugar factories still running today, we figured why not make Louisiana a world-wide name in rum making? Our inspiration comes from those little sugar makers who were making rum on the side.” continued on page 52

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December 2013


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Places & Faces | Spirits To create Bayou Rum, Louisiana Spirits uses a sugar house recipe they created after searching through Louisiana’s sugar history. Each bottle starts with molasses and raw sugar from M.A. Patout and Son, the oldest sugar mill in operation the United States, which is located just down the road in Patoutville near Jeanerette. “We get out sugar directly from the mill so we can be assured that we are getting the purest Louisiana sugar possible,” Litel says. “We combine unprocessed, unrefined sugar with molasses and water in a pasteurization process that sanitizes the ingredients to give us the best tasting wash. This wash is then prepared for fermentation.” The wash is heated up to kill off any bacteria and wild yeast to give the rum makers a pure liquid prior to fermentation. “We invested two years on developing a proprietary yeast that is one of the contributors of our great taste,” says Litel. “This is how we assure consistency and quality.” Once the mix moves to the fermentation, the magic begins. “We add the yeast to the wash during the fermentation process. The yeast eat the sugar and produce alcohol. Rum starts straight from sugar

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so it’s a little cleaner process. After the fermentation takes place, it’s about eight percent alcohol per volume. A beer or wine company would stop at this point and begin their final production stage. With rum though, we move it to the distiller because we want to concentrate the alcohol.” The distillation process involves two steps, where the wash still pulls out as much alcohol as possible. This process makes the mixture about 40 percent alcohol by volume. Once this is captured it then moves to the big still where it eventually becomes 90 percent alcohol by volume or about 180 proof. The first cuts to come off the mix are not consumed. They are typically used to make other products like turpentine and ethanol. Louisiana Spirits actually sells these cuts to a Baton Rouge chemical company for further production. “After the initial cuts are made, we capture the rum,” adds Litel. “It then goes to a tank where we bulk it up. Because each batch is a little different, we ensure consistency by bulking up the batches and averaging them out.” Louisiana Spirits currently makes two versions of its Bayou Rum, Silver Label and Spiced Rum. The next product the company is planning to

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launch is an aged rum. “We are putting up a lot of rum right now, storing it in barrels to create a new line,” Litel says. “Louisiana’s climate is actually ideal for this aging process and this is going to be a great addition to our product offering.” In addition to a new product in the near future, Louisiana Spirits is also in the process of expanding its distilling space. It’s been quite an impressive reception for this new company considering they just launched earlier this year. “At the end of the day, we are a value-added economic product,” adds Litel. “We want to shine a light on our state’s great sugar industry. We are doing something that hasn’t been done before. It’s our hope that Louisiana can be a world-class producer of rum.” For more information, visit www.laspirits.net. Tours are now taking place throughout the day and are free to the public.

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F

or over 25 years we have created full-flavored, all natural beers that are brewed for the way we love to live in Louisiana. Abita Beer has no preservatives, additives or stabilizers and is made with the pure artesian water of Abita Springs.

LAKE STREET LIQUOR STORE

4336 Lake Street • Lake Charles, LA 70605 337-477-2428 • e: lakestreetliquor@suddenlink.net

abita.com We proudly sell Abita Beers and Louisiana Spirits Bayou Rum!

December 2013

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53


Places & Faces

Athlete Trey Quinn is the Axiom of Calm on the Cusp of Big Changes

by Chris LeBlanc

Trophy cases line one wall of the Barbe High School front office – glistening monuments to the athletic achievements of bygone years. The reminders continue in the office of Barbe Head Football Coach Mike Cutrera. Trophies adorn bookshelves. Placed prominently amongst the accolades are photos, trophies and paintings commemorating the 2012 Barbe state runnersup—a bittersweet reminder of what might have been. With the eyes of the past peering from the walls, the pressure to perform seems omnipresent for the young men of Barbe’s football team, but if star wide receiver and LSU commit Trey Quinn is nervous, he’s not showing it. The 6-foot, 1-inch 200-pound senior has a poise that is rare for his age, in spite of all the chatter surrounding his performance on the field. “He’s very mature,” said Cutrera. “That’s something his parents have worked on. His dad and mom have always preached to be humble and put your teammates, first and that’s the type of guy he is.”

Recently breaking the state career receptions and receiving yardage records – and setting a national record for career receiving yards – Quinn is awed by the position in which he finds himself. “It’s crazy,” Quinn said. “I would’ve never seen myself where I am right now. It’s crazy how far I’ve come from working out as a freshman with the varsity to now.” In spite of the buzz surrounding his budding career, Quinn is focused on the goals of his team. “I mean, I have people in my ear,” Quinn said. “But playoff time, it’s about the state championship. The people I hang around know I don’t like to hear about it.”

He eats, sleeps and breathes football. “There’s not really a life outside of football for me,” Quinn said. “I’ll play X-box. But that’s also football for me. I usually play NCAA [football] or Madden.” Cutrera said that Quinn often works on his own outside the confines of mandated team practices. Whether with catching, speed drills or agility exercises, this sinewy young man is constantly working to improve himself as an athlete. “His work ethic is unbelievable,” Cutrera said.

Barbe head football coach, Mike Cutrera, and Trey Quinn.

Quinn comes up with a big catch. Photo by Summer Richard Boudreaux

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December 2013


Must-See Holiday Movies Baby, it’s cold outside. Grab your blankets, popcorn and hot chocolate and snuggle up. Spend some quality time with your loved ones while cuing up some of these timeless holiday classics.

1. Miracle on 34th Street 2. Love Actually 3. Elf 4. A Christmas Story 5. The Polar Express 6. The Holiday 7. How the Grinch Stole Christmas 8. Home Alone 9. A Charlie Brown Christmas

10. It’s A Wonderful Life 11. The Santa Claus 12. Rudolph, the Red-Nosed Reindeer 13. The Nightmare Before Christmas 14. Frosty the Snowman 1 5. National Lampoon’s Christmas Vacation

Trust.

When it comes to women’s health, experience is on our side. Many women feel uncomfortable talking about gynecological issues. So at Surgicare of Lake Charles, if you need GYN surgery, we’ll work hard to help you feel at ease. And because your gynecological health can quickly impact you emotionally and physically, the surgical specialists will do everything they can to get you feeling better and back to your life as soon as possible. Women have placed their trust in the experienced staff at Surgicare for the past 38 years, and so can you. For a physician referral or more information, call 337-436-6941.

2100 Lake Street

December 2013

73492_WCH_SurgicareGYN_8x4_875c.indd 1

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11/14/13 1:08 PM


Places & Faces

Local Artist Designs Christmas Ornaments with Lake Charles Students for National Display

Louisiana’s First Lady, Supriya Jindal and Lake Charles artist, Susan Hebert visited A.A. Nelson Elementary School back in October to assist students in decorating Christmas ornaments that are currently on display on the 2013 National Christmas Tree, as well as the “Louisiana” tree, both of which are located on the National Mall in Washington, D.C. “My inspiration for the ornament design comes from all the unique natural elements that are found in Louisiana,” says Hebert. “It was a wonderful experience working with the 5th grade students on this exciting project.” Each year, every state is asked to prepare 24 Christmas ornaments. Twenty-three of the ornaments are hung on the state Christmas tree as part of the National Christmas Tree display, and one of the ornaments is displayed on a Christmas tree in the White House Visitor Center showcasing each state ornament. “I want to thank Lake Charles artist Susan Hebert and the students of A.A. Nelson Elementary—this year’s ornament is truly a work of art,” First Lady Jindal says. “It is an honor for Louisiana to once again participate in this special Christmas event that features such a talented Louisiana artist alongside our creative students.” Hebert shares the tradition of designing Louisiana’s ornament with other great Louisiana artists including Josephine Busse, Tony Bernard and George Rodrigue.

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The front of the ornament features a pelican sitting in a nest made of Louisiana Spanish moss and a mallard duck tail feather. The reverse of the ornament is an alligator resting on a bed of cypress twigs.

First Lady Supriya Jindal and Lake Charles artist, Susan Hebert (center) pose with 5th Grade students at A.A. Nelson Elementary following the completion of the Louisiana Christmas ornament project.

t

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December 2013


Susan Hebert, left with First Lady Supriya Jindal.

December 2013

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57


Places & Faces

Uplifting Spirits through

Music by Katie Harrington

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December 2013


Just looking at sisters Dasha A and Dawn Daneé, you’d never guess the duo are a powerful singing and songwriting force. Dasha A, a 14-year-old student at Barbe High School, and Dawn Daneé, a 12-yearold student at SJ Welsh Middle School, have collaborated on musical projects since 2008. “I was riding my bike one day and I just started singing,” says Dasha. “I wasn’t singing an actual song I had heard before though, it was my own words coming out in the form of a song.” Dasha went home, pulled out a piece of paper and wrote the words down. “I saw what she was doing and we started discussing the songs,” Dawn says. “I’m the singer of the two of us so I began singing her songs. She gives me input on how she wants them to sound and I help bring them to life.” The original inspiration for their work came from a sad time in their lives. “Our granddad passed away in 2007, so most of our songs were about missing someone,” says Dasha. “Now, we find our inspiration in each other and we hope our alternative positive genre can touch others in a positive way.” Even though they’re just getting started, the pair has big dreams that they’re on their way to achieving. “We want to take this as far as we can,” Dawn adds. “Dasha already has another artist

who wants her to write for them and I have already sang for choirs throughout the area and am looking to start doing more of that.” In order to be successful, the sisters will have to continue to work closely together, something they say can sometimes be a challenge. “I am calmer and relaxed where as Dawn is a little more spirited, but we work it out,” Dasha says. Although their roots can be found in gospel music, it’s singing their original works that makes them the happiest. “I love music across the board, but there’s just something about singing our own songs,” says Dawn. Their first album is complete and available for the public to download off their website, www.dawndanee.com. It’s a Christmas CD that includes four traditional holiday songs and one original songs.

Merry Christmas

from the staff and volunteers of Brighton Bridge Hospice

May your holiday season be happy and blessed!

Proudly Serving Southwest Louisiana www.brightonbridge.com 1-888-878-0337

December 2013

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Places & Faces

Movers and Shakers in Southwest News? You tell us! Send press releases to Louisiana... Who’s edit@thriveswla.com with the subject line “Who’s News.”

Family & Youth Announces Youth Advisory Council Officers

Magnolia LNG Management Team in Place

Local Attorneys Recognized

Ernie Megginson

Lee Hoffoss Jr.

Zachary Schwartzenburg

Whitney Osburn

Hannah Pettefer

Clause Devall

The Louisiana Association for Justice honored Lee Hoffoss, Jr. and Claude “T-Claude” Devall, local plaintiff attorneys with Hoffoss Devall Law Firm, for Justice at the organization’s annual Fall Conference. Both Hoffoss and Devall were presented the 2013 President’s Award for their work and involvement in the 2010 Desselle v. Acadian Ambulance Service, Inc. case, a class action law suit resulting in an initial award of over $16.7 million in reimbursement and general damages to more than 14,000 plaintiffs represented in the case. For more information, call (337) 433-2053.

Fontenot Elected Vice President Harry P. Fontenot Jr. was elected Vice Chairman of the Calcasieu Republican Parish Executive Committee. Fontenot, who has a B.S and J.D., is an attorney and is the Deputy District Defender for Calcasieu Parish. Fontenot serves on the Contraband Days, Inc. Board and the Board of the Southwest Louisiana Chapter of Parents of Murdered Children (POMC).

CHRISTUS St. Patrick Hospital Announces Dubuis Medical Directorship CHRISTUS St. Patrick Hospital has announced that the Pulmonologists of Imperial Health have assumed the medical directorship role of Dubuis Lake Charles, a long-term care facility located in CHRISTUS St. Patrick Hospital. Pulmonologists Johnny Belenchia, M.D., Albert Chinn, M.D., and Luke Williams, M.D., all of Imperial Health, began their role as medical directors. These three respected physicians will enhance the overall quality of care provided at Dubuis Lake Charles.

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Olivia Vincent

Family & Youth Counseling Agency (Family & Youth) announced the newly elected officers of the Youth Advisory Council (YAC). Officers for 2013-14 are Olivia Vincent, chair; Zachary Schwartzenburg, vice-chair; Whitney Devan Corbello Osburn, secretary; Hannah Pettefer, vice chair of community impact; and Devan Corbello, parliamentarian.

James Schulz

Magnolia LNG, a wholly owned subsidiary of Liquefied Natural Gas Limited (LNG Limited), has announced that a strong project management team has been put in place to lead its Lake Charles-based liquefied natural gas (LNG) export Komi Hassan facility. The company appointed Ernie Megginson as vice president of development, James “Jim” Schulz as engineering manager, and Komi Hassan as environmental, health and safety manager. For more information on Magnolia LNG, visit www.magnolialng.com.

Barbe High School Swim Team Wraps Up Record Season

Armstrong named new Executive Director The NAMI Southwest Louisiana Board of Directors named Anastasia A. Armstrong, M.A. as the new Executive Director. Anastasia is a native of Russia and a Anastasia Armstrong Lake Charles resident. Anastasia had previously worked for NAMI SWLA as the Walk Manager and the Director of Marketing while completing her Bachelor of Science and Master of Arts degrees in Psychology from McNeese State University.

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The Barbe High School swim team wrapped up a record season. The Bucs swept post-season competition this season with first places wins in the Calcasieu Championships and District 5A Championships. The team also placed first out of 32 teams in the Regional Top 24 meet. Photo Provided by “Danette Olier Photography”

December 2013


Drewett Elected Chairman

Karen Drewett

Karen Drewett was elected Chairman of the Calcasieu Republican Parish Executive Committee. Drewett, a CPA, is the Senior Vice President and Senior Commercial lender for Iberia Bank. She also serves as a Chairman of the Memorial Hospital Foundation Board. She is the President-Elect of the Lake Charles Symphony and the Treasurer of the Calcasieu Community Clinic and a board member of the newly formed Music Makers.

Dr. Brad LeBert Relocates ENT Practice Local Ear, Nose and Throat Specialist (ENT), Dr. Brad LeBert will relocate his medical practice to 501 Dr. Michael DeBakey Drive (2nd Floor) in Lake Charles, effective Monday, December 2. Dr. LeBert is originally from Lake Charles and specializes in the medical and surgical treatment of a variety of diseases and disorders of the ear, nose and throat, as well as related structures of the head and neck. This includes, but is not limited to: sinus disease, tinnitus, ear infections, Brad LeBert, MD tonsilar conditions, thyroid disorders and hearing loss. Dr. LeBert offers minimally invasive sinus procedures and also provides specialized allergy treatment. Dr. LeBert attended LaGrange High School in Lake Charles. He graduated magna cum laude from Louisiana State University in Baton Rouge with a degree in zoology, and went on to earn a medical degree from LSU School of Medicine in New Orleans, where he also completed a residency in Otorhinolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery. In his new practice, the ENT & Allergy Clinic, Dr. LeBert will continue to offer cutting-edge ENT care, along with a wide range of allergy testing and treatment options to the residents of Southwest Louisiana. For more information, or to schedule an appointment with Dr. LeBert, please call (337) 312-8564.

Clark Named WCCH Employee of the Quarter West Calcasieu Cameron Hospital named Jeff Clark, RN, patient care director, as its fourth quarter Employee of the Quarter. Clark is responsible for directing hospital-wide Jeff Clark, RN nursing activities across all shifts, which includes providing consultation and support to all of the hospital’s clinical areas. Clark is a resident of Sulphur and has served in his current capacity since 2006.

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Mind & Body

You Better Watch Out for Seasonal Health Risks

by Kristy Armand

The cheer and warm wishes of the season can lighten the heart and lift the spirit, but they can bring about some not-so-jolly health problems. The reason? All the things we love about the holidays – shopping, parties, visiting with family and friends, eating and drinking – can lead to a few adverse effects on your health. But that doesn’t mean you have to be a Grinch and miss all the fun. Healthcare professionals with CHRISTUS St. Patrick Hospital say by being aware of the risks and taking a few precautions, you can stay healthy and enjoy the holiday season. Here’s a list of some of the more unwelcome gifts the season can bring and how you can avoid them: GERMS With all the season’s greetings (think hugs and kisses), gatherings, crowded stores, airports and hotels, germs are the unseen and unwelcome party-crashers that show up in droves during the holiday season. “Washing your hands is by far the best thing anyone can do, at any time of the year, to keep germs in check,” 62 www.thriveswla.com

says infectious disease specialist Tim Haman, M.D, CHRISTUS St. Patrick Medical Group Internal Medicine Associate-Moss Bluff. “Use soap and running water if possible. If you aren’t near soap and water, anti-bacterial gels are a good second choice. Keep some with you on your desk, in your purse or bag, in your vehicle, and in as many places as you can so you’ll remember to use them.” Regardless of what you do, during the colder months when the holidays occur, more people stay indoors which simply leads to cold germs and viruses being passed around more frequently. High Thrive Magazine for Better Living

risk areas include check-out lines, bank machines, escalator handrails and shopping cart handles. “Again, this doesn’t mean you have to avoid these things, just that you need to be cautious, and wash your hands frequently,” stresses Dr. Haman. “In addition, some of the new immune boosting medications can be a good idea, especially before traveling or when you know you’ll be around a lot of people,” says Dr. Haman. “Check with your doctor if you take any other medication, or if you have concerns, but in most cases, these can add a small measure of protection against germs.” December 2013


ALLERGIES People with allergies and asthma face unique health challenges during the winter holidays. The variety of foods available increases the risk for those with food allergies. “For those with known allergies, extra care is needed during the holidays when so many different people are preparing foods,” says Keith DeSonnier, MD, ENT specialist on the CHRISTUS St. Patrick Medical staff. If you aren’t sure of the ingredients in a dish, ask, or if you can’t find out, don’t eat it. Also, take time to check restaurant menus before eating out and always have an epinephrine injection kit available in case of a reaction.” “Molds are not usually a problem in the winter, as their counts are lower, but the greenery many people bring into their homes, including Christmas trees, can harbor mold spores, which could cause a flare-up,” says Dr. DeSonier. “Dust mites and molds also can be a problem for those spending a lot of time on the floor and moving around on carpeted surfaces indoors.” Dr. DeSonier advises using an artificial tree or greenery if you are prone to indoor allergies, and dusting off old or used decorations and ornaments. Clean or replace home air filters, as well as those in portable air cleaners. Limit or remove scented candles, potpourri and similar items than can cause discomfort for asthmatics. Dr. DeSonier adds that caution should be used when using spray-on “snow,” and popular pine-scented sprays or oils, which can cause allergic reactions in some people. “If you have an established patterns for allergy and asthma flare ups at this time of year, then be sure to take treatment precautions to prevent those symptoms, and if you are traveling, be sure to pack any medications you may need.”

Toys with small parts that can cause choking should be avoided for children under age three, and children under eight should not have toys with sharp edges or electric toys with heating parts. Dr. Broussard recommends picking toys suitable for the child’s age, abilities, skills and interest level. “Look for labels with age and safety advice, and discard plastic packaging wrap immediately, which can suffocate a child. Much of toy safety is common sense, and adult supervision also is critical. In addition, make sure toys appropriate for older siblings but not young children are kept out of reach.”

TOYS Each year, over 150,000 children under age 15 are treated for toyrelated injuries in emergency rooms, according to the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission. “A lot of toys have moveable and detachable parts, and the smaller the child, the bigger risk,” says Imperial Health Internal Medicine and Pediatric Physician, and member of the CHRISTUS St. Patrick Hospital medical staff.

HEART HEALTH The holiday season is full of surprises – that’s part of the magic of the season. But the unwelcome surprise of a “Merry Christmas Coronary” is something no one would ever expect. Both phrases were coined by researchers from Vanderbilt Medical Center in Nashville who studied national death rates from a nearly 30-year period. They found that deaths related to heart disease spike in December and January, reaching their peak on Christmas and New Year’s Day. Similar results were found in a national study conducted at the University of California in San Diego. These researchers found that the number of cardiac deaths is higher on Christmas Day than on

December 2013

HEARTBURN When it comes to over-indulgence, most people worry about calories and health, holiday heartburn is another seasonal concern. Rich holiday food may leave you reaching for the antacids instead of the leftovers. According to Francis Bride, M.D., with Colonnade Endoscopy Center, for those who experience chronic acid reflux or gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), the holidays can be especially painful. He explains that acid reflux is a common and chronic digestive condition caused by a weakened lower esophageal sphincter (the valve between the stomach and esophagus) that allows stomach acid to back up into the esophagus. Heartburn, sour taste and indigestion are the most common symptoms. “The holiday season is one of the worst times of the year for patients with GERD,” says Dr. Bride. “The large amounts, and different types of food, we eat during the holidays can lead to extreme discomfort for chronic heartburn sufferers. It’s important to stay focused on your dietary recommendations and make sure you take any medications as directed.”

Thrive Magazine for Better Living

any other day of the year; with the second highest on December 26 and third highest on January 1. Dr. Thomas Mulhearn, Cardiologist with Cardiovascular Specialists, an affiliate of Imperial Health and member of the medical staff of CHRISTUS St. Patrick Hospital’s Regional Heart Center, sasy there are many reasons for this phenomenon. “People with symptoms of heart trouble prior to the holidays tend to delay going to the doctor, partly from denial and partly from procrastination because it’s such a busy time. They have extra obligations at home and work, and don’t want to spoil the festivities of the season. As a result, they are less likely to see their physicians when they first notice symptoms, mistakenly thinking they can just deal with it after the holidays are over.” Other holidayrelated factors, include too much food, too little exercise, added stress, and alcohol according to Dr. Mulhearn. “During the holidays, many people get busy, and either don’t have time to follow their regular diet and exercise program, or choose to take a break. Parties, shopping, guests and other activities provide the perfect excuse for skipping a workout or indulging in foods that are higher in fat, sodium and calories – all things that are not good for your heart.” The hectic pace of the holiday season can cause people to forget to take medications such as blood thinners and pills for high blood pressure. Those who are traveling may forget to pack their prescription and be unable to get refills during the time they are gone. “While certainly understandable, these are the types of things that contribute to the higher rate of heart problems we see during the holidays,” adds Dr. Mulhearn “Keep in mind that you can’t take a holiday from cardiovascular health, particularly if you have had cardiac problems. It’s important to make sure your heart health is always on the top of your holiday checklist.”

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Mind & Body

Managing the Work/Life Balance with Corporate Wellness Programs

by Katie Harrington

The average American works 47 hours each week. We spend more time at work than anywhere else, making a healthy work/life balance a challenge. With the New Year just around the corner, many will make a healthier lifestyle their top priority for 2014. Making time to be healthier will be one of the top deterrents to the success of this resolution, but there’s a way for companies to help their employees stick to their goals while gaining some benefits. “A corporate wellness program is an important tool to help employees establish balance,” says Louise McDaniel, workplace wellness coordinator with CHRISTUS St. Patrick Hospital. “There are many options out there as far as programs go, but the common goal is to promote the well-being of employees, employers and the organization in general.”

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As corporate wellness programs become more common, companies are beginning to realize some tremendous benefits. “One of the most positive results is a reduction in the rate of illness and injuries among employees,” McDaniel says. “Unhealthy employees are more apt to experience work-related injuries like muscle strain, carpel tunnel syndrome, stress fractures and back pain. They are also more susceptible to developing longterm illnesses such as diabetes, heart disease and even stroke.” Some other benefits to company-wide wellness programs include reductions in absenteeism and healthcare costs, increased productivity and retention of key employees.

December 2013


Getting started can seem overwhelming and concerns about the costs can stop a program before it even begins. According to McDaniel the process does not have to be difficult. “Starting a wellness program doesn’t have to involve installing a fitness center and hiring a full-time wellness coach. Even the smallest of companies can start a program.” The first step is to assess the needs of your company. “You can poll your employees to gauge their interest level,” McDaniel adds. “Send out a survey listing every element that you are willing to implement and have them rank their importance.” Once you know what your employees are most interested in, you can design your program. “It can be as simple as instituting a no smoking policy or a walking program,” says McDaniel. “Even offering yearly health screenings or providing healthy dining options are a good start.” Where fitness and nutrition are concerned, offering a pedometer challenge, a safe place to store bikes, or encouraging employees to take the stairs are easy ways to get your staff more active. Once your program is designed it’s important to secure employee buy-in. “Managers need to be good examples,” McDaniel says. “If your employees see their supervisors and company leadership making wellness a priority in

their own lives then they will be more likely to take their own health more seriously.” Prizes and rewards are another way to increase employee buy-in. Gift cards, an extended lunch break or special recognitions are easy ways to get staff more involved. Once your program has been in place for a while it’s important to evaluate it. “One of the easiest ways to see what impact your program is having is to compare your absenteeism rates to the past,” adds McDaniel. “You can also look at your productivity rates since your program has been implemented.” Finally, McDaniel says the best way to judge effectiveness is to ask your employees. “Corporate wellness programs should change with the times. Conduct regular surveys on morale and check in staff members to see what’s important to them when it comes to the wellness program.”

For more information on the corporate wellness programs offered by CHRITUS St. Patrick Hospital, call (337) 491-7555 or visit www.christusstpatrick.org.

HOW STRONG ARE YOUR BONES?

It’s a question everyone should be concerned about as they get older. Millions of Americans--52 million to be exact--have low bone density or osteoporosis. In fact, about one in two women and up to one in four men over the age of 50 will break a bone due to osteoporosis. You’re never too young or too old to improve the health of your bones. Join local Bone Health Expert, Staci Boudreaux, PA-C, CCD, for an in-depth discussion on the Top 10 Myths Associated With Osteoporosis. This free community seminar will help participants initiate a long-term plan to protect delicate bones and prevent future bone loss and breaks.

Tuesday, December 17, 5:30pm

Center for Orthopaedics • 1747 Imperial Blvd., Lake Charles Seating is limited and pre-registration is requested. Refreshments will be served.

Call 721-2903 or register online at www.centerforortho.com • December 2013

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Information about our Osteoporosis Support Group will be provided.

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Mind & Body

Surgeon Dr. Paul Fenn checks out Laudrey Darbonne’s new ankle.

Getting Back Into Step LAUDREY DARBONNE MAY BE MATURE IN HER YEARS, BUT THAT DOES NOT MEAN SHE HAS ANY PLANS TO STROLL ALONG LIFE’S PATH. HOWEVER, UNBEARABLE PAIN FROM ARTHRITIS IN HER ANKLES WAS KEEPING HER DOWN. There was a crunch when she walked. The cartilage cushion in her ankles was gone. Her selfdescribed walking pattern was that of a duck. “It was pretty bad,” the 76-year-old recalls. “I was on medication the whole time. I could only take so much pain medicine a day, apply a heating pad and stay off of it as much as I could.” Laudrey had enough of the pain. So, she went to see orthopaedic surgeon, Dr. Paul Fenn with Orthopaedic Specialists, a part of the Memorial Medical Group. Dr. Fenn offered her a new and improved way to be rid her of the joint pain, the STAR™ Total Ankle Replacement. He is the only doctor in the Lake Charles and Lafayette areas certified to offer this type of treatment to patients. “The performance of these implants is now up to the level of knee and hip replacement technology,” Dr. Fenn says. “The replacement is a great way to get pain relief and maintain function.” 66 www.thriveswla.com

Laudrey had her most troublesome ankle replaced first and it worked so well that she wanted the other one done right away. Dr. Fenn gave her four months to recover and then replaced the other ankle. Ankle implants were first used back in the 50s and 60s, but were not of good quality. The gold standard was to fuse the ankle, which took away the motion and drastically changed a person’s walking pattern. All of the technology that developed with the knee and hip replacements allowed for ankle implants to be improved. Dr. Fenn says implants now have a more than 90 percent survival after 10 years and there is data that even suggests the implants will last longer than that. “It’s such a small joint so all of your body weight is going through such a small area. The implants, though tiny, can withstand a lot of force,” Dr. Fenn says. “In order for these implants to not fail they had to have advanced designs, materials and tolerances to allow Thrive Magazine for Better Living

for them to survive. Every one I have put in is still in.” There are similar restrictions like you would have with any knee or hip replacement. However, nonimpact sports such as cycling, skiing and swimming are perfectly okay to do. The results are a night and day difference for Laudrey. She now has a life without pain, is free of dependence on medication and can continue to live to the fullest. “I’m real please with the way things are going. I’m not the kind of person to just sit around and have somebody wait on me,” she says. “That’s pretty much what I had to do until now, but now I’m ready to go dancing again!” For more information contact Orthopaedic Specialists at (337) 494.4900.

December 2013


Intelligence is on the Breakfast Menu for Kids Well, it’s official. Eating breakfast makes kids smarter! This is according to a new study in the journal Early Human Development which involved more than 12-hundred six-year-olds. It shows that kids who did not eat breakfast every day scored about five points lower on IQ test on average compared to children who did eat breakfast daily. Experts say one obvious reason for the IQ boost is that breakfast supplies

Follow your Nose

important nutrients which fuel the brain and boost cognitive function. Plus, most kids eat breakfast with their parents – which gives them a chance to talk and socialize before heading off to school. And many studies show that social interactions in the morning helps promote brain development. Eating breakfast does indeed make kids smarter.

to Dr. LeBert’s New Office

Local Ear, Nose and Throat Specialist (ENT), Dr. Brad LeBert has relocated his medical practice to 501 Dr. Michael DeBakey Drive (2nd Floor) in Lake Charles. Originally from Lake Charles, Dr. LeBert earned his medical degree from LSU School of Medicine in New Orleans, where he also completed a residency in Otorhinolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery. He has been in practice in Lake Charles for three years. Dr. LeBert specializes in the medical and surgical treatment of a variety of diseases and disorders of the ear, nose and throat, as well as related structures of the head and neck, including: · · · · · · · ·

sinus disease tinnitus ear infections tonsilar conditions thyroid disorders hearing loss minimally invasive sinus procedures specialized allergy treatment

For more information, or to schedule an appointment with Dr. LeBert, call:

(337) 312-8564

(337) 312-8564 • 501 Dr. Michael DeBakey Dr., 2nd Floor, Lake Charles

2014 cultur al season

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December 2013

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Mind & Body

New Hope for Insulin Dependent Diabetics DIABETES SPECIALISTS ACROSS THE COUNTRY ARE EXCITED ABOUT A MODERN-DAY MEDICAL BREAKTHROUGH DESIGNED TO AUTOMATICALLY STOP INSULIN DELIVERY IN DIABETICS WHEN BLOOD-SUGAR LEVELS ARE TOO LOW. THE DEVICE, OFFICIALLY NAMED THE MINIMED 530G, BUT OFTEN TIMES REFERRED TO AS “ARTIFICIAL PANCREAS TECHNOLOGY,” WAS ENDORSED AND APPROVED BY THE U.S. FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION ON SEPTEMBER 27. THE DEVICE IS MANUFACTURED BY MEDTRONIC DIABETES DIVISION, THE WORLD LEADER IN INSULIN PUMP THERAPY AND RELATED TECHNOLOGY.

Insulin pump therapy has been around for several years and is used to lower blood sugar in diabetic patients, but sometimes insulin can also cause sugar levels to fall too low, posing serious health risks for patients. The condition is called hypoglycemia and it can be dangerous for some diabetics, especially during night time hours when patients are asleep and often times unaware that their levels are decreasing. These attacks can lead to seizures, comas and even death. “I treat thousands of insulin dependent diabetic patients, and they’ll be the first to tell you going low in the middle of the

night is a major fear,” says Imperial Health Endocrinologist, Dr. Timothy Gilbert. “The new artificial pancreas device decreases nighttime hypoglycemia incidence rates by 37.5 percent.” Dr. Gilbert was one of the first physicians in the United States to utilize the device, and he’s a huge advocate for the new technology. In fact, he is one of only six doctors in the country hand selected to serve on a National Advisory and Education Panel focused on instructing other endocrinologists and physicians on how to utilize this advanced medical device. The MiniMed 530G is about the size

How Strong Are Your Bones?

by Kristy Armand

The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force issued new bone density screening guidelines three years ago, but many women – and their doctors – are not aware of the recommendation that some women as young as 50 should be checked for osteoporosis. Previous guidelines recommended bone density screenings for women ages 60-64 in high risk groups and all women older than 65. “The newer guidelines dropped the recommendation screening age for high-risk women by 10 years, which is fairly significant,” said Staci Boudreaux, PA-C, CCD, coordinator of Bone Health Central at Center for Orthopaedics, an affiliate of Imperial Health. “The hope is that earlier detection could allow health professionals to prevent future injury caused by this condition, 68 www.thriveswla.com

which is viewed as a silent disease. Women typically aren’t aware they have osteoporosis until they experience a fall or a fracture. Bone density screenings can help detect bone thinning in its early stages, which means preventative measures can be taken. These screenings are effective, safe, non-invasive and painless.” The task force panel lowered the recommended screening age for high-risk patients after determining that women as young as 50 may meet the threshold depending on their risk factors. According to the National Osteoporosis Foundation, factors that can increase a woman’s risk include low body weight, use of certain drugs, smoking, heavy alcohol use, and a parent who has broken a hip. The odds of a woman in this Thrive Magazine for Better Living

risk group of experiencing a fracture within 10 years was concerning enough for the screening recommendation to be expanded, according to the task force. Osteoporosis is a major public health threat, affecting an estimated 44 million Americans – about 55 percent of people age 50 and older, according to the National Osteoporosis Foundation. The foundation reports that 10 million Americans already have the disease, and an estimated 34 million have low bone density. The guidelines did not determine how often women should have the screenings, but Boudreaux suggests having them once every two years, although this could depend on your practitioner’s personal recommendation. Boudreaux says

December 2013


and weight of a pager and is utilized like any other insulin pump. The continuous glucose monitoring integration system provides glucose readings every five minutes. If there is a spike or dip in blood sugar levels a protective alert will sound and notify the patient up to 30 minutes before he or she reaches a certain sensor glucose level. “This technology helps patients and caregivers react sooner to low and high blood sugar levels,” Dr. Gilbert adds. “This also allows patients and medical professionals to identify trends and make adjustments to lifestyle and/or treatment.” The artificial pancreas system also has a threshold suspend feature that will automatically stop insulin delivery when the sensor detects an extremely low glucose level and it will alert people nearby with a siren type sound. A warning message will flash across the device’s

women of any age who have had a total hysterectomy or symptoms of menopause at least 6 months ago who are not on hormone replacement, and/or have risk factors for osteoporosis, should be evaluated as well. The task force made no recommendation for men; however, the National Osteoporosis Foundation recommends bone density screenings for men older than 70, and it is recommended that all adults (men and women) 50 and older with a new fracture should be evaluated for low bone density. “Women are more adversely and widely affected by osteoporosis

electronic window stating call for medical assistance. “The artificial pancreas device system has been approved for use in patients over the age of 16 with Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes,” Dr. Gilbert adds. “In my professional opinion, it is the most advanced diabetes management tool on the market right now. This device actually mimics some of the functions of a healthy pancreas.”

because their bone density tends to be lower than men’s, so the guidelines are more lenient for males,” Boudreaux said. “That said, physicians should pay attention to bone density in all their senior patients to prevent bone density conditions from developing into a problem.” Learn more about osteoporosis risk, prevention, detection and treatment at a free seminar at Center for Orthopaedics on Thursday, December 17, at 5:30 pm. Call 721-2903 or register online at www.centerforortho.com.

For more information, log on to www.medtronicdiabetes.com.

NOW O PE N ! A Piece of Cake’s

3611 Ryan Street Lake Charles, La TUES - FRI • 11AM - 6PM SAT 10AM - 3PM December 2013

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Mind & Body

Are the Holiday’s

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70 www.thriveswla.com

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December 2013


Happy Birthday, Sagittarius!

This has been a very interesting year for you, one with arrows shooting in every possible direction. December is the time to indulge yourself—make sure to celebrate your birthday in style! However, don’t get over taken by the party. Have fun, but keep your eyes open or you could miss an exciting opportunity to start off 2014 with a bang!

Horoscopes

Sagittarius

(November 22-December 21) Make sure to take some time in-between all of the season’s festivities to evaluate your accomplishments this year and make a list of all your challenges. This review will not only provide a fresh perspective, but it will also open your sphere to an array of new creative ideas.

Capricorn

(December 21-January 19) This year has brought about a great amount of change. December will bring you closer to friends and family. Now is the time to share your new goals and ideas with your loved ones. You may be surprised by their show of support.

Aquarius

(January 20-February 18) December will be very busy for you, lots of tasks and many opportunities for fun with friends and family, but be careful not get over extended as you may get overwhelmed and miss the magical moments you cherish the most.

Pisces

(February 19-March 28) It’s been a long year. You’ve worked very hard. Shelf the worries, it’s time to relax and have some fun. You deserve it. Plus, some downtime will possibly leave you open to a good turn of fortune.

Taurus

(April 20-May 20) December will bring about positive interactions for you. If you are open you may find yourself much more in tune with others than usual, but remember to listen. It could lead to some very exciting news.

Gemini

(May 21-June 20) December is the time to take it to the next level at work. The stars are in your corner on the job front. Make sure to take your Vitamin C—your natural energy will need a boost. You’ve got a lot of work to do.

Cancer

(June 21-July 22) Keep a close eye on your finances; it’s always too easy to break the bank this time of year. Indulge your creativity whether it’s using your talents for holiday decorating, experimenting with new recipes or crafting presents for loved ones.

Leo (July 23-August 22) This is the perfect time to make some changes, whether it’s within the home or in your personal life. Love is in the air this December. If you’re single keep your eyes open—your dance card may be full. If you’re taken, prepare for unexpected romance.

Virgo

(August 23-September 22) December is a time for merriment for Virgos. You will relish this time with family and friends. It is also a time of balance. If you are watchful of holiday spending and are careful in your planning, you will end the year on a good note.

Libra

(September 23-October 22) This month the scales will swing back into balance. The stars are in your corner. Stay positive when connecting with friends and family and this could be one for the record books.

Scorpio

(October 23-November 21) December is time of adventure for the Scorpio! End this year on a different note. Add some spice to holiday traditions or consider taking a last minute trip. It will be important to quench your sense of curiosity.

Aries

(March 21-April 19) It’s not time to slow down yet. December has the potential to present an array of opportunities for the steadfast ram. If you stay the course you have a good chance at achieving that personal change you’ve been hoping for.

December 2013

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Ensuring Your Pet has a Jolly Holiday Too The tinsel is on the tree and the Christmas poinsettias are spread throughout the house. With the excitement of holiday hustle and bustle it is easy to forget about hidden dangers many holiday decorations can pose to your pets. Sharpening your senses when it comes to safe holidaying with your pets is the best way to avoid a holiday trip to the veterinarian, according to the Dr. Jae Chang, veterinarian with Farr Veterinary Hospital. “For most families the holidays are a happy time, but it’s also quite stressful. It’s important to remember that it can be stressful for your pet, as well – particularly since they don’t understand what’s going on,” Dr. Chang said. “For this reason, it’s important to keep them as close to their routine as possible. You may be tempted to give them some extra leftovers or nibbles of the Christmas ham, but this can have very unpleasant results, to say the least.” You also want to make sure that your pet doesn’t swipe treats without your knowledge – so keep things like serving trays, mixing bowls and dishes out of their reach. Never feed sweet treats to your animals. Most pet owners know that chocolate is toxic to dogs, but there are many other foods that can cause your pet distress. Christmas trees, particularly real ones, can also cause potential problems. “Make sure your pet doesn’t have access to standing tree water. The bacteria could cause stomach upset if it’s ingested,” said Dr. Chang. “Also, be careful of how you decorate

the tree. Shiny decorations and tinsel can easily catch the eye of a playful cat or dog, but if the decoration is accidentally swallowed, it could create serious problems. It’s typically recommended that families with pets avoid tinsel altogether.” If you include your pet in the gift-giving and stocking-stuffer festivities, choose safe toys that are appropriate for their size. Don’t give a Chihuahua an enormous bone that’s designed for a Rottweiler, and don’t give a Rottweiler a chew toy made for a Chihuahua. “There are reasons why most toys come with safety precautions,” Dr. Chang said. One of the biggest problems with pet toys – whether it’s for dogs or cats – is when it’s inadvertently swallowed. “It’s possible for these items to get trapped in the digestive tract, requiring surgery. This is true for toys as well as things like ribbon or wrapping paper.” If you have a shy or timid pet, make sure it has its own retreat. This ensures their safety, as well as that of your guests. “Don’t overwhelm a nervous animal with dozens of guests,” Dr.

Chang said. “Put them in a nice, safe place where they won’t feel threatened or frightened.” Keep an eye on your guests to make sure they don’t inadvertently give your pet access to alcoholic beverages, plates of food or other potentially harmful items. “Also, if possible, opt for artificial plant décor or make sure it’s out of your pet’s reach. Some popular Christmas decorations, such as mistletoe and holly, can cause gastrointestinal and cardiovascular problems,” Dr. Chang said.

Find the Healthy Image Elves

andWIN!

Meet the Healthy Image Marketing Agency holiday elves: Pixel and Mark A. Ting. They met in Candy Cane Forest as Mark was practicing his ear wiggle technique and Pixel was perfecting her pixie dust sprinkling skills. It was love at first sprite. They enjoy long walks in the snow, sipping hot cocoa, and going on wild adventures. You’ll see them often between now and Christmas as they check on Healthy Image clients (and probably get into a little mischief along the way). facebook.com/healthyimagemarketing 72 www.thriveswla.com

We can hardly keep track of them so we need your help! We’ll post pictures of their adventures on the Healthy Image Facebook page (facebook.com/ healthyimagemarketing). The first person to guess their location each weekday in December will win a Starbucks gift card tucked inside of an awesome Healthy Image mug. Each daily winner will be entered into the Grand Holiday Prize Drawing for a holly-palooza package of restaurant gift certificates.

The adventures are about to begin, so buckle your mistletoe and let’s go! Thrive Magazine for Better Living

December 2013


J&J Exterminating Hosts Toy and Food Drive J&J Exterminating is collecting new, unwrapped toys and non-perishable food items through Saturday, December 14. All 10 locations throughout the state are participating, including the Lake Charles office at 1717 W. Prien Lake Rd. and the DeRidder office at 514 N. Pine Street. All donations will be given to organizations in each area. The Lake Charles and DeRidder offices will give the food items to Abraham’s Tent. In Lake Charles, the toys will go to KPLC’s Community Christmas and in DeRidder, they’ll be donated to the Angel Tree organization. “We encourage Southwest Louisiana residents to include a few extra food items the next time they’re shopping and add a toy or two. Together, we can make the holidays brighter for those in need. We’ll take any donation, large or small,” said Robert Soileau, manager of the Lake Charles location.

For details, call (337) 474-7377 in Lake Charles or (337) 463-4574 in DeRidder.

Focused on your Future

The Rau Financial Group: Mark Eckard, Debora Alexander, Denise Wilkinson, Denise Rau, Joel Istre, Eva Abate, Philip O’Quin

(337) 480-3835 | 1634 RYAN ST., LAKE CHARLES | www.raufinancialgroup.com December 2013

Whether it’s getting started with investing, saving for college, managing risk, preparing for retirement, arranging your estate, supporting an aging parent, or all of these, the experienced advisors at Rau Financial Group can help. We’ll listen to your goals and dreams first. Then we’ll develop a sound customized strategy to help you pursue them. Let us help you take a closer look at your finances with a free consultation.

Denise Rau

Securities offered through LPL Financial Member FINRA/SIPC

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Mind & Body

The Power of

Hope by Erin Kelly

There’s a singular product that can help you overcome anything: Hope. According to Dr. Dale Archer, founder of the Institute for Neuropsychiatry, hope is often “the only thing between man and the abyss.” As long as a person has hope, they can recover and survive just about anything. If your goal is to embrace 2014 with a better, healthier attitude, you may want to consider the role that hope does or doesn’t play in your current life. “Hope is an emotion that springs from the heart, not the brain,” adds Dr. Archer, author of the New York Times bestselling book Better Than Normal. “Hope lays dormant until it’s beckoned, supplying a sheer belief that you will overcome, persevere and endure anything and everything that comes your way.” Hope comes in many forms and faces, Dr. Archer says. It isn’t the belief that things will go exactly as planned or that all will end perfectly—after all, life is unpredictable and full of curve balls. Instead, it’s an enduring belief that things will get better. “It’s the belief that at age 55, after a disaster where you’ve lost your home, car and possessions—everything material—that you still have your health and family, and that you can and you will start over. It’s the steadfast determination of the cancer patient who fights, believing that eventually a cure will come. It’s the man who has lost his job, has a family to support and knows that new employment is just around the corner as long as he keeps looking.” Hope, Dr. Archer says, is the championing trait of a true survivor. After working with victims of Hurricanes Katrina and Rita, Dr. Archer noticed that most people fell into one of two camps: psychological victims or psychological survivors. Victims tended toward the pessimistic and passive. Survivors were more active, optimistic, forward-thinking and hopeful, even when grieving. What do the hopeful survivors have that the psychological victims don’t? According to Dr. Archer, it comes down to a few things:

people who have their sights on something bigger and more important than themselves are typically powered by hope, because they believe they have a greater cause.” Gratitude. Survivors are thankful for what they have, rather than focused on what they don’t. “To tap into our inner hope, we have to remind ourselves every day of the things we should be grateful for. It’s easy to focus on what we don’t have, but it’s far more helpful and productive to focus on what we do.” Love. Love is another compelling factor that propels hope, Dr. Archer adds. “Think about the people in your life that you love and those that love you—family and friends. Make it a point to connect often with each and every one. This is best accomplished in person, but as we know that is not always possible. A phone call, text or a quick email will do,” Dr. Archer says. When you go through times of stress and pain, “know without a doubt that this, too, shall pass,” Dr. Archer says. “Then you have hope. And often, that alone is enough to make all the difference.”

Faith. “I’ve found that hope comes from many different places,” Dr. Archer says. “For some, it’s faith—a belief in something greater. Whether it’s God, a higher power, a child, cause or mission, 74 www.thriveswla.com

Thrive Magazine for Better Living

December 2013


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Style & Beauty

Cool Accessories to Complete Your Every Holiday Look by Leslie Fain

“Holiday dressing has everything to do with accessorizing,” said Lauren Flurry, owner of LuLu’s Downtown in Lake Charles. “Adding a pop of color or print to your look is all you need.” She suggests jazzing up your holiday office party outfit with a leopard, chevron, fringe, crochet or bold-colored scarf. If your party outfit is neutral, go with a bold color such as red, pink or purple, according to Morgan Smith, assistant manager for LuLu’s Downtown. “If you are going with a brighter color, go with neutrals like tan, flax or white, something that will contrast with what you are wearing.” You can go from the office party to dinner with friends or a night

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out by swapping out your scarf for a cardigan or poncho. Flurry says ponchos and cardigans are musthaves this season. “They are a perfect transition from a day at work to a night on the town. Just add a piece of jewelry for an elegant evening look.” For an evening holiday party, a special piece of jewelry that is a conversation starter is a good investment, said Flurry. “Statement earrings are the best for balancing an outfit and calling attention to the face and hairstyle.” “If your outfit for the evening is simple, a statement necklace is a great way to draw attention,” said Smith.

Christmas is the time for an array of family get-togethers. For casual get-togethers like these, Smith said headbands are both fun and chic. “Bring a little hippie style to any event with a linked, bedazzled, solid, braided, or printed headband.” Looking ahead to New Year’s Eve, the perfect accessory is a clutch. “With New Year’s Eve, you always want to bring something to the table with sparkles,” said Smith. “The perfect way to kick your cocktail dress up a notch this holiday season is with a sparkly clutch.”

Thrive Magazine for Better Living

December 2013


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Magazine for Better Living

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Style & Beauty

Giving the Gift of by Allie Mariano

WITH THE GIFT-GIVING SEASON IN FULL SWING, MANY PEOPLE WILL BE ON THE PROWL FOR THE PERFECT GIFT. JEWELRY IS A POPULAR OPTION FOR SIGNIFICANT OTHERS, BUT GOOD JEWELRY IS AN INVESTMENT, SO IT’S IMPORTANT TO CONSIDER ALL ASPECTS OF YOUR PURCHASE.

Longtime area jeweler Jim Price, owner of Jim Price Jewelers, has helped select the perfect gift for many customers over the course of his 42 years in business. He says there are several things you should take into account before purchasing jewelry as a gift. “Even before you begin shopping, look at what they wear day to day,” Price says. “Ask yourself if they like big jewelry, if they wear rings, if they are partial to yellow or white gold.” Price takes notice of what his

customers are wearing to help them find something they will love. Another thing to consider is your price range. According to Price, many people come into the store not knowing what they want to spend. “They think they’ll go with whatever strikes their fancy, but it’s our responsibility to find something affordable that is similar.” Sometimes customers are looking for an upgrade. “Either way, a good jeweler will be able to help someone find the perfect piece based on what they have been looking at.” Finally, Price adds that the main thing to consider when giving jewelry as a gift is to look for something unique. “You want to give them that precious item they can’t find anywhere else. This truly shows the amount of thought and effort behind the gift.” For more information, contact Jim Price Jewelers at (337) 478-3953 or visit www.jimpricejewelers.com.

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Thrive Magazine for Better Living

December 2013


Whatever your plans this weekend, we’re ready to join you. Working with more than 2500 Louisiana businesses across 63 parishes, all of us at LCI Workers’ Comp truly appreciate unwinding after a long workweek. For more than 20 years, we’ve been working hard to help all kinds of local companies grow and prosper, providing local businesses with competitive rates, great service, and excellent coverage. So whether you’re throwing a line or just roasting a few marshmallows, we’re with you Louisiana. lciwc.com :: 985-612-1230 December 2013

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Style & Beauty

to Ready Wear

Kick Your Look Up a Notch with

BOOTS!

When the leaves start falling, the boots start calling! My favorite part about fall and winter is getting to wear boots. Ankle boots, booties, mid-calf, knee high, thigh high, riding boots, stiletto boots; there are so many different options that it can sometimes be overwhelming, but I’m here to help!

Remember, if you have a fashion question for me, just email it to edit@thriveswla. com or post it on the Thrive Facebook page. It could be answered in an upcoming column. If yours is chosen, you’ll receive a Thrive t-shirt.

Let’s start with finding the right boot for you. Think about the portions of your body and keep balance with these portions. Any boot worn with the same color tights or jeans can really be any height because your legs and the boots become one whole portion of your body. When booties and tights are the same color it elongates your leg. Avoid having the boot hit at the largest part of your calf because it will make your calves appear larger. If you have large calves, choose boots that are just a few inches shorter than your knee. For a dressier boot, look for a more fitted boot and casual boots can be a little bit roomier.

Booties can be tricky. Avoid booties that hit at the largest part of your ankle, which will create a ‘cankle’. For ladies with larger calves, choose booties that dip down in the opening, which will elongate your ankles. To tuck jeans into booties make sure that the jeans are skinny/tight to the ankle to help slenderize your ankle. If your jeans are not super skinny, you can roll up to create a cuff or roll the jean underneath to make it seem like it’s a shorter jean (a great concept for petites and curvier girls) with just a little bit of your skin showing. For a dressy outfit, wear your heeled boots or booties with your winter dresses or skirts and add tights the same tone as the boots. Keeping the tights the same color as the boots gives it a more put- together and sophisticated look.

Whitney Manns is the owner of WM Wardrobe Consulting. For more information, visit WMwardrobeconsulting.com

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December 2013


For casual days, wear winter shorts, skirts, dresses and jeans with any of your boots. Flat, suede, and worn leather boots are all great details that say casual. If you’re going to tuck your jeans into your boots, make sure that the jeans aren’t too baggy, it looks messy when your knees in your jeans or the jean around the opening of the boot is all bunched up. A fun look with a skirt or shorts is to add a leg warmer that peeks out of the top of the boot, this look can be layered with leggings underneath the leg warmers. Opt for your flat boots for a more casual comfortable look. If your dress hits at your knees you might want to have a boot that hits at your ankle or above the knee, leaving a bare skin in the calf area can make you look shorter and your calves look wider. Step outside of your flats, pumps and sneakers and go for a great pair of boots. They’re a great way to express your personality and take your outfit up a notch.

Have a

Beautiful

Holiday

If a healthier, more youthful appearance is on your wish list, call the Aesthetic Center. Our skin care specialists will asses your skin and recommend rejuvenating treatments and products to help you glow this holiday season!

Our services include: • Cosmetic Injections • Chemical Peels • Microdermabrasion • Targeted Skin Care Treatments • PCA Home Care Products • Jane Iredale Mineral Make-up • Facial Cosmetic Surgery Call 310-1070 for more information or to schedule your appointment.

Gift Certificates Available

Dr. Mark Crawford, Medical Director

(337) December 2013

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310-1070 l facehealth.net www.thriveswla.com

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Community Contributor$ Sasol Donates to American Cancer Society

Sasol North America, S&B Engineers and Constructors, I&I and ISC donated $9,000 to the American Cancer Society in Southwest Louisiana. The total results from increased safety observations, which were matched by the companies. For more information, visit cancer.org.

Entergy Donates to Christus Health Entergy representatives, Margaret Harris, senior account service manager, Keith Coleman, senior engineering assistant, and Anthony “Chip” Arnould, regional customer service manager, present a $5,000 check to CHRISTUS St. Patrick Foundation representatives, Kay C. Barnett, executive director of development, and Chuck O’Connor, annual events manager, as a Corporate Sponsor of the 2013 Dragon Boat Race.

Sowela Receives Donation Mrs. Lisa Bonin Schram, on behalf of the Captain Daniel and Katarina Moeling Goos Foundation, presented a $60,000 gift to Southwest Louisiana Technical Community College (SOWELA). The Goos Foundation is the first Lake Charles donor to contribute to the College’s capital campaign that will help provide $960,000 in local matching funds needed for the construction of an $8 million Student Union building to be built in 2015. For more information, call (337)421-6900.

American Heart Association Heart Walk Receives Donation CHRISTUS Home Care contributed $17,000 to support Team CHRISTUS for the 2013 SWLA American Heart association Heart Walk.

SOWELA Receives Gift from the W.O. Moss Service Auxiliary
 

 Southwest Louisiana Technical Community College (SOWELA) Nursing and Allied Health program was presented with a $6,000 check on behalf of the W.O. Moss Service Auxiliary. For more information, visit www.sowela.edu.

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Sasol Donates to Ethel Precht Foundation

Sasol North America, S&B Engineers and Constructors, I&I and ISC donated $9,000 to the Ethel Precht Hope Breast Cancer Foundation. The total results from increased safety observations, which were matched by the companies. Through the group effort of ECHO employees, Sasol’s contribution will help the Foundation as they continue to provide prosthesis, wigs and other necessary items for survivors in Southwest Louisiana.

Big Lake Fuels donates FishO-Rama Proceeds Family & Youth received $6,500 from G2X Energy. The funds were raised at the Big Lake Fuels Fish-O-Rama, which was held on November 2nd at Calcasieu Point Landing. Big Lake Fuels hosted the event to benefit Family & Youth. For more information, call (337) 436-9533.

Kiwanis Club Supports Court Appointed Special Advocates Family & Youth accepted a $1,000 grant from the Kiwanis Club of South Lake Charles to support programs and services of Court Appointed Special Advocates (CASA). CASA, or Court Appointed Special Advocates, recruits and trains volunteers who are appointed by Family and Juvenile Court Judges to advocate for the best interests of children who have been removed from their homes because of abuse and neglect. Abused and neglected children with a CASA volunteer typically spend less time in foster care and have a better chance of finding a safe, loving, and permanent home. For experienced professional assistance, contact Family & Youth at 337-4369533.

CHRISTUS St. Patrick Hospital Donates CHRISTUS St. Patrick Hospital became the American Heart Association My Heart. My Life. Sponsor with a $25,000 donation to support the 2013 SWLA Heart Walk. This donation helps to promote walking as a part of a healthy lifestyle and provides funding to support cardiovascular research and educational programs for SWLA.

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Solutions Solutions Counseling & EAP for Life Oh, You Better Not Pout!

“I have had enough of the whining! I just can’t take it anymore.” No, I didn’t actually utter those words to any recent client, but I sure thought it a couple of times. I know, I know, not very therapeutic. Not very nurturing and “unconditional loving” either. That’s why I didn’t say it. I have admitted to you before that I’m not the best therapist for someone committed to staying in the victim position, and that is what a whiner is: a person who is going to complain, but not really do anything about whatever he is complaining about. You see, I assume that by the time you got the courage to call my office and schedule an appointment then drummed up the gumption needed to actually show up for the appointment, you are ready to make a change. Not just gripe. Sometimes I wish I was one of those therapists that could just see you week after week and listen unconditionally with the belief that by just being fully present with you, you’ll find your own best path. I’d be a whole lot richer! I would also be a sham. I believe that if you only needed someone to listen to you, you probably could have found a friend to do that. You come to me because you need some additional skills, or a plan of action, or someone to call you out on your unhealthy behaviors. Please understand, I’m not “antiwhiner.” I believe that whiners truly don’t like their circumstances. I also believe that whining is a generational curse; it’s a behavior learned in childhood. The child observes adults whining/griping/complaining but not doing anything to positively change the situation. You see, whiners simply would like for their circumstances to magically change instead of taking some personal responsibility to make the change happen. They want their partner to wake up one day choosing to be a better

December 2013

from

by Keri Forbess-McCorquodale, MS, LPC, LMFT, CEAP

season, check yourself. When you find person (more thoughtful, less angry, the traffic frustrating, remember that less critical, happier); they don’t want you are fortunate to have a car. When to adjust their own behavior to ensure someone treats you unkindly, remind breaking out of the pattern. However, yourself that you could have such bigger as they learn the lesson “You teach problems. When you’re in the crowded people how to treat you” in therapy, the mall, be grateful to have a mall with whiner begins to transform into a more fully stocked stores and some money in assertive (non-whining) individual. your pocket to spend in them. Don’t let A good friend sent me an article the first world problems even leave your some time back that really resonated lips. Remember, no pouting. with me. It was about the fact that the vast amount of the whining that occurs is a result of just how good we have it. People in third world countries are not whining about how someone was mean to her, or that his phone is slower now that he did the download, or that traffic is “horrible.” No, no, they are much more concerned about their family’s next meal, or where they’ll sleep, or how they’re going to keep their children safe from the insurgents. It’s only because we’re a first world country that we have the audacity to complain about such trivial things. My friend and I have adopted www.tutoringcenter.com “that’s a first world problem” as our mantra when we gripe to each other. So, as you go through 3471 Nelson Road your holiday

Lake Charles, LA 70605

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Richard $1 Million Memorial Gift

Leslie R. Richard

Cameron Parish native and businessman Leslie R. Richard was well known to many as one of the organizers of Cameron State Bank and now McNeese State University students will be introduced to him through a generous $1 million memorial gift to the McNeese Foundation for academic scholarships. For more information on the McNeese State University 75th anniversary campaign or the McNeese Foundation, contact Reid at 337-475-5588.

McNeese Professor Receives Fulbright Award

Dr. Steven Rainey

Dr. Steven Rainey, assistant professor of geography at McNeese State University, has been selected for a Fulbright Award to teach and conduct research for a semester in Brazil at the Federal University of Rondonia in Porto Velho. Rainey will spend the spring 2014 semester teaching seminars on geographic information systems and cultural and political ecology in the UNIR geography graduate program and working with members of the graduate faculty to develop future collaborative research projects.

Citgo Donates to McNeese Engineering Citgo Petroleum Corp. has presented a $35,000 donation to the McNeese State University Foundation for the Citgo Petroleum Professorship in Engineering No. 8. L to R: McNeese President Dr. Philip Williams; Tomeu Vadell, Citgo’s vice president and general manager for the Lake Charles manufacturing complex; Dana Keel, Citgo’s government and public affairs manager; Dr. Nikos Kiritsis, dean of the McNeese college of engineering; and Richard H. Reid, vice president for university advancement and executive vice president for the McNeese Foundation.

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McNeese Adds New Police Officers Four recent graduates of the Calcasieu Parish Regional Law Enforcement Training Academy have been sworn in as McNeese State University police officers. McNeese Police Lieutenant Vickie Boudreaux administered the oath of office to four new McNeese police officers. (L-R) Radford Jones, Erroll Williams Jr., Jimmy Vazquez and Keenon Joseph.

McNeese Receives Custom Motor Coach

Robert Noland presented the keys and title to a custom motor coach to McNeese President Dr. Philip Williams (left) and Athletic Director Bruce Hemphill (right).

McNeese Athletics has received a 55 passenger custom motor coach. Donated to the university by RN Entertainment, a luxury tour coach and entertainment travel company based in Lebanon, TN. The 2009 Prevost H3-45 seats 55 comfortably and provides large cargo spaces for equipment.

KMI Donates to Banners at McNeese Banners at McNeese State University is annually supported by donations from area corporate sponsors. Knight Media Inc. has donated $5,000 to Banners.

L to R: Patricia Prudhomme, Banners director; Chris Ehlers, KMI chief operating officer; and Allen Jarvis, KMI chief financial officer.

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December 2013


Turner Industries Donates to McNeese Turner Industries gave $2,500 to the Louisiana Environmental Research Center at McNeese State University through the McNeese Foundation. LERC was established in 1990 for the purpose of conducting L to R: David Franks, senior vice president of Turner research focused on Industries; Janet Woolman, executive director for LERC; and Ben Bourgeois, business development and human environmental issues and resources director of Turner Industries. problems of importance to Southwest Louisiana and the Gulf of Mexico region and to provide information and data to other state and national agencies, researchers and industry.

Market Basket Donates to McNeese Foundation The Market Basket Foundation presented a $10,000 donation to the McNeese State University Foundation for Market Basket scholarships. L to R: Russell Saleme, director of merchandising; Steve Cormier, senior vice president of retail operations; Richard H. Reid, vice president for university advancement and executive vice president for the McNeese Foundation; Skylar Thompson, president; and Keith Dauterive, senior vice president of buying and advertising.

McNeese MFA Program Ranked in Top 25 For the second consecutive year, Poets & Writers magazine has listed McNeese’s MFA program among the nation’s Top 25 MFA programs in its 2014 MFA Index. McNeese’s program – up to No. 22 in the nation - is ranked better than major programs at Columbia University, Florida State University, Notre Dame, Oregon State University, Purdue University, University of Arkansas and Virginia Tech. F or more information about the MFA program visit the website at mfa.mcneese.edu.

Iberia Bank Donates to MSU Athletics IBERIABANK, the 126-yearold subsidiary of IBERIABANK Corporation, has announced the donation of $100,000 to the McNeese State University Athletic Department.

L ro R: MSU President Dr. Phil Williams, IBERIABANK Market President Phil Earhart and MSU Athletic Director Bruce Hemphill.

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Mark Your Calendar! Holiday Performers Bring in the Yuletide Spirit at Local Libraries The Calcasieu Parish Public Library has announced fun, family-oriented holiday performances at local libraries. Performers include Brian and Terri Kinder, Buster Jordan, Johnette Downing and Vicky Branton. For more information contact your local library or log on to www.calcasieulibrary.org for a schedule of performances.

Iberia Bank Hosts Holiday Spirit Drive Iberia Bank is hosting the Holiday Spirit Drive through the end of December. All donations may be dropped off at any Southwest Louisiana Iberia Bank location. Items needed include non-perishable food, personal toiletries and household cleaning products. All items collected will be donated to a pantry or nonprofit organization in the same neighborhood as the collection site.

CTC Announces Disney’s Tarzan School Performances Disney’s TARZAN launches The Children’s Theatre Company’s 2012-2013 Season. Directed by Kerry A. Onxley, this family musical will play for area schools on February 21. Ticket prices are $7.00 per person including students, teachers, chaperons, parents

and bus drivers. For more information, visit www. childrenstheatre.cc

Fusion Five Announces 2nd Annual 5K Zombie Run Fusion Five, SWLA’s Young Professionals Organization, will be hosting their second annual 5K Run, End of the Human Race: Camp Zombie, held at Camp Edgewood on February 8. Participants can choose to be a runner or a zombie. For more information, visit www.endofthehumanrace.com.

First Baptist’s “Singing Christmas Tree” Relives World War II Days First Baptist Lafayette presents its annual “Singing Christmas Tree” performance with a cast of more than 200, including 85 choir members, in “Keep Calm…Christmas is Coming.” The performance will be held December 13-16 at First Baptist Church, 1100 Lee Ave. in downtown Lafayette. Tickets are available through the First Baptist office, online at www.fbclaf.org, or by calling (800) 965-9324.

Christmas Concert Scheduled The annual Louisiana Choral Foundation’s Christmas Concert, Christmas Spirits, will be presented in two venues, Immaculate Conception Cathedral in Lake Charles on December 6 at 7:30pm and Immaculate Conception Church in Sulphur on December 8 at 3:00pm Tickets are available at Swicegood Music and at the door. For more information, call (337) 491-9384.

Cinderella Holiday Dining Scheduled The Children’s Theatre Company and Artistic Director, Kerry Arthur Onxley will present Cinderella’s Holiday Dining on December 7 with seating at 12noon. The cost is $25 and will include children’s favorite storybook characters such as Beauty and the Beast, Cinderella, Prince, Snow White, Pinnochio and more. Character meals include pizza, dessert and a drink. For more information, call (337) 433-7323.

NAMI Holiday Donation Drive National Alliance on Mental Illness of Southwest Louisiana will be collecting donations for both homeless veterans and people affected by serious mental illness through December 13 at NAMI SWLA office in the United Way building, 715 Ryan Street. For more information, call (337) 433-0219.

Vanity L.Y.F.E. Red Carpet Soiree Benefit Vanity L.Y.F.E. will host the 2nd annual “Red Carpet Soiree,” on December 7 from 7-11pm. at 3Topia Ultra Lounge in Lake Charles. This fundraiser will benefit the Southwest Louisiana AIDS Council. For more information, call (337) 263-8828.

Jen Kober Brings Her Homegrown Comedy Tour to Lake Charles Following a number of sold-out shows, nationally known comedian and Lake Charles native Jen Kober brings her Homegrown Comedy Show back to L’Auberge Lake Charles for the holidays. The stand-up, improve and storytelling show features new material each week. General admission tickets are $10 and can be purchased at www.ticketmaster.com. December 25, 9pm, Jack Daniel’s Bar & Grill December 26, 9pm, Jack Daniel’s Bar & Grill

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December 2013


Leukemia and Lymphoma Society Offers Free Community Education Program

Founder of Please Be Kind to Cyclists to Oversee Public Meeting

On Tuesday, December 10, the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society (LLS) will host a free community education program entitled Cancer Treatment: How to Make Informed Choices About Standard Care and Clinical Trials, presented by Rev. Stephen A. Hebert RN, RNFA, BS HCA, followed by an “Ask the Doctor” panel. Registration is required, and begins at 5:30pm at Reeves Uptown Catering in Lake Charles. A complimentary dinner will be served at 6pm with the program and panel to follow until 8pm. For more information, call (800) 955-4572.

Alvero Bastidas, the founder of Please Be Kind to Cyclists, will present a public meeting on Wednesday, December 11 in Room 108 at Central School. Based in Austin, Texas, the organization has chapters worldwide. Organizers hope to open a new dialogue to create positive change where pedestrian and cyclist-friendly streets are concerned.

Holiday Arts Performances The Nutcracker Returns

Jazz in the Arts Holiday Performance Scheduled

The Nutcracker will be presented by the Lake Charles Dance Academy with multiple performances scheduled for December 12-15th at the Shearman Fine Arts Center located on the McNeese State University. This year’s performance marks the 50th anniversary of the first time the ballet was performed in Lake Charles in 1963. For more information, performance times and ticket prices, call (337) 475-5000.

Merry Christmas, a Jazz in the Arts concert, is scheduled for Sunday, December 22, at the Central School Arts and Humanities Theatre. The performance will take place at 5 p.m. but a silent auction will be held beforehand starting at 4 p.m. The concert will feature Carl Richardson and Jairus Daigle with a special appearance by Lindsey Papion. Tickets are $10 in advance or $12 at the door. For more information, call (337) 439-2787 or (337) 794-5744.

Rudolph, the Red-Nosed Reindeer Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer is a classic from the Lake Charles Civic Ballet (LCCB) repertoire and is scheduled for December 14 at the Rosa Hart Theatre. Created in 1969 by Lady Leah Lafargue Hathaway, Rudolph has delighted audiences every two-four years ever since that first performance. It is the classic Christmas story of the young reindeer who learns that he is important and needed, choreographed and set by the artists of LCCB. For more information,performance times and ticket prices, visit www.lakecharlescivicballet.com.

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Thrive December 2013 Issue  

December 2013 issue of Thrive