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2012 NURSE ANNUAL REPORT


OUR WORK IS NEVER DONE Most of us consider nursing a calling – we know that our care doesn’t end when a shift is over. Whether staying late with a grieving family, talking with a friend about their swollen ankle or helping in an emergency at a neighborhood pool, Texas Health Resources nurses share their skills and passion 24/7. In 2012, Texas Health nurses strengthened that 24/7 commitment in a number of ways. More than 1,200 nurses participated in Texas Health’s educational opportunities for Nursing, and more nurses than ever participated in our Nursing Career Advancement Program. We continued to bring together Nursing across the system through initiatives such as implementing one policy and procedure system for all of Texas Health and developing a system Nursing Informatics program. Texas Health nurses embraced opportunities in 2012 to make contributions to Texas Health and the nursing profession through new knowledge and improvements. Texas Health nurses were fellows in the Texas Christian University (TCU) Center for Evidence Based Practice and Research, and a number of nurses worked on American Organization of Nurse Executives (AONE) Center for Care Innovation and Transformation projects on their units. Texas Health nurses travelled the globe in 2012 – from Thailand to California to Australia to Florida – sharing new knowledge through podium and poster presentations. Being a nurse 24/7 in today’s rapidly-changing health care environment requires nimble, empowered nurses who can implement and sustain quick change. Read through our annual report, and you’ll see the programs we’ve established and the progress we’ve made in equipping and empowering our nurses to lead and manage change. Regards, Joan Shinkus Clark, D.N.P., R.N., N.E.A.-B.C., C.E.N.P., F.A.C.H.E., F.A.A.N. Senior Vice President and Texas Health Chief Nurse Executive


TRANSFORMATIONAL LEADERSHIP...... .......... 2 NURSE PROFILE: JULIE BALLUCK, M.S.N., R.N., C.P.A.N., N.E.A.-B.C.

STRUCTURAL EMPOWERMENT..................... 6 NURSE PROFILE: CELINA COOK, R.N., P.C.C.N.

EXEMPLARY PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE . . . . . . . . . . 1 2 NURSE PROFILE: BRIAN PRIMM, M.S.N., R.N., C.N.L.

NEW KNOWLEDGE AND INNOVATION............... 1 6 NURSE PROFILE: SARIKA PICH, B.S.N., R.N.

EMPIRICAL QUALITY RESULTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 NURSE PROFILE: JAIME BALL, B.S.N., R.N., C.C.R.N.

CNOS’ ENTITY ACCOMPLISHMENTS ............... 28 GREAT 100 NURSES AND ACHIEVEMENTS......... 30 SPOTLIGHT ON TEXAS HEALTH FORT WORTH. . . . . 32

On the Cover: Amelia Cuello, R.N., Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital Plano; Brian Primm, M.S.N., R.N., C.N.L., Texas Health Harris Methodist Hospital HEB; Jade Taylor, R.N., Texas Health Arlington Memorial Hospital.


CHARTING NEW TERRITORY Transformational Leadership In a time of increased focus on accountable care, Julie Balluck, M.S.N., R.N., C.P.A.N., N.E.A.-B.C., has what it takes to be a transformational leader. As director of Surgical Services at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital Dallas, she has steadily moved her employee teams to achieve higher employee engagement, greater patient and physician satisfaction, and improved quality outcomes. “Making change happen requires transparency, visibility, accessibility and listening skills,” said Balluck, whose quick smile and positive demeanor make her an approachable leader. “Plus, holding everyone equally accountable helps move us forward.” Balluck believes in a “bottom up” approach to finding solutions. “The best solutions come from the bedside, and it’s my job to listen and then use my position to help make those solutions happen,” said Balluck. Balluck credits a supportive PACU staff that she led when she was only in her 20s, as well as her director at the time, with helping her become the leader she is today. She also appreciates her chief nursing officer, Cole Edmonson, D.N.P., R.N., F.A.C.H.E., N.E.A.-B.C., as a great role model and coach. Throughout her career, Balluck has learned the importance of honest and clear communication. She uses texting, email, face-to-face and phone calls to lead her staff where they need to go. Balluck is quick to recognize that transformation can be a struggle, and that some changes are made without input from her staff. “If a decision has been made without the staff’s input, I believe it’s very important to be honest and let them know what is coming,” she said. “Explaining the reasons why decisions have been made is key to gaining the staff’s support.” Leaders like Balluck are helping Texas Health nurses drive the change needed for transforming health care in North Texas.


Julie Balluck

Transformational Leadership

3


TRANSFORMATIONAL LEADERSHIP

Chief Nurse Officer Council Creates Vision for Future Texas Health’s Chief Nurse Officer Council (CNOC) guides the implementation of the Nursing Strategic Plan. CNOC members include all chief nursing officers (see list on pages 28 and 29), as well as the following leaders:

• Candy Baptist, B.S.N., R.N., M.H.S.M., director of Clinical/Academic Education programs, Texas Health

• •

• • •

Resources Center for Learning Janelle Browne, M.B.A., S.P.H.R., vice president of Human Resources, Texas Health Resources Joan Clark, D.N.P., R.N., N.E.A.-B.C., C.E.N.P., F.A.C.H.E., F.A.A.N., senior vice president and Texas Health Chief Nurse Executive Terri DeSio, Esq., assistant general counsel, Texas Health Resources Linda Gerbig, B.S.N., R.N., M.S.P.H., Texas Health vice president of Performance Improvement Debbie Hay, B.S.N., R.N., C.A.S.C., senior vice president of Texas Health Partners

• Mary Beth Mitchell, M.S.N., R.N., B.C., Texas Health • •

chief nursing information officer Tanya Mitchell, Texas Health program director for Nursing Finance Paula Spears, D.N.Sc., R.N., N.E.A.-B.C., vice president for Professional Practice, Research and Magnet Program

• Marcie Williams, M.S., R.N., F.A.S.H.R.M., C.P.P.S., C.P.H.R.M., C.H.S.P., C.H.E.P., C.L.N.C., Texas Health vice president of Safety and Risk Management CNOs are represented on all Texas Health systemwide Clinical and Operational Performance Improvement Councils, other councils, and committees, giving Nursing the opportunity to influence systemwide processes and programs.

Nurse Executive Residency develops future leaders Texas Health’s Center for Learning Talent Academy launched a Nurse Executive Residency program in 2012 to identify a pool of high-potential nursing directors and equip them with evidence-based skill sets for assuming future nursing executive leader roles. The residency involves leader-led workshops and assignments to achieve personal mastery of a number of competencies, from human resource management to fiscal outcomes. Each participant is assigned to a chief nurse officer within the system to serve as a mentor. Five nurses completed the residency for 2012.

4


Clinical Leader Rounding Helps Leaders Connect with Patients, Families Texas Health nurse leaders make it a priority to participate in Clinical Leader Rounding. This evidencebased best practice is an opportunity for clinical leaders to connect with patients and families and ask them questions about their care and service experience.

Having a clinical leader stop by and talk to a patient and family members provides a number of opportunities and benefits. The leader can: • Address service recovery issues while the patient is still in the care environment • Learn of staff members who should be recognized

• • •

for a job well done Demonstrate Texas Health’s clinical commitment to providing high quality care and service Share feedback with staff for performance improvement opportunities Proactively manage the patient experience to ensure that their expectations are being met or exceeded Validate quality and hardwiring of organizational initiatives

11,875

In 2012 (through Dec. 4), patients responded that they were visited by a nurse manager or supervisor during their inpatient stay. Not only does Clinical Leader Rounding improve outcomes, including patient satisfaction on HCAHPS (Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems), it also is essential to Texas Health’s values of respect, integrity, compassion and excellence.

Transformational Leadership

5


TEAM SPIRIT Structural Empowerment Celina Cook, R.N., P.C.C.N., Texas Health Harris Methodist Hospital Fort Worth Heart Center, is making a difference – not only for her patients but also for her practice. By taking advantage of the structures in place to empower nurses at Texas Health hospitals, Cook has been leading nurses on her unit to have an impact on decisions. Cook has been the chair of her unit’s Unit Based Council (UBC) for three years. “When things aren’t working on our unit, we turn to our UBC to come up with our own solutions which are unique to our unit,” said Cook. “The UBC gives frontline nurses the opportunity to provide input on decisions.” Cook claims that she is “an accidental nurse” who planned on being an interior designer. “I thought I’d just do nursing for a little while, and I cried all the time while I was in school because of the stress,” she said with a laugh. “But once I realized that I could really make such an impact on my patients, I never looked back.” Spend just a few minutes with Cook, and you’ll feel her enthusiasm for Nursing and making a difference. “Our patients are just little angels in disguise,” said Cook. “They are so appreciative, and it’s great to know that you can make such a difference in their lives.” A qualified bilingual interpreter for the hospital, Cook takes her commitment to shared decision making beyond her UBC by serving on the hospital’s Recruitment, Retention and Recognition Committee, and the Versant Committee. “It’s important for nurses to be involved because if they don’t make decisions themselves, someone else will make the decisions for them,” she said.


Celina Cook

Structural Empowerment

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STRUCTURAL EMPOWERMENT

Agents of Change Nursing Congress Provides Opportunity for Making Impact Texas Health’s Nursing Congress met four times in 2012 to share best practices, make decisions about changes to workflow, and contribute to individual, entity and system goals. Nursing Congress consists of more than 75 nurses with varied job descriptions from throughout Texas Health, as well as system Nursing leadership.

1,170

nursing policies and procedures

Standardized

90%

nursing policies and procedures

Eliminated

“In Nursing Congress, we share information about what nurses are doing and experiencing all over North Texas,” said Mary Teague, B.S.N., R.N., C.H.P.N., nursing supervisor on the Hospice Unit at Texas Health Arlington Memorial Hospital and a member of Texas Health’s Nursing Congress. “We gather input and make decisions about workflow processes, patient satisfaction and employee engagement. We are then able to take valuable information back to our own hospitals for process improvements.”

PolicyConnect

Teague stresses that serving on Nursing Congress provides a powerful opportunity for nurses.

for all policies and procedure documents

“Being a part of Nursing Congress provides the opportunity to have a direct impact on the practice of professional nursing at Texas Health,” said Teague. “I am proud to be part of a health care system that listens and makes changes based on input from employees involved in direct patient care.”

launched

8

The purpose of Nursing Congress is to facilitate collaboration of Nursing voices to recommend, facilitate and implement Texas Health Nursing initiatives in alignment with Texas Health’s 10-Year Strategic Focus and the organization’s transformational themes.


Great Expectations As a nursing student, Camia Fox, Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital Denton, gets inspiration from the nurses she works with as a unit clerk in Labor and Delivery.

Upping our Game More than 1,250 nurses took advantage of Texas Health’s educational programs and partnerships in 2012. Texas Health’s Center for Learning coordinated a variety of programs, from the Nurse Executive Residency Program to Continuing Nursing Education classes to academic partnerships with a number of area universities.

“You can tell that they love what they do, and I really want to have that kind of patient interaction and impact on people’s lives,” she said. Fox is a student in Texas Health Resources’ Academic Partner BSN program with the University of Texas at Arlington and receives tuition reimbursement from Texas Health. She began the program in January 2012 and will graduate in May 2013. “I am as nervous as I am excited about becoming a nurse,” said Fox. “It has been a challenging journey, but it has made me stronger.”

Structural Empowerment

9


In Good Faith The mission of Faith Community Nursing at Texas Health is the intentional integration of the practice of faith with the practice of professional Nursing to improve the health of the communities we serve. At the end of 2012, the program included 112 unpaid registered nurses serving 88 faith communities and touching more than 49,000 families.

Above: Bonnie Skodak, B.S.N., R.N., Trauma coordinator at Texas Health HEB, has cared for congregants as a faith community nurse since 2005 at St. Philip Presbyterian Church in Hurst, Texas, where Rev. Dr. Greg Garis serves as pastor.

Nurses coordinated 74 health events in 2012, such as cardiovascular risk assessments, child car seat safety education, Matter of Balance fall prevention training, as well as programs on topics including nutrition, stroke education and CPR training. Faith Community nurses also provided more than 2,820 flu vaccines to faith community members. Additionally, the Faith Community Nursing program donated automatic blood pressure machines and digital scales to 79 faith communities in 2012. Texas Health has a systemwide Faith Community Nursing director as well as directors at five hospitals.

“Nursing is my ministry, so I enjoy taking my skills and serving my church.� – Bonnie Skodak, B.S.N., R.N., Trauma coordinator at Texas Health HEB and faith community nurse at St. Philip Presbyterian Church.

10

Structural Empowerment


Education Levels: Nursing Leaders Systemwide Funding Excellence

Reflecting Texas Health’s commitment to furthering nursing education and building the Clinical Nurse Leader program, almost $400,000 of the fund was disbursed in 2012 (through Oct. 31, 2012). Funds are disbursed based on the recommendations of the Nursing Excellence Advisory Board, which is comprised of nurses from throughout the system.

MSN

DIRECTOR

The Nursing Excellence Fund received just over $690,000 in pledges and gifts through Oct. 31, 2012, in addition to a $1.5 million endowment gift. This unique fund provides educational scholarships for nurses in the University of Texas at Arlington Academic Partnership BSN Program and the Clinical Nurse Leader program.

61%

BSN

23%

2YR College Degree

11%

Doctorate

5%

The Texas Health Central Staffing Office was created as a wholly-owned Texas Health entity in 2012.

75 558

active working Texas Health entity based Float Pool staff credentialed staff for filling shifts with affiliate providers

MANAGER

Staffing Solutions MSN

65%

BSN

23%

2YR College Degree

9%

Diploma Nurse

2% HS Graduate or Equal

1%

Structural Empowerment

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A BALANCE IN EVERYONE’S FAVOR Exemplary Professional Practice From serving in the Army to working in business to studying electrical engineering, Brian Primm, M.S.N., R.N., C.N.L., Texas Health Harris Methodist Hospital Hurst-Euless-Bedford, took a winding road to becoming a clinical nurse leader (CNL) that has served him well. “I’m able to bring a different perspective to our work because of my background,” said Primm, who doesn’t miss a beat in talking with a visitor, stopping by a patient room to address an alarm, and then continuing the conversation. As the CNL on the Progressive Care Unit, Primm serves as an advocate, team manager, information manager, systems analyst and outcomes manager. He is committed to excellence in professional practice and says he appreciates that the CNL role gives him the time to look for trends, study best practices, analyze costs and educate patients. “This is the perfect job for me,” he said. “I love talking with and teaching patients, and it’s great to have the freedom to find out the real issues.” Primm’s job gives him the time to be at the bedside while also implementing changes, such as those recommended by the unit based council and system initiatives such as hourly rounding and bedside reports. “I can bring Texas Health’s vision to the frontline nursing staff and then share their feedback with Texas Health,” he said. Since Primm first started on the unit one and one-half years ago, the unit has seen a decrease in length of stay, increase in nurse engagement and improvement in discharge education. Achieving these results takes a balance, according to Primm. “As CNLs we’re always working to find a balance between working on process improvements, which will have long-term benefits, with spending time with the patients in our care area to make sure they are getting what they need,” he said.

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Brian Primm

Exemplary Professional Practice

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EXEMPLARY PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE

Clinical Nurse Leader Program Continues to Grow The clinical nurse leader (CNL) role continued to make a significant impact on coordinating care with patients, families and the multidisciplinary team at Texas Health hospitals. Twenty-seven Texas Health nurses were enrolled in the CNL program at Texas Christian University during 2012, with 13 graduating in May.

INTERNSHIP IMPACT Almost 400 nursing students and newly graduated nurses took advantage of internships at Texas Health in 2012.

IMPROVING COMPETENCY Texas Health Physicians Group developed and deployed a nurse educator-led annual competency evaluation of unlicensed assistive personnel in the physician office that increased blood pressure measurement competency from 37 to 90 percent.

VERSANT RN RESIDENCY™ PROGRAM The prestigious Versant RN Residency Program is an education and training system designed to successfully transition nurses from academia to the bedside. Texas Health had 120 Versant residents at five hospitals in 2012.

Versant residents at Texas Health Arlington Memorial in 2012 included, from left back, Patti Bentley, R.N., clinical educator and Versant program coordinator; Nancy Osteen, R.N., clinical educator; Versant nurse residents: Linda Elliott, Alyssa Sebesta, Nicole Garcia, and Jaelynn Owens, and Anne-Gret Friedrich-Cuntz, R.N., clinical educator; Front Row, Julie Holland, R.N., nursing administration manager; Versant nurse residents: Jade Taylor, Candice DeLuna and Roshan Jacob, and Lori Donovan, R.N., chief nursing officer.

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LEADERSHIP IN PROFESSIONAL ORGANIZATIONS Angela Alexander, B.S.N., R.N., C.M.S.R.N., Texas Health Plano, chair of the North Texas Academy of Medical Surgical Nurses – Community Outreach

John Marchand, B.S.N., R.N., J.D., Texas Health Plano • ABPANC Board member and Test Writing Committee • Wesley-Rankin Community Center Board member

Peggy Brady, B.S.N., R.N., C.E.N., Texas Health Arlington Memorial, president-elect of Tarrant County ENA

Jennifer Mazandarani, R.N.C.-O.B., Texas Health Plano, officer for AWHONN

Mary Carrizalez, M.B.A., R.N.C.-N.I.C., C.C.R.N., Texas Health Arlington Memorial, board member of the Perinatal Nursing Symposium

Mary Beth Mitchell, M.S.N., R.N., B.C., Texas Health Resources • HIMSS Nursing Informatics Committee • ANIA Conference Planning Committee • ANCC Content Expert Registry

Joan Shinkus Clark, D.N.P., R.N., N.E.A.-B.C., C.E.N.P., F.A.C.H.E., F.A.A.N., senior vice president and Texas Health Chief Nurse Executive: • AONE Board member (Region 7) • AONE Health Care Reform Task Force co-chair • AONE System Chief Nurse Executive Steering Committee member • AONE representative for the American Association of Colleges of Nursing’s Clinical Nurse Leader Steering Committee member • AHA regional policy board representative (Region 7) • AHA workgroup on the patient care team of the future member • North Texas Chapter of the American College of Healthcare Executives Communications Committee Michelle Duron, R.N., C.M.S.R.N., Texas Health Plano, master trainer for the Stanford Chronic Disease Self Management Program Kathleen Glass, I.N.I., Texas Health Arlington Memorial, president of Local Greater Midcities Chapter of the AACN

Judy Oyer, L.V.N./C.S.T., Texas Health Plano, Collin College Advisory Board for the Scrub Tech Program Michel Roberts, B.S.N., R.N., C.R.N.I., V.A.-B.C., Texas Health Arlington Memorial, president of INS Donna Rogers, I.N.I., Texas Health Arlington Memorial, president of Lion’s Club Christine Russe, M.S.N., R.N., C.E.N., C.P.E.N., Texas Health Plano • Texas State Council ENA president-elect • Texas State Council ENA Nursing Practice Committee Chair • Dallas Chapter ENA immediate past president • DCENA Nursing Practice Committee chair • DCENA Education Committee Chair • DCENA Government Affairs Committee Chair

Heidi Gustus, R.N., Texas Health Arlington Memorial, board member of the Perinatal Nursing Symposium

Sue Sebazco, R.N., M.B.A., C.I.C., Texas Health Arlington Memorial, appointed by the State of Texas to the Health Care Associated Infections/Preventable Adverse Events Advisory (HAI/PAE) Panel

Sheree Henson, M.S.N., R.N.-B.C., Texas Health Southwest, TNE CNE Committee and TNA District 3 director

Karen Sullivan, B.S.N., R.N., C.C.R.N., Texas Health Plano, president of the Dallas Chapter of AACN

Linda Humphries, M.S.N., R.N., C.N.S., Texas Health Southwest, membership chair of the Texas Association of Clinical Nurse Specialists

Diane Thomas, M.S.N., R.N., C.W.O.C.N., C.N.L., Texas Health Specialty Hospital, chairperson of the Hospitality Committee for the South Central Region WOC Conference Planning Committee

RN V: 23

RN VI: 1

NURSING CAREER ADVANCEMENT PROGRAM Of the more than

RN IV: 291

500 nurses

who participated in the program in

2012 NURSING CAREER ADVANCEMENT PROGRAM (NCAP) PARTICIPANTS TOTAL: 503

200 were nurses new to the program and 35 2012, almost

nurses advanced levels.

RN III: 188

Exemplary Professional Practice

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BEST IN CLASS New Knowledge & Innovation When Sarika Pich, B.S.N., R.N., manager of Education for Texas Health Physicians Group (THPG), touts ACES as fun, beneficial and rewarding, you might think she’s promoting the latest, greatest card game. Pich’s ACES, however, is the Annual Competency Evaluation of Skills, which she leads for unlicensed assistive personnel in THPG. “I am passionate about teaching and seeing that glow when someone understands what you are teaching them,” said Pich. “I love cheering on staff to ‘ace the ACES.’” Pich and her manager and mentor, Catherine Hill, D.N.P., A.P.R.N., G.N.P.-B.C., chief nursing officer for THPG, identified an opportunity to improve quality of care provided by frontline support staff in THPG medical offices. In response, Pich developed the innovative ACES program, which features the first annual competency check-off of key clinical skills conducted by nurse educators for THPG. Pich views her role as that of a coach and mentor. “It’s so great to work with the staff and help them see the product of their clinical skills,” said Pich. “They appreciate the training and mentorship so it’s a win for them, for the patients and for THPG.” Pich was a fellow for 2011–2012 with the Texas Christian University Center for Evidence Based Practice and Research: A Collaborating Center of the Joanna Briggs Institute. For her project, Pich researched the evidence and conducted a study on the effectiveness of an unstructured program of skills training for unlicensed assistive personnel versus a structured program. Through her work and assistance of colleagues, Pich was able to identify basic blood pressure competency of 37 percent in unstructured training versus a 90 percent competence using a structured program among medical assistants in THPG provider offices. THPG includes approximately 600 physicians and more than 200 physician assistants and nurse practitioners. The ACES program is extending Texas Health’s commitment to improve quality of care in this crucial portion of the continuum of care. Pich recognizes the important role of nurses in quality improvement. “Nurses should embrace opportunities and use their skill sets, knowledge and the evidence to improve patient care,” said Pich.

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Sarika Pich

New Knowledge

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NEW KNOWLEDGE & INNOVATION

Highlights of AONE Center for Care Innovation and Transformation Projects Texas Health Plano: CCIT TEAMS: Janice DeLa Paz, B.S.N., R.N., O.N.C.; Brandon Stark, R.N.; Anthodith Garganera, B.S.N., R.N.; Angie Marshall, B.S.N., R.N., M.M.H.A.; Charmaine Sy, B.S.N., R.N.; Catherine Bates, B.S.N., R.N. PROJECTS: • Improving PCT Care Delivery and Workflow • Integrating Progressive Nursing Process in Decreasing Call Light Use

Texas Health HEB: CCIT TEAM: Lupe Alvarado, B.S.N., R.N., P.C.F.; Ester Bowman, B.S.N., R.N.; Amanda David, B.S.N., R.N.; Bernette Dong, M.A., R.N.; June Downs, R.N.; Lori Krogman, B.S.N., R.N.; Cathy Maliyekal, R.N.; Karen Murphy, B.S.N., R.N.; Marah Murphy, unit secretary; Kathy Novocin, R.N.; Pushpa Narayanan, R.N. PROJECTS: • The Tower 4 Welcome Cup • Medication Administration laminated teaching guides Texas Health Southwest: CCIT TEAM: Zandra Mendoza, R.N.; Kathy Terryah, R.N.; Tammy Reagan, R.N.; Gretchen Hunt, R.N.; Mary Robinson, R.N.; Pa’Shauna Evans, unit secretary; Austin Grajczyk, R.N.; Rachel Mansheim, R.N.; Kim Meadows, R.N.; Cindy Seitz, R.N; Aracely Kundmueller, R.N.; Karen Mirabella, R.N.; Lanita Stowe, R.N. PROJECTS: • Unit Orientation Guideline Sheets for PCTs/nurses floated to the unit • Ready Room Checklist for Charge Nurses Texas Health Specialty Hospital: CCIT TEAM: Karan Rider, B.S.N., R.N.; Sarah Comeau, R.N.; Crystal Schramm, R.N. PROJECTS: • HoverMatt, to improve ease of moving patients on the bed • Rental Rounding to assure appropriate use of rental items

Members of the CCIT team at Texas Health Southwest.

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PUBLICATIONS Batcheller, J., Edmonson, C., both of Texas Health Dallas. Nurses Taking Action in Texas: A Series, Texas Nursing Voice, October, November, December 2012. Crenshaw, J., Texas Health Dallas. Perioperative Fasting. Response to letter to the editor [Crenshaw, Preoperative Fasting: Will the evidence ever be implemented? October 2010], American Journal of Nursing, January 2012. Crenshaw, J., Texas Health Dallas. Use of Video-Feedback, Reflection, and Interactive Analysis to Improve Nurse Leadership Practices, Nursing Administration Quarterly, July 2012. Crenshaw, J., et al., Texas Health Dallas. Use of a VideoEthnographic Intervention (PRECESS Immersion Method) to Improve Skin to Skin Care and Breastfeeding, Breastfeeding Medicine, February 2012. Edmonson, C., Texas Health Dallas. Leader to Patient Program: Bringing the Clinical and Leadership Domains Together, Nurse Leader, April 2012. Humphries, L., Baldwin, K., Clark, K., Tenuta, V., Brumley, K., all of Texas Health Southwest. A Comparison of Coagulation Study Results Between Heparinized Peripherally Inserted Central Catheters and Venipunctures, Clinical Nurse Specialist: The International Journal for Advanced Nursing Practice, October 2012. Kelly, P., Texas Health Dallas. A National Genetic Testing Registry: Will it Provide Useful Information?, ONS Genetics SIG Newsletter, June 2012. Marshall, J., Edmonson, C., Gemeinhardt, G., Hamilton, P., all of Texas Health Dallas. Balancing Interests of Hospitals and Nurse Researchers: Lessons Learned, Applied Nursing Research, August 2012.

Mitchell, M.B., Texas Health Resources. Mobile Use at Texas Health Resources, HIMSS Newsletter, March 2012. Mullen, S., Texas Health Dallas. Operation Daughters Addicted: Positive Strategies to Overcome the Dual Addiction of Eating Disorders and Substance Abuse, Inkwater Press, July 2012. Ranier, J., Texas Health Dallas. Child Visitor, Adult ICU, Nursing Management, January 2012. Roberts, L., Texas Health Dallas. ANA/AONE: Principles of Collaborative Relationships between Clinical Nurses and Nurse Managers, May 2012. Shinkus Clark, J., Texas Health Resources. The System Chief Nurse Executive Role: Sign of the Changing Times?, Nursing Administration Quarterly, October 2012. True, B., Texas Health Arlington Memorial. Postpartum Hemorrhage and Maternal Resuscitation Workstation Crib Sheet, Instructor Manual for the Advanced Life Support in Obstetrics (ALSO) Course. True, B., Tullar, P., Stowe-Quain, A., Kauffman, R., GravesEvenson, K., all of Texas Health Arlington Memorial. Comparison Study of ALSO Trained and Traditional Trained OB/GYN and Family Practice Residents in Shoulder Dystocia, Open Medical Education Journal, 2012. Winslow, E., Cooper, S., Haws, D., Balluck, J., Jones, C., Morse, E., Edwards, T., Kelly, P., all of Texas Health Dallas. Unplanned Perioperative Hypothermia and Agreement Between Oral, Temporal Artery, and Bladder Temperatures in Adult Major Surgery Patients, Journal of PeriAnesthesia Nursing, June 2012. Winslow, E., Kelly, P., both of Texas Health Dallas. Active Warming Study: Letter to the Editor, American Journal of Nursing, September 2012.

Mitchell, M.B., Texas Health Resources. Increasing Use of Mobile Devices by Nurses, Nursing Management, September 2012.

TCU EVIDENCE BASED PRACTICE FELLOWS Texas Health had eight Evidence Based Practice fellows for 2011–2012 with the Texas Christian University (TCU) Center for Evidence Based Practice and Research: A Collaborating Center of the Joanna Briggs Institute:

• • • • • • • •

Rebekah Brooks, B.S.N., R.N., Texas Health Southwest Rosemary Cruikshank, B.S.N., R.N., Texas Health Azle Boyce Davis, B.S.N., R.N., O.N.C., Texas Health Dallas Angie Marshall, M.M.H.A., B.S.N., R.N., C.C.R.N., Texas Health Plano Kerry Miller, B.S.N., C.E.N., Texas Health HEB Sarika Pich, B.S.N., R.N., Texas Health Physicians Group Jessica Rangel, R.N., M.S., Texas Health Fort Worth Marina Reeves, B.S.N., R.N.C.-L.R.N., Texas Health Dallas

26

Texas Health nurses are TCU Evidence Based Practice fellows for 2012-2013. New Knowledge

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NURSING RESEARCH STUDIES

Nursing Informatics Grows, Enhances Nursing Quality Under the leadership of Texas Health Chief Nursing Informatics Officer Mary Beth Mitchell, M.S.N., R.N., B.C., nursing informatics continued to grow in 2012. Significant achievements include: • Development of a Texas Health Nursing Informatics program with five nursing informaticists to transition to corporate from the entities in 2013

• Implementation of bar-coded blood administration • •

20

for Nursing Revision and streamlining of patient discharge instructions and nursing care plans in CareConnect Implementation of a Nursing Acuity System at 14 hospitals in all Med/Surg, Telemetry and Critical Care areas Promotion of nursing informatics professional development through Nursing Informatics Boot Camp and other educational events

New Knowledge

Aromatherapy Interventions to Reduce the Anxiety and Depression Levels of Family Members and Friends of Patients with Traumatic Injury – Charlsea Prichard, R.N., B.S.N., C.C.R.N., C.C.A.P., N.E.-B.C., Texas Health Fort Worth Blanket Warmer Study – Patricia Kelly, D.N.P., A.P.R.N., C.N.S., A.O.C.N., Texas Health Dallas Bullying in the Workplace – Kerri Miller, R.N.; Roxanne Jones, R.N.; Ilse Gonzalez-Castillo, S.N.; Deborah Behan, Ph.D., R.N.B.C.; all of Texas Health HEB Cardiac Rehab Survey – Pat Poprocki, B.S.N., R.N.; Deborah Behan, Ph.D., R.N.-B.C.; both of Texas Health HEB Clinical Nurse Leadership at the Bedside – Lenora Langlais, Ph.D. candidate; Kathleen Baldwin, Ph.D., R.N., Texas Health Southwest Colorectal Cancer and Family History Assessment – Patricia Kelly, D.N.P., A.P.R.N., C.N.S., A.O.C.N., Texas Health Dallas Does Music Soothe the Soul in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit? – Candy Bruton, R.N.; Deborah Behan, Ph.D., R.N.-B.C.; Stepheny Thacker, S.N.; all of Texas Health HEB Effect of Authentic Leadership on Leadership Attributes & Positive State-Like Capacities Among RNs – Judy Martin, R.N., Texas Health HEB Human Resource Management and Built Environment Interface – Hessam Sadatsafavi, Ph.D. candidate; Kathleen Baldwin, Ph.D., R.N., Texas Health Southwest Identifying Heart Failure Patients at Risk for Readmission – Kathleen Baldwin, Ph.D., R.N., Texas Health Southwest Impacting Memory Loss through Brain Aerobics – Kathleen Baldwin, Ph.D., R.N.; Linda Humphries, M.S.N., R.N., A.C.N.S.; both of Texas Health Southwest Integrating Genomic Competencies with the Registered Nurse’s Scope of Practice – Michelle Hampton, M.S.N., R.N., C.C.R.N., Texas Health Fort Worth; Patricia Kelly, D.N.P., A.P.R.N., C.N.S., A.O.C.N., Texas Health Dallas; Cole Edmonson, D.N.P., R.N., F.A.C.H.E., N.E.A.-B.C., Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Executive Nurse Fellow, Texas Health Dallas Minimizing Preventable Readmissions – Kathleen Baldwin, Ph.D., R.N., Texas Health Southwest Missed Nursing Care – Deborrah Wegmann, R.N., Texas Health HEB SmartBed – Mehrdad Nourani, Ph.D., University of Texas at Dallas; Alan Bowling, Ph.D., University of Texas at Arlington; Deborah Behan, Ph.D., R.N.-B.C., Texas Health HEB The Geriatric Institutional Assessment Profile (GIAP) as an Indicator of Facility Readiness to Provide Exemplary Geriatric care – Michelle Hampton, M.S.N., R.N., C.C.R.N., Texas Health Fort Worth Understanding Crying in Babies – Kathleen Baldwin, Ph.D., R.N.; Jamie Underhill, M.S.N., R.N.; both of Texas Health Southwest Use of Essential Oil Therapy in Hemodialysis Patients During Treatment to Reduce Anxiety – Marie Markish, R.N.; Deborah Behan, Ph.D., R.N.-B.C.; Heather Lynch, S.N.; all of Texas Health HEB What do Patients Perceive as Quietness of Hospital? – Mercy Mumba, R.N.; Deborah Behan, Ph.D., R.N.-B.C.; both of Texas Health HEB


PODIUM PRESENTATIONS Baldwin, K. M., Texas Health Southwest, and Hammond, S. L., Texas Health Cleburne. Hospital-Based Post-Discharge Community Case Management in Rural Texas. Texas Clinical Nurse Specialists 2012 Conference, Austin, TX, June 2012.

Pytleski, M., and Schraffenberger, C., both of Texas Health Southwest. Implementation of the Period of Purple Crying Program. Period of Purple Crying Implementation Workshop, Fort Worth, TX, September 2012.

Jones, C., Morse, L., both of Texas Health Dallas. Identifying and Reducing Unplanned Perioperative Hypothermia. Texas Association of PeriAnesthesia Nurses Seminar, Dallas, TX, May 2012.

Reeves, M., Texas Health Dallas. Improving Patient Satisfaction by Performing Newborn Procedures at the Bedside. 8th Biennial Joanna Briggs International Colloquium, Chiang Mai, Thailand, November 2012.

Kalish, J., Texas Health Plano. How the DART TEAM Keeps Throughput Humming. UGM (EPIC) Conference, Verona, WI, September 2012. Poster presentation, AMSN Conference, Salt Lake City, UT, October 2012.

Robinson, M., Texas Health Southwest. • Leveraging New Nursing Roles in Our Changing Times: How the CNL Role is Changing the Landscape within a Multi-Hospital System. Co-presenter, AONE 45th Annual Meeting, Boston, MA, March 2012. • Nurses Drive a Culture of Excellence: Building Positive Practice Environments. ANCC National Magnet Conference Program, Los Angeles, CA, October 2012.

Kelly, P., Texas Health Dallas. • Demystifying the Genetics of Colorectal Cancer. 37th Annual ONS Congress, New Orleans, LA, May 2012. • Colon Cancer Bottom Line: Family History and Tumor Screening Making a Difference. Scripps Cancer Center, San Diego, CA, October 2012. • Learning Genetics with Stories and Case Studies. Cowtown Oncology Nursing Society Update, Fort Worth, TX, April 2012. • Connecting Genomics and Clinical Practice. North Texas TONE, September 2012. Krogh, M., Texas Health Dallas. What is the Optimal Cabinet Warming Temperature for Cotton Blankets? Texas Association of PeriAnesthesia Nurses Seminar, Dallas, TX, May 2012. Larkin, L., Texas Health Dallas. Panel presentation with national experts and overview of the Texas Health Dallas SANE Program. Annual Meeting of the Texas Association Against Sexual Assault, San Antonio, TX, February 2012. Lewis, V., Rhodes, K., both of Texas Health Southwest. Cdif Scoring Tool Project on Behalf of the Antibiotic Stewardship Committee. Infection Control Conference, CA, May 2012. McCorstin, P., Texas Health Dallas. Past Challenges and Opportunities for the ICU Multidisciplinary Team. Texas Clinical Nurse Specialists 2012 Conference, Austin, TX, June 2012. Mitchell, M.B., Texas Health Resources. • Legal Aspects of Documenting in the EHR. SWAHAP State Conference, El Paso, TX, November 2012. • Workflow Management for Patient Safety with the EHR. HIT Task Force State Conference, Houston, TX, June 2012. • Amazing Optimization by Staff Nurses. Epic Nursing Council National Conference, Madison, WI, April 2012. • The Emerging Role of the CNIO in Optimization of the EMR. HIMSS 2012 National Conference, Las Vegas, NV, February 2012.

Russe, C., Texas Health Plano. Emergency Department Workplace Violence: The Toolkit is Here! Texas ENA State Council, Galveston, TX, April 14. Schaedler, V., Texas Health Plano. Alabama Lactation Consultant Association Breastfeeding Education Support Team Conference, September 2012. Sellar, J., Texas Health Dallas. Identifying High and Low Risk Patients for Post-operative Urinary Retention. Texas Association of PeriAnesthesia Nurses Seminar, Dallas, TX, May 2012. Shinkus Clark, J., Texas Health Resources. • Leveraging New Nursing Roles in Our Changing Times: How the CNL Role is Changing the Landscape within a Multi-Hospital System. Co-presenter, AONE 45th Annual Meeting, Boston, MA, March 2012. • Maintaining Positive Nursing Practice Environments in a Changing Labor Climate. Co-presenter, AONE 45th Annual Meeting, Boston, MA, March 2012. True, B., Texas Health Arlington Memorial. Advanced Life Support in Obstetrics. American Academy of Family Physicians, August 2012. Double Trouble: Multiple Gestations. Association of Women’s Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses, March 2012. True, B., Rodriguez, L., Rushing, J., all of Texas Health Arlington Memorial. Integration of CNS/CNL Role. Texas Association of Clinical Nurse Specialists, July 2012. Zachariades, G., Texas Health Plano. Reaching the Summit Through Next Level Bedside Reporting. AONE CCIT Conference, San Antonio, TX, January 2012.

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Poster Presentations Baggett, B., Davis, B., Knight, K., Nguyen, T., all of Texas Health Dallas. Unit Based Council: Transformation Into a High Performing Team Utilizing the New Magnet Model. Magnet Conference, Los Angeles, CA, October 2012. Baldwin, K. M., Texas Health Southwest; Black, D. L., Texas Health Cleburne; Hammond, S. L., Texas Health Cleburne. Hospital-Based PostDischarge Community Case Management in Rural Texas. 2012 ANCC Pathway to Excellence Conference, Arlington, VA, May 2012. National Pathway Award Winner. Bates, C., Sy, C., both of Texas Health Plano. Improving PCT Care Delivery and Workflow. AONE CCIT Conference, Phoenix, AZ, September 2012. Comeau, S., Rider, K., and Schramm, C., all of Texas Health Specialty Hospital. Patient Urinal Holders. Yankauer Holders. CCIT Cohort Meeting, New Orleans, LA, January 2012. Counts, K., Texas Health Fort Worth. Standardization Drives Outcomes for Geriatric Hip Fracture Patients. Annual NICHE conference, New Orleans, LA, March 2012. NAON Congress, New Orleans, LA, May 2012.

Dachroeden, L., Texas Health Arlington Memorial. Community Case Management: Decreasing Readmissions for High Risk Patients. Society for Chest Pain Center, Orlando, FL, May 2012. Davis, B., and Reeves, M., both of Texas Health Dallas. Which Action is Best? Continuous Passive Motion Active Versus Passive Range of Motion. Improving Outcomes: Performing Newborn Procedures at the Bedside. TCU EBP Celebration, Fort Worth, TX, September 2012. Garganera, A., Texas Health Plano. Integrating Progressive Nursing Process in Decreasing Call Light Use. AONE CCIT Conference, Phoenix, AZ, September 2012. Goddard, S., Texas Health Plano. Twelve-hour Shifts and Fatigue. Joanna Briggs Institute National Australian Conference, Adelaide, Australia, August 2012. Haddad, H., Texas Health Allen. The Effect of Nursing Pain Management Strategies on Length of Stay and Patient Satisfaction. TCU Harris College of Nursing & Health Sciences 9th Annual Student Research Symposium, Fort Worth, TX, April 2012. First place graduate poster presentation. Henson, S., Mitchell, J., both of Texas Health Southwest. Joining Forces: A Collaborative Effort to Improve Patient Education. 2012 Versant Client Conference, San Antonio, TX, November 2012. Horn, R., Texas Health Dallas. RN Perceived Effectiveness When Working with Patients Diagnosed with an Eating Disorder. 26th Annual Psychiatric Nursing Symposium at the University of Texas at Arlington, Arlington, TX, March 2012. Humphries, L., Bryant, W., Day, J., Adams, R., Ericson, C., Gosdin, E., Hafley, J., Johnson, T., Odicio, N., Salone, C., all of Texas Health Southwest. Developing an Inpatient Carbohydrate Based Insulin Protocol. Texas Clinical Nurse Specialist Conference, Austin, TX, June 2012. Humphries, L., Hafley, J., Johnson, T., Hunt, G., Robinson, M., Hood, V., Odicio, N., Weber, L., Stewart, D., all of Texas Health Southwest. Building an Orthopedic Post Op Program through Clinical Nurse Specialist and Clinical Nurse Leader Collaboration and a Multidisciplinary Team Approach. Texas Clinical Nurse Specialist Conference, Austin, TX, June 2012. Hunt, G., Texas Health Southwest. C2It Improving Communication Project. 2012 Annual TONE Conference, Dallas, TX, March 2012. Jones, C., Morse, E., both of Texas Health Dallas. Identifying and Reducing Unplanned Preoperative Hypothermia. Texas Association of PeriAnesthesia Nurses Seminar, Dallas, TX, May 2012. Judd, K., Edmonson, C., Britting, A., Hampton, M., Bruce, L., all of Texas Health Fort Worth. Inter-Professional Excellence in Safe Patient Handling and Movement. Summer Institute for EBP, San Antonio, TX, July 2012. Magnet Conference, Los Angeles, CA, October 2012.

Holly Haddad, M.H.S., M.S.N., R.N., C.N.L., Texas Health Allen, won first place in her graduate poster category at the TCU Harris College of Nursing & Health Sciences 9th Annual Student Research Symposium.

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New Knowledge

Kalish, J., Alexander, A., both of Texas Health Plano. How the DART TEAM Keeps Throughput Humming. AMSN Conference, Salt Lake City, UT, October 2012.


Keith, L., Texas Health Fort Worth. Walk this Way with a Successful Joint Replacement Program. Annual NICHE conference, New Orleans, LA, March 2012.

Tenayan, R., Kelly, P., Nakashima, C., all of Texas Health Dallas. Evidence Based Answers at the Bedside in Less than 10 Minutes: Google be Gone. 19th National Nursing Research Conference, Department of VA North Texas Health Care System, Dallas, TX, October 2012.

Krogh, M., Texas Health Dallas. What is the Optimal Cabinet Warming Temperature for Cotton Blankets? Texas Association of PeriAnesthesia Nurses Seminar, Dallas, TX, May 2012.

Terryah, K., Mendoza, Z., both of Texas Health Southwest. Nursing Care Model Change. AONE CCIT Conference, New Orleans, LA, January 2012.

Matawaran, J., Walsh, J., both of Texas Health Plano. Survey of Nurses’ Self-Perceived Extent of Distractions and Interruptions During Medication Administration. 19th National Research Conference, Department of Veteran Affairs North Texas Health Care System, Dallas, TX, October 2012. McNeill, D., Cozma, A., and Brown, D., all of Texas Health Fort Worth. Get Ready, Get Set, Get Certified; Motivating RNs to Achieve Certification. NNSDO National Conference, Boston, MA, July, 2012. Magnet Conference, Los Angeles, CA, October 2012. McNeill, D., Texas Health Fort Worth; Humphries, L., Texas Health Southwest; and Hampton, M., Texas Health Fort Worth. Utilizing the Kirkpatrick Method to Evaluate Safe Patient Handling and Movement Training. 2012 Annual TONE Conference, Dallas, TX, March 2012.

Todd, J., Texas Health Fort Worth. A Collaboration of Leadership and Clinical Nursing in Transforming the Patient Care Environment. 2012 Annual TONE Conference, Dallas, TX, March 2012. Underhill, J., Peloquin, L., both of Texas Health Southwest. Resident/ Preceptor Safe Handoff. 2012 Versant Client Conference, San Antonio, TX, November 2012. Uytico, F., Texas Health Dallas. Effective Use of Core Stroke Measures to Provide Quality Stroke Care. 19th National Nursing Research Conference, Department of VA North Texas Health Care System, Dallas, TX, October 2012. Werner, K., Kelly, P., Nitsos, A., Lee, J., all of Texas Health Dallas. Evidence & Practice: A Fall Reduction Program Using Implementation Science. 37th Annual ONS Congress, New Orleans, LA, May 2012.

McWilliams-Ross, K., Texas Health Fort Worth. Improving Outcomes in the Geriatric Hip Fracture Population by Developing a Joint Commission Disease Specific Certified Program. NACNS, Chicago, IL, March 2012. The Society of Trauma Nurses, Savannah, GA, April 2012.

Williamson, A., Texas Health Fort Worth. Dilemma of Delirium in the Geriatric Hip Fracture Patient. Annual NICHE conference, New Orleans, LA, March 2012. NAON Congress, New Orleans, LA, May 2012.

Mitchell, J., Texas Health Southwest. Enhancing Collaboration of New Nurses through the Professional Passport. 2012 Versant Client Conference, San Antonio, TX, November 2012.

Yellen, E., Texas Health Dallas. Sustaining Change in Hospital Acquired Pressure Ulcer Rate. NDNQI, January 2012. Texas Clinical Nurse Specialists 2012 Conference, Austin, TX, June 2012.

Morse, E., Cooper, S., Kelly, P., Balluck, J., Jones, C., Haws, D., Edwards, T., Winslow, E., all of Texas Health Dallas. Are Preoperative Adult Patients’ Thermal Comfort Ratings and Temporal Artery Thermometer Readings Accurate Indices for Identifying Hypothermia? ASPAN, April 2012. Newman, B., Texas Health Arlington Memorial, Padden, J., Texas Health Fort Worth. Super Users…Helping us Navigate the New EHR Path. I LOVE my Care Plan. Using Nurse Champions to Keep the EHR Channel Open. American Nursing Informatics Association Conference, July 2012. Newman, B., Texas Health Arlington Memorial. Preceptor Handoff Tool… Collaboration is Key! 2012 Versant Client Conference, San Antonio, TX, November 2012. Reeves, M., Texas Health Dallas. Improving Satisfaction by Performing Newborn Procedures at the Bedside. 19th National Nursing Research Conference, Department of VA North Texas Health Care System, Dallas, TX, October 2012. Sellar, J., Texas Health Dallas. Identifying High and Low Risk Patients for Post-op Urinary Retention. Texas Association of PeriAnesthesia Nurses Seminar, Dallas, TX, May 2012. South, R., Texas Health Plano. Reduction of Central Line Blood Stream Infections. NANN Annual Conference, Palm Springs, CA, October 2012.

OTHER PRESENTATIONS Baldwin, K. M., Texas Health Southwest; Black, D. L., Texas Health Cleburne; and Hammond, S. L., Texas Health Cleburne. Community Case Management: A Project to Decrease Hospital and Emergency Room Readmissions. Keene Chamber of Commerce, Keene, TX, February 2012. Marshall, A., Texas Health Plano. Peer Coaching: A Clinician Led Inpatient Task Force in Risk Assessment, HAPU Prevention, and the Impact of Clinical Research in Engaging Clinicians and Improving Patients’ Lives. Texas Christian University Commencement Ceremony and Cohort 4 Conference, Fort Worth, TX, September 2012. McDonald, A. R., Texas Health Cleburne. Fall Prevention – New Strategies for an Old Problem. Premier Webinar, May 2012. Mitchell, M.B., Texas Health Resources. • Demystifying Meaningful Use: Impact of Health Information Technology and Improving Outcomes. National Webinar, November 2012. • Collaboration Among Quality, Patient Safety and Health IT to Effect Safe EHR Use. National Webinar, August 2012. • Leveraging Health IT. Webinar, July 2012. • Legal Implication of Documenting in the EMR. National Webinar, May 2012. • Unintended Consequences of Documenting in the EMR. National Webinar, February 2012.

New Knowledge

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STRENGTH IN NUMBERS Empirical Quality Results With a reputation for a strong commitment to patient safety, Jaime Ball, B.S.N., R.N., C.C.R.N., Texas Health Harris Methodist Hospital Azle, believes in the importance of measuring and understanding outcomes. “It’s so critical to understand why the data is important, not just what the numbers are,” she said. “When changes are made in our practice, it’s so much more meaningful if we can see and understand the data on which the change is based.” An ICU nurse, Ball has played a key role in a number of initiatives that have impacted quality results at Texas Health Azle, from helping two patient identifiers become ingrained in the culture of the ICU to helping launch the hospital’s Rapid Response Team. She has also been a Texas Christian University Evidence Based Practice fellow, and has served on the hospital’s Service Excellence Committee, Nursing Advisory Committee and the system’s Nursing Congress. “It’s nice for our small hospital to be part of a system, because it gives us opportunities to get involved with other hospitals and learn from them,” said Ball. While she enjoys serving on committees and leading quality efforts, Ball’s greatest love is caring for patients at the bedside. An Azle native, she is known for showing great love and compassion to her patients. “These patients are our neighbors, and I love the opportunity to learn from them,” said Ball. “We have six beds in our ICU; it’s very homey, and we get great time with our patients.” Ball takes her care for patients beyond the hospital, coordinating hospital-wide drives to help needy seniors who are a part of Azle’s Good News Program. This commitment to the community is another way Texas Health nurses share their passion 24/7.

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Jaime Ball

Empirical Quality Results

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EMPIRICAL QUALITY RESULTS

Survey Results Show Impact of Team STEPPS Texas Health Resources’ 2012 Patient Safety Culture Survey results revealed the positive impact of Team STEPPS, Texas Health’s program for enhancing patient safety through effective communication techniques and team strategies. Since launching Team STEPPS in 2011, more than 100 master trainers have been educated regarding the program; almost 200 four-hour Team STEPPS Champion sessions have been conducted; and the program has been implemented throughout the system.

Patient Safety Culture Survey CATEGORY

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2010 PERCENTILE

2012 PERCENTILE

SHIFT


Systemwide Central Line Associated Blood Stream Infection Rate (Wholly-owned Hospitals) 0.9 0.8 0.7 0.6 0.5 0.4 0.3 0.2 0.1 0.0 Oct 2011

Nov Dec Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug

Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS) Survey

Wholly-owned Hospitals Jan

3.32

Feb Mar

3.06 2.81

Apr

How often did How often did nurses nurses explain treat you with things in a way you courtesy and respect? could understand?

How often did nurses listen carefully to you?

3.03

Jun

2.82

Jul

2.80

Aug

2.82

Oct

Inpatient Score – wholly-owned hospitals, systemwide results 2012 (year to date through Dec. 4)

3.17

May

Sep

Sep YTD 2012

Composite score of three questions:

2.63 2.87

Empirical Quality Results

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MAKING GOOD TIME Chief nursing officers share their entity’s most significant accomplishments for 2012

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CNOs

Texas Health Central Staffing Rosemarie Aznavorian, M.S.N., R.N., C.C.R.N.-A. “Texas Health Single Source Staffing [THSS] became a wholly-owned Texas Health entity in 2012, transitioning more than 225 THSS staff to Texas Health employees, creating Texas Health Central Staffing.”

Texas Health Harris Methodist Hospital Cleburne Lorrie Normand, M.S., B.S.N., R.N., N.E.A.-B.C. “We were so honored to earn the first ever Pathway to Excellence national award in 2012.”

Texas Health Harris Methodist Hospital Alliance Kendra Slatton, M.S.N., R.N., C.D.E. “Playing an integral role in the opening of Texas Health Resources’ newest wholly-owned hospital was an incredible privilege and opportunity for the nurses at Texas Health Alliance.”

Texas Health Harris Methodist Hospital Fort Worth Elaine Nelson, R.N., M.S., C.C.R.N., N.E.A.-B.C. “We are so proud of the work done by staff nurses in 2012 to develop a process to hardwire hourly rounding and the impact it is having on patient satisfaction.”

Texas Health Harris Methodist Hospital Arlington Memorial Lori Donovan, M.S.N., R.N., C.N.O.R., N.E.A.-B.C. “Our greatest development was the creation of Nursing driven multidisciplinary shared governance council structures throughout the facility.”

Texas Health Harris Methodist Hospital HEB Lucy Norris, M.S., R.N. “The implementation of hourly rounding and bedside shift report and the Bedside Scanning Device to assure correct patient ID for specimen labeling throughout the hospital were our greatest accomplishments.”

Texas Health Harris Methodist Hospital Azle Valarie Gilbert, M.S.N./Ed., M.L.A., B.S.N., R.N. “Our greatest achievement was receiving a national award for High-Value Healthcare from Premier; we were the only hospital in the nation to receive the award.”

Texas Health Harris Methodist Hospital Southwest Fort Worth Mary Robinson, Ph.D., R.N.-B.C. “Our most significant achievement was earning our first Pathway to Excellence Nursing Designation.”


Texas Health Harris Methodist Hospital Stephenville Cindy McCarthy, D.N.P., M.B.A., M.H.A., R.N., C.E.N. “Achieving our Pathway to Excellence Nursing Designation in 2012 was a true representation of our nurses’ dedication to their patients, their community and their profession.”

Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital Denton Deborah Bostic, M.S.N., R.N. “Texas Health Denton has experienced significant and rapid change since joining Texas Health Resources more than three years ago.  The most significant of all was accomplished this past year with the implementation of CareConnect and conversion to various other Texas Health systems.”

Texas Health Physicians Group Catherine Hill, D.N.P., A.P.R.N., G.N.P.-B.C. “Our greatest accomplishments were developing and deploying a nurse educator led annual competency evaluation of unlicensed assistive personnel in physician offices; deployment of shared medical visits by nurse patient educators; and development of a population health nursing care management model.”

Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital Kaufman Denise Claussen, M.S.N., B.S.N., R.N. “Implementing bedside reporting throughout the hospital and adding two patient care facilitators to our roster were significant achievements for us in 2012.”

Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital Allen Jane Cook, M.S.N., R.N., N.E.A.-B.C. “We were so proud to be re-designated as a Pathway to Excellence hospital by ANCC, and consistently ranking in the top decile for patient satisfaction in the Emergency Department was another significant accomplishment for our hospital.”

Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital Plano Raymond Kelly, M.S.N., R.N. “Achieving Magnet re-designation was our most significant accomplishment in 2012.”

Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital Dallas Cole Edmonson, D.N.P., R.N., F.A.C.H.E., N.E.A.-B.C., Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Executive Nurse Fellow “Our most significant achievements included implementing an evidence-based acuity system, opening of Safe Healing Suites for our Sexual Assault Nurse Examiner program and implementing a new APRN Privilege and Credential model, including the expansion of the APRN model to include Core Measure.”

Texas Health Specialty Hospital Louise Baldwin, R.N., M.B.A., N.E.A.-B.C., F.A.C.H.E., President/CNO “Our CCIT team had a number of significant achievements for our hospital in 2012, including implementation of the HoverMatt to improve ease of moving patients on the bed and promoting Project R.E.D. notebooks designed to improve patient education.”

CNOs

29


TEXAS HEALTH RESOURCES’ 2012 GREAT 100 NURSES Nurses at Texas Health hospitals accounted for 31 of the 2012 “Great 100 Nurses,” an annual award recognizing the best of the nursing profession in the Dallas-Fort Worth area. Texas Health honorees included:

30

Linda Allison, M.S., R.N., Texas Health Plano

Ann Gillis Babin, B.S.N., Barbara Baggett, R.N., P.C.C.N., Texas B.S.N., R.N., O.N.C., Health Fort Worth Texas Health Dallas

Beverly Barton, R.N., Texas Health Cleburne

Linda Beaverstock, B.S.N., R.N., O.B.C., Texas Health HEB

Karen Bell, R.N., C.O.H.N.-S., Texas Health Southwest

Leisha Buller, B.S.N., R.N., C.M.S.R.N., Texas Health Fort Worth

Amy Conner, B.S.N., R.N., Texas Health Rockwall

Ha Duong, B.S.N., R.N., Texas Health Fort Worth

Carissa Enright, M.S.N., R.N., P.M.H.N.P.-B.C., Texas Health Dallas

Valarie Gilbert, M.S.N./Ed., B.S.N., M.L.A., R.N., Texas Health Azle

Sheri Hammond, M.S.N., A.P.R.N., A.C.N.S.-B.C., C.C.R.N., Texas Health Cleburne

Jenna Harper, B.S.N., R.N., Texas Health Denton

Megan E. Harris, B.S.N., R.N., P.C.C.N., Texas Health Fort Worth

Regina Harrison, B.S.N., R.N., Texas Health Southwest

Rona HarrisonNg’ethe, M.S.N., R.N., C.N.M.L., Texas Health Center for Diagnostics & Surgery Plano

Tami Hlus-Hawkins, M.S.N., R.N., N.E.A.B.C., Texas Health Rockwall

Ashley Hodo, M.S.N., R.N., Texas Health Fort Worth

Jodi Jeffords, B.S.N., R.N., O.C.N., Texas Health Fort Worth

Adam Jobe, R.N., Texas Health Cleburne

Great 100 Nurses


ACHIEVEMENTS Jaime Ball, B.S.N., R.N., C.C.R.N., Texas Health Azle, was named Dallas-Fort Worth Hospital Council’s 2012 Hospital Employee of the Year.

Mary Krogh, R.N., C.P.A.N., Texas Health Dallas

John Marchand, B.S.N., J.D., R.N., C.P.A.N., Texas Health Plano

Amanda McDonald, B.S.N., R.N., Texas Health Cleburne

Karen Bell, Employee Health R.N., Texas Health Southwest, was the regional winner of the 2012 Nursing Excellence Award presented by Nurse.com. Judy Common, R.N., C.E.N., C.P.E.N., C.A./C.P. S.A.N.E., S.A.N.E.-P., Texas Health Plano, received the ENA Nursing Practice Award. Emily Jestes, M.S.N., R.N., C.N.L., Texas Health Allen, was awarded the TCU Harris College of Nursing’s Academic Achievement Award. Sharyon Maverick, R.N., A.D.N., Texas Health Azle, was highlighted in an article titled “Texas Health Azle Nurse Gives Back through Associates Campaign” in In Touch magazine.

Libby Morse, B.S.N., R.N., C.P.A.N., Texas Health Dallas

Shari Nathanson, B.S.N., R.N.C.-N.I.C., Texas Health Dallas

Thanh Nguyen, R.N., C.R.R.N., Texas Health Dallas

Shirley McKinney, M.S.N., R.N.C.-O.B., and Taffi Marchand, B.S.N., R.N., both of Texas Health Plano, applied for and were awarded the City of Plano Environmental Recycling Award for Texas Health Plano. Kathy Rhodes, B.S.N., R.N., C.I.C., C.O.H.N.-S., Texas Health Southwest, received the Hero of Infection Prevention award from the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology (APIC). Skin Team, Texas Health Dallas, was named Advance for Nurses magazine’s Best Team in the South for reducing HAPUs.

Thao P. Nguyen, B.S.N., R.N.C.-N.I.C., C.C.R.N., Texas Health Dallas

Thuy D. Nguyen, B.S.N., R.N., O.N.C., Texas Health Dallas

Kelli Raibick, M.S.N., R.N., N.E.A.-B.C., I.B.C.L.C., Texas Health Dallas

Kathy Wright, B.S.N., R.N., C.C.R.N., Texas Health Plano, was named Critical Care Nurse of the Year by the AACN, Dallas Chapter. The following Texas Health Plano nurses have received the DAISY Award for Extraordinary Nurses: • Andrea Ansley, B.S.N., R.N., C.C.R.N. • Scarlett Owen, R.N. • Amy Guest, B.S.N., R.N. • Preston Padua, R.N. • Mary Wells, B.S.N., R.N. • Chris Ashley, R.N. • Mary Wallum, B.S.N., R.N. Darla Webb, R.N., Texas Health Southwest, also received the

Tia Reinhardt, R.N., Texas Health Resources

Kat Vance, R.N., C.G.R.N., Texas Health Southwest

DAISY Award.

Achievements

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SPOTLIGHT ON TEXAS HEALTH FORT WORTH 2012 HOSPITAL ACHIEVEMENTS Texas Health Harris Methodist Hospital Fort Worth nurses played key roles in helping the hospital achieve a number of recognitions in 2012, including:

• • • • • • • • • • • • •

National distinction for excellence in patient safety, achieving an A in Leapfrog’s Hospital Safety Score Bronze Beacon Award from the American Association of Critical Care Nurses for the CVICU and TCIU teams NICHE (Nurses Improving Care for Healthsystem Elders) designation Highest in quality and image recognition by Tarrant County residents in the annual National Research Corporation’s survey and 2012-2013 Consumer Choice Awards Launching of the hospital’s SANE program (Sexual Assault Nursing Program) Named “Best Place to Have a Baby” by readers of Fort Worth Child magazine for the 17th year Named BCBS Center of Excellence in Orthopedics Joint Commission Re-Accreditation Emergency Center of Excellence recognition Full establishment of the Fort Worth Emergency Collaborative Safe Surgery Initiative implementation Accreditation by the Society of Cardiovascular Patient Care for Chest Pain and Heart Failure Accreditation with Commendation as a Community Hospital Comprehensive Cancer Program from the American College of Surgeons Commission on Cancer

Nurses Selected for National Genomics Study Texas Health Harris Methodist Hospital Fort Worth was selected in October 2012 to participate in a national study to advance genetics and genomic knowledge among nurses. The study, Expanding RN Scope of Practice: A Method for Introducing a New Competency into Nursing Practice, is funded by the National Council of State Boards of Nursing and aims to increase nurses’ understanding of how a patient’s family history of common diseases like cancer, heart disease and diabetes can affect their care plan. Twenty-one medical centers nationally were selected to participate in the study. In addition to Texas Health Fort Worth, Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital Dallas was also selected to participate. At Texas Health Fort Worth, Michelle Hampton, clinical education specialist; Elaine Nelson, chief nursing officer and vice president of patient care services; Twyla O’Keefe, clinical education specialist; and Sally Carmen, director of advancing professional nursing practice; are leading the study.

Joint Commission certifications for Texas Health Fort Worth include: • Hip Fracture • Joint Replacement: Hip and Knee • Primary Stroke Center   • Advanced Certification in Palliative Care Texas Health Fort Worth 2012 Great 100 Nurses • Ann Gillis Babin, B.S.N., R.N., P.C.C.N. • Leisha Buller, B.S.N., R.N., C.M.S.R.N. • Ha Duong, B.S.N., R.N. • Megan E. Harris, B.S.N., R.N., P.C.C.N. • Ashley Hodo, M.S.N., R.N. • Jodi Jeffords, B.S.N., R.N., O.C.N.

National genomics study participants are (from left): Michelle Hampton, clinical education specialist; Elaine Nelson, chief nursing officer and vice president of patient care services; Twyla O’Keefe, clinical education specialist; and Sally Carmen, director of advancing professional nursing practice.

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Nurses Provide Specialized Care for Geriatric Patients Texas Health Harris Methodist Hospital Fort Worth was named the first hospital in Tarrant County and one of the first in the state to earn the NICHE (Nurses Improving Care for Healthsystem Elders) designation in 2012 from the Hartford Institute for Geriatric Nursing at New York University College of Nursing. NICHE is the largest geriatric nursing program nationwide and the only program that addresses the needs of hospitalized older adults. Focusing on utilizing protocols that are largely under the control of nursing practice, the program’s goal is to achieve a systematic nursing environment that stimulates a change in the culture of health care facilities to ultimately improve outcomes and attain greater patient and family satisfaction. At Texas Health Fort Worth, where 40 percent of inpatient admissions are age 65 and older, nurses have implemented a number of programs and strategies to better care for geriatric patients, including 20 hours of specialized training completed by 12 nurses who became GRNs for the hospital’s Ortho/Trauma Unit; multidisciplinary daily care conferences, identifying geriatric specific needs and patients at risk for delirium; and continual cognitive stimulation and orientation through the use of white boards, clocks and verbal cues. NICHE contributes to a number of Texas Health Resources’ organizational goals, and will provide critical support as the number of geriatric inpatients continues to grow rapidly.

Improving Patient Safety • Texas Health Fort Worth Emergency Department nurses and physicians collaborated to develop a Level 1 Medical Protocol in 2012 to quickly identify and mobilize resources for patients with sepsis. As a result, patients are screened more consistently; door to physician time has decreased; and septic patients are being recognized faster and resuscitated more aggressively.   

• Texas Health Fort Worth nurses helped develop and implement a Safe Surgery Checklist in 2012. Second quarter observation results revealed 94 percent overall compliance, and third quarter results rose to 98 percent.

Leadership in Professional Organizations Cathy Dykes, M.S.N., R.N., C.C.R.C., C.C.R.P., C.G.R.N., chairperson, DFW Chapter of the Society of Clinical Research Associates   Michelle Hampton, M.S.N., R.N., C.C.R.N., delegate to House of Delegates, Texas Nurses Association, District 3 Betty Haywood, B.S.N., R.N.C.-O.B., C.-E.F.M., Fort Worth Chapter chair, Association of Women’s Health, Obstetrics, and Neonatal Nursing Lynda Heeps, B.S.N., R.N., C.C.R.N., N.E.A.-B.C., president, Tarrant County Association of NeuroScience Nurses Anne Mattern, B.S.N., R.N., C.N.O.R., treasurer, Fort Worth Chapter of the Association of Operating Room Nurses DeVonna McNeil, M.S.N., R.N.-B.C., R.N.C.-O.B., member of Texas Nurses Association State Committee for Continuing Nursing Education Debbie Phillips, M.S.N., R.N., F.N.P.-B.C., vice president of programs, Texas Nurses Association, District 3 Florence Raquepo, B.S.N., R.N.C.-N.I.C., C.C.A.P., president, National Association of Neonatal Nurses, Fort Worth Chapter In 2012, Texas Health Fort Worth nurses started three local chapters for their professional organizations: The DFW Chapter of the Society of Clinical Research Associates, the Fort Worth Chapter of the National Association of Neonatal Nurses, and the Fort Worth Chapter of the Association of Women’s Health, Obstetrics, and Neonatal Nursing.

Magnet 3 in 2013

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Texas Health Resources 612 E. Lamar Boulevard, Suite 1000 Arlington, TX 76011

TEXAS HEALTH RESOURCES

Texas Health Resources is one of the largest faith-based, nonprofit health systems in the United States. The health system includes 25 acute care and short-stay hospitals that are owned, operated, joint-ventured or affiliated with Texas Health Resources. It includes the Texas Health Presbyterian, Texas Health Arlington Memorial and Texas Health Harris Methodist hospitals, Huguley Memorial Medical Center, Texas Health Physicians Group, outpatient facilities, behavioral health and home health, preventive and fitness services, and an organization for medical research and education.

TEXAS HEALTH RESOURCES WHOLLY-OWNED HOSPITALS

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Texas Health 2012 Nurse Annual Report