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Creating Together THE THREESIXTY ARCHITECTURE COOKBOOK


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Contents Contents

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1 Why?

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2 Starters

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3 Mains

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4 Desserts

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Enjoy!


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Why? So why is an architectural practice producing a cookbook? It’s a fair question; I suppose it primarily arose from our multicultural team eating together at lunchtime following our desire to outlaw eating “aldesko”. We would often have food envy when confronted with a colleague’s culinary creations and we all quickly learned to cook extra for sharing. The practice currently has 12 nationalities represented and the resulting ethnic diversity of the dishes is not only educational, national pride is at stake as well! Fundamentally it’s the creative and social aspect of cooking (and eating) that attracts us. Needless to say, plans for our new Glasgow studio include a ridiculously large kitchen…

Alan Anthony Managing Director We also design buildings: www.360architecture.com

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— Scallops tapa Elena Pastrana Scallops are not inexpensive; it can be a little intimidating to cook them; what if you mess up such an expensive dinner?

Ingredients olive oil 1 red onion 1 sweet or regular potato some mint (optional) some milk (dairy milk or any other plant based milk) 1 scallop pp. 1/2 cup fresh lime juice 1/2 teaspoon salt 1/4 teaspoon pepper

This is the beautiful thing about scallops, once you understand how quickly they are cooked, you’ll never mess them up. They take just 4 to 5 minutes to cook — that’s it! We’ll show you below, step by step, how to do this, but the gist is simple: Sear in an oiled skillet for about 2 minutes on each side. Done! Method: 1. To boil the potatoes, put in a saucepan and cover with an inch or two of cold water. Bring to a boil, add 1/2 teaspoon salt, reduce heat and simmer for about 15-20 minutes, or until a fork easily pierces through the pieces. 2. Heat a pan over medium heat. Then add some of the olive oil, followed by the julliened onion. As soon as the onions start sticking to the pan, let them stick a little and brown, then stir them before they burn. The trick is to leave them alone long enough to brown (if you stir them too often, they won’t brown), but not so long that they burn. Check the onions every 5 to 10 minutes. 3. Place cooked sweet potato pieces in a large bowl, add olive oil, mash with a potato masher until completely mashed. Slowly add milk, stirring with a wooden spoon until the sweet potatoes reach desired consistency. If feeling adventurous stir in some chopped mint. Add more salt, to taste. 4. Rinse scallops and pat them dry with paper towels before cooking. If scallops have too much moisture on the outside, they won’t brown properly. Cut large scallops in half to assure even cooking. Minutes count! Cook the scallops just until done or until they are opaque; otherwise they can get tough quickly. 5. For the vinaigrette whisk the lime juice, salt and pepper together . Gradually whisk in 1/3 cup olive oil until blended. 6. Stack the mashed potato the scallop and onion, finally add some vinaigrette to taste.

— Adding height can make a plate look more interesting. Stacking ingredients gives the dish more depth.


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— Courgette Soup Gillian Allan This soup started out as a slimmer’s delight, but because I don’t need to diet (don’t laugh!) I’ve added some cream cheese to make it rich and creamy. Feel free to swap out the veggie stock cubes for chicken or ham ones they make it even tastier. However, to keep the vegetarians happy, no animals were harmed in the making of this version. Ingredients: 3-4 Courgettes (roughly sliced) 2 Onions (roughly chopped) 1 Carrot (roughly sliced) 2 Vegetable Stock Cubes 1.5 litres of water Dollop of Cream Cheese (Philly low fat) Salt & Pepper to taste

Method: 1. Chop up the vegetables and throw into a big soup pot along with the stock cubes dissolved in 1.5 litres of boiling water. 2. Simmer on the stove, part covered for 1-2 hours. 3. Add a generous dollop of cream cheese. The more you add the creamier it will be. For this quantity I usually add about 40g. 4. Take it off the heat and blend with a hand blender until completely smooth. Add a little water if the consistency is too thick and reheat thoroughly. 5. Ladle into bowls, and serve with a hot crusty roll!

— Add a little water if the consistency is too thick and reheat thoroughly. Ladle into bowls, and serve with a hot crusty roll!

1 Ingredients 2 Vegetables 3 Simmer 4 Ready to serve


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— Viennese Escalopes Rolf Basler An Austrian dish with Italian roots, great as starter, finger food or a proper main course. Method:

Ingredients: 400g Veal Juice of 1 lemon 6 tablespoons of flour (type 00) Salt White pepper 2 eggs 150gr breadcrumbs (white split tin bread, 400g) 50g double cream light (approx. 30% fat per 100ml) 100ml oil (sunflower) 2 round lettuce 1 baguette 2 lemons ··

1. Cut the escalopes in strips of approx. 4 to 5cm and marinate the meat for 10 minutes in the lemon juice you put into a shallow plate or bowl before. 2. In the meantime prepare a plate of flour and a plate of breadcrumbs. Scramble the eggs in a bowl, add the double cream, season with a pinch of salt and white pepper to your liking and whisk a final time. 3. Dunk the marinated veal slices one by one, ensuring both sides are covered in the flour first then repeat the procedure by dunking in the egg cream and finally in the breadcrumbs, patting crumbs on until the veal is evenly coated. Repeat until all the meat is covered. 4. Heat 1/2cm of oil in a heavy-based frying pan set over a medium high heat. Fry the veal slices in batches on both sides until golden (approx. 3-4 minutes). Spoon some oil from time to time evenly over the first fried side while frying the other. After two or three batches replace the oil and clean pan before continuing frying. 5. Drain finished escalopes on kitchen paper and leave to rest for a couple of minutes. 6. During the resting time of the escalopes wash the lettuce, spin-dry and rip lettuce leaves in smaller pieces. 7. Slice baguette diagonally in 1 to 1.5cm thick slices, avoid cutting thicker slices. 8. Slice lemon into long wedges. 9. Place salad leaf, escalope and lemon wedge together, fix with wooden tooth picks onto the sliced baguette and put on a plate. 10. A simple green, round lettuce salad on a vinaigrette makes a perfect companion. Chef’s annotations: •• Escalope: veal is unfortunately not that commonly available; the preferred cut for escalopes is from the round / topside. When buying the veal escalopes ask your butcher to cut into thin slices of 5 to 6mm. •• Breadcrumbs: buy ready made without additives,.or better do it yourself; buy one white split tin bread sliced, leave to dry for one week and shred in food processor until you have small breadcrumbs. Express method; toast bread slices pale yellow, shred in food processor and toss crumbs in heavy-based pan until dry and shred a last time to desired size. •• Cook to perfection: after frying, when the meat and breadcrumb coating have separated but the coating is still in one piece the escalope has been cooked to perfection. •• Cream: with a fat content of 30% per 100ml provides the ideal binding for the breadcrumb coating.

— Pair with a light white wine such as an Oriveto or a Riesling. A lager if your favourite drink is beer.

1 Ingredients

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breadcrumbs 3 Enjoy!


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— Lamb Tagine Victoria Jarvis This recipe is one of the many tagine recipes on offer, they always seem to go down well when you have friends round and it’s easy to make a veggie version to go along with them.

Ingredients: Lamb, diced (approx. 2lb) 1 tsp cinnamon 1 tsp ground ginger (or 2tsp ras el hanout) salt and ground pepper to taste 2tbsp honey 50g chopped dates (unpitted) 200g dates (unpitted) 1 onion, finely chopped 350ml lamb stock 2tbsp lemon juice 100g flaked almonds Rind of 1/2 preserved lemon, cut into strips for decoration (not essential)

This one is quite simple, but you can mix it up with different fruit / nuts or add fresh tomatoes to make more of a sauce. As a veggie version, I would use cauliflower florets and chickpeas, and reduce my cooking time so you cook the sauce first for about half an hour, then add the rest for 20mins. I suggest you serve with either regular couscous cooked with stock or whiz up a cauliflower and steam gently as a gluten free alternative. Either way, I like to add some Greek style yoghurt and pomegranate seeds to finish off the dish. Coriander or a squeeze of lime is nice as well. It’s good to marinate the lamb the night before if you have time, but the recipe works fine without it. If you have a tagine to cook it in, that’s great, but you can just use a big robust pot (with lid). We have one with a metal base that goes on the hob. This is best as the ceramic ones are only for the oven and don’t allow the top of the tagine to stay cool (it’s all about the condensation). Method: 1. Mix the spices with the lamb and marinate overnight in the fridge (if possible). 2. Fry off the chopped onion in a little butter or oil in the base of your tagine / pot on a low heat, then add the lamb to brown the meat. Turn the heat up for this stage. 3. Once the lamb has browned, add the stock (or just water if you prefer), a good pinch of salt and let it simmer. Put the lid on the tagine. 4. Turn the heat down and leave for a good long while (1h to 1h30, stirring occasionally) until the lamb is soft and the kitchen smells great. There should still be plenty of liquid in the dish but it should be thicker. 5. Add the honey, whole dates (unpitted), lemon juice and leave for another 30 mins until the dates swell up. 6. Check the seasoning. It should be slightly sweet but can take a bit of a kick if you want to add some cayenne. 7. Toast the flaked almonds in a hot pan and set aside. Prepare your side dishes (couscous / cauliflower) and any herbs / fruit. Serve and sprinkle. Enjoy!

1 Serving suggestion (Moroccan Style with mint tea) 2 Some ingredients 3 Mmm smells awesome 4 Looks a bit brown but tastes amazing! (forgot to serve the coriander)


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— Gracie (South African) Chicken and Davie Rice Gillian Allan A recipe passed down from my good friend and fellow twin mummy Jen, this was the first ‘grown up’ meal toddlers Abby & Ailsa ate with gusto - mainly because I renamed it Gracie Chicken and Davie Rice, after their best twin buddies David and Grace!

Ingredients (serves 4): 3-4 Chicken Breasts (diced) 1 Onion (finely sliced) 125g Mushrooms (roughly chopped) 6 tbsp Tomato Ketchup 1 tbsp Olive Oil 1 tbsp Vinegar 1 tsp Mixed Herbs 1 tsp Yellow Mustard 1/2 tsp Salt 1/2 tsp Garlic Salt 1/2 tsp Curry Powder Dash of Tabasco (to taste) 150ml Double cream Pepper to taste

10 years on it’s still a family favourite. For me, because it’s so easy to throw together (leaving me time to multi task), and for the rest of the family; because it’s delicious! Method: 1. Pre heat an oven to 180 degrees C 2. Heat oil in a casserole on the stove, slow fry the onions until soft but not browned, tip in the chicken and sizzle till all white on the outside. 3. Still on the heat, chuck in all the other ingredients, including the mushrooms and double cream last. Mix together and heat through. 4. Whack the casserole covered into the oven for 1 hour and check half way through, giving it a quick stir. Add a tiny bit water if it’s a little dry. 5. Cook up some Basmati rice (50-75g per person), dish up and dive in!

50-75g Basmati Rice per person

1 Meat & veg you need 2 Sauce ingredients 3 Herbs & spices 4 Combining 5 Final bits & pieces 6 Delicious!


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— Giant Yorkshire Puddings Matt Bonney This is a very simple and versatile recipe. Much like a strong defence, this is the base around which the rest of the team can be built. The traditional serving suggestion would be a giant Yorkshire Pudding covered in a thin onion gravy as a starter prior to the roast dinner main. However It is also popular to combine the two meals into a loaded Yorkshire Pudding main. Ingredients: Yorkshires: Eggs (half dozen) Plain Flour (150g) Milk (200ml) Vegetable Oil Seasoning Filling: Whatever tickles your fancy, but gravy is a must!

The beauty of this recipe, as with many British meals, is that there are no marks for presentation. Don’t be afraid to test the Yorkshire’s structural integrity with a wealth of meat, roast spuds, veggies and of course lashings of thick homemade gravy. Method: 1. Pre-heat the oven to 220o. Add 3 tsp of oil to each oven-proof dish and place in the oven to heat up. (I find stoneware dishes give the best results, however metal cake tins can also be used). 2. Sieve the flour into a large bowl. Create a well in the centre of the flour and crack in the eggs. 3. Whisk the mixture until smooth - this will take a bit of effort . 4. Gradually stir in the milk until you are left with a thin batter. 5. Gently pour 1/4 of the mix into each dish and place centrally in the oven for 20 minutes. It is important not to open the oven until the Yorkshires are cooked as this will cause them to collapse.

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Whisk eggs Homemade gravy Filling of choice Yorkshire puds


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— Fusilli con Spinaci e Pancetta Anthony Fusi This is a pasta dish I have been eating since I was a kid and It has evolved over time. Like all good dishes everybody has their own way of doing things and I am no different. I was reared on pasta and like every great pasta dish I love, this tastes great eaten hot, or cold straight from the fridge the next day. Ingredients: 250g of fresh spinach 85g of pancetta 1 onion chopped finely 3 cloves of garlic a pinch of salt a good bit of pepper Fusilli pasta

This is fast food done the right way. Why go to the bother of ordering a takeaway when you can make this in less than 12 minutes. Your takeaway shop would not have even started making your order in that time! I normally make this with Orecchiette (the name means little ears) but given I had none in my kitchen when I made it for this book I decided to use Fusilli instead - well what would you expect, it goes with my name! Method: 1. Boil the water for the pasta and the spinach. 2. Salt the water and ensure its boiling before placing in the pasta. Don’t bother with putting oil in the water, it is a waste of good oil and does not prevent the pasta sticking together. To ensure it does not stick just use a large pot and plenty of water to let the pasta swirl around in. All pasta have a different cook time so check the recommendation on a packet, but it shouldn’t be any more than 12 minutes, and less if you like it al dente. 3. While the pasta is boiling, fry the pancetta, onion and garlic in a pan with olive oil. Season with pepper and salt. Reduce heat and keep warm until the pasta is ready. 4. While you are frying your pancetta boil the spinach and once cooked drain well. Press a spoon against the spinach in a colander to ensure you take out any excess of water. Place the spinach back in the pot and blend. This will reduce the spinach to a pesto like texture as viewed in image 2. 5. Then mix in the fried pancetta, onion and garlic followed by the pasta. 6. Serve with parmesan.

1 Prep 2 Mix 3 Fry 4 Eat


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— Cheesy-Peasy Mushroom Penne Mantas Skirmantas This dish is super easy to make and doesn’t require a lot of ingredients. Doesn’t consume too much time either and recipe is easy to follow. Therefore, even those who are really good at burning their food in the kitchen should be able to get a decent meal out of this.

Ingredients: Penne Pasta (500g pack) Olive Oil (1 tablespoon) Salt (up to your taste) Black Pepper (up to your taste) Big Onion (1 unit) Mushrooms (1 pack) Garden Peas (2 cans) Cheese – Mature White Cheddar (100-150g) Sour Cream (2 tablespoons) *for 5-6 servings

Takes around 15-20 mins to make. Goes well with white wine. Method: 1. Kick everybody out of the kitchen. Put some sexy tunes on to keep you company. Wash your hands and ingredients that need to be washed. 2. Chop onion and mushrooms (prepare some tissues - chopping onions gets emotional). 3. Add a generous tablespoon of olive oil to the pan; boil water in the pot; 4. Add Penne pasta to the boiling water + a pinch of salt and a drop of olive oil so pasta won’t stick. 5. Will take around 10-12 mins for pasta to get cooked. 6. Start frying onion. Once they start looking more appetizing, add mushrooms. After 3-5 mins add garden peas to the mix (add salt). Don’t forget to stir your pasta from time to time. Drain it once it’s cooked. 7. Add 2 tablespoons of sour cream to the pan with onion, mushrooms and peas. Generously top it with grated cheese. Mix everything, add more cheese and salt if needed; add black pepper. 8. Mix your cooked Penne pasta with the vegetables in the pan. Serve it hot with extra grated cheese on top.

— Even those who are really good at burning their food in the kitchen should be able to get a decent meal out of this.

1 What you need 2 It’s getting hot in here 3 #instafamous #360arch 4 Delish


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— Couscous Gigantes Alan Anthony This is a recipe I invented when I agreed with my daughter to be Vegetarian (then Pescatarian) for a year. It’s not fancy but it is filling and, when you make a pot it’s a bit moreish. Like me, you will make enough for a couple of days and then….

Ingredients: Olive oil (not virgin) Giant Whole-wheat Couscous 500g Vegetable Stock Halloumi (1 pack) Fresh chillies (1 or 2) Large capers (2 tablespoons) Radishes (handful of) Spring onion (pack) Zest of 1 lemon Fresh, chopped coriander and squeeze of lemon to serve.

It’s about a balance between textures with the soft halloumi and couscous pearls against crunchy radish and spring onion. It’s a mixture of colours and flavours with the salty fried capers giving an intense surprise now and then. As an ex-smoker with no taste buds to speak of, I like it spicy with loads of fresh chillies cooked with the halloumi (to make it go pinky red). You can calm it down to suit. There’s no main event with each ingredient working together and no prima donnas. Obviously the halloumi brings the protein to the party but you could miss it out and use the couscous as a base for salmon or lamb or other dead animals (well-done as blood running through it won’t be pretty). I wouldn’t put anything with a sauce as the couscous melange is busy enough - just season with salt and pepper and lemon juice. Method: 1. Rinse the couscous and boil in water with vegetable stock for 8 minutes, drain and set aside in pot with lid. Don’t overcook! 2. Meanwhile, heat the olive oil, cube the halloumi, finely chop the chillies (remove seeds) and fry along with the capers until the liquid from the halloumi reduces and it starts to brown a little (probably about 7 mins). 3. While the above is happening, prepare the ingredients that go in raw – slice the radishes with a mandolin if you have one (watch your fingers), chop the spring onions and grate the zest off the lemon. 4. Mix everything in with the couscous and serve with chopped coriander and squeeze of lemon juice.

— It’s not fancy but it’s filling, when you make a pot it’s a bit moreish.

1 Stuff you need 2 Chop chop. 3 Num num


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— Aromatic Beef Curry Laura Ronald This is loosely based on a dish I tasted in Dubai called “chilli beef” and I have turned it into more of a spicy curry – true winter warmer! Method:

Ingredients 125ml/4fl oz ghee or vegetable oil 400g/14oz beef braising steak, diced into 3cm chunks 1 medium onion, diced 2 garlic cloves, finely chopped 1 tsp ground cumin 1 tsp ground coriander 1 tsp ground turmeric 1 tsp ground black pepper 1 tsp chilli powder ½ tsp ground ginger 3 cloves 3 cardamom pods (optional) ½ tsp ground cinnamon ½ x 400g/14oz can chopped tomatoes 125g/4½oz natural yoghurt 1 tbsp vinegar pinch salt pinch sugar

1. Heat a lidded frying pan over a medium heat and add the ghee or oil. Fry the meat until lightly browned on all sides, then remove from the pan with a slotted spoon, cover and set aside. 2. Add the onion and garlic to the pan and fry over a low heat until soft. Turn the heat up slightly, add the spices and fry for 1 minute; they should start to smell aromatic, without burning. 3. Return the beef to the pan, add the tomatoes and bring to the boil. Take the pan off the heat and stir in the yoghurt and vinegar, then season to taste with the salt and the sugar. 4. Return the pan to the heat, bring back to the boil and simmer, covered, for 1½ hours, or until the meat is tender.

— Tip – add chopped fresh chillies for an extra kick!


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— Spaghetti Ajo, Ojo e Peperoncino Stefano Faiella Roman dialect lesson. The name of the dish reads as Spaghetti Ah-yo, Oh-yo eh peh-peh-ron-Chi-no. Simply translated, spaghetti with garlic, oil and chilli. In Rome, this dish is the cultural equivalent of a kebab after a night out. Just healthier, better at sobering you up and generally more sociable.

Ingredients (for 1): Spaghetti: 80-120gms Garlic: 1clove finely sliced Oil: A good splash of good quality extra virgin olive oil (c. 3 tbsps) Dried chillies: a good sprinkle Basil: to garnish Optional Baby tomatoes: 3 or 4 split in half Tomato paste: 1 teaspoon for colour and punch

It is generally introduced by use of the standard gesture in RSL (Roman Sign Language,see my pic) which stands for “famose du’ spaghi”, literally, let’s have a couple of spaghetti. It’s as straightforward as it sounds. It’s tasty, fast and so easy to make that even a drunk person would struggle to mess it up! The ingredients listed are for one person, but as the dish is all about personal taste, experiment a few times to get it right for you! The trick is learning to balance the recipe when cooking for loads of people (like the time I served it to 14 members of 360 back at my flat after midnight). Top tip: don’t skimp on the oil! Method: 1. Ready and chop your ingredients and then get going on the pasta. 2. Bring a pot of water to the boil. Once it’s bubbling (not before or you will slow down the boil time) flavour the water with a good spoonful of rock salt. Give it another minute to come back to the boil. If you meet someone who says you don’t need to salt the water, they’re an idiot. 3. Twist in your spaghetti; you will get a nice ‘fan’ and it will stop the pasta from sticking together. 4. Sauce: this can be prepared in the amount of time it takes the spaghetti to cook. 5. Heat the oil in a pan at medium low heat. Chuck in garlic and chilli to flavour the oil. 6. At this point you have the basic recipe, but might like to add a few tomatoes and tomato paste. Adds a little punch, colour and flavour to the whole thing. Squash the tomatoes to get the juice out. 7. Drain your pasta ‘al dente’ (around 2 mins before official cooking time) and chuck it in with the sauce and stir well. Remember the pasta will keep cooking at this point so don’t be shy on the ‘al dente’ decision.

— In Rome, this dish is the cultural equivalent of a kebab after a night out. Just healthier, better at sobering you up and generally more sociable.

1 Ingredients 2 Don’t forget salt in water! 3 Ajo, Ojo e Peperoncino in the pan 4 Optional tomato flavours 5 Supervise operations with glass of wine 6 Feed the troops


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— Remojon Andaluz de Zuheros Aurora Tallon From the Moorish village of Zuheros in the south of Spain we get this special salad. Recipe from grandma Aurorita Zafra. Fish was not common in the interior countryside villages, so they only had dried salt cod which could be kept for a long time before rinsing it and cooking it. Ingredients: 4 or 5 oranges 400 grams of cod (salt cod if possible ) Spring onions Black olives 3 eggs

We would always eat this salad on Christmas day to balance with all the massive Christmas meals. After all, Spain is all about the weather the people and most of all, the food Method: 1. If the cod is dry leave it in cold water for a day making sure you change the water at least two times during the day. 2. Fry the cod in a pan with a bit of olive oil and break it in pieces. Let it cool 3. Boil the eggs for 8 minutes until they are fully boiled. Let them cool and cut In pieces 4. Peel and cut the oranges in pieces. 5. Put everything together and add the spring onions & some black olives cut in slices 6. The most important thing is the olive oil. It must be Spanish cold pressed extra virgin olive oil especially from Zuheros. 7. Let it all absorb the flavours overnight and eat cold

— Recipe from grandma Aurorita Zafra.

1 Ingredients 2. Pan fry the cod 2 Boil eggs & break fish 3 Mix all, use the best oil and enjoy :)


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— Hallacas Giovanni Pesiri Hallacas [ay-YAH-kahs] is a traditional Venezuelan dish made of masa dough, filled with a stew-like meat filling, which is steamed in a plantain leaf parcel. This is the ultimate jungle food typically enjoyed during the Christmas festivities, however it is so popular that most Venezuelans eat it during the whole year. Ingredients (for 15 Hallacas): Meat Filling: 500g Top Round beef, finely diced 500g Lean Pork, finely diced 500g Chicken breast, finely diced 100g bacon diced 2 garlic cloves 4 Tomatoes, 1 leek and 1 onion finely sliced 100g Spring onion, finely sliced 2 red/green peppers, finely diced Salt and Pepper to taste 1/2 cup small Capers and green olives 1 ½ Cups of Marsala wine 125g Brown sugar ½ Cup of Raisins ½ Cup of vegetable oil and ½ Cup of Vinegar Masa Dough: 500g Pre- Cooked Corn Masa Flour Salt to taste 100ml. Vegetable Oil 50g Anatto seed (for colouring) 250ml Beef/Chicken Stock 250ml Water Final Preparation: Frozen Banana leafs (Available at Chinese markets) 250g Shredded boiled chicken breast 4 Hard boiled eggs, sliced 1 Red Pepper, finely sliced 100g Pepper stuffed green olives and Capers Husk for tying the parcels

Method: For the Meat Filling: 1. On a deep large casserole at moderate heat, add the oil until hot. Using a wooden spoon, add the onion and garlic, cook until soft, add the leeks and spring onions and cook for 5 minutes then add all the meats and seal until brown. Once the meat is tender, add the rest of the ingredients and cook for about one hour until all the ingredients are well cooked and the filling is not watery. Set aside and let cool (better if left overnight) For the Masa Dough: 2. Place the flour on a tray or in a bowl. Make a well in the centre, salt to taste then slowly add the stock and knead until the dough does not stick to the tray. Heat the annatto seed with the oil until a red colour is achieved. Pour the liquid through a sieve and add half to the dough, keeping the rest. Cover the dough with a wet cloth. .Defrost the plantain leaves. Clean each leaf with a damp rag, always moving the cloth parallel to the veins. Cut the leaves into squares - you will require three squares per each hallacas. Final preparation and assembly: 3. Place a leaf on a clean table. Warm up the coloured rendered oil prepared earlier so that it liquefies. Dip a small rag into the fat and spread a thin layer onto the base, again moving the cloth along the veins and not across them. Make a small billiard-sized ball of dough and place it in the middle of the large base leaf. Flatten the dough evenly until you reach a thickness of about 15mm. Place approximately 4 tbsp of filling in a rectangular shape in the centre of the dough, aligning the long edge of the rectangle parallel to the veins of the plantain leaf. Add three to four olives, capers, and egg to the top of the filling. Fold to completely encase the filling, another leaf to wrap in the opposite direction and another leaf at the end on a perpendicular direction. Tie the parcels as a Christmas present with the husk. Boil the hallacas in a pot of water for one hour. Remove from the pot and let cool and drain. And enjoy! NOTE: Hallacas are easily refrigerated or frozen. Reheat by steaming again until hot.

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This is how they should look like Some of the ingredients Preparing the dough for the filling Buen provecho


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— Sharded Barf -Ruby Murray Laura McLeod A Scottish classic - the Indian curry. My family eats curry on average 3 times a week. They even went out for curry on Christmas day last year when I was in Bolivia (I won’t be letting that happen again)! We all take our turns trying out different dishes but don’t often stick to a recipe. Ingredients: 1 kg beef (scotch shoulder beef braising steak) 1 tbsp plain flour Knob of butter 1 tbsp oil 2 tbsp garam masala 1.5 tsp turmeric 1 tsp kashmiri chilli 1 large chilli (or to taste) 3 beef oxo cubes 6 cloves garlic, crushed 3 small onions 800ml boiling water 75g desiccated coconut Bunch of fresh coriander (to serve) Top Tips * The Perfect Rice: 75g basmati rice per person 100ml boiling water per person Salt to taste 1 chicken oxo cube (optional, but really tasty) Handful of frozen peas (optional, but good for ye!)

This particular recipe, however, has been tried and tested and is a family favourite. It is an ideal meal for the slow cooker but can be made in a pan if preferred, following the same recipe but adjusting the cooking time to suit the cut of beef. The recipe serves 6-8 people (probably more as we’re pretty big eaters) but can easily be halved and still serve decent portions for 4 people. Bon appetit! Method: 1. Trim fat off beef and cut into 1 inch cubes. Coat beef with flour and brown in batches in frying pan with butter and move to slow cooker (or non-stick pan). 2. Slice onion and fry in oil. Finely chop chilli & crush garlic, add to onions and cook further on low heat until soft and golden brown, adding the kashmiri chilli, turmeric and half of the garam masala. 3. Add mixture to slow cooker, crumble over oxo cubes and add boiling water. Stir well, adding coconut. 4. Cover with lid and cook on high for 5-6 hours or low for 8-9 hours. (Adjust cooking time to suit cut of beef) 5. Stir in remainder of garam masala before serving and serve with fresh coriander, basmati rice and chapatis. Heat a little oil in a non stick pan and add the rice. Stir for a minute before adding the boiling water. Add a good shake of salt and crumble the oxo cube into the pan, if using. Mix well and add the peas. Place the lid over the pan and turn the heat down to low. Leave to simmer gently for 13 minutes. Et voila! Fluff with a fork and serve. Chapatis: Dry fry the chapatis individually in a frying pan or use tongs to move over flame of a gas hob for a charred, crispier, more authentic taste!

— A Scottish classic - the Indian curry.

1 What you need 2 Sizzle sizzle 3 Mouth wateringly good!


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— Peruvian Ceviche with Sweet Coconut Rice Sam Wilson Ceviche is a South American dish of raw fish, essentially ‘cooked’ in the acidic juices of fresh limes, oranges, onion and chilli. Heston WHO?! Each country within the region has their it’s take on the dish, but this recipe is closest to the fresh, light combination found in Peru, where coconut rice can also be found as a popular accompaniment. Ingredients Serves 4 For the ceviche: 4 x seabass fillets (although most white fish will do) 5 x limes 1 x large orange 2 x red onions 2 x fresh red chillies Handful chopped coriander 1 x teaspoon salt For the coconut rice: 500 grams brown rice 2 x cans reduced fat coconut milk 2 x cans water 1 x tablespoon desiccated coconut 3 x spring onions Salt and pepper to taste

— Heston WHO?

Method: 1. Add the coconut milk and boiling water to a pan with the rice and simmer over a medium heat for 10-15 minutes. 2. While the rice is cooking, remove the skin from the seabass fillets and cut into roughly 1cm cubes, placing them in a large bowl. 3. Juice the limes and orange into a separate bowl with the teaspoon of salt, and finely chop the red onions and chilli. 4. Add the chopped veg and half of the coriander to the bowl containing the seabass. Now pour over the lime and orange juice. This will start the ‘cooking’ process, which really should only be five minutes maximum! You may need to give the mixture a stir halfway through. 5. Once the rice is ready season with salt, pepper and desiccated coconut. Stir in half of the chopped spring onions, reserving the other half to garnish. Use a ramekin or similar to mould the rice into a fancy tower on each plate. 6. Serve a few spoonfuls of the Ceviche onto each plate, draining off some of the juice in the process. 7. Garnish with the remaining spring onion and coriander.

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Stuff you need All chopped Ready for cooking Garnish to finish


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— Lentil Dhal Laura McLeod I’ve been trying to cut down on my meat consumption recently and have discovered some delicious vegetarian recipes along the way. This one is super tasty, filling, cheap and easy to make! I like to make it in big batches and freeze half or serve it as a side dish in an Indian themed dinner party so this recipe serves 6-8 people but the portions can easily be halved to make a smaller amount. Enjoy! Ingredients:

Method:

500g red split lentils 1 tsp turmeric 4 tsp of ground coriander 2 green chillies (or to taste) 1 tbsp of ginger, grated 400g tin chopped tomatoes 1 litre water Salt to taste

1. Rinse lentils and add to large non-stick pan with turmeric, ground coriander and ginger. Add boiling water and simmer for 15-20 mins or until tender. Stir every so often to avoid sticking. Add salt to taste. 2. Add tinned tomatoes and chilli to mix, stir well and simmer for a further 20-30 minutes. Ready to serve!

2 onions, diced 2 tbsp butter Bunch of fresh coriander

Optional topping (really tasty): Fry onions in butter on a low-medium heat until golden brown. Add a good dollop on top of the dhal before sprinkling with fresh coriander and some chopped chilli.

1 Prep 2 Mix 3 Fry 4 Eat


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— Homemade Pizza Paul Pointon This recipe is one for those who think that a £4 freshly made pizza from any of the leading supermarkets is just not enough hassle or those who feel their instagram or snapchat story needs some fresh content to show the world how much of a functioning adult you are. Ingredients: For 2 medium sized pizzas: 300g strong white flour 1 teaspoon yeast 1 teaspoon sugar 1 teaspoon honey 200ml warm water Pinch of salt Pinch of pepper Your choice of toppings Your choice of base sauce (Tomato Passata, Bbq, Garlic) (optional: herbs through the dough - I use rosemary and thyme)

I suggest you ‘go to town’ on the toppings. It’s entirely up to you what goes on this pizza and you aren’t limited to the stingy topping portion given by the workforce of the popular pizza takeaways who obviously feel as if it’s coming out of their pay check. This recipe is strictly for an excessive topping allocation. A margarita pizza is not recommended. TIP: those who choose to have margarita as a pizza choice should not be trusted. Method: 1. Mix the flour with the sugar, salt, pepper and herbs if you’re using any. 2. Make a big ‘O’ (well) in the dry mix on the counter 3. Mix the yeast and honey in the warm water and leave it until there is a frothy top (this is the yeast activating). 4. Now pour the warm yeasty goodness into the big ‘O’. 5. Gradually start mixing the warm yeast mixture until you have a nice sticky, tempting dough. 6. Mix in the remaining flour until the dough feels dryer and you can actually knead it with your hands. 7. To knead this kind of dough you want to hold the bottom with one hand and stretch the dough out in front of you with the other. Do this for about ten minutes till your mixture is pretty smooth 8. That’s it done. Stick it in a bowl with a tea towel over the top for about an hour; it should double in size. 9. Before rolling out your pizza base, knead it a few times to push out any air bubbles. Now add your base sauce and toppings. Then bake it at 200°C for 10 mins.

— For those who want to show the world how much of a functioning adult you are.

1 The dry mixture 2 The big ‘O’ (well) 3 Dough 4 Dough doubled in size 5 Dough rolled out to form pizza base 6 Adding your selection of toppings (Spicy chicken, chorizo, mushroom, tomato, mozzarella) 7 Tasty cooked pizza


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— Diet Cola chicken Sonia Paterson This is an extremely tasty and a very low fat dish. Feel free to use oil rather than low calorie spray. Perfect for anyone watching their waistline who enjoys a hearty meal with none of the guilt. Method Ingredients Low calorie cooking spray/ oil 1 onion, finely chopped 1 red pepper, 1 yellow and 1 green pepper, chopped into chunks 2 garlic cloves, finely chopped 4 skinless chicken breasts, cut into pieces 2 tsp Worcestershire sauce 4 tbsp tomato purée 8 tbsp passata with onions and garlic 1 tbsp dark soy sauce 1 tsp dried mixed herbs 330ml can diet cola 200ml chicken stock( I use a cube) 200g sugar snap peas

1. Spray large pan with low calorie cooking spray over a high heat. (Or oil whatever you prefer) 2. Add the chicken, peppers and onion and stir-fry for 4-5 minutes, or until lightly browned. 3. Add the diet cola, stock, passata, tomato purée, garlic, Worcestershire sauce, soy sauce and dried mixed herbs and stir well. 4. Bring to the boil, cover, reduce the heat to medium-low and simmer for 12-15 minutes. 5. Add the sugar snap peas, stir and increase the heat to medium-high. 6. Cook for another 10-15 minutes, or until the chicken is cooked through and the veg is tender. 7. My personal favourite – enjoy with a large glass of wine and relax

— The diet cola gives a BBQ taste but you can also use Fanta for a sweet and sour taste. Enjoy!

1 My mums recipe 2 Eat with coffee 3 Brush filo pastry 4 Walnuts 5 Time for the ruler 6 Baked 7 Syrup


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— Asparagus and Eggs Elena Pastrana I love the meals that come together quickly, focus less on the exact measurement and more about what you have on hand. Moreover, since these meals can be so simple, it sometimes feels silly to write them down.

Ingredients 5 to 6 spears asparagus 2 teaspoon olive oil 1/4 teaspoon salt 2 eggs 1/4 cup parmesan cheese (optional) Pepper, for topping

For example, this asparagus and egg dish. In this case, you fry a few asparagus spears, crack an egg or two in the pan, add bit of cheese and you’re done. It’s the perfect, quick meal for breakfast, lunch, or even a light dinner. Method: 1. Prepare the asparagus by cutting off roughly 1 inch off the bottoms of the spears. 2. Heat a pan over medium heat. Then add some of the olive oil, followed by the asparagus. Shake pan to coat asparagus and cook until tender, about 4 to 5 minutes, then set aside and cover to keep warm. 3. Make sure your pan is still hot, add olive oil, and crack the eggs. I like to cover the pan partway through cooking and let the trapped heat and steam gently cook the top. How long you cook your eggs is a matter of personal preference. The whites will set in a few minutes, particularly if you cover the pan for a minute or two. 4. Add the fried eggs to the asparagus and top with some cheese and pepper

— Serve with a simple side salad for lunch or with toast for breakfast.


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— Spaghetti alla Puttanesca Anthony Fusi There is great debate over where the original recipe for Puttanesca came from. Most agree it is a southern Italian dish invented in the mid 20th century. I could go into all the stories and folklore but it would fill a book all on its own!

Ingredients: 400g of Spaghetti 400g of chopped tomatoes 80g of black olives 30g capers 60g anchovies crushed chillies 3 cloves of garlic salt pepper parsley

Some recipes (and some argue the original) do not include anchovies but I have always had it with them and can’t imagine it without them, so that is the recipe I am going to run through here. This is comfort food with a capital C and everyone I know always comes back for more. Method: 1. Fry the anchovies in the olive oil with the crushed chillies and garlic. Once the anchovies have dissolved to a paste like consistency add in the chopped tomatoes, bring to the boil then reduce heat and allow to simmer for anything from 25 to 40 minutes. The longer you cook a sauce and let it reduce down, the tastier it is. 2. Boil your water for the pasta 3. Salt the water and ensure it’s boiling before placing in the Spaghetti. Don’t bother with putting oil in the water, it is a waste of good oil, and does not prevent the pasta from sticking together. To ensure it does not stick just use a large pot and plenty of water to let the pasta swirl around in. All pastas have a different cook time so check the recommendation on a packet, but it shouldn’t be any more than 12 minutes, and less if you like it al dente. 4. 5 minutes before the pasta is ready add the black olives and capers to the sauce as well as a little of the starchy water from the pasta. 5. Once the pasta is ready and drained, place back into the pot with the sauce and mix well. Never place the drained pasta straight onto the plate with the sauce on top as it does not allow the sauce to coat the pasta properly, does not taste as good and the pasta cools too quickly. 6. This is a borderline fish dish due to the anchovies but serve with parmesan anyway and a good glass of red wine!

1 Prep 2 Key ingredients 3 Spaghetti 4 Eat


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DESSERTS

THE THREESIXTY ARCHITECTURE COOKBOOK

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— Crunchie bar cheesecake Grace Brown This luscious cheesecake will leave your guests craving more. It’s a fun twist on a classic cheesecake but with added naughtiness. However it is made from light cream cheese so no need to fuss about the calories... just try and forget about the six Crunchie bars that are in it. Method: Ingredients: 1x 250g packet of plain digestive biscuits 150g melted butter 3 teaspoons of vegetarian gelatine 1/4 cup of water 375g softened cream cheese (I use philadelphia light) 1x tablespoon of vanilla extract 1/2 cup of caster sugar 1x 350ml double cream 3 x 60g chopped Crunchies

1. Grease a 24cm diameter spring form tin with a light coating of butter 2. Melt the butter in the microwave. Whiz up the biscuits in a food processor or if you have had a bad day bash them up like in the olden days. Once they have a fine grain texture combine with the butter. Press this biscuit mixture into the tin, making sure it is evenly spread and pop it into the fridge. 3. Melt the gelatine in hot water (just follow the instructions on the packet as they are all slightly different). and put to one side to cool slightly. 4. Beat the sugar, cream cheese and vanilla until smooth. Stir in the slightly cooled gelatine (do this fast as to not melt the cheese). Chop up the Crunchies into bitesize bits (remember to leave some for the topping) then combine with the cream cheese mixture. 5. Separately whisk the cream until it has soft peaks. Fold the cream into the rest of the mixture and then spread evenly onto the biscuit base. Leave in the fridge to set for as long as you can bear it! 6. Finally, get your Picasso hat on and decorate to your taste using some of the leftover Crunchie.

1 Whiz whiz or anger management 2 Chop chop 3 Dollop 4 Yum Yum


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— Springfield Quay Lime Pie Neal Hemingway Originating from the Florida Keys this recipe creates a harmony between the texture of the crunchy ginger nut base and the delicious lime topping. Simple and easy to make, this is a dinner party classic that will leave your guests craving more. Method: Ingredients: One packet of ginger nut biscuits Butter 150g One tin of condensed milk Double cream (300ml) 6-8 limes (zested and squeezed)

1. For the base: Crumble down the packet of ginger nut biscuits, then mix with a little melted butter to form base. Stir well and place the base mixture into a cake tin, pressing down on all the base to make an evenly packed layer. Put base in the freezer for a while to cool down. (but don’t freeze) 2. For the good part: Open the tin of condensed milk and carton of double cream and mix together in a bowl. 1 by 1 add the limes. Zest first then squeeze each lime into the mixture, stirring well after each one. Mix all the ingredients together until the cream starts to solidify. 3. Finishing touches Pour the cream mixture onto the base and then place in the fridge to set..

— This buttery biscuit base would make Master-chef’s Gregg Wallace cry with joy.

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Stuff you need Squeezy squeezy Buttery biscuit base Yum Yum


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— Semla Dilyana Krushkova A must when celebrating Fat Tuesday in Sweden , this semi-sweet cardamom rich bun is filled with almond paste and heavy whipped cream. A pastry perfect for your next coffee break on a winter day. Method

Ingredients Cardamom Buns 240ml milk 90g caster sugar 14g dried yeast(2 sachets) 1 tsp. ground cardamom 1 egg 500g plain flour 1 tbsp. baking powder 1 tsp. salt 55g unsalted butter, soft 1 egg + a dash of milk (for egg wash) Almond Filling 100g ground almonds 100g icing sugar 2 tbsp water 1/2 tsp. ground cardamom dash of vanilla extract dash of double cream Vanilla Cream 600ml double cream 60g icing sugar 1 vanilla pod ( dash of vanilla extract)

For the Cardamom Buns: 1. Heat the milk until warm to the touch and place it in a bowl with the sugar, yeast and cardamom. Whisk until slightly foamy and let the mixture stand for about 5 minutes. 2. In the same bowl add the egg, flour, baking powder and salt and whisk until combined. Knead the dough for a couple of minutes and start adding the butter in small pieces. 3. Knead the dough for 5 minutes after you have added all of the butter (the dough should be smooth and elastic). Cover the bowl with a tea towel and leave in a warm place until it has doubled its size (approx. 1 hour) 4. After the dough has risen divide it into 16 portions(I weighed them all so once they are in the oven they bake evenly- 50-60 gr each) 5. Roll each portion into a ball and place them onto two baking trays lined with baking paper. Space them evenly as they will rise and spread. Cover the trays with a towel and leave to prove again for 30-40 min. While your dough is proving, pre-heat your oven to 200 degrees C. 6. In a bowl, whisk together the egg and milk to make an egg wash. Brush the tops of the buns but make sure it doesn’t pool around the base of the dough. Bake them until golden, approx. 15 minutes. Leave to cool. For the Almond Filling: 1. Mix together the ground almonds and caster sugar in a food processor. Add a few tbsp. of water until you reach a thick paste 2. Add in the cardamom seeds and vanilla and 2tbs of double cream until you reach a soft scoop-able mixture. For the Vanilla Cream: 1. Whisk together all the ingredients until firm. Place in a piping bag fitted with a star nozzle. To assemble the Semlas 1. Cup the tops off of the buns, scoop out the middle and fill the buns with almond paste (some breadcrumbs can be mixed with the paste) 2. Pipe the cream in a tall swirl on top of each bun. 3. Cover with a generous sprinkle of icing sugar.

1 Ingredients 2 Knead dough and roll into a ball 3 Bake until golden brown 4 Yum


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— Plum Cake Asya Ivanova An easy delicious cake, which is a great way of using plums when in-season. Recipe of my mum’s (Bulgaria) although many versions are available in other countries. The cake combines the fresh taste of the plums with the sweet sponge. Ideal with a cup of tea on a cold evening. Ingredients: 3 eggs 1 1/2 cups brown sugar 1 1/2 cups plain flour 1/2 cup unsalted butter 1/4 cup oil 1 tsp baking powder 1 tsp vanilla extract 2 tbsp yoghurt 250 g plums

Method: 1. Mix the eggs with the sugar in a large bowl until light and fluffy. 2. Gradually add the flour, baking powder, vanilla, oil, yoghurt and melted butter. Mix until smooth. Pour the mixture in a cake dish. 3. Half and de-seed the plums. Place them skin down onto the cake mix. Mix 1 tbsp butter with 2tbsp flour to make the crumbs and add on top of the plums. 4. Bake for 35min in a preheated oven to 180C. Optionally sprinkle icing sugar on the ready cake.

1 Adding the flour 2 Halving the plums 3 Ready for the oven 4 Cake


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— Tablet Kieron Goodman Passed down through 3 generations of my family this wee sugary treat is one for the ‘sweet tooths’. Packed full of the bad stuff the method of making has not really changed over the decades.

Ingredients: 2 lb granulated sugar (white) 4 oz butter 7 fl oz milk 1 tin (400g) condensed milk Secret Family Ingredient

Obviously the base ingredient here is sugar. Lots and lots of sugar. In fact it’s best not to tell you how much sugar, cause it really is lots. Add in some butter, milk, condensed milk (basically more sugar) and that’s it. Well.... apart from the secret ingredient which is a family secret so I’m no tellin’ you! The key to creating a smooth and creamy tablet is patience. Slowly, slowly does it when melting the sugar to avoid any sugar crystals forming, then boiling to exactly the right consistency and beating it until your arm falls off. A real time consumer of a recipe! Very tasty, and very moreish, this old Scottish tray bake is still keeping dentists busy. Method: 1. Grab yir biggest pan (and I mean biggest!). Fill it up with the sugar, milk and diced butter. Melt this over a really low heat until it all melts into a paste. Keep stirring regularly with a wooden spoon. It’s only ready when you feel no sugar crystals crunching at the bottom of the pan when dabbing the wooden spoon in. 2. Only once you are convinced that your paste is as smooth as a baby’s bum, add the condensed milk and turn the heat up a wee bit. 3. Bring the mix up to a simmer and gently keep it bubblin’ for about 25ish minutes. To test if the mix is ready to be taken off the heat and beaten (whisked) drop a wee dollup into a cup of cold water. If it goes hard(ish) so you can pick it up, then you’re good. If it remains runny so it’s impossible to pick it up, cook it some more! 4. If your test is good take the pan off the heat. Get your electric whisk out and whisk the mix until it’s grabbing your whisky bits. When you can see the whisk leaving defined trail lines then you’re done. 5. Pour it all into a couple of baking trays lined with greaseproof paper, and when cooled a bit, score out (with a knife) your wee tablet shaped cubes. Leave to cool overnight then cut into wee bite sized chunks.

— Obviously the base ingredient here is sugar. Lots and lots of sugar. In fact it’s best not to tell you how much sugar, cause it really is lots.

1. Whisking. 2. Ready to pour into greaseproof trays. 3. Bubblin’ gently. 4. Setting in the trays


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— Irish Mealie Biscuits Rory Kellett Sure what’s a cup of tea without a biscuit? This recipe for Mealie biscuits derived in Dublin by my Auntie Siobhan has won over the extended family. The recipe has made it across to Scotland and is spreading fast throughout the Highlands. This biscuit is a great all-rounder, suitable for all occasions from the morning tea break to a full state funeral. Ingredients: Melt this: 8 oz butter 6 oz caster sugar 1 Tablespoon golden syrup Mix this: 8 ox plan flour 6 oz Irish oats 1 teaspoon bicarbonate of soda

The crisp crunch and the buttery, oaty, Irish taste will have you coming back to the biscuit tin again and again. For something different why not smash up the Mealie Biscuits and sprinkle them over some vanilla ice cream (yum). Method 1. It couldn’t be easier. Melt together the butter, sugar and syrup and mix in the oats, flour and bi carb (dry mix) 2. Place teaspoon amounts of the mix onto a baking tray (leave some room for the mixture to spread) 3. 10 -12 mins in a 190 -200°C oven.

— This biscuit is a great all-rounder, suitable for all occasions from the morning tea break to a full state funeral.

1. Ingredients 2. Prep the mix 3. Melt the mix in the pan. 4. Crunchy Irish Delight.


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— Chocolate, Strawberry Oreo Tart! Cassie Mitchell This no bake chocolate, strawberry, Oreo tart is a perfect last minute dessert! It is an easy dessert to make. Minimum effort maximum taste. So easy, even the kids can do it! Method: Ingredients 2 packets of Oreos ¼ block of melted butter 1 tub of double cream Big massive bar of Galaxy Small bar of Galaxy 1 small Milkybar Some strawberries Icing sugar

1. Line a cake tin with greaseproof paper and spray with non-stick spray. 2. Put the Oreos in the blender/food processor. Pour in the melted butter and blend a few times until the mixture reaches a fine crumb consistency. 3. Press the Oreo mixture into the bottom of the cake tin. Put in the freezer for 10 mins while you prepare the filling. 4. Melt together the bar of Galaxy and cream over a medium heat until simmering. 5. Pour the chocolate over the prepared Oreo crust. 6. Lightly press the strawberry halves into the top of the tart. 7. Melt small bar of Galaxy and Milkybar and drizzle over the top of the tart. 8. Refrigerate for 3 hours. 9. Before you serve, sprinkle some icing sugar on top.

1. Ingredients 2. Happy little girl! 3. Voilà!


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— Alaska Pudding Skye Sturm This is my adaptation of my uncle’s famously dense bread pudding, a staple of my family’s Thanksgiving dinner for as long as I can remember. I created this version while working at a hut in the Italian alps, where the manager dubbed it ‘Alaska Pudding.’ Best served warm with a big dollop of whipped cream. Ingredients: Bread (I used most of one baguette) 60g butter 750mL milk 6 eggs 250g sugar 1tsp vanilla extract 2tsp cinnamon 1/4tsp nutmeg 4 apples

Method 1. Cut the bread into bite-sized pieces. Peel and chop one apple and fill a cake pan lined with oven paper with the bread and apple pieces. Melt the butter and drizzle it over the bread. 2. In a large bowl, beat the eggs and mix in the milk, sugar, vanilla, cinnamon, and nutmeg. Pour the mixture into the pan and gently push the bread down until it is all submerged. 3. Peel and core the remaining three apples and cut them into thin slices. Arrange the slices artistically on the top of the pudding and dust all over with cinnamon. Bake at 175 C for 1 hour.

Cinnamon (for dusting) Whipped cream to serve (optional)

— I created this version while working at a hut in the Italian alps, where the manager dubbed it ‘Alaska Pudding.’

1. Stuff you need 2. Bread awaiting the good stuff. 3. Mix it all together. 4. Make it pretty 5. Mmmmmmmm


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— Brazo de Gitano de Naranja y Chocolate Aurora Tallon Easy orange and dark chocolate cake to use up those oranges which are getting old. It has the texture of a pudding as it is basically an orange omelette. Spanish traditionally Swiss roll type cakes are called gypsy arms. It is a type of medieval cake folded in on itself. Method: Ingredients: 1 orange zest Juice of one big orange 7 eggs 200 grams of sugar A teaspoon of corn flour A teaspoon of margarine Some sugar and dark chocolate for the coating

1. Preheat the oven to 160°C and prepare the tray. Use a long tray so the sponge stays as thin as possible so it is easier to roll it later. Put some baking paper on the tray and rub it with the margarine so the thin sponge will detach from it easily. 2. Crack the eggs in a bowl and mix them with the sugar. We don’t need to whisk them, it will stay more like an omelette. Now we mix the cornflour with the orange juice and we add it with the zest to the mix. 3. It will be pretty much liquid as we pour it into the oven tray. Put it into the oven at 160°C for 20 minutes or half an hour. We can check if it is fully cooked with a knife or a toothpick; if you insert it into the centre of the cake, it should come out clean, with no streaks of batter. 4. Now comes the hardest part; we put a clean kitchen towel or some more baking paper on a flat surface with some sugar and some of the dark chocolate chips or cocoa and we turn the sponge on top of it and remove the baking paper carefully from above. If we rubbed it well with margarine it should detach easily. 5. The chocolate chips and the sugar should melt under the sponge and now carefully we roll it in on itself. 6. We will have to let it cool before eating it and we can decorate again with more cocoa or dark chocolate.

1 Orange and eggs, that’s mostly it... 2 liquid mix ready for the oven 3. Roll up roll up 4 Let it cool and enjoy :)


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— Shortbread Anthony Hubbert Shortbread is a staple of the famously healthy Scottish diet and lifestyle and provides 2 of your 5 a day (if your 5 a day consists of butter, batter, sugar, crisps and irn-bru).

Ingredients: (makes approximately 24 biscuits) 10 oz plain flour 3 oz caster sugar 3 oz cornflour 1 block salted butter (250g)

This is an easy to follow recipe that, with the aid of a food mixer, is pretty idiot proof (I am testament to that). It can also be rolled thinner and used to make brilliant empire biscuits - an even healthier option with their inclusion of fruit! Method: 1. Begin by cutting butter into small cubes and place in food mixer along with the caster sugar and cream together. 2. Next, add in the cornflour and mix together, 3. Following this, add all of the flour and continue to mix until mixture has a dough like consistency and comes together as a ‘ball’ away from the sides of the bowl (fig.2). 4. Tip mixture out onto a pre-floured surface and roll out to desired thickness (about 10mm thick is ideal). 5. Cut into shapes with cutters or a knife, prick with a fork and place onto a lightly greased baking tray. (fig 3.) 6. Place into a preheated oven at 170 C / gas mark 3 for 10 minutes or until a light golden colour. 7. Once removed from oven, sprinkle generously with caster sugar and place on a wire tray to cool. Eat and (hopefully) enjoy!

— Provides 2 of your 5 a day.’

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Ingredients required Ingredients mixed to ‘dough like’ consistency Mixture cut into shapes and placed on pre-greased tray The finished product!


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Where are we? Whether it’s to discuss your next project, you’re interested in working with us, or you’d just like to get to know us better we’d love to hear from you!

Glasgow Stirling House 226 St Vincent Street Glasgow G2 5RQ +44(0)141 229 7575 Inverness Moray House 16 –18 Bank Street Inverness IV1 1QY +44(0)1463 729929

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The practice currently has 12 nationalities represented and the resulting ethnic diversity of the dishes is not only educational there is national pride at stake!

Š JULY 2017 Š JULY 2017 Compiled by Neal Hemingway

Profile for Threesixty Architecture

Creating Together - The Threesixty Architecture Cookbook  

So why is an architectural practice producing a cookbook? It’s a fair question; I suppose it primarily arose from our multicultural team e...

Creating Together - The Threesixty Architecture Cookbook  

So why is an architectural practice producing a cookbook? It’s a fair question; I suppose it primarily arose from our multicultural team e...

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