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Highlights Hi hli ht of the North Carolina Public School Budget February 0 3 2013 Information Analysis Division of School Business North Carolina Department of Public Instruction


Highlights of the N.C. Public School Budget Funding public education in North Carolina is a complex and integrated process. This booklet presents charts and tables which describe how state and federal funds are distributed to North Carolina's Public Schools. It also reviews the growth in average daily membership (ADM), school personnel, and the effect of Charter Schools. The State funds schools with three basic types of allotments.

Quick Facts

Position Allotments:

Students:

The State allots positions to a local school system for a specific purpose. The local school system pays whatever is required to hire certified teachers and other educators, based on the State Salary Schedule, without being limited to a specific dollar amount. Each local school system will have a different average salary based on the certified personnel's experience and education. Examples of position iti allotments ll t t are:

Allotted '12-13 Allotted '13-14

- Teachers

1,492,793 1,509,925

Number of Schools 12-13: Regular 2418 Charter 107 Regional 1 LEA LEAs: 115

- School Building Administration.

State Funding: 2012-13

- Instructional Support Personnel

$7.74 billion

Dollar Allotments: Local school systems can hire employees or purchase goods for a specific purpose, but the local school system must operate within the allotted dollar amount. Examples of dollar allotments are: - Teacher Assistants

- Textbooks

- Central Office Administration

- Classroom Materials/Supplies/Equip.

Categorical Allotments: Local school systems may use this funding to purchase all services necessary to address the needs of a specific population or service. The local school system must operate within the allotted funds. These funds may be used to hire personnel such as teachers, teacher assistants, and instructional support personnel or to provide a service such as transportation, staff development, or to purchase supplies and materials. Examples of categorical funding are: - At Risk Student Serv ices

- Children with Disabilities

- Noninstructional Support Pers.

- Transportation

For additional information, please contact: Information Analysis Division of School Business Public Schools of North Carolina Education Building, 301 N. Wilmington Street Raleigh, i North Carolina i 27601-2825 Telephone : (919) 807-3700 For more information on Public School Finance visit www.ncpublicschools.org/fbs/

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Federal Funding excl. child nutrition: $856 million

Education Percent of General Fund: 37.3% Estimated Average Teacher Compensation: $45,938

Number of Teachers FY 2013 LEA 95,146 Charter Schools

3 203 3,203


Percent of the General Fund Public Schools Appropriations 55% 52.5%

Since 1970, the Public School’s share of the General Fund has decreased by 15.2%. If our Public Schools were still funded at the same percentage t as in i FY 1969-70, we would have an additional $3.02 billion for our students.

50% 46.5% 45.5%

44.7%

45% 43.7% 41.3%

40.9% 39.2%

39.6%

40%

38.9% 37.7%

37.4%

37.9%

37.3% 35%

30% 1969-70 1974-75 1979-80 1984-85 1989-90 1994-95 1999-00 2004-05 2007-08 2008-09 2009-10 2010-11 2011-12 2012-13

Total State Public School Appropriations 1997-98 to 2012-13 (in Billions) $9 $8.19 $7.74

$8

Funding g increased from $4.72 billion in 1997-98 to $7.74 billion in 201213. In 2009-10 state appropriations were reduced by $840 million to $7.35 billion. Since 2006-07 the number of students has increased by more than 58,000, yet the funding level is the same.

$7.15

$7

$6.52 $5.88

$6

$5.59 $4.72

$5 $4 $3 $2 $1 $0

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Source of Expenditures Child Nutrition Included FY 2011-12 In 2012, NC ranked 11th in the Nation and 2nd in the Southeast for the highest percentage of funds from State revenue. The national average was 45.5%. Most other state school systems are primarily funded by locally driven initiatives such as property taxes and local bond issues.

State, 62.0%

Local, 24.0% Federal, 14.0%

Child Nutrition Excluded

State: Federal: Local:

65.9% 65 9% 10.7% 23.4%

.

Due to temporary ARRA & RttT funding the percentage funded by federal funds has increased from 7% in FY 2004 to 10.7% in FY2012 representing an increase of $672 million.

How State Funds Were Expended FY 2011-12 Alternative Programs & Services 3% Limited English Proficiency (LEP) 1%

School Leadership Services 5%

School-Based Support Services 6%

System-Wide y Support pp Services 3%

Academically and Intellect. Gifted (AIG) 1%

Operational Support & Ancillary Services 9%

Exceptional Children Services (EC) 10%

Regular Instructional Services 62%

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th $7.5 $7 5 billion billi Of the State Public School Fund for FY2011-12, all but 9.6% was used for salaries and benefits.


Average Daily Membership 1994-2014 1,600,000

1,250,000 1,201,688

1,200,000

1,050,000

1,125,028

1,150,000 1,100,000

Projected 201 P 13-14

1,368 8,607 1,288,556

1,300,000

(Se ee Note)

1,434,625

1,400,000 1,350,000

1,464,914

1,450,000

1,492,793

1,500,000

1,509,925

1,550,000

1,000,000 1994

1996

1998

2000

2002

2004

2006

2008

2010

2012

Note: Decrease in 2009-10 Average Daily Membership is due to the change in the Kindergarten age cut off. Starting in 2009-10, students may not be enrolled in a NC public school unless they are 5 years of age on or before August 31st, previously October 16th. This represented a decrease in Kindergarten of 13,490.

Average Daily Membership for each school month is based on the sum of the days in membership for all students in individual LEAs, LEAs divided by the number of days in the school month. To be included in ADM, a student must have a class schedule that is at least 1/2 of the school’s instructional day.

Allotted Average Daily Membership (ADM) is based on the higher of: (a)

Actual ADM from the prior year, or

(b)

Projected ADM of the current year.

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2014


LEA Name Alamance-Burlington

Allotted ADM

ADM

22,423

LEA Name

Edgecombe County

FY 2012-13 ADM 7,076

Alexander County

5 458 5,458

Forsyth County

53 189 53,189

Alleghany County

1,446

Franklin County

8,660

Anson County

3,744

Gaston County

30,985

Ashe County

3,139

Gates County

Av ery County

2,141

Beaufort County

LEA Name Chapel Hill-Carrboro

ADM 12,129

Pamlico County

1 393 1,393

Pasquotank County

5,858

Pender County

8,397

1,794

Perquimans County

1,769

Graham County

1,227

Person County

4,828

6,940

Granv ille County

8,559

Pitt County

23,594

Bertie County

2,696

Greene County

3,213

Polk County

2,300

Bladen County

5,128

Guilford County

72,603

Brunswick County

12,295

Halifax County

3,674

Asheboro City

4,852

Buncombe County

25,592

Roanoke Rapids City

3,113

Richmond County

7,643

Weldon City

1,011

Robeson County

24,023

Rockingham County

13,596

Rowan-Salisbury

20,079

Randolph County

18,528

Ashev ille City

4,174

Burke County

13,053

Harnett County

Cabarrus County

29,844

Haywood County

7,665

5,281

Henderson County

13,563

Rutherford County

8,803

Hertford County

3,047

Sampson County

8,618

Clinton City

2,987

Scotland County

6,124

Kannapolis City

19,871

Caldwell County

12,477

Camden County

1,942

Hoke County

8,228

Carteret County

8,489

Hyde County

574

Caswell County

2 858 2,858

Iredell Statesv ille Iredell-Statesv

21 447 21,447

Stanly County

8 953 8,953

17,128

Mooresv ille City

5,682

Stokes County

6,822

Hickory City

4,452

Jackson County

3,634

Surry County

8,449

Newton-Conov er

2,975

Johnston County

33,175

Elkin City

1,182

Chatham County

8,109

Jones County

1,128

Mount Airy City

1,691

Cherokee County

3,368

Lee County

9,857

Swain County

1,982

Edenton/Chowan

2,283

Lenoir County

9,097

Transylv ania County

3,555

Clay County

1,337

Lincoln County

11,803

Tyrrell County

570

Clev eland County

15,651

Macon County

4,417

Union County

40,454

Columbus County

6,450

Madison County

2,548

Vance County

6,848

Whitev ille City

2,249

Martin County

3,721

Wake County

6,455

Warren County

2,426

Washington County

1,710 4,491

Catawba County

Crav en County

14,996

McDowell County

Cumberland County

51,890

Mecklenburg County

139,737

Currituck County

3,923

Mitchell County

2,071

Watauga County

Dare County

4,917

Montgomery County

4,139

Wayne County

Dav idson County

20,175

150,544

19,333

Moore County

12,499

Wilkes County

9,979

Lexington City

3,038

Nash-Rocky Mount

16,576

Wilson County

12,246

Thomasv ille City

2 449 2,449

New Hanov er County

25 024 25,024

Yadkin County

5 739 5,739

Dav ie County

6,483

Northampton County

2,230

Yancey County

2,367

Duplin County

9,278

Onslow County

25,081

Charter Schools - Public

33,072

Orange County

7,420

Total

Durham County

5

48,795 1,492,793


N.C. Elementary and Secondary Education Appropriated Funds FY 2012-13 (Note 1) Budgeted Positions I. State Aid - Local Education Agencies General Administration Central Office Administration Instructional Personnel and Related Services Classroom Teachers Teacher Assistants Instructional Support School Building Administration Classroom Materials/Instructional Supplies/Equipment Textbooks Annual Leave Mentor Pay ABC Incentive Awards Estimated Matching Benefits (Note 2) Subtotal Support Noninstructional Support Personnel Categorical Programs Academically & Intellectually Gifted At Risk Student Services/Alternative Schools Children with Special Needs Disadvantaged Student Supplemental Funding Driver Education Limited English Proficiency Low Wealth Supplemental Funding School Technology Small County Supplemental Funding Staff Development Transportation Vocational Education Subtotal

Budgeted Funds

71,400.50 7,152.50 4,018.68

6,696.00

LEA Adjustment

$94,626,908

1.16%

2,986,497,197 554,090,958 343,332,091 238,804,328 50,152,585 22,816,039 33,457,308 , , 0 0 1,209,453,427 5,438,603,933

66.58%

351,125,707

4.30%

73,625,278 275,992,693 734 674 633 734,674,633 80,808,768 26,877,414 84,463,502 227,417,694 0 45,574,879 0 423,853,724 414,697,125 2,387,985,710

29.24%

(359,738,508)

II. Other Public School Appropriations ADM Contingency Reserve Contracts-Finance Officer Staff Development EVAAS Focused Education Reform Pilot Learn and Earn & Learn and Earn Online Small Specialty High School Education Reform Studies Personnel Svcs (Longevity $78.5M, ST Disability $5.4M, Workers Comp $33.9M, Unemployment $2.4M) Sale of Equipment-Surplus School Based Child and Family Support Teams School Breakfast Student Diagnostic and Intervention Initiative School Bus Replacement Liability Insurance for Public Schools Testing Tort Claims (Department of Justice) UERS Learn and Earn Online Virtual Public Schools Subtotal Total State Public School Fund Requirements

2,618,500 64,560 1,845,000 0 24,066,520 4,017,304 0 121,008,229 0 9,579,281 2,017,761 25,601,151 36,851,619 3,145,000 8,993,628 4 599 195 4,599,195 10,258,861 0 0 254,666,609 8,167,270,359 (430,569,163)

Funded by Receipts (Civil Penalties, Lottery Fund, Sales Tax Refund, Highway Fund, Surplus Sales)

% of Total

7,736,701,196

-4.40%

3.12% 100.00% 5.27% 94.73%

Grand Total State Appropriation

$

DPI Agency Budget - State Appropriation for FY 2012-13 = $71,542,475 (Note 3) Fl Flow Th Through hA Appropriations i ti ffor FY 2012 2012-13 13 = $31 $31,691,562 691 562

DPI Positions = 1,336.50 see note 4)

Note 1: Based on the State Public School Fund Certified Budget per the 701 Report dated September 8, 2012 for period ending August 31, 2012 Note 2: Includes funds for Social Security, Retirement and Hospitalization for position/month of employment allotments for Classroom Teachers, Instr Support and School Bldg Administration. Benefits for other LEA staff are included in the dollar allotments, such as Central Office Administration and Vocational Education. Note 3: DPI's number does not include NCCAT or Teacher Academy since they are not under our State Board of Education. Note 4: DPI's Positions includes those transferred for Residential Schools

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Initial Allotment Formulas FY 2012-13 Administration Category

(F nding Factors are ro rounding.) nding ) Basis of Allotment (Funding

Central Office Administration

Increase by LEA from FY 11-12 Initial Allotment is 2.60%.

Instructional Personnel and Support Services Category Classroom Teachers

(F di Factors F t are rounded.) d d) Basis of Allotment (Funding

Grades Kindergarten

1 per 18 in ADM. (LEA Class Size Avg. is 21)

Grades 1 - 3 Grades 4 - 6 Grades 7 - 8 Grade 9 Grades 10 - 12 M th/S i Math/Science/Computer /C t T Teachers h

1 per 17 in ADM. (LEA Class Size Avg. is 21)

Allotted Salary

1 per 22 in ADM. 1 per 21 in ADM. 1 per 24.5 in ADM. 1 per 26.64 in ADM. 1 per county or based on sub agreements.

LEA Average

Teacher Assistants

$1,182.69 per K-3 ADM.

N/A

Instructional Support

1 per 210.53 in ADM.

LEA Average

1 per school with at least 100 ADM or at least 7 state paid teachers or instructional support personnel. 1 month per 98.53 in ADM.

LEA Average

Career Technical Ed. - MOE

Base of 50 Months of Employment per LEA with remainder distributed

LEA Average

(LIMITED FLEXIBILITY- Salary Increase)

based on ADM in grades 8-12.

Classroom Materials/Instructional

$33.16 per ADM plus $2.69 per ADM in grades 8 and 9 for PSAT Testing

Supplies/Equipment Textbooks

$14.26 per ADM in grades K-12.

School Building Administration Principals Assistant Principals

LEA Average

Employee Benefits C Category Hospitalization Retirement Social Security

Basis off Allotment $5,192 per position per year. 14.23% of total salaries. 7.65% of total salaries.

Statewide Average Salaries for FY 2011-12 (Benefits are not included) Category

Basis of Allotment

Teachers Principals (MOE)

$41,817

Assistant Principals (MOE) Career Technical Ed. (MOE)

$4,996

$5,430

$4,411

$47,999 Instructional Support Note: Dollars for 2012-13 position/month allotments are based on LEA's average salary including benefits, rather than the statewide average salary. They are still position/month allotments and you must stay within the positions/months allotted, not the dollars. This calculation is necessary to determine your LEA's allotment per ADM for charter schools.

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Initial Allotment Formulas FY 2012-13 Support Category

(F di Factors F t are rounded.) d d) Basis of Allotment (Funding

Noninstructional Support Personnel

$233.74 per ADM. $6,000 per Textbook Commission member for Clerical Assistants.

Categorical Programs Category

Basis of Allotment (Funding Factors are rounded.)

Academically y or Intellectually y Gifted Students

$1,232.94 per child for 4% of ADM.

At-Risk Student Services

Each LEA receives the dollar equivalent of one resource officer ($37,838) per high school. Of the remaining funds, 50% is distrib uted b ased on ADM ($86.33 per ADM) and 50% is distrib uted b ased on numb er of poor children, per the federal Title 1 Low Income poverty data ($342.50 per poor child). Each LEA receives a minimum of the dollar equivalent of two teachers and two instructional support personnel ($239,704).

Children with Disabilities School Aged

$3,743.48 per funded child count. Child count is comprised of the lesser of the April 1 handicapped child count or 12.5% of the allotted ADM.

Preschool

Base of $56,159 per LEA; remainder distrib uted b ased on Decemb er 1 child count of ages

Group Homes

Approved applications.

Developmental Day Care (3-21)

To b e allotted in Revision

Community Residential Centers

To b e allotted in Revision

3, 4, and PreK- 5, ($2,979.01) per child.

Disadvantaged Student Supplemental Funding Driver Training Limited English Proficiency Low Wealth Supplemental Funding

S the See th All Allotment t tP Policy li M Manuall ffor fformula l ffor allocating ll ti supplemental l t l ffunding di tto address dd th the capacity needs of LEAs in meeting the needs of disadvantaged students. $200.84 per 9th grade ADM. Includes private, charter, and federal schools. Base of a teacher asst. ($31,101); remainder b ased 50% on numb er of funded LEP students ($406.20) and 50% on an LEA's concentration of LEP students ($3,988.79). See the Allotment Policy Manual for formula allocating supplemental funds to eligib le LEAs that are located in counties that do not have the ab ility to generate revenue to support pub lic schools at the state average level.

Mentor Pay

No New Appropriation for FY 12-13 12-13.

School Technology

No New Appropriation for FY 12-13. Fines and Forfeitures will still b e allocated. See the Allotment Policy Manual for formula that allocates supplemental funding to County LEAs with less than 3,239 ADM. Also county LEAs with ADM b etween 3,239 and 4,080 whose adjusted property tax b ase per student is b elow the state average adjusted property tax b ase per student.

Small County Supplemental Funding

Staff Development Transportation

No New Appropriation for FY 12-13. Based on an efficiency rated formula and local operating plans. The initial allotment is 80% of Adjusted (based on final budget reductions) Planning.

Career Technical Education Program Support

$10,000 per LEA with remainder distributed based on ADM in grades 8-12 ($33.79).

Restrictions for FY 2012-13 through an ABC transfer. Category Textbooks CTE Months and Support Classroom Teachers Teacher Assistants School Technology Position/MOE Allotments

Restrictions Transfers limited to Current Year Allocation. Transfers to Categories outside of CTE are limited b y Salary increase or prior year increase in allocation. Transfers only to Teacher Assistants (PRC 027) Transfers only to PRC 008 - Dollars for K-12 Teachers. Transfers are limited to the amount of current appropriation. No transfers in or out . No Transfers into position or MOE categories.

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Types of State Funding FY 2012-13 What State Money Is Available To Local Education Agencies?

Dollar, 13.1%

Position, 67.1%

C t Categorical, i l 19 19.8% 8%

67.1% of the State funds are allocated as guaranteed certified positions. Therefore, a LEA receives a position (or month of employment) and the state pays for the salary and benefits for the position, regardless of where the individual falls on a salary schedule. So‌ a state paid teacher with 5 yrs experience costs the same to an LEA as a state paid teacher with 25 yrs experience, experience they both = 1 position. position

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Funding North Carolina's Public School Children Based on FY 2012-2013 State Funding Levels Students in Kindergarten through 3rd Grade Student Example 1 Funding for Different Students Every Student (note) Student from a Low Income Family Special Learning Issues (IEP's) Small County Disadvantaged Student Supplemental Funding Low Wealth County Limited English Proficiency Intellectually and Academically Gifted Career & Technical Ed (Voc Ed) Learn & Earn

State $5,508.70 $342.50 $3,743.48 $740.83 $241.77 $290.24 $852.58 $411.00 $0.00 $0.00

$7,124.04 X X X X X

Student Example 2 $11,720.10 X X X X X X X

Student Example 3 $10,689.03 X X X

Student Example 4 $5,919.70 X

X X X

Every Student includes: Teachers (total divided by ADM; not by grade span allotment), teacher assistants (K-3), instructional support, some at-risk (ADM portion), textbooks, classroom materials/supplies (PSAT test in 9-12), school technology, transportation, and administrative & support categories ($916.10) which includes central office administration, school building administration, noninstructional support personnel, driver education, school connectivity, school safety officer, annual leave, longevity, mentor pay, and school bus purchases.

Students in Grade 4 through 8 Student Example 1 Funding for Different Students Every Student (note) Student from a Low Income Family Special Learning Issues (IEP's) Small County Disadvantaged Student Supplemental Funding Low Wealth County Limited English Proficiency Intellectually and Academically Gifted Career & Technical Ed (Voc Ed) Learn & Earn

State $4,326.01 $342.50 $3,743.48 $740.83 $241 77 $241.77 $290.24 $852.58 $411.00 $0.00 $0.00

$5,941.35 X X X X X

Student Example 2 $10,537.41 X X X X X X X

Student Example 3 $9,506.34 X X X

Student Example 4 $4,737.01 X

X X X

Every Student includes: Teachers (total divided by ADM; not by grade span allotment), instructional support, some at-risk (ADM portion), textbooks, classroom materials/supplies (PSAT test in 9-12), school technology, transportation, and administrative & support categories ($916.10) which includes central office administration administration, school building administration administration, noninstructional support personnel personnel, driver education, school connectivity, school safety officer, annual leave, longevity, mentor pay, and school bus purchases.

Students in Grade 9 through 12 Student Example 1 Funding for Different Students Every Student (note) Student from a Low Income Family Special Learning Issues (IEP's) Small County Disadvantaged Student Supplemental Funding Low Wealth County Limited English Proficiency Intellectually and Academically Gifted Career & Technical Ed (Voc Ed) Learn & Earn

State $4 328 70 $4,328.70 $342.50 $3,743.48 $740.83 $241.77 $290.24 $852.58 $411.00 $753.55 $52.29 $5 9

$5,944.04 X X X X X

Student Example 2 $11,293.65 X X X X X X X

Student Example 3 $8,946.69 X X X

$4,739.70 X

X X X

X

Every Student includes: Teachers (total divided by ADM; not by grade span allotment), instructional support, some at-risk (ADM portion), textbooks, classroom materials/supplies (PSAT test in 9-12), school technology, transportation, and administrative & support categories ($916.10) which includes central office administration, school building administration, noninstructional support personnel, driver education, school connectivity, school safety officer, annual leave, longevity, mentor pay, and school bus purchases.

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Student Example 4


Funding North Carolina's Public School Children Based on FY 2012-2013 Federal Funding Levels

Students in Kindergarten through 3rd Grade

Funding for Different Students Every Student Student from a Low Income Family Special Learning Issues (IEP's) Limited English Proficiency Career & Technical Ed (Voc Ed)

Federal $29.90 $4 528 81 $4,528.81 $2,421.25 $2,904.42 $0.00

Student Example 1

Student Example 2

Student Example 3

Student Example 4

$4,558.71

$9,884.38

$9,884.38

$29.90

X X

X X X X

X X X X

X

Students in Grade 4 through 8

Funding for Different Students Every Student Student from a Low Income Family Special Learning Issues (IEP's) Limited English Proficiency C Career & Technical T h i l Ed (V (Voc Ed)

Federal $29.90 $4,528.81 $1,635.54 $2,904.42 $0 00 $0.00

Student Example 1

Student Example 2

Student Example 3

Student Example 4

$4,558.71 X X

$9,098.67 X X X X

$9,098.67 X X X X

$29.90 X

Students in Grade 9 through 12

Funding for Different Students Every Student Student from a Low Income Family Special Learning Issues (IEP's) Limited English Proficiency Career & Technical Ed (Voc Ed)

Federal $29.90 $4,528.81 $1,635.54 $2,904.42 $27.78

Student Example 1

Student Example 2

Student Example 3

Student Example 4

$4,558.71 X X

$9,126.45 X X X X X

$9,098.67 X X X X

$29.90 X

Federal Funding Level: Funding includes federal formula grants only. Every Student includes Funds from Safe and Drug Free Schools, Improving Teacher Quality, and Education Technology. Student from a Low Income Family includes Title I, Title I Reward School Mini-Grant, Title I School Improvement 1003G and Title I School Improvement. The ADM served for Title I School Improvement has decreased from prior year due to a decrease in the number of eligible schools. Title I School Improvement 1003G allocation was included in FY2012-2013 and no allocation was made in FY2011-12. Special Learning Issues includes IDEA VI B Preschool Handicapped, IDEA VI B School Age Handicapped and IDEA VI B Capacity Building. Career & Technical Ed (Voc Ed) includes Funds from Vocational Education Program Support.

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Example of Student Funding Grades K-3 (State & Federal)

Student Example 4, $21,604.48 Limited English Proficient Student with Special Learning Issues Disadvantaged Student from Low-Income y living g in a Small,, Low-Wealth County. y $ $16,065.88 , additional funds Family

Student Example 3, $20,573.41 Limited English Proficient Student with Special Learning Issues Disadvantaged Student from LowIncome Family. Family $15,034.81 $15 034 81 additional funds funds.

Student Example 2 $11,851.98 Academically Gifted Student from Low-Income Family living in a Small, Low-Wealth County. $6,313.38 additional funds

Student Example1, $5,538.60 Student in grade K-3 K 3 with no additional needs. needs

Difficulties in Comparing Dollars per ADM • • • •

Huge variance in the size of LEAs. ADM ranges from systems with an ADM of 570 to an ADM of 150,544. C t i fixed Certain fi d costs t in i LEAs LEA such h central t l office ffi operations ti Younger Teachers versus Older Teachers (experience levels) Fixed Salary Schedules

Teacher Comparison • Ex: Teacher in Wake with 5 years experience, versus Hyde with 20 years experience. Cost per ADM for Hyde is greater. greater – – Both schools have a teacher.

12


Teacher Allotment Ratios and Allotted Positions FY 2012-13

2012-13 Grade Teacher Class-Size Average Spans Allotment Ratio Ratio for the LEA

Individual Class-Size Maximum

Positions Allotted in 2012-13

K

1:18

1:21

1:24

6,594.0

1-3

1:17

1:21

1:24

19,564.0

4-6

1:22

See Note

See Note

15,447.5

7-8

1:21

See Note

See Note

10,668.0

9

1:24.5

See Note

See Note

5,070.5

10-12

1:26.64

See Note

See Note

11,449.0

Notwithstanding G.S. 115C-301 or any other law, local school administrative units shall have the maximum flexibility to use allotted teacher positions to maximize student achievement in grades 4-12. Class size requirements in grades K-3 shall remain unchanged.

Positions and Salaries FY 2012-13 Average Base Salary

Allotted Positions

N/A N/A

Personnel Type

Salary Range

Superintendent (12 months)

$57,324 - $138,996

Assoc/Asst Supt/Dir Supervisors/Coord (12 months)

$40,188 - $104,268

N/A N/A

Principals (12 months)

$51,540 - $110,364 $38,280 - $65,170 $30,800 - $68,050

$63,856 $48,849 $40,716

2,398 1,431 68,793

$30,800 - $68,050 $30,800 - $68,050

$46,997 $43,540

6,653 6,040

Assistant Principals (10 months) Teachers (10 months) Instructional Support (10 months) Vocational Education (10 months)

Non Certified Employees - Monthly Salary Teacher Asistants

$1,935.51 - $3,087.64

$21,258

N/A

Clerical

$1,875.09 - $4,004.86

$31,791

N/A

Custodian

$1,856.73 - $3,578.07

$20,984

N/A

13

The average salary amounts do not include matching benefits Social Security – 7.65%, Retirement – 14.23% Hospitalization - $5,192


Local Education Agencies Full-Time Personnel FY 2012-13 Certified Personnel:

State

Federal

Local

Total

918

160

732

, 1,810

Principals

2,382

0

50

2,432

Assistant Principals

1,719

72

942

2,733

Teachers

82,095

6,856

6,195

95,146

Instructional Support

10,445

1,361

2,916

14,722

Total Certified

97,559

8,449

10,835

116,843

17,579

4,635

2,198

24,412

469

118

968

1,555

Clerical, Secretarial

5,169

290

4,811

10,270

Other Non Certified

13,016

501

10,552

24,069

Total Non Certified

36,233

5,544

18,529

60,306

133,792

13,993

29,364

177,149

Percent of Total

75.5%

7.9%

16.6%

100.0%

Total 2012 Percent of Total

130,594 74.4%

18,650 10.7%

26,386 15.0%

175,630 100.0%

Central Office Admin.

N Non C Certified tifi d P Personnel: l Teacher Assistants Technicians

Total 2013

Teachers, Teacher Assistants, and Instructional Support Personnel make up 75.8% of all personnel. School Building Administrators (Principals & Assistant Principals) make up 2.9% of all personnel. Central office Administrators make up 1.0% of all personnel. Other Nonprofessionals (Clerical, Technicians, Service Workers, etc‌) make up the remaining 20.3% of personnel.

Instructional Support FY 2012-13 Instructional Support Position Alt and Remedial Support Services Audiologists Career Technical Education Services (CTE) Full Time Mentors Guidance Services Health Services Instructional Coaches Instructional Technology Services Lead Teacher Services Media Services Other Instructional Support Psychologists S i lW Social Workk Services S i Special Populations Services Speech Language Pathologists Total FTEs

FULL TIME EQUIVALENT STATE FEDERAL LOCAL TOTAL 66.26 513.13 17.05 596.44 21.52 1.00 5.55 28.07 105.87 59.63 165.50 2.94 27.76 14.62 45.32 3,627.24 40.04 249.02 3,916.30 411.56 8.97 189.76 610.29 385.30 147.60 390.38 923.28 76.07 17.88 79.22 173.17 17.37 103.66 168.60 289.63 2,035.43 2.00 136.00 2,173.43 235.43 43.24 207.27 485.94 606.06 123.07 43.34 772.47 763 23 763.23 68 13 68.13 75 86 75.86 907 22 907.22 242.92 129.01 34.18 406.11 1,345.24 57.53 60.24 1,463.01 9,836.57 1,388.89 1,730.72 12,956.18 14


Compensation Increases Teachers and State Employees State Consumer Fiscal Year Employees Teachers Price Index

Since 1992-93 The yearly percentage increase

1992-93

0.0% a.

2.0%

3.1%

in salary accumulates to:

1993-94

2.0%

5.0%

2.6%

1994-95

4.0% b.

7.0% c.

2.9%

1995-96

2.0%

2.0%

2.7%

1996-97

4.5%

5.5%

2.8%

1997-98

4.0%

7.5% d.

1.8%

1998-99

3.0% b.

7.5% d.

1.7%

1999-00

3.0% b.

7.5% d.

2.9%

2000-01

4.2% e.

6.5% d.

3.4%

2001-02

0.0% f.

2.9%

1.8%

2002-03

0.0% g.

1.8%

2.2%

2003-04

0.0% h.

1.8%

2.2%

2004-05

2.5% i.

2.5%

3.0%

2005-06

2.0% k.

4.2%

3.8%

2006-07

5.5%

8.0%

3.2%

2007-08

4.0%

5.0%

2.8%

2008-09 2009-10 2010-11 2011-12 2012-13

2.8% l. 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 1.2% m.

4.0% d. 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 1.2% m.

- Teachers - State Employees - Consumer Price Index -

121.8% 52.5%* 68.2%

Notes: * Flat rate amounts are not included in the percentage accumulation total. a. An across-the-board flat rate of $43.5 per month was prov ided for all employees. b. Plus a one-time bonus of 1% to each permanent employee (0.5% bonus in 1999-2000). c. Salary increases for teachers ranged from 5% for teachers with 3 years or less experience or at the 30 year maximum, to 7% for teachers with ov er 3 years experience. Principals and Assistant Principals receiv ed a 9% increase. School bus driv ers receiv ed an 8% increase. d. Teachers receiv ed v arying increases depending on their years of experience. e. Plus a one-time bonus of $500 to each permanent employee. f. An across-the-board flat rate of $52.08 per month was prov ided for all employees. g. Full-time State Employees receiv ed an additional 10 days v acation. h. Full-time State Employees receiv ed an additional 10 days v acation plus a one-time bonus of $550. i. State Employees receiv ed the greater of $1,000 or 2.5%. j. Through Nov ember 2012. Bureau of Labor Statistics k. State Employees receiv ed the greater of $850 or 2.0%. l. State Employees receiv ed the greater of $1,100 or 2.75% m. Full-time State Employees receiv ed an additional 5 days v acation.

15

3.8% -0.4% 1.5% 3.0% 1.8% j.


Average Teacher Compensation 2012-13 Estimate

Category Base Salary

(1)

New Teacher Orientation Extended Contract Tutor

(2)

(2)

(2)

Longevity Pay

(2)

Supplementary Pay

(3)

ABC and Retention Bonus Workshop Participant Annual Leave Pay Mentor Pay

(4)

(2)

(2)

(2)

Other Assignments

(2)

Total

$

40,716

$

41,032

$

20

$

13

$

9

$

4

$

248

$

244

$

748

$

752

$

3,726

$

3,433

$

5

$

8

$

15

$

17

$

357

$

341

$ $

10 14

$ $

9 10

$

State Agency Teachers

45,868

(5)

Grand Total G

2012-13 $ Chg g

2011-12 Final

$

45,863

70 $

45,938 5,938

$

NOTES:

($316) 1) Base salary $7

calculated based on 6th pay period payroll data.

$5 2) Calculated amounts based on JHA355EG-

$4 R01 expenditure data. ($4) 3) Supplementary pay

$293 information is received from LEAs annually via

($3) survey. ($2) 4) Bonuses are based

$16 on JHA355EG-R01

expenditure data, and

$1 FTEs on 6P Salary data. $4 5) Additional pay per $

5

70

0

45,933 5,933

$5

Office of State Budget, and Management for state agency teachers such as those provided by Office of Juvenile Justice and DHHS.

North Carolina vs. National Average Comparison of Average Teacher Compensation $60,000 National Average

56,643

N.C. Average 55,241 55,623

N ti National l Average A from f NEA Annual Rankings and Estimates.

54,319

$55,000 52,308 50,816

Estimated Average Salary for Southeast Region FY 2012 was $48,090.

49,026

$50,000 47,659 46,605

48,454

45,688

47,633

44,655

$45 000 $45,000

43 378 43,378

46,137

41,807 40,544

42,680 42,411

43,211

43,343

43,922

41,496

$40,000

45,933 45,938

North Carolina ranks 10th in the Southeast in Average Teacher Compensation. States included are VA, WV, AL, AR, FL, GA, KY, LA, MS, SC, TN, NC

39,419

$35,000

46,850 46,700

36,883

$30,000

16


National Board (NBPTS) History Fiscal Year 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013

NBPTS Teachers 6,002 7,399 8,582 9,604 10,478 11,314 12,175 13 641 13,641 13,973 13,363

Years Exp 16.40 16.60 16.77 16.91 16.95 17.04 16.85 16 46 16.46 16.67 17.13

Monthly NBPTS Pay $475.76 $480.61 $493.34 $527.47 $545.91 $552.16 $543.87 $531 70 $531.70 $525.56 $528.11

Avg Certified Salary $4,437 $4,486 $4,605 $4,923 $5,095 $5,153 $5,076 $4 963 $4,963 $4,905 $4,929

Note: NBPTS pay differential originated on July J l 1, 1 1997. 1997 Teachers who receive a National Boards for Professional Teaching Standards certification may be eligible for a 12% pay differential.

Classroom Teacher Education and Years Experience State Funded only, FY 2012-2013 Years of Experience 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35+

Bachelors 3,013.09 2,420.31 2,172.63 1,730.72 2,107.10 2,285.49 2,272.88 2,254.56 1,978.84 1,959.46 1,766.46 1,751.55 1,703.45 1,616.90 1,536.21 1,455.28 1,415.07 1 231 25 1,231.25 1,181.26 1,186.35 977.23 905.11 854.86 849.53 825.78 740.10 638.60 649.10 635.07 536.89 398.90 285.08 281.32 252.94 227.33 682.33

Masters 644.33 593.12 519.49 502.85 792.54 1,008.73 1,060.58 1,089.06 1,156.98 1,008.44 1,012.13 990.87 946.35 915.11 853.83 817.14 762.67 709 72 709.72 665.90 601.08 533.91 511.77 439.16 448.74 470.30 446.24 355.36 420.26 388.24 309.43 250.07 225.22 238.23 215.26 162.10 686.55

Sub total

46,779.03

22,751.76

Full Time Equivalent NBPTS Adv./Doc. Bachelors 5.00 8.70 1.00 6.00 2.00 11.91 15.00 39.39 9.00 181.22 12.50 215.51 14.69 259.72 12.85 248.07 14.90 282.26 11.22 267.82 13.01 284.10 13.50 297.32 18.97 268.46 17.48 281.42 21.77 249.33 28 43 28.43 253 70 253.70 20.50 229.20 19.94 199.50 10.50 187.62 11.44 142.92 11.00 170.29 14.52 109.89 17.28 127.15 19.45 117.37 9.38 112.46 15.00 87.50 17.06 92.00 13.96 73.36 11.50 47.37 17.86 32.26 7.60 38.00 8.70 25.50 6.20 28.60 39.75 47.92 497.66

5,009.14

NBPTS Masters 19.00 60.41 161.95 226.92 277.38 312.70 325.69 307.39 298.51 343.05 320.69 327.33 310.12 316 65 316.65 290.63 280.42 269.44 203.53 221.21 201.24 179.85 198.19 171.50 165.53 161.71 132.43 91.30 94.23 63.59 59.43 49.74 133.85

NBPTS Adv./Doc. 3.00 1.00 5.00 4.91 1.00 6.00 5.97 6.00 6.00 5 00 5.00 1.00 7.08 10.00 7.00 5.00 3.00 5.00 8.00 4.46 9.00 12.00 4.00 8.00 1.55 2.50 2.00 4.00 10.50

6,575.61

147.97

•Master’s Teachers pay is 10% above Bachelor’s pay. NBPTS pay is 12% above Bachelor’s or Master’s pay. •Advanced Teachers receive $126/ month in addition to Masters and/or NBPTS pay differential. •Doctorate Teachers receive an additional $253/ month in addition to the Master’s and or NBPTS pay differential . • Data for 262.47 teachers was not available and therefore not included. (1) Does not include Local Supplement or other compensation.

17

Total Years of Exp. 3,662.42 3,022.13 2,693.12 2,239.57 2,932.55 3,409.02 3,685.63 3,798.55 3,690.61 3,542.52 3,406.44 3,333.76 3,246.42 3,191.88 3,004.13 2,904.65 2,764.96 2 544 75 2,544.75 2,388.49 2,294.37 1,988.70 1,781.77 1,701.52 1,626.92 1,625.36 1,529.35 1,291.76 1,346.39 1,306.08 1,070.07 807.14 656.20 631.24 563.83 477.97 1,600.90

2013 Average Salary $3,134.92 $3,141.90 $3,139.62 $3,150.49 $3,169.71 $3,233.82 $3,310.46 $3,467.52 $3,645.25 $3,787.65 $3,944.35 $4,051.49 $4,103.65 $4,171.96 $4,224.51 $4,285.40 $4,335.37 $4 410 17 $4,410.17 $4,458.93 $4,509.65 $4,589.32 $4,627.19 $4,703.64 $4,750.96 $4,814.84 $4,905.23 $4,967.21 $5,040.10 $5,110.93 $5,168.26 $5,240.09 $5,359.18 $5,402.08 $5,479.76 $5,577.12 $5,696.19 81,761.17


Low Wealth Supplemental Funding FY 2012-13 Counties

Funded Counties Counties Not Eligible

North Carolina provides supplemental funding to systems whose ability to generate local revenue per student is below the state average. Some of the factors used to determine eligibility are county adjusted property tax base, square miles in the county, and per capita income. There are 68 “Low Wealth� counties (78 LEAs) in 2012-13.

18


Low Wealth Supplemental Funding Total State Funding $250

$226 $192 $200

In Million ns

$150

$133

Low wealth formula was not fully funded until 2006-07

$92

$100

$77

$41

$50

$6 $0

$800 $750 $700 $650 $600 $550 $500 $450 $400 $350 $300 $250 $200 $150 $100 $50 $ $-

Dollars per ADM by County

Alexander County Montgomery County Franklin County Nash County

Camden County Pender County Beaufort County Swain

Wealth Percentage Note: The low dollars per ADM for Swain County is a result of the county’s low “effort”. Swain County's effective tax rate was below the State average effective tax rate and Swain County's local appropriation per student was 25.6% of what the county could contribute based on the county's wealth and an average state effort, therefore; Swain County was eligible for 25.6% of their appropriation (based on funds available).

19


Low Wealth Eligible Counties FY 2012-13 Eligible County Robeson County Greene County Hoke County Richmond County i h d Sampson County Scotland County Anson County Harnett County Columbus County Duplin County Gates County Bertie County Edgecombe County Granville County Vance County Hertford County Halifax County Randolph County Caldwell County Caswell County Lenoir County Bladen County Wayne County Franklin County Yadkin County Rockingham County Cleveland Countyy McDowell County Washington County Nash County Stokes County Johnston County Alexander County Alexander County Martin County

Wealth % 55.97% 59.99% 62.65% 64.85% % 64.91% 64.91% 67.44% 67.98% 68.00% 68.14% 68.62% 69.61% 69.74% 70.87% 71.98% 72.12% 72.17% 74.21% 74.41% 75.32% 76.30% 76.41% 76.41% 76.72% 76.84% 76.92% 77.16% 77.34% 77.53% 77.72% 78.00% 78.07% 78.09% 78.38%

Dollars per  child $           737.85 $           670.48 $           625.90 $ $           589.04 $           588.03 $           588.03 $           545.63 $           536.58 $           536.25 $          533.90 $           525.86 $           509.27 $           507.09 $           488.15 $           469.55 $          467.21 $           466.37 $           405.82 $           428.83 $           413.58 $           397.16 $           395.32 $           395.32 $           390.12 $           388.11 $           386.77 $          382.75 $           317.83 $           376.55 $           373.36 $           368.67 $           367.50 $          356.9 $ 356.92 $           362.30

Eligible County Stanly County Surry County Burke County Rutherford County h f d Montgomery County Northampton County Lee County Wilkes County Pasquotank County Wilson County Davidson County Pitt County Tyrrell County Jones County Rowan County Camden County Person County Alamance County Swain County Warren County Pender County Chowan County Mitchell County Beaufort County Gaston County Union County Perquimans County q y Craven County Davie County Onslow County Lincoln County Graham County Cumberland County Cumberland County Madison County

20

Wealth % 79.03% 79.32% 79.85% 80.09% % 81.05% 83.46% 83.62% 83.78% 84.07% 85.16% 86.21% 86.30% 86.52% 87.65% 87.66% 87.73% 88.21% 88.32% 89.22% 90.58% 90.67% 91.51% 93.49% 94.31% 94.60% 95.68% 95.84% 95.92% 96.59% 96.67% 97.43% 97.48% 97.92% 97.9 % 97.98%

Dollars per  child $           351.41 $           344.37 $           270.14 $ $           289.94 $           317.56 $           277.17 $           274.49 $           271.81 $           266.95 $          248.69 $           192.50 $           229.58 $           225.90 $           206.96 $           194.09 $          205.62 $           197.57 $           190.45 $             44.80 $           157.86 $           156.35 $           142.27 $             68.73 $             95.35 $             90.49 $             72.39 $             50.61 $             49.50 $             57.14 $             43.86 $             43.07 $             11.99 $             34.86 $ $             20.41


How Low Wealth Funds Were Expended FY 2011-12

Workshops and Contracted Services 4.0% TA and Tutors 2.8%

Clerical and Other 20.9%

Benefits 19.1%

Teachers & Instructional Support 38.5%

Textbooks, Supplies and Materials 7.8%

Cap/Non Cap Outlay 6.9%

21


Small County Supplemental Funding FY 2012-13 Counties

Funded Counties Counties Not Eligible

North Carolina provides supplemental funding to those county school systems with average daily membership (ADM) less than 3,175 or to county school systems with ADM between 3,175 and 4,000 whose county adjusted property tax base per student is below the state adjusted property tax base per student. p In 2012-13,, 27 County y LEAs received small county y supplemental funding. City LEAs are not eligible to receive funding.

22


Small County Supplemental Funding Millions $45

$43

$43

$39 $40 $35 $30

In FY2012-13, eligible counties received between $1.46 and $1.94 million in Small County Supplemental funding. The per ADM dollars were between $433 (Martin) and $3,018 (Tyrrell).

$28

$25 $20 $15 $15 $10 $4 $5 $0

How Small County Funds Were Expended FY 2011-12

Other Expenditures include Utilities, Workshop, Contracted Services Non-Certified Non Certified Salary 29.6% TA and Tutors 1.9%

Other Expenditures 13.2%

Benefits 19.2%

Teachers & Instructional Support 18.7%

School Building Administration 3.9%

23

Textbooks, Supplies and Materials 8.7% Cap/Non Cap Outlay 4.9%


Small County Supplemental Funding Total and Per ADM Funding FY 2012 2012-13 13

LEA Name

 Allotment 

 ADM 

 Per ADM 

Tyrrell County

$       1,720,049

570 $            3,017.63

Hyde County

          1,713,381

574                2,984.98

Jones County

        1,940,526

1,128                1,720.32

Graham County

          1,671,834

1,227                1,362.54

Clay County

          1,551,851

1,337                1,160.70

Pamlico County

          1,503,294

1,393                1,079.18

Alleghany County

          1,460,219

1,446                1,009.83

W hi t C Washington County t

        1,714,625 1 714 625

1 710                1,002.70 1,710 1 002 70

Perquimans County

          1,539,461

1,769                   870.24

Gates County

          1,523,305

1,794                   849.11

Camden County

          1,590,449

1,942                   818.97

Swain County

          1,566,075

1,982                   790.15

Mitchell County

          1,556,806

2,071                   751.72

Avery County

          1,539,739

2,141                   719.17

Northampton County

          1,566,136

2,230                   702.30

Yancey County

          1,571,927

2,367                   664.10

Chowan County Chowan County

        1,474,391 1 474 391

2 283                   645.81 2,283 645 81

Polk County

          1,480,066

2,300                   643.51

Warren County

          1,537,100

2,426                   633.59

Bertie County

          1,583,768

2,696                   587.45

Madison County

          1,478,456

2,548                   580.24

Caswell County

          1,540,533

2,858                   539.02

Hertford County

          1,558,342

3,047                   511.43

Greene County

          1,599,159

3,213                   497.72

Ashe County

          1,476,726

3,139                   470.44

Anson County Anson County

        1,645,912

3,744                   439.61

Martin County

          1,608,884

3,721                   432.38

Total 

$     42,713,014 24

Avg $

$                943.88


The E-Rate Program: Governed by the FCC & Administered by the Universal Service Administrative Company Provides 20%-90% discounts to schools & libraries for Telecommunications, Internet Access, Internal Connections and Basic Maintenance of Internal Connections. Services Include: Telephone service, Long Distance, Cell phone service, Voice mail service, WANs, Telecommunications Services, Internet access, Cabling/Wiring, Routers/Switches http://www.usac.org/_res/documents/sl/pdf/ESL_archive/EligibleServicesList-2012.pdf More Information: DPI Website - http://www.ncpublicschools.org/erate/ Schools & Libraries Division - http://www.universalservice.org/sl/ North Carolina E-Rate Commitments Summary by Service Type 100 000 000 100,000,000 90,000,000 80,000,000 70,000,000

Funding Year 2011-12, Not Yet Complete

60,000,000 50,000,000 40,000,000 30,000,000 20,000,000 10,000,000 0 2003

2004

TELECOMM SERVICES

2005

2006

INTERNET ACCESS

2007

2008

2009

INTERNAL CONNECTIONS MNT

25

2010

2011

2012

INTERNAL CONNECTIONS


Capital Outlay for School Facilities Fiscal Year

State Funds

1995-96

Federal Funds

$13,446,202

Local Funds

$92,012

Totals

$518,058,988

$531,597,202

1996-97

43,853,339

383,545

565,670,606

609,907,490

1997-98

240,704,605

215,489

526,754,170

767,674,264

1998-99

554,588,979

1,291,004

561,394,095

1,117,274,078

1999-00

518,506,820

8,272,720

627,673,264

1,154,452,804

2000-01

371,109,242

789,866,134

1,160,975,376

2001-02

170,257,261

517,911

842,184,297

1,012,959,469

2002-03

41,949,345

9,697,902

782,630,041

834,277,288

-

2003-04

46,210,952

9,528,857

752,716,127

808,455,936

2004-05

21,169,420

3,690,000

699,746,058

724,605,478

2005-06

13,842,620

1,790,866

1,003,523,533

1,019,157,019

2006-07

21,216,361

743,931

1,170,080,840

1,192,041,132

2007-08

18,024,915

212,220

939,450,137

957,687,272

2008-09

12,741,320

139,932

1,266,076,911

1,278,958,164

2009-10

13,211,971

2,370,296

415,228,020

430,810,287

2010-11

15,124,664

3,810,633

381,005,150

399,940,447

2011-12

8,709,622

Total

12,880,229

$2,124,667,638

330,098,767

$55,637,547

351,688,618

$12,172,157,138

$14,352,462,324

State Funding Historically, the state of North Carolina has provided funding for salaries and operations to the local school systems and the local units have been responsible for providing facilities. The state had a School Facilities Appropriation in 1949 and has passed state school bonds in 1949, 1953, 1963, 1973, and 1996. Currently, North Carolina provides school construction aid to LEAs through the following programs:

Public School Building Capital Fund: Comprised of two portions, the ADM portion and the Lottery portion 1. (ADM Fund) 1987-present - Uses part of the corporate income tax revenues to provide counties with an allotment based on average daily membership. LEAs may let their allotments accrue until they are ready to use them for a specific project, at which time they must match (1:3) the amount from the state. The fund is currently about $90 Million per year. The fund was frozen by the Legislature for 2002-03 because of state budget $1 Billion has been allotted since 1987;; the current fund balance to be allotted is over $60 $ shortfalls. More than $ million dollars. $300

Total Revenue

$250

Allotted

$150

$100

26

2011-12

2010-11

2009-10

2008-09

2007-08

2006-07

2005-06

2004-05

2003-04

2002-03

2001-02

2000-01

1999-00

1998-99

$0

1997-98

$50

1996-97

in millions

$200


Capital Outlay for School Facilities Cont. 2. The Education Lottery. Lottery sales began in March of 2006. The General Assembly allocated $140 million of anticipated proceeds for school construction for the 2008/2009 fiscal year to be distributed four times per year. Funds are divided among the LEA’s based on (a) ADM as a percentage of state ADM, and (b) property tax rate as a percent of average property tax rate, statewide. Funding for school construction by lottery revenues differs from the PSBCF in two main areas: local matching funds are not required, and lottery funding cannot be used for “technology.” One-half of lottery sales are returned to the public as prizes; 15% is used for administrative expenses, and 35% is divided among the educational programs. Of the educational programs share, h 40% iis di directed t d ffor school h l construction t ti th through h th the PSBCF PSBCF.

Fiscal Year

Lottery Revenue

2006-07 2007-08 00 08 2008-09 2009-10 2010-11 2011-12 Totals

Interest Earned Interest on on Lottery Disbursing Project Allotm ent Revenues Acct. Balance Fiscal

102,384,597.00 1,913,370.25 128,887,893.00 8,88 ,893 00 5,045,560.83 5,0 5,560 83 123,821,061.00 4,988,190.54 209,575,479.00 2,880,644.51 145,805,007.00 1,705,969.62 89,782,097.00 1,149,637.32 800,256,134.00 17,683,373.07

233,909.70 967,847.54 96 ,8 5 954,669.58 541,131.05 361,964.22 186,289.77 3,245,811.86

42,299,649.67 92,355,256.80 9 ,355, 56 80 139,871,080.32 148,949,764.10 157,152,512.01 103,638,988.54 684,267,251.44

Unallotted Balance

62,232,227.28 104,778,271.85 0 , 8, 85 94,671,112.65 158,718,603.11 149,406,166.94 136,885,202.49

Local Option Sales Tax In addition to direct state aid, the state earmarks sales tax revenues for facilities improvements. State law allows counties to levy two one-half cent additions to the state sales tax (1983, 1986), 30 percent and 60 percent respectively goes to schools (all 100 counties levy the tax). The revenues are distributed to counties on a per capita basis and may be used for public school capital outlay or to retire indebtedness incurred by the county for these purposes. In many cases, this has allowed counties to fund local bond issues without raising gp property p y taxes. Recent legislation g allows counties to levy y either an additional one-quarter cent sales tax, or a Land Transfer Tax. There is no state capital funding for charter school facilities. Federal Funding There is no recurring federal funding for public school facilities. Federal funds have included FEMA emergency relief (hurricane) funds. A federal program that has provided school renovation funds is: Qualified Zone Academy Bonds (QZABs) – a zero-interest bond program (IRS code) that requires a 10% match from a local business partner. QZABs authority issued to North Carolina 1998 - $ 9,115,000 1999 - $ 8,851,000 2000 - $11,281,000 2001 - $11,961,000 2002 - $10,903,000 2003 - $11,607,000 2004 - $12,750,000 2005 - $13,618,000 2006 - $11,444,000 2007 - $11,444,000 2008 - $12,600,000 $12 600 000 2009 - $44,099,000 $44 099 000 2010 - $44,454,000 2011 - $13,178,000 2012 - $ 9,678,000

27


Funding from the Lottery School Funds 8,167,270,359 

The Education Lottery contributes an extra 3.5% to the State Public School Fund Requirements

Lottery 283,778,896 

2011 – 12 Lottery Revenue Distributions Allocation of Expenses FY 2012

Prize Exp & Prize Exp &  Prize Tickets 60% Net Revenue  Transferred to  NCEL Fund 29%

Distribution

Other  Expenses Advertising Commisions 3% 1% 7%

Teacher's  Salaries 50%

Total Operating Revenue for the Ed ti Lottery L tt i FY 2012 was Education in $1,602,361,000.

Financial Aid 6%

More @ Four 14%

School  Construction 23%

College  Scholarships 7%

The total amount of funds received from the NC Education Lottery in FY 2012 was $435,478,201

28


Charter Schools 1997--2013 1997 The General Assembly passed legislation in 1996 which created Charter Schools in North Carolina. A Charter School in North Carolina is a public school operated by a group of parents teachers, parents, teachers and/or community members as a semi-autonomous semi autonomous school of choice within a school district, operating under a "charter" with the State Board of Education. The final approval on all charters will be granted by the State Board of Education. Charter Schools are designed to give significant autonomy to individual schools and in turn to hold these schools accountable for results. For 2012-13, North Carolina has 107 operating Charter Schools. Senate Bill 8 (2011) removed the cap of 100 Charter Schools. Charter Schools receive funding based on the average per pupil allocation in the local education agency from which the student came.

Charter Schools Status Report 1997 - 2013 Y Year

A Approved d

O Opened d

1996-97 1997-98 1998-99 1999-00 2000-01 2001 02 2001-02 2002-03 2003-04 2004-05 2005-06 2006-07 2007-08 2008-09 2009-10 2010-11 2011-12 2012-13

34 31 28 17 9 3 2 4 2 1 7 2 0 3 1 9 24 177

0 34 26 23 15 8 5 2 4 2 1 7 2 0 3 1 8 141

Relinq Planning % of w/o Total in Allotted Total Closed Cl d Opening O i Operation O ti ADM ADM 0 1 3 4 4 3 3 2 0 3 4 2 3 1 0 0 1 34

0 0 0 4 3 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 11

0 33 56 75 86 91 93 93 97 96 93 98 97 96 99 100 107

4,106 5,572 10,257 14,230 19 492 19,492 19,832 21,578 24,784 28,733 29,170 30 892 30,892 34,694 38,449 41,314 44,829 48,795

0.3% 0.4% 0.8% 1.1% 1 5% 1.5% 1.5% 1.6% 1.8% 2.1% 2.0% 2 1% 2.1% 2.3% 2.6% 2.8% 3.0% 3.3%

Total State Funds All tt d Allotted $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

16,559,947 32,143,691 50,104,210 64,213,491 77 177 902 77,177,902 87,233,744 94,286,726 110,888,050 132,089,910 144,299,621 169 871 326 169,871,326 191,751,412 187,726,898 200,058,046 228,291,552 255,396,318

* as of 1/17/2013 ~ Applications are not due until Feb; 156 Letters of Intent to Apply hav e been submitted to DPI for the 2014-2015 school year.

29


Flexibility of Charter Schools Charter schools are provided both financial and educational flexibility Financial • Funds allotted in one dollar allotment. allotment • Not eligible for the construction funds from the lottery revenue or Local Education Agency. • Not required to:  pay personnel using the state salary schedules or salary ranges,  participate in the State Employees Retirement System or State Major Medical Plan,  purchase on state contract or participate in e-procurement. Educational • Not held to:  

Class size maximums, 1,025 instructional hours requirement (only required to have 185 instructional days),

Not Required to request a waiver to start before August 25th or end after June 10th.

Licensing standards of teachers (required to have 75% of the teachers licensed in grades K-5 and 50% in 6-12).

Charter School Full-Time Personnel FY 2012-13 Certified Personnel:

State

Federal

C Central l Offi Office Admin. Ad i

Local

Total

127

9

14

150

Principals

99

1

6

106

Assistant Principals

92

3

5

100

2,914

188

101

3,203

201

28

16

245

3,433

229

142

3,804

651

62

24

737

41

0

2

43

Clerical, Secretarial

221

0

17

238

Other Non Certified

191

11

12

214

Total Non Certified

1 104 1,104

73

55

1 232 1,232

Total 2013

4,537

302

197

5,036

Percent of Total

90.1%

6.0%

3.9%

100.0%

Teachers Instructional Support Total Certified Non Certified Personnel: Teacher Assistants Technicians

Teachers Teacher Assistants, Teachers, Assistants and Instructional Support Personnel make up 83.1% 83 1% of all personnel. personnel School Building Administrators (Principals & Assistant Principals) make up 4.1% of all personnel. Central office Administrators make up 3.0% of all personnel. Other Nonprofessionals (Clerical, Technicians, Service Workers, etc…) make up the remaining 9.8% of personnel.

30


Charter School Expenditures FY 2011-12 State funds are allotted based on the number of students in ADM at the Charter School. State funds may be used for any purpose other than purchasing a building. Most federal funds are targeted towards a specific population such as Low Income Children or Handicapped Children. Local funds are given to Charter Schools based on the local current expense appropriation in the county in which the student resides. Local funds may be used ffor any purpose. Source of Expenditures FY 2011-12

Local, 30.9%

Federal, 4.9%

State, 64.2%

How State Funds Were Expended FY 2011-12

Salaries & Benefits 74%

Capital C it l Outlay O tl 1% Buildings & Purchased Services 21%

Supplies & Materials 4%

31


Funded ADM and Total State Funding FY 2012-13 CS # 01B 01C 01D 06A 06B 07A 10A 11A 11B 11K 12A 13A 16A 16B 19A 19B 20A 24N 26B 27A 32A 32B 32C 32D 32H 32K 32L 32M 32N 33A 34B 34C 34D 34F 34G 35A 36B 36C 41B 41C 41D 41F 41G 41H 45A 49B 49D 49E 50A 51A 54A 54B 55A 58B

Charter School Name River Mill Clover Garden School The Hawbridge School Grandfather Academy Crossnore Academy Washington Montessori Charter Day School Evergreen Community Charter ArtSpace Charter School Francine Delany School New Dimensions Carolina International School Cape Lookout Marine HS The Tiller School Chatham Charter The Woods Charter School Learning Center Columbus Charter School Alpha Academy Water's Edge Village School* Maureen Joy Healthy Start Academy Carter Community Kestrel Heights School Research Triangle Charter Academy Central Park School for Children Voyager Academy Global Scholars Academy Research Triangle High School* North East Carolina Preparatory School* Quality Education Academy STEAM Academy of Winston Salem Carter G. Woodson F Forsyth h Academy A d Arts-Based Elementary Crosscreek Charter School Piedmont Community Mountain Island Charter School Greensboro Charter Academy Guilford Preparatory Academy Phoenix Academy Triad Math and Science Academy Cornerstone Academy* The College Preparatory & Leadership Academy of High Point* The Mountain Community School American Renaissance Middle School Success Institute Pine Lake Preparatory Summit Charter Neuse Charter School Children's Village Academy Kinston Charter Academy Lincoln Charter School Bear Grass* * - Denotes First Year Charter

32

Funded ADM 595 498 177 32 91 309 924 408 383 163 195 553 54 189 328 501 186 725 379 15 370 408 283 987 645 299 1,235 128 149 380 406 102 480 713 372 179 1,203 800 720 216 316 591 500 107 180 524 102 1,598 195 626 202 302 1,542 256

Total State Funding 2 895 203 2,895,203 2,496,280 964,521 289,143 613,631 1,752,542 4,677,814 2,179,491 1,999,381 855,988 1,066,102 2,629,037 372,333 988,346 1,672,453 2,654,437 1,103,066 4,218,121 1,794,155 86,680 1,905,658 2,011,062 1,452,160 4,988,245 3,237,927 1,600,379 6,195,073 603,278 753,783 2,258,575 2,138,935 525,711 2,630,640 3 767 314 3,767,314 1,918,320 1,104,751 5,722,800 3,775,359 3,499,378 1,116,273 1,538,702 2 906 078 2,906,078 2,479,555 533,445 901,853 2,770,477 523,255 7,751,237 1,109,430 3 155 863 3,155,863 1,100,364 1,643,165 7,600,498 1,545,133

Funding Per ADM 4 866 4,866 5,013 5,449 9,036 6,743 5,672 5,063 5,342 5,220 5,251 5,467 4,754 6,895 5,229 5,099 5,298 5,930 5,818 4,734 5,779 5,150 4,929 5,131 5,054 5,020 5,352 5,016 4,713 5,059 5,944 5,268 5,154 5,481 5 284 5,284 5,157 6,172 4,757 4,719 4,860 5,168 4,869 4 917 4,917 4,959 4,985 5,010 5,287 5,130 4,851 5,689 5 041 5,041 5,447 5,441 4,929 6,036


Funded ADM and Total State Funding FY 2012-13 Charter School Name Community Charter School Sugar Creek Charter School Kennedy Charter Public Lake Norman Charter Sch. Metrolina Regional Scholars' Academy Queen's Grant Crossroads Charter High Community School of Davidson Socrates Academy Charlotte Secondary School KIPP:Charlotte Corvian Community School* The Academy of Moore County STARS Rocky Mount Charter Public School Cape Fear Center for Inquiry g Preparatory p y Wilmington Gaston College Preparatory Orange Charter School PACE Academy Arapahoe Charter School Bethel Hill Roxboro Community School CIS Academy Bethany Community Middle School Thomas Jefferson Classical Academy Lake Lure Classical Academy Gray Stone Day School Millennium Charter Academy Mountain Discovery Brevard Academy Union Academy Vance Charter School Henderson Collegiate Exploris Middle School Magellan Charter Sterling Montessori Franklin Academy East Wake Academy Raleigh Charter High School Torchlight Academy PreEminent Charter School Quest Academy Southern Wake Academy Hope Elementary School Casa Esperanza Endeavor Charter School Triangle Math and Science Academy* Haliwa-Saponi Tribal Two Rivers Community Dillard Academy Bridges Sallie B. Howard School Totals 107 * - Denotes First Year Charter

Funded ADM 141 875 356 1,592 361 1,286 232 1,189 606 237 336 88 195 304 1,160 376 128 808 225 125 431 377 643 109 223 1,199 309 368 486 174 201 1,209 545 298 203 401 584 1,619 1,114 540 411 586 142 173 115 383 473 272 171 177 195 135 818 49,525

CS # 60A 60B 60C 60D 60F 60G 60H 60I 60J 60K 60L 60M 63A 63B 64A 65A 65B 66A 68A 68N 69A 73A 73B 78A 79A 81A 81B 84B 86T 87A 88A 90A 91A 91B 92B 92D 92E 92F 92G 92K 92L 92M 92N 92P 92Q 92R 92S 92T 93A 95A 96C 97D 98A

33

Total State Funding 732 152 732,152 4,147,612 1,809,753 7,532,181 1,700,940 6,326,916 1,153,745 5,995,923 2 956 878 2,956,878 1,224,750 1,784,457 415,493 1,043,095 1,602,530 6,204,311 1,930,284 645,042 , 5,486,924 1,300,940 793,245 3,051,290 2,013,079 3,264,403 728,439 1,289,003 6,349,081 1,685,143 1,886,285 2,855,641 1,170,011 1,087,881 5,914,779 3,382,070 1,802,966 1,017,923 2,035,359 2,846,225 7,626,466 5,541,044 2,546,648 2,156,593 2 888 456 2,888,456 689,217 974,084 646,722 1,912,182 2,340,310 1,305,297 1,162,416 1 030 944 1,030,944 1,127,445 833,472 4,395,730 256,417,175

Funding Per ADM 5 193 5,193 4,740 5,084 4,731 4,712 4,920 4,973 5,043 4 879 4,879 5,168 5,311 4,722 5,349 5,271 5,349 5,134 5,039 , 6,791 5,782 6,346 7,080 5,340 5,077 6,683 5,780 5,295 5,454 5,126 5,876 6,724 5,412 4,892 6,206 6,050 5,014 5,076 4,874 4,711 4,974 4,716 5,247 4 929 4,929 4,854 5,631 5,624 4,993 4,948 4,799 6,798 5 825 5,825 5,782 6,174 5,374 5,178


Federal Funds Funding Our Public Schools


Federal Funds Received (incl Charters) FY 2012-13

Voc Ed 2%

Other 9%

Most federal funds are targeted towards a specific population such as Low Income Children or Handicapped Children.

Title I 31%

IDEA Handicapped pp 25%

These funds must be used for the purposes allotted and cannot be transferred.

Child Nutrition 33%

Federal Fund Expenditures FY 2011-12

In 2011-12, 10.7% of total personnel were paid from federal funds. This equates to 10,259 teachers and instructional support, 369 central office administrators; There were 5,237 teacher assistants, and 2,785 personnel other non-certified personnel.

Salary/Benefits, 78.6%

Other includes Utilities, Insurance, Transportation Costs, and Indirect Costs.

Purchased Services Services, 7.2% Other, 1.9%

35

Supp/Mat/Equip/Text, 10.2%

WorkshopExpenses, 2.1%


Funds for State Aid M Millions

$600

$500

Since 2002 2002-03, 03, NCLB funding for State aid has increased by $171.0 million.

NO CHILD LEFT BEHIND

$400

$300

$200

$100

Since 2002-03, IDEA funding for State aid has increased by $104.6 million.

CARL D. PERKINS VOC ED ACT

$0 2002-03

2003-04

2004-05

2005-06

2006-07

2007-08

2008-09

2009-10

2010-11

2011-12

2012-13

Graph excludes ARRA Federal stabilization funds totaling $670 million.

Funds for Administration of Grants

40,000,000

35,000,000

NO CHILD LEFT BEHIND 30,000,000

25,000,000

IDEA HANDICAPPED 20,000,000

15,000,000

10,000,000

CHILD NUTRITION/MISC.

CARL D. PERKINS VOC ED ACT 5,000,000

0 2002-03

2003-04

2004-05

IDEA HANDICAPPED

2005-06

2006-07

2007-08

CARL D. PERKINS VOC ED ACT

36

2008-09

2009-10

NO CHILD LEFT BEHIND

2010-11

2011-12

2012-13

CHILD NUTRITION/MISC.


Race to the Top The Race to the Top competitive grants will be awarded to encourage and reward states that are "creating the conditions for education innovation and reform; implementing ambitious plans in four education reform areas and achieving significant improvement in student outcomes." States will use the funds to create comprehensive strategies for addressing four key areas of reform that drive school improvement: – – – –

Adopting international benchmarked standards and assessments that prepare students for success in college and workplace. Recruiting, developing, retaining and rewarding effective teachers and principals. Building data systems that measure student success and inform teachers and principals how they can improve their practices practices. Turning around the lowest-performing schools.

North Carolina is one of only 12 recipients of the 2010 federal Race to the Top (RttT) grants, bringing nearly $400 million to the state's public school system for use over the next four years. RttT is a collaborative effort across the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction, and guided by the State Board of Education and the Governor's Education Transformation Commission Approximately one-half of the grant is earmarked for distribution to local education agencies for their own initiatives that support the North Carolina RttT plan. Local RttT funds will be distributed in accordance with federal Title I eligibility to districts and to charter schools once their Scope of Work application has been approved by the NC Department of Public Instruction. The ultimate goal of Career & College: Ready, Set, Go! (North Carolina's Race to the Top initiative) is for every NC student to graduate from high school ready for a career, two- or four-year college, or technical training, and prepared to be productive. For More information visit: – www.ncpublicschools.org/rttt/ – www.racetothetop.nc.gov/

Note:  In FY 2011 LEAs received $200 million in Race to the Top Grants.  $100.9 million remained unspent and available for FY I Y 2011 L A i d $200 illi i h G $100 9 illi i d d il bl f Y 2013. 2013

37


2012-2013 Federal Grants Received State Aid No Child Left Behind Title I College and Career Ready Students $ Title I College and Career Ready Students School Improvem School Improvement Grants Migrant Improving Teacher Quality English Language Acquisition 21st Century Community Learning Centers Rural and Low-Income Schools Education for Homeless Children and Youth Total NCLB $

380,025,246 15,187,061 13,676,209 Est. 4 843 509 4,843,509 50,672,619 14,611,972 28,863,685 5,898,996 1,381,008 521,946,612

Individuals With Disabilities Education Act Special Education - Grants to States State Program Improvement Special Education - Preschool Grants Total IDEA

303,404,868 1,486,542 8,484,164 313,375,574

$

Perkins IV Career and Technical Education Basic

20,154,947

Transfer to Community Colleges

11,839,185

Transfer to Dept. of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency

50,000

Total Perkins

$

Miscellaneous Abstinence Education Child Nutrition Food Services Child Nutrition Fresh Fruits and Vegetables Total Miscellaneous

38

20,154,947

809,762 809 762 450,000,000 Est. 3,356,930 $

454,166,692


N.C. ELEMENTARY AND SECONDARY EDUCATION FEDERAL GRANTS 2012-2013 (Note 1) Grant Name

21st Century Community Learning Centers Abstinence Education

Advanced Placement Fee

Performance

Budget

Period

Period

27 months 12 months

Brief Description

Grant Type

Funds to provide quality, accessible, afterState school weekend, school, weekend or summer programs for A /C App./Comp

children, youth, and their families. Funds are to enable states to provide 12 months 12 months State App/.Comp Abstinence Education, mentoring, counseling, and adult supervision to promote abstinence from sexual activity, with a focus on those groups which are most likely to bear children out-of-wedlock. Funds to reimburse part or all of the cost of 12 months N/A State Application AP test fees for low income students. Funds to expand, improve, and develop State Plan/Direct quality programs to enhance future

Career and Technical Education

27 months 12 months

Child Nutrition Prog. Fresh Fruits & Veg.

12 months 12 months State Plan Funding for School Fresh Fruits and

Child Nutrition Programs

12 months 12 months State Plan Funding for School Lunch, Special Milk, and

Education for Homeless Children & Youth

27 months 12 months

State App./Comp

English Language Acquisition

27 months 27 months

State App./Direct

Head Start Collaboration

12 months 60 months

State Application

Healthy Schools/HIV

12 months

workforce skills.

IDEA Deaf/Blind IDEA Special Education - Grants to States IDEA Special Education - Preschool IDEA State Improvement

Improving Teacher Quality

Vegetables.

N/A

School Breakfast. Breakfast Funds to ensure that homeless children and youth have greater access to the appropriate educational services provided under Federal, State, and local law. Funds to assist school districts in teaching english to limited english proficient students and in helping these students meet the Funds are used to assist North Carolina in meeting the needs of young children and their families. While North Carolina initiatives such as More At Four Pre-K Program, Smart Start, Healthy Choice and Five-Star Rated Funds to train teachers on integrating HIV education into school health education.

State Application State Admin. - To coordinate programs for 12 months 60 months State Application children to age 22 that are both deaf and blind. Some funds are contracted. Special education programs for 27 months 27 months State Plan/Direct handicapped children ages 3 to 21. Special education programs for 27 months 27 months State Plan/Direct handicapped children ages 3 to 5.

12 months 60 months

The objective of this grant is to assist States State Application in reforming and improving their systems for

personnel preparation and professional development of individuals providing early intervention, educational and transition services to improve results for childre Funds to prepare, train, and recruit high 27 months 27 months State App./Direct quality teachers. Also allows LEAs to reduce class size.

39


N.C. ELEMENTARY AND SECONDARY EDUCATION FEDERAL GRANTS 2012-2013 (Note 1) Grant Name

NAEP State Coordinator

Rural Low Income School

State Assessment and Accountability Statewide Longitudinal Data System Program

Performance Period

Budget Period

Grant Type

Brief Description

State Admin: Funds to support a position which will serve as a liaison between the state education agency and the National Center for Education Statistics. Funds to address the unique needs of rural 27 months 27 months State App./Comp school districts that frequently lack the resources needed to compete effectively for federal competitive grants, and receive formula grant allocations in amounts too small to be effective in meeting their intend State Admin: Funds to assist with 27 months N/A State Application establishing a state system of standards and assessment. Funds used to enable State educational 36 12 State App./Comp agencies to design, develop, and implement statewide, longitudinal data systems to efficiently and accurately manage, analyze, disaggregate, and use individual student data, consistent with the Elementary and Section

12 months

N/A

Direct

Title I College and Career Ready Students

27 months 27 months

Supplemental funds to provide special help State App./Direct to educationally deprived children, ages 5 to

Title I College and Career Ready Students School Improvement

27 months 27 months

Supplemental funds to provide special help State App./Direct to educationally deprived children, ages 5 to

Title I - Migrant Education

27 months 27 months

Title I - Migrant Consortium

Funds provide incentive grants to State educational agencies that participate in consortia with another SEA or other appropriate entity to improve the delivery of services to migrant children whose education is interrupted. Funds for neglected and delinquent children 27 months 27 months State App./Direct under 21 in state institutions or attending community day programs. Funds are used to help States and LEAs 27 months 27 months State App./Direct address the needs of Title I schools in i improvement, t corrective ti action, ti andd restructuring. State Admin: Funds to attract retired military 27 months N/A State Application personnel to a second career as public school teachers.

17 from low income families.

Title I - Neglected and Delinquent Title I School Improvement

Troops To Teachers

State App./Direct 27 months 27 months State App./Direct

40

17 from low income families. Funds to meet the educational needs of migratory children.


DPI's 2013 Education Highlights