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TYPE 7


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VOL UME ONE


PREFACE

We dared to launch the daily lifestyle magazine Type 7 exactly one year ago. So why Type 7? Under the designation ‘Type 754’, the Porsche archive harbours a vehicle whose design was finalised by Ferdinand Alexander ‘Butzi’ Porsche and his team – and provided the initial spark for an unparalleled success story in the automotive world. In Zuffenhausen they named it ‘Type 7’. The model still featured a slight notchback, but already bore the unmistakable silhouette that represents the 911 globally to this day. The Type 7 thus marks the start of something momentous and iconic for the Porsche brand. So when we launched Type 7 one year ago, our aim was clear – “this gotta be great”. Our declared goal was to address young, ambitious people with a similar mindset: enthusiasts, who challenge outdated perceptions, seek meaningful experiences and offer inspiring perspectives. A community that shares the same passion for design and art, drivable art. We wanted to unite people sharing a particular characteristic that identifies them as a group (fun fact: this is the official definition of ‘type’). After all, a ‘type’ is more to us than just a model or design. It is always a concept – and the permanent drive to create something special. Because we are 356, 911, Spyder and Speedster. We are the ignition lock on the left. We are legends like James Dean and Steve McQueen. And we, Ted, our editorial team and myself, are one thing above all: we are Type 7 – the daily magazine for those who are driven – 24hrs a day, 7 days a week.

Franziska Jostoc k

Marketing Communications Specialist at Dr. Ing. h.c. F. Porsche AG

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TYPE 7


Three years ago I found myself standing on the balcony of a hotel room in Bangkok overlooking the city skyline. I had been in Thailand for two hours and it was my first time there. I snapped a picture with my iPhone and posted it with a pithy caption, with no real expectation. 10 minutes later I receive a comment from an account named @tennster asking me if I would be up for a drive in his customized 964 Turbo, which turned into two of the most incredible automotive days of my life. I met the most fascinating car people in a world I had never been to before. This was one of the many instances of Instagram proving to me that something special was happening here, and that there was an opportunity to do something really unique: to use the platform to tell real stories about real people living really interesting lives with Porsche, with art, with architecture. When Franzi, myself, and the team at Porsche came together to explore this idea we spent nearly a year debating the specifics, but that core idea never changes: to capture the magic of the intersections of our communities around the world in a place where you wouldn’t be penalized for not being an insider, because that was our job: to bring you inside. Type 7 has been the biggest undertaking in my professional career, but in the short year that we’ve been around it’s already been the wildest ride I could have ever asked for. I genuinely thank you for coming along on it with us, and I can’t wait to see where it goes from here.

Ted Gushue

Type 7 Editor in Chief

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T YP E 7

TYPE 7

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Now that we’re all here, it’s time we told you a little bit about where our name comes from: In 1961 Ferdinand Alexander Porsche debuted his first concept prototype for the successor to the iconic 356. It was this design that would ultimately become the 911, and internally it was referred to as Type 754, or Type 7 for short, following the 356 code number Type 6. If you happen to be visiting the Porsche Museum you might find this very prototype on display - Ted Gushue

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It’s not always the greatest hits that reveal the soul of a band. Sometimes, an

were dismissed, company heir Ferdinand Alexander "Butzi" Porsche designed

obscure B-side, a bootleg from a live show or an edgy studio version is more

the T7, a modern sports coupe that already sported the flat front with its two

insightful than the fine-tuned and filtered chartstormer you might hear on

signature stand-out headlights, but stretched the roofline and fastback of the

the radio. The Porsche 754 T7 – or Type 7, as we like to call it – is the perfect

356 to accommodate four passengers. Ferry Porsche approved the new looks,

example of an early draft version: a case study for the car that would become

but demanded a lower roofline, putting sportiness over passenger space –

Porsche’s greatest success, the 911. Go to the Porsche Museum in Stuttgart and

creating the most famous silhouette in automotive history.

you will see more icons than an orthodox church. But it’s that slightly strange looking green coupe that sticks out between all the undisputed heroes, that

It’s almost a relief that the Porsche 911 was not created "deus ex machina" in

catches your attention with its well-known but somehow different silhouette –

a single stroke of genius on a white sheet of paper, but rather developed in a

and that always makes you come back to have another look.

painstaking design process in which ideas were tried and rejected, and details fine-tuned again and again in order to get closer to a perfectly balanced design.

In the late 1950s, Porsche had already landed its first big strike with the 356.

It‘s the result of a perfectionist approach, a workflow that improves things until

But the technical possibilities for further developing the purist sports car

there is nothing more to improve. That‘s what Porsche still stands for today.

were exhausted, chassis and engine needed a replacement – and the zeitgeist demanded a fresh design. Ferry Porsche asked for a car that was bigger and

— Jan Karl Baedeker

bolder than the 356, but still unmistakably a Porsche. While the first drawings

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T YPE 7


T YPE 7

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year: 1969 model: 912 engine: 1.7L

243KM & 4 CYLS 12

TYPE 7

colour code: 012 owner: Alister Cant

It’s dark, the sun is yet to rise. To my left, the driver Alister, behind me, the song of an air cooled flat four. We’re the only things alive and kicking, traveling on a road that I’m told will take us to our destination. This two lane highway is unfamiliar to me, but not to Al: he grew up around these parts. As the sun begins to rise, revealing the ocean to our left, Al swaps the gas pedal for the brakes and shifts the car into a lower gear. We pull over, under a 'Jurassic Park' like sign declaring the start of the Great Ocean Road.

photos and text by

THOMAS WALK


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Regarded as one of the best coastal roads in Australia, The Great Ocean Road stretches out for 300km, leading to natural monuments such as the Twelve Apostles. First laid down in 1919 by returning WWI soldiers, this road possess views that I’m told will not disappoint. The sun breaks the horizon, and we quickly jump back in the '69 912, before the buses of tourists that frequent this road start to show up. How far would we go? Who knows. Where were we going? I didn’t know. Only one thing was for certain, this was the right vehicle with the right driver.

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TYPE 7


It just does what it’s meant to – drive.

Our machine for the journey, an original 1969 912, is a

familiar with your new pride and joy. Four weeks of driving

rare car on this side of the world. Back in 2013, Alister

later, Al brought the car back to John and headed home

began searching for a long hood Porsche 912. Discouraged

to Australia where the 912 would join him six months down

by rising prices at home, he turned his attention to the

the line.

United States, specifically California. This is where Al would become acquainted with a man he refers to as “The 912

Since then Al has taken it upon himself to improve the

Guru": Mr. John Benton, from Benton Performance.

tired interior with touches like a new dash, Recaro seats, new door and window rubbers, an RS carpet kit, fresh roof

“I called John and asked if he had any cars for sale,

lining and more.

turned out he had three sitting in a warehouse. We talked, and after a while I landed on a matching numbers,

This is a passion project only recently completed, after

’69 Tangerine 912, with a smoking engine and a shabby

years of having the car on Australian soil. Despite its

interior,” Alister explains.

charming interior, this car is no garage queen. “In the last few years alone, I’ve probably added another 15,000kms

With the deal made, John got to work. He tidied up the

to the car. I drive it regularly from Melbourne to Sydney. It

engine, braking system, and chassis. Al travelled across the

just does what it’s meant to – drive. And it does it well for

Pacific and took the 912 on a 4,000km test drive around

a fifty year old car."

the block, and then up the West Coast - a great way to get

243K M & 4 CYL S

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As the Great Ocean Road unwinds before us, the promise of sharp corners and ocean views is kept. The tangerine 912 feels right at home against the cool ocean background. If by chance, you get tired of looking at crashing waves and smelling the salty air, a change of scenery is only a right turn away. Within minutes you can go from the edge of the sea to the depths of the rainforest that straddles the Great Ocean Road We turn right, into the greenery. The 912 pushes uphill, around well cambered corners, the flat four echoing amongst the trees. There’s nobody else around to hear. It doesn’t weigh much, meaning it’s agile — perhaps more so than its heavier six cylinder comrade. The motor gives just the right amount of power on demand, launching into corners eagerly, putting a huge smile on our faces. Forget everything you’ve heard about the 912; these can move given the right road and driver. After all, it is a Porsche. This particular road is a personal favourite for Al, who drives it whenever he's around here. Go far enough and it eventually leads to a straight stretch of country road in the middle of butt-F-nowhere. Better turn around towards the blue stuff. The diversion adds another hour to an already long trip, not that either of us cared — it was even more fun downhill. The Great Ocean Road links up to another road continuing to another two states. As Al explains: “You’ll most likely run dry of fuel before being sick of driving. It’s a magical road.” It’s easy to see what he means – ocean to your left, winding roads in front. Paired with a well tuned flat four in full chorus, and I have no problem entertaining the idea of driving across another two states. All good things come to an end, and we found ourselves short on daylight. After all, this is Australia and driving after dark isn’t advised due to wildlife with suicidal tendencies

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243K M & 4 CYL S


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TYPE 7


You ’ll most likely run dr y of fuel before being sick of driving. It ’s a magical road. As we retrace our steps back towards Al’s hometown, Lorne, he reveals his plan for the car: “John has just shipped all the components for a new engine. I’ll be putting it together myself, building a 1.9 big bore, twin plug, high comp motor. The original motor will sit on the shelf for a rainy day.” Serious business for a fun car. As the prices for these gems of the vintage car world rise, owners like Al are becoming rare. Willing to not only drive their cars often but to fix, maintain, and improve on them. After all, if your end goal is to drive on the Great Ocean Road on the weekends, getting your hands greasy seems like a fair price to pay.

243K M & 4 CYL S

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My very first illustrations were rather simple, with little attention to detail - I tried to simplify as much as I could. As time has passed and more cars come through my hands, I’ve studied the behaviour of light and shade closer.

PETROLIFIED illustrations & text by

MARTIN MIŠKOLCI

Now I put much more thought and detail into them. I’ve looked at how reflections shape the surface of chrome and how light affects matte, gloss, and metallic surfaces differently. I’ve moved from mimicking what I’ve seen in photos to what I feel should highlight the contours of these iconic cars. Each illustration can be broken down in four steps. First, laying out the basic shapes and making sure the perspective stays the same across my work. Secondly I capture all of the shadows, dark areas and body gaps over a light grey car. Then over a darker colour I work on all the highlights - most importantly the horizon reflection emphasising the gloss and contours on the side of the car. Lastly, I work on colours, adding contrast and adjusting shades where needed. What you see here is the result of hours of research, looking for resource photographs on the internet, days and nights spent sitting behind the computer illustrating each car and years of practice, trying to improve on every line I draw.

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PE T ROLIFIED


PE T ROLIFIED

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TYPE 7


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RACE LIDS A driver’s helmet is his identity in the car, something personal that differentiates them from others. The only opportunity for personalisation whilst competing in motor race. The helmets you see here were all used by Le Mans-winning Porsche drivers, and are amongst a larger collection of significant helmets I have. To me they are pieces of art - which if you consider the career of a driver, and how many helmets they may have used, are almost like limited editions. Unlike a commemorative painting or sculpture these all have real history, and can tell a story about a specific race or season. With these particular three, it’s impressive to think they have all been down the Mulsanne straight at over 200mph, whilst contributing to the rich history of Porsche and La Sarthe.

photos and text by

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JOE T WYMAN


919 Timo Bernhard

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956 Klaus Ludwig

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R ACE L IDS


935/936 Derek Be ll

R ACE L IDS

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year: 1967 model: 911S engine: 2.4L colour code: 6609

GUY BERRYMAN

owner: Guy Berryman

“I grew up with my Dad’s old Triumph TR3A in our garage. It was always up on blocks and covered in boxes and typical garage junk. I was fascinated by the shape of it in comparison to the mundane cars we had around us for everyday use - Vauxhall Astras and Ford Sierras. My dad subsequently bought an MGB GT, which ended up decaying in our garden too - so when I was about fourteen years old I decided to strip the car down and restore it. I guess that process was what cemented my love for old cars.”

photos & text by

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TYPE 7

AMY SHORE


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If I could only have one classic car in my life it would be hard to beat this car...

“If you are a car collector or enthusiast I think you need to have a 911 in your life.” Explains Road Rat Magazine’s Guy Berryman. “Old Porsches, unlike some other marques, just work. They are reliable and useable. For me it was important to get an early SWB car and it really had to be the uprated 911S - so my car is a 1967 911S, which represents the first year of the ‘high-performance’ offering. My car is in completely original specification and was restored by Tuthill Porsche, who did a great job. I took the car on the annual ‘Coupe des Alpes’ rally this year and it didn’t miss a beat.” 32

GU Y BERRYMAN


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“The Road Rat Magazine is the brainchild of my two

a quarterly publication is that you can really spend

very good friends, Mikey Harvey and Jon Claydon

time on the editorial content, the quality of the

and myself.” Guy explains: “We’re all car crazy and

photography and graphic design - and we print it

we were spending an inordinate amount of time on

on a mix of art-quality paper stocks. We felt it was

fascinating car discussions just between ourselves.

the perfect time to launch a new car magazine,

We thought it would be a good idea to formalise

as we are really looking at the end of the internal-

our enthusiasm for the subject in a magazine and it

combustion age - so there’s no better time to look

seemed crazy to us that nobody had elevated the

back objectively at the automotive world knowing

car magazine concept into something more luxury

that a certain phase of it is about to have a fairly

and in-depth.

dramatic full-stop.

So the idea was born to create the most beautiful

We embrace old cars, new cars, racing cars as well as

car magazine. It had to be something which was

looking at what is happening with new technologies

absolutely collectible - and not for one minute ‘just

- this is a magazine for people who have an interest

another magazine that ends up in the recycling

in the entire spectrum of the automotive world,

bin’. The magazine is a quarterly and is packed full

who appreciate art and design, as well as beautiful

of features with minimal advertising. The beauty of

photography and graphic design.”

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TYPE 7

...there's no bet ter time to look back objectively at the automotive world.


GU Y BERRYMAN

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GU Y BERRYMAN


GU Y BERRYMAN

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As a kid I dreamed of being a car designer, but the more life went on, the more I became interested in visual arts in many forms. I have been creating images in Photoshop since I was ten years old. Then my dad gently pushed me into photography at the age of 17. Within six months I was travelling across Europe shooting cars. Fast forward nine years, and I ask myself: ‘am I still a photographer?’ In a word - yes, however my techniques are endlessly evolving to the point that I’m almost never behind a camera, or having to travel at all to work on various projects.

TOM WHEATLEY photos & text by

TOM WHEATLEY

If I can’t access the right location, or the right car, I Photoshop it. If the light on location is dull and boring, I Photoshop it. If in any way the real life situation can be improved, I Photoshop it. For full viewing pleasure. I don’t follow the standard photographic rules, if it looks right in my mind I’ll go with it. Take the Santorini series for example, where I was on holiday. I saw the typical postcard view and noticed various rooftops begging for me to park a legendary car on top. The contrasting Salzburg red 917 was the obvious choice!

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TOM WHE AT L E Y


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TOM WHE AT L E Y


TOM WHE AT L E Y

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INTO THE WOODS Les Landes is a well known and popular holiday destination on the west coast of France and a paradise for surfers.⁣ ⁣ That’s why Olivier Saint-Jour, Eastpak marketing director, and owner of the automotive fashion label Ride Anyways, chose the spot for his dream holiday home.⁣

photos by text by

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JEREMY SOMA & JULIEN L ANOO

TED GUSHUE


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...the per fect place for my family to unwind in nature, and of course for sur fing and a bit of driving.

The project represents the perfect balance between the simple life of a retreat and a contemporary family home with room for maximum toys in the garage: always on view thanks to a clear glass floor on the living level.⁣ ⁣ The structure is located on the sandy banks near the ocean, surrounded primarily by foliage and wildlife, allowing the naturally finished house to blend effortlessly into its environment. Olivier's little frog, a 1973 911 2.8 RSR in Viper Green, takes safe refuge inside.⁣

INTO T HE WOODS

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INTO T HE WOODS


It was inspired by the mid century modern architecture of Southern California, utilizing dry polished concrete and natural elements throughout to create an organic yet industrial feel. Olivier explains: “Discretion was important for me, so the house is actually configured so that no one can view the interior from outside - the open living spaces are all raised on stilts. Naturally this provides the best view as well — a very simple yet very important luxury. ⁣ ⁣ I did not want anything ostentatious in the house, so the interior is very spartan and simple. I wanted total harmony with our

...a ver y simple yet ver y important luxur y. ⁣

surroundings. It’s really the perfect place for my family to unwind in nature, and of course for surfing and a bit of driving as well.”

INTO T HE WOODS

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A hundred years ago the first air freight transported in

UP IN THE AIR

Germany was a simple bundle of newspapers. But that was only the start, and a more diverse selection of cargo soon followed, along with the march of globalization. These days, almost anything can be flown on a plane, from windmill propellers, to other planes. And of course, cars too. From 1955 to 1968, the Convair CV-340 and the later CV440 were used for cargo operations by Lufthansa. On the runway aprons, VW Beetles and Bulli’s moved people and items alike between terminals and the aircraft, as seen

photos by text by

THE LUFTHANSA ARC HIVES

ANDREA PAUKER

in the photos here. On Lufthansa’s 50th anniversary in Hanover, one of the VW buses received a very special paint job to mark the occasion.


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UP IN T HE AIR


In 1972, Lufthansa Cargo was the first airline to use the Boeing 747F jumbo freighter. To demonstrate the cargo capacity of this new behemoth, 72 VW Beetles were loaded in the plane, nose first. With a nose-loading option, the 747F was soon jokingly named “the first smiling Boeing in the world�, but this allowed for much more varied cargo to be brought onboard, or at the very least loaded with more ease. With a payload of around 100 tonnes on each flight and a range of approximately 5,300km, the plane soon became a favourite to transport racing vehicles around the world fast. Formula One teams became quick clients, and so did Porsche.

UP IN T HE AIR

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UP IN T HE AIR

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year: 1973 model: 911E engine: 3.2L colour code: 341 owner: Ryan Curnick

A CUT ABOVE

There’s a lot of contrariness in this car, and that is a big part of what makes it special. The fact that it's a hot rod Targa for a start. There seems to be an unwritten rule that only coupes can be hot rods. The colour is another - both the fact that it’s an eye-catching deep purple, and it’s not the original colour of the car. The green interior, well that speaks for itself.

photos by text by

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TYPE 7

THOMAS WALK

RYAN CURNIC K


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It's simple, the gold just looks bet ter against the purple.

The car was purchased as an 80’s update disaster. In

The front bumper is the 'T' style, not the more common

retrospect, poor decisions were everywhere: the Ferrari

'S' spoiler, and it wears no over-riders. The rocker strips

‘Fly Yellow’ paint, the impact bumpered “Turbo” wide

are likewise the skinnier 'T' version.“I think the Targa

body, the black spray painted interior trim, and the fake

works best with brightwork like rocker strips in place,

964 Cup wheels. The original 2.4E engine was also long

as they compliment the stainless steel hoop," Ryan

gone, with a 3.2L Carrera unit in its place. However, the

explains."The intention was to keep the rocker trim but

car was Australian delivered, and thus factory right hand

hopefully in a more subtle way.”

drive - making it particularly rare, as longhood right hand drive Targas were only available for the 1973 model year.

Out the back, the over-riders are the earlier SWB type - which don’t carry rubber strips, and the black badging

Ryan intended to restore the car to original spec, whilst

has been swapped for gold. "It’s simple, the gold just

taking some small liberties. Ryan stripped the car of

looks better against the purple.”

the mechanicals and interior, and delivered it to Zag

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Automotive in Sydney to fit new bodywork. Royal Purple,

The stock wheels were replaced with wider 15x7 Fuchs

also known as Lilac, was chosen, which was a colour

on all corners, in a satin RSR-style finish.The door

available for the '73 model year. Now, the body work

mounted mirrors were deleted and a 'hot rod' style

appears pretty much stock until you look closely.

mirror was fitted to the window frame.


A C U T ABOVE

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A power to weight ratio almost identical to a 2.7 RS. A carbon fibre bucket seat that had been previously modified to resemble an early racing seat was paired with an original Recaro sports passenger seat, with both re-trimmed by Prostitch. John also trimmed the rest of the green interior using Porsche 356A square weave carpet and dark green Jaguar leather. The tartan inserts were sourced directly from Scotland, with the purple accent in the tartan closely matching the Royal Purple paint. The door trims are also a custom design, based around '64 -'68 SWB style door trims, but with the pull handle deleted for a cleaner look. The door pocket was also shortened to allow for a speaker perforation, and the stitching was adjusted to suit. The dash was similarly trimmed in SWB style with a matching speaker perforation. A vintage Nardi steering wheel was decided on, after Ryan saw one too many Prototipos. The wooden shift knob is from Joshy Robots, and is made from recycled skateboard decks. The 'RatFink' door lock knobs were found by accident whilst looking through a hot rodders catalogue for ideas

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A C U T ABOVE


That said, the car is not just about the visuals: it's also set up as a fast road car. The rebuilt 3.2 engine has a healthy power increase over the old 2.4 and uses stainless steel headers, with a 'two in two out' stainless steel sports muffler. The muffler was designed to have one outlet in the stock location and a second hidden 'dump pipe' style outlet, that can also be closed by a cap to reduce noise when required. This provided for dual outlets at will while retaining a stock rear bumper. The brakes were also fully rebuilt and fitted with road and track pads. Likewise, the suspension was fully rebuilt, with 22mm front and 28mm rear torsion bars, matching ‘Level 2’ Vons shocks from Elephant Racing, alongside their blade-adjustable front and rear sway bars. On the road, the car is fun and very, very quick. The 3.2L engine in this early chassis gives a power to weight ratio nearly identical to a 2.7RS Carrera lightweight, but with better bottom end torque.

"The Elephant Racing suspension provides fantastic grip, but also compliance to deal with pot-holed Sydney roads. I’m thrilled with the chassis setup. It’s tempting when building a hot rod to max out everything - wheel and tyre width, shocks, sway bars, springs. Widest, hardest, stiffest, more, more! Using Elephant Racing’s nomenclature, this car is only level two out of a maximum of five. Turning it up all the way might be good on the track, and maybe gives coffee shop bragging rights, but it would be awful on the street.” Ryan explains. The visuals are wild. However, the contrary approach of the restrained chassis setup - and the drive it gives - is proof that less is often more.

A C U T ABOVE

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There isn’t a better historic racing series in my mind than the 2.0L Cup for pre-’66 Porsche 911s, so when they asked me to make the trip over to Spa-Francorchamps to be their guest photographer I jumped at the chance, especially having never visited this iconic circuit before. For me, a great racing photo is all about emotion. You can express that in a few ways, but I think the most fun challenge is to find it through movement, whether that’s done in camera, or from finding the moments in racing that really show these cars attacking the circuit and racing wheel-to-wheel with the competition. It’s easier said than done, especially at certain historic races, where the cars are treated with the fragility of Fabergé Eggs, but after watching the cars power down through Eau Rouge, then drift gracefully up Raidillon during the first practice session, I knew there was a great moment waiting to happen.

TRAC K SIDE photos & text by

NAT TIWSS

Some of my favourite images from Spa happened without any kind of planning. On the way back from the outside of La Source, walking towards the main paddock, I noticed a small crop of trees happened to have a small gap, giving a clean view to the apex. In the main race there’s always somewhere else I need to be, so I only had a few valuable minutes at this spot or my whole plan would be thrown into chaos. Leaving it entirely to fate, I turned the shutter speed on my camera way, way, way down - to around 0.1 seconds, and started following the cars as they went nose to tail through the turn. Without even thinking about whether one of those shots turned out, I moved on, and only saw the final image once I was back at my computer. Moments like those are the fuel that make motorsports photography worth all the effort.

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T R ACK SIDE


T R ACK SIDE

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To me, there is no dashboard layout as instantly recognizable as the classic Porsche 911 five-dial cluster. Conversely, it’s difficult to imagine it on anything but an air-cooled 911. Its efficiency is its signature. Laid before you are the only

EMOTIONAL INSTRUMENTS

instruments you need to monitor your machine: engine revolutions, vehicle speed, oil and fuel, plus a clock. The last is perhaps a bit superfluous — a Germanic reminder to the driver that a gentleman is always, always on time. Schnell! The order of these five dials is what pulls me in every time I see a 911. My eyes sweep across each dial, and they tell me this machine is ready: enough fuel, oil just right, engine at a steady

photos & text by

idle. And a speedometer at zero, just daring me to explore its

JOAC HIM RAYOS

limits. Let’s buckle up, I have appointments to keep after all. If only modern dashboards could be so communicative.

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TYPE 7


1. '84 911 CARRERA

2. '67 910 CARRERA

3. '65 912

4. '60 356B

5. '82 911 SC

6. '92 964 C4

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year: 1972 model: 911 RS engine: 2.7L colour code: 908 owner: Nick Morfett

Within the global Porsche racing

HISTORIKA

community, the work done by Historika on and off the track is considered top tier, but they’d never be the first to say it: “We’re a humble shop that has been doing this long enough to know how much respect the process deserves. When my father Kevin started working with Porsches in the 70’s these were not investments - they were performance machines. We just try to continue that legacy and aim to achieve the same quality and care that the factory racing mechanics would have had when these cars were new.”

photos by text by

TED GUSHUE & NAT T WISS

TED GUSHUE


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HISTORIK A


You don’t get out of bed at 5am in the middle of an English winter to work on freezing cold race cars in a tin shed because it’s easy.

“We go racing with our cars because it’s the ultimate test for our work. What better way to prove the performance and reliability than to race it hard for however many hours. This was what the factory did and we still see it as the best way to show the quality of our work.” Explains Nick Morfett of Historika. Pictured here is their 1964 Porsche 901 race car, one of a handful in the world that compete in the European circuits and at the 2.0L Cup with drivers like Olly Bryant and Andrew Smith behind the wheel "The 1972 2.7RS was one of the first cars that Historika restored. My father Kevin bought it from the original owner just before I was born and it was a completely sympathetic restoration. It was originally going to be a Lightweight, but Porsche racing legend Huschke Von Hanstein convinced the first owner to change its spec to 'Touring' as he was going to be covering so many miles in it. I was raised in this car — it’s part of my family.”

HISTORIK A

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HISTORIK A


We go racing with our cars because it ’s the ultimate test for our work.

HISTORIK A

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I’m not the first person to own an art car, it’s pretty well worn territory. But there’s something very rewarding about commissioning an artist you love to treat something you love even more as a blank canvas.

FAST ART

This is why I commissioned Abdullah Qandeel to paint my 24H Dubai 997 GT3 Cup race car: “The truth is, to be a race car driver you have to be something of a social misfit. You can’t be the individual who conforms or who has let himself be conditioned by any sort of structure - yet you have to be able to operate within the rules and regulations of a racing circuit. You have to be the person who is totally oppositional; who thrives on the risky side, on the side where chance prevails, while still understanding the rules enough to bend them. That is the yin and yang of being a racing driver, and that’s what this car represents, that dichotomy.”

photos by text by

WSF CREATIVE: THADEUS BROWN & ABDULL A JAAFARI

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BYRON BAY I was filming a movie in Australia at the start of 2019, and had never been to the Gold Coast before. I brought a few boards as I knew I would have some time off and ended up staying in Byron Bay a lot. My part in the production was on hold for a few weeks, waiting until they were ready to shoot the stunts we had planned, and a work trip quickly turned into a surf trip. Being born and bred in Los Angeles, I had always heard Byron has a few similarities to home. I’d seen photos of ‘The Pass’ and the waves looked so similar to First Point in Malibu, where I grew up, and surfed before I could walk. It’s a chill longboard wave, with families from all around the world just enjoying themselves.

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It ’s the best parts of Malibu distilled into one epic location.

In a way, Byron Bay is like a wilder, untouched version of Point Dume in Malibu, with fewer yuppies, better food, more sharks, cleaner water, and way better coffee. You can’t help but eat extremely healthily here, as fast food places aren’t allowed in Byron. It’s all local grown organic farms and cafes The beauty of Instagram came into play, and people started hitting me up to go for a surf or grab a beer. I settled in quickly because everyone is extremely friendly and open. My fiancé flew out to see me and we continued our trip. I showed her what I had found and we explored some of the more remote beaches and better waves to the north and south of Byron. Needless to say, we were not disappointed.

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year: 1988 model: Carrera engine: 3.2L colour code: 80D owner: Kyoko Yamashita

“It’s my car, not my boyfriend’s.” An answer Kyoko often gives to people who question her after getting out of her 911. ⁣From a young age, Kyoko has been drawn to cars.⁣ ⁣ Her first memories of a 911 begin at four years old, peeking out of the living room window at the mid ‘70s 911 in front of her house - a car that belonged to the daughter of the family landlord. After earning her first real paycheck at an automotive company, Kyoko set out a goal to one day own a Porsche.

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JAC K SC HROEDER


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It ’s not just a mac hine that takes me from point A to B.

Fast forward to 2008, and a test drive in a new Cayenne. After arriving back at the dealership parking lot, a 2007 Cayman S was staring her down. One test drive, and an evening of crunching numbers later, she returns to the dealership to collect the keys to her very own 987S. That went on to be the first car she took to the track, starting a new chapter of her automotive life. The 987S was simply a “gateway drug” as it turned out for Kyoko, who found herself behind the wheel of a 997 Turbo not long after, which of course led to the hunt last summer for a specific color air-cooled 911.⁣ ⁣ The elusive Cassis Red metallic. ⁣ ⁣ “Strangely once I decided on the color, it didn’t take me long to find this car, considering its rarity. When I took delivery, it was like my dream car turned into reality.”⁣⁣⁣⁣ ⁣⁣⁣⁣ For Kyoko, every car she has owned, every road trip she’s taken, every track day has been meaningful. She cherishes milestones, life events, and memorable moments with her cars. “It’s not just a machine that takes me from point A to B. I develop a real relationship with each car.” Spoken like a true enthusiast.⁣⁣⁣⁣ ⁣⁣⁣⁣ When asked why she was drawn to the 911, Kyoko replies: “They’re true sports cars with style, beauty and elegance—what more do you need?”

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WAREHOUSE LIVING

This adaptive reuse of a former warehouse has left the exterior almost untouched, with only a few new windows inserted into existing openings. The soft touch has been extended to the interior, where original brick walls have been exposed and the large timber roof trusses have been highlighted as key visual elements in the conversion.

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The brief called for a four bedroom home, with self contained guest accommodation and a home office, to be used as an equine genetics laboratory, alongside a large garage space to store a collection of classic sports cars. There was a strong emphasis on maintaining an industrial feel to the conversion and the owners asked that there be no additional timber, marble or black finishes used in the renovation. A cavernous, cold space has been transformed into a comfortable family home by locating all household spaces on the upper level, effectively functioning as a single storey house, while ancillary spaces are retained on the lower level. Large outdoor recreation areas flow off the main living space, allowing natural light and ventilation, as well as views to the sky and new landscaping - where even the family dog gets real grass on the terrace. Well considered material and furniture choices provide comfort with low maintenance, while bold coloured detailing enlivens the space.

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ORIGINALE AS ART With the limited catalogue ORIGINALE, Porsche Classic manages to present original parts in a unique, artistic way. In collaboration with exclusive photographers, selected spare parts are presented in each issue with extraordinary photography. By elevating humble spare parts into art pieces in their own right, ORIGINALE is fast becoming an essential item for collectors.

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ANNE SC HUBERT, FREDERIK DUL AY-WINKLE

& AXL JANSEN

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THE CARLYLE A mainstay of Miami’s Ocean Drive, The Carlyle represents an evolution of the Art Deco style that had dominated architect Richard Kiehnel’s previous works, while still retaining Art Deco essentials like the rule of thirds and elegant curvatures nestled among sharp geometry.⁣ Opening in 1941 with a sparse color palette of white and seafoam green, The Carlyle is a significantly more understated and nuanced take on the bright pastel colour themes seen on other South Beach hotels, like The Pelican or The Berkeley Shore. With approximately 900 other buildings comprising the Miami Beach Art Deco District, The Carlyle remains a lasting monument to a golden age of new architectural ideas.⁣

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Once the hotel to see and to be seen, and situated a mere block away from Gianni Versace’s residence Casa Casuarina, this newly restored series of private residences has appeared in many forms of media over its near eight decade life, lending its facade to films like Scarface and Bad Boys 2, and most notably, giving up its name to become the titular setting of 1996’s The Birdcage.

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year: 1980 model: 911 SC engine: 3L

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colour code: 027 builder: Lehman Keen

"People always ask me now that we’ve done a bunch of these if I would ‘safari’ this, or ‘safari’ that. 'Make my 944 a safari! How about my C4S 964?' To which I just politely reply: nope.” Explains Lehman Keen. ⁣⁣⁣ “It’s not to say that you couldn’t, or even that you shouldn’t, it’s just that if I started safari-ing everything I would compromise the quality, or the build time, or the engineering. I’ve got a formula for G Models that just works, the more you fuss with it - the less it works as intended.”⁣⁣⁣

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We’re building these cars to be enjoyed.⁣ And rightly so - Leh has built close to twenty ‘Keen Project’ 911s that all stick to his simple formula. In July 2019 he released a suspension upgrade package to all of his cars that he’s been developing with motion control suspension: "You really change the behavior of the car off road at speed when you develop the right parts for it. We had a lot of success with off the rack long travel suspension, but until it gets developed alongside your platform you’re not gonna see the results you want from it. This package changes all that and takes us to the next level.”⁣⁣⁣

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That next level of performance is exactly where Leh needed to get to, as these cars are not built to be garage queens: “When you apply for a slot on the Keen Project build list I spend some time getting to know you. You can always tell people that are building cars like these as sculptures versus the people who are building them to be enjoyed. We’re building these cars to be enjoyed.”⁣ ⁣ This ethos is also reflected in the shops that he works with to complete the builds: “We use a real functioning race shop, Gold Crest Motorsports, they do good, honest work on cars that are driven at the highest level. Our body shop Classic Livery in Atlanta is likewise. Georgia has top shelf talent at its disposal to do great work. We’re very lucky to be situated where we are.”⁣ ⁣ As for the drive? “Shoot dang, it couldn’t be more fun.”⁣

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OCEAN AIR COOLED Not too long ago, André and I started talking about a photography project. It had been a pretty long time since I had shot a Porsche and I was really done with the winter here in the Netherlands. It was time to go to Porsche heaven. I pitched my plan to André and without hesitation he was down to organise a shoot with me. We made a few phone calls and figured out the project. It was amazing to see how friendly and committed André was with my ideas. Fast forward a couple weeks, I landed in Lisbon. I dropped my stuff at my Airbnb and took an Uber straight to Sportclasse to meet him. He walked me through the workshop and gave me a tour of the Sportclasse workshop. I really felt like a kid in a candy store. The Porsche collection is just insane. It was really amazing to see the way Sportclasse builds their projects from scratch. We talked about the shoot and made up our plan: the idea was to escape the city in a Pre-A 356, André’s daily driver, crossing over the Ponte 25 de Abril bridge and drive down to the area around Sesimbra where I had scouted some of my locations.

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After we crossed the bridge, we drove to the first location. The sun was still pretty high up as we crossed the bridge early to avoid traffic. It was not how I planned the shot, but the high contrast worked out pretty well in the image. I really wanted to include the iconic bridge in the series, and I think I found the perfect spot to do this. I had to climb a little, but it was definitely worth it. We then explored the harbour nearby for a while. I always like to explore around shoot locations without planning. There’s always the chance that you just stumble upon a sick location. Unfortunately, it was impossible to drive further with the car so we had to turn around. We decided to hit up the next location. It was all going smoothly, until we joined the highway. There, we somehow lost the accelerator. André told me he took the car to the racetrack in Estoril a few days earlier. That might be the cause of the broken accelerator; they really pushed the car to its limits over there. With the car still rolling, we stopped in the emergency lane. It was sad to see such a car sitting at the roadside. Luckily, André had a quick idea. He increased the idle speed so we could get to the next gas station. Once we were there, we kind of accepted we had a problem and I saw our evening go up in smoke. Nonetheless, André didn’t lose his bright smile and went to the shop to get us some snacks. When he returned, he had somehow also got his hands on a length of rope which he thought could serve as an alternative way to operate the throttle. He connected the rope to the accelerator in the carburetors and took the other end of the rope all the way through the front left window. The throttle was now hand operated. André was pulling the rope with his left hand, and steering and shifting gears with his right hand. That’s how we spent the entire 150 kilometre drive down south. It had us smiling the whole time. Because driving the car was now a bit more restricted, we made some cuts in the plan for the shoot. We decided to drive down south straight away, so we could be there in time for the sunset. We were surprised by some really great roads on the way there, so we pulled over to take some unplanned photos. Unfortunately, the accelerator solution didn’t last forever. About an hour later, the rope got stuck in the engine cooling fan, and it didn’t seem too good. I really thought it was all over, but André again fixed the problem. We were back on the road.

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Meanwhile, it started to become clear that I was not the best navigator to drive with. I missed a couple exits that made us have to turn around at some pretty awkward places. Besides that, André’s allergies got pretty bad, and he was sneezing all the time - turning and shifting the car with one hand, while sneezing every two seconds wasn’t the best combination, but it was kinda funny. Even this didn’t keep him from doing a few donuts every now and then! We continued or drive down south, with about 40 kilometres remaining. Our minor setbacks didn’t stop our escape from the city. However, it did make us run out of light. With only a few minutes left before the sun would go under completely, we made our way to the last location. I figured this would be the ideal location to end the shoot. It was such a James Bond vibe, staring down the Atlantic ocean. It made all the effort and struggle worth it. Even though the accelerator messed up our plan, it made our evening one to remember.

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LÜFTGEKUHLT VI It’s not everyday that you get the opportunity to shoot on one of the most important movie sets in cinema history — it’s such an outrageous premise. On top of that, add some of the best aircooled Porsches in the land and you have the recipe for pure magic. It took a gang of true visionaries to set up the blank canvas that was Lüftgekuhlt 6, but the vision paid off. Big time.

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My first attendance at Lüftgekuhlt was the third edition, at Modernica in DTLA — that event felt like the grand arrival. Suddenly it all seemed like this huge beast, and everyone wondered how it could ever be topped. Yet, here we are. Three years down the track, bigger and better than anyone could have ever imagined. It's a unique experience on a grand scale for all Porsche enthusiasts. Shooting such an event is easy — you just need to feed off the energy all around you. Any angle through the viewfinder feels planned to perfection, something a certain Jeff Zwart might be responsible for, but not without the skills of Pat Long, Howie Idelson, and the rest of the team.

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Any angle through the viewfinder feels planned to per fection...

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THE BEST STORY Flush with mid-70’s catalogue showroom success and blessed with good taste and an appetite for risk, retail magnates Sydney and Frances Lewis (founders of BEST Products) decided to embark on a radical rebranding exercise. ⁣ Enlisting NYC-based sculptor James Wines and his avant-garde architecture group, Sculpture In The Environment (SITE), an unconventional culture clash of art, architecture and consumerism was conceived.⁣

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The BEST Products Showrooms - a series of nine buildings, conceived and built between 1972 and 1984, were described as ‘de-architecture’ and considered by some to be the accidental birthplace of American Postmodernism. ⁣ ⁣SITE’s masterpieces were a comment on commercialism, urban decay and the specter of ruin; concepts that were perfectly aligned with the material culture of that time. ‘Indeterminate Facade’, the BEST showroom built in Houston, Texas, made its spectacular debut on September 12, 1975. The building was giftwrapped, Christo-like, in black gauze to disguise the mastery hidden underneath. A helicopter appeared and proceeded to remove the entire shroud, to the mild disbelief of the gathered crowd. A man wearing a white suit reportedly stepped out of a big white Cadillac, looked at the helicopter, then the building, and said: "Can’t do this no place but Texas." ⁣ Sadly, there was not much sentiment for the preservation of these suburban landmarks and every showroom bar one was altered, or razed to the ground, following BEST’s 1997 bankruptcy. ⁣ James Wines lamented the loss with the painfully American statement: “In France, this would never happen.” ⁣

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year : 1974 model: 914 engine: 1.8L colour code: L13K owner: Alex Block

FAMILY TIES

My 914 story starts in 1980 in Champaign, Illinois, when my dad purchased this car.⁣ ⁣ Prompted by his former roommate’s purchase of a ‘74 914 1.8, my dad wanted a Porsche of his own. Throughout the ‘80’s, this car was lovingly driven, autocrossed, and tracked - all the while being cosmetically enhanced and improved. Some of my earliest memories with my father were in this car as a young boy going for long drives to get ice cream, pretending to help shift gear as he held my hand under his on the shifter. I would go into the garage sometimes while the car was on jack stands and “assist” in whatever way a three year old could

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ALEX BLOC K


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1995 came, our family was growing, and my little brother was born. There was little room or practicality for a two seat sports car, and in the late summer it was gone. I would often spend time looking at old pictures from Porsche Club events, and reminiscing with my dad about the 914, a car he dearly missed. For the next fifteen years, my dad wouldn’t own another Porsche, but finally bought a 1988 3.2 Carrera. I too, had grown up, and purchased an early 1992 968 when I got out of college.⁣ ⁣ However, there was still a deep longing to try and locate my dads car again. He and I would often talk about trying to find it, but neither of us were hopeful in recovering the car. ⁣ The summer of 2014 had come, and in an effort to satiate my desire to own a 914 I’d purchased a ‘74 1.8, but it just wasn’t the same. I had tracked down who I thought owned the car online, and finally struck gold with pictures of the car on 914 World. The gentleman my dad sold the car to had made some changes, but there were some distinct cosmetic items that made me certain of this being the same car.⁣⁣

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I called ever y few months for two years and eventually, he decided to sell the 914. In this midst of this, my dad was diagnosed with amyloidosis, and unfortunately passed away in early November 2014. Shortly after, I made contact with the gentleman to whom my dad had sold the 914. He let me know he sold the car to a friend, who in turn recently sold it to another individual, out in Pennsylvania. As luck would have it, I was able to obtain his contact details and cold called him. I called every few months for two years and eventually, he decided to sell the 914.⁣⁣ ⁣⁣ I went out to Pennsylvania to buy the car in 2017 and we drove the 1,200 mile journey back to Indiana. Over the last couple years the engine has been out of the car, fuel injection has been re-installed, and things have been generally refreshed. I competed in a full season of PCA autocross and concours events, and I was quite pleased with how well the car did - but I was more elated in being able to share the car with my friends, and some of my dads friends in PCA. We even reunited my dads car with his roommates car again. ⁣⁣ ⁣⁣ Looking to the future, I plan on returning the car back to being a stock-appearing ‘74 2.0, and recreating the car that I grew up in. I plan on wrenching on it until it’s just right - not only for myself, but as a fitting tribute to my dad.⁣⁣

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What I love about catching the early light is the feeling of peacefulness in the process. Good morning light is ephemeral, so you need to be ready and waiting at the right time; one hour or even a few minutes later and the light tells a whole other story. The misty hues of pink, blue, and orange don't exist for long, and the soft reflections photos & text by

VINCENT PERRAUD

of those colours against the silhouette and curves of the 911 is something truly beautiful. When I'm shooting in a natural landscape, the light almost has a timeless quality. With some of the cars I photograph it can be hard to know if the photo was taken yesterday or decades ago. Less traffic in the early morning is also very convenient, so it's not as hard to stop a car in the middle of the road to get the perfect shot.

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INFORMALLY KNOWN AS D.S.C David Gwyther, the artist informally known D.S.C, has a saying: “If you do something that requires wearing a helmet, then it’s something that’s worth doing. Helmets are constant reminder of mortality.” A bold statement, yes - but it’s that sort of radical philosophy that makes DSC’s work effortlessly cool.

photos by

MI KE H U NT, DAN I E L B E NSO N ,

RO N Z AR A S , RYAN DAV IS , DAN W I LTO N & D. S .C

text by

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⁣D.S.C’s liveries on helmets, cars and motorcycles are sharply designed, and the added touch of memento mori elevates his work to art status, “You can’t just drive a motorcycle into an art gallery and call it art. It has to mean something.” Says D.S.C, “Put it upside down. Then it’s art.” ⁣ Beyond that, for D.S.C, artistic merit lies in originality and simplicity, “It has to be something that hasn’t been done before, with clarity of message and style of imagery.”

This explains why he’s a fan of the Porsche Pink Pig livery, “I want to do the least amount of work which is why the Pink Pig Porsche is an inspiration – an all-time favourite.” Says David of the iconic design: “Its design didn’t fit a script. It was a benchmark.” That level of thought in design is what D.S.C has taken into his own work. Death Spray wants viewers of his work to ask, ‘what is this?’ - both on the track and in the gallery. That was certainly what caught our eye with his 2017 show at HM Electric, where D.S.C reimagined the hoods of race cars.

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Brands you certainly don’t normally associate with racing are emblazoned on these hoods, leaving everyone thinking, 'did these actually exist?' It’s exactly

..it takes a lot

what DSC wanted them to think. But the beauty was not being held responsible

of work to make

to sponsor guidelines and creating fantastically wild brand partnerships like the delightfully incongruous Pirelli

it look simple.⁣⁣⁣

and Vivienne Westwood. ⁣⁣⁣ The aim for simplicity in David’s work is almost mathematical: “I did a whole paint job in the dirt of my van. Just flames at the back.” This loyalty to design might explain why he can’t remember exactly what type of Porsche his dad had, saying “It was a 911 from the 80s maybe a Carrera?” Maybe it doesn’t matter - he remembers the silhouette, and like his own works, he admires the simplicity of it: “It takes a lot of work to make something look simple.”⁣⁣⁣

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LONE STAR EXPRESS “The tour bus was like an experiment to see if I could live in a weird tiny space.” Says Revival Cycles head fabricator Andy James. “I bought the bus in March, followed shortly thereafter by the 996. I’m kinda fascinated by things that are undervalued. Things that are cool or worthwhile that other people haven’t really caught on to yet. The 996 and the tour bus actually have a lot in common, strangely. Neither have traction control. No launch control. Both have cable throttles. Both totally undervalued. Each of them cost approximately $15k.”

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...you can literally move to wherever you want, whenever you want... "Life on the bus is interesting because you can literally move wherever you want, whenever you want. I take the bus all over the place, and the first few days of being in a new location are surreal, because your home is there, your kitchen is there, your record collection is there, and you’ve only spent $130 in gas to get there. It’s the cheapest hotel you could ask for."

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“I know it’s weird isn’t it – maybe I should’ve been a bell ringer.” Says the graphic designer turned music man, Russ Chimes. What kind of music, exactly? Not bell ringing, we gather: “I’m writing a lot of pop music at the moment and compose for films and adverts. I started 10 years ago and was making retrotinged electronic dance music.” Think influences from Prince, Michael McDonald and Outrun.

TARGA SOUNDS photos by text by

BROTHER FILM .CO

FLORENCE WALKER

“I had this poster of a Guards Red 3.2L Carrera above my studio desk when I was just starting out.” So incredibly ‘80s. Soon enough ‘just starting out’ became fully established: “When things started going well, I got my first publishing deal with EMI. I went and got the Targa the very next day.”⁣⁣⁣

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Of course, music needs some visuals for when the

were sympathetic – no subs or anything – just some

speakers aren’t turned up to 11: “This shoot came

discrete JBLs – I didn’t want to mess with it. It’s still

about from for a number of reasons, primarily to have

got the period correct Blaupunkt head unit and I want

a fun day shooting with some super talented friends

to keep it as factory as possible. ⁣⁣⁣⁣

My first

about doing something using the Targa for a while, but

⁣My first record back in ‘09 was called Targa, which

decided this would be a great way to celebrate the car

I’d written before being lucky enough to actually own

and also capture some great material that could be

one. It’s been great to connect with people who listen

record back

used for artwork or promo for any future releases of

to my music and then are really surprised that I’m such

mine down the line!”⁣⁣⁣⁣

a petrol head. It’s good to know that other people

of mine, the Brother Film Co. We’ve been chatting

feel the link between music and driving as strongly as Russ tries his best to make time for driving – last year

I do.” It’s not such a surprise for his family – who are

he road tripped to Le Mans Classic. But even the

themselves very much into cars, “Dad loves it. He’s

act of driving turns Russ to music: “One of the first

told me to never get rid of it.” Music to our ears.

things I did was to put some better speakers in that

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in ‘09 was called 'Targa'.


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PFM 3200 The Mooney-Porsche M20 PFM 3200 is a unique piece of aviation history. It was the brainchild of Peter Schutz, former president of Porsche, and keen pilot. â Ł â Ł It was his dream to produce a plane powered by Porsche engines. And with some help from aircraft manufacturer Mooney, it happened. Porsche introduced electronic ignition and digital engine control to an aviation market still mired in decades old technology, while Mooney took care of providing a 911 worthy fuselage.

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⁣You could rest a glass of water on its glare shield and then fire up the engine: the Porsche power plant combined with a revolutionary single-level power control made for a ride so smooth not a drop would be spilled, even during taxi. ⁣ ⁣ To market this new venture a race from Kerrville to Dallas was staged between a 911 Turbo and the PFM. Of course, the plane won. The PFM was unbelievable to fly – quiet, efficient and easy to manage. Alas, the project never got to the heights it should have. When Schultz stepped down at the end of the ‘80s as the president of Porsche the lights went off on this unique program. ⁣

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Throughout the ‘90s Porsche reclaimed almost all of their engines but a dedicated few owners, like Craig McAlpine of North Texas, continue to fly theirs intact.

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“It’s an amalgamation of everything I love about Porsche,” Explains Rod Emory of his latest build, the 911K. “You’ve got the brilliant sound of the flat fan - something typically reserved for the 917K and other legendary cars from Weissach, paired with the light and nimble setup of a ‘68 SWB 911. The handling and braking on the car exceeded my expectations with the coilover suspension and bigger brakes. For me it’s a perfect balance between a race car and a street car, wrapped in a vintage motorsport-inspired package.”

911K photos by text by TED

DREW PHILLIPS GUSHUE

Unveiled at Luftgekühlt 6, the 911K has since undergone its final shakedown and testing and is prepped to be handed off to its new owner, but that’s easier said than done for Rod: “It brings me right back to the days when I used to race these. The big megaphone exhausts screaming in your ear. It’s the perfect balance of performance and nostalgia.”

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FREQUENT FLYER “Racing cars, riding motorcycles, flying helicopters, they’re all similar forms of meditation," Our friend Niki Byrne explains. ⁣ “My mom rolls her eyes at me when I say ‘meditation’, but it’s true; these activities absorb your whole brain. There’s no time to think about what’s for dinner when you’re one, maybe two bad decisions away from your own death."

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⁣"I think flying improves my life, even when I’m

flying is that I get to do it with my big brother,

on the ground. Learning captaincy is a big part

Julian. We’ve flown in some tricky, remote parts

of the training, and it’s a hard lesson to learn.

of the world, and have pushed each other hard.

I’m tempted to say it’s harder for women than

Julian’s foible is pessimism, mine is optimism. I

for men because we’re so often taught to follow

like to joke that without me we wouldn’t go, and

someone else’s lead, but I’ve met plenty of men

without Julian we wouldn’t come back.⁣

who have struggled with it as well.

⁣ A Robinson R22 is like a vintage racing car, but

Captaincy means you’re in control: it’s your

probably with a better view. Flying around the

ship, your decision, your responsibility, and you

world is certainly an ambition; it appeals to me

take that authority and self-assuredness with

because I’m pretty stupid, and I’ve read too many

you everywhere you go. My favorite thing about

books about Eddie Rickenbacker.”⁣

FREQUENT FLYER

Captaincy means you’re in control: it ’s your ship, your decisions.

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A Robinson R22 is like a vintage racing car, but probably with a bet ter view.

FREQUENT FLYER

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Olorpo reperum facero blaborro incit venditiae dernate veliquam de parumquame pellaci ligendis ea sae serrovi tetur, occaborentus deniendis ut quis aut porepudant, ipietur? Ihillaborem sequia nis ventotati od excerciis quisqui digenim illuptatur, cus simporepro molor atuscitatem deliqui alitati nvelestia site audam, corrum, solo ipient. illuptatur, cus simporepro molor atuscitatem deliqui alitati nvelestia site audam, corrum, solo ipient. illuptatur, cus simporepro molor atuscitatem deliqui alitati nvelestia site audam, corrum, solo ipient.

CARBY TUC KWELL text by

TED GUSHUE

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Natecabo rumquis et lis este rem laborae stiatem eatqui re latur?Iquatum volut pos nonse Dolorpo reperum facero blaborro incit venditiae dernate veliquam de parumquame pellaci ligendis ea sae serrovi tetur, occaborentus deniendis ut quis aut porepudant, ipietur? Ihillaborem sequia nis ventotati od excerciis quisqui digenim illuptatur, cus simporepro molor atuscitatem deliqui alitati nvelestia site audam, corrum, solo ipient. illuptatur, cus simporepro molor atuscitatem deliqui alitati nvelestia site audam, corrum, solo ipient. Natecabo rumquis et lis este rem laborae stiatem eatqui re latur?Iquatum volut pos nonse Dolorpo reperum facero blaborro incit venditiae dernate veliquam de parumquame pellaci ligendis ea sae serrovi tetur, occaborentus deniendis ut quis aut porepudant, ipietur? Ihillaborem sequia nis ventotati od excerciis quisqui digenim

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CARBY TUCKWELL

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year: 1969 & 2001 models : 911T & 996 GT3 engine: 2.7L & 3.6L colour code: 6803 & 9076 owner: Hugh Feggans

Father, husband, architect, Porsche enthusiast. Enthusiast being a key

DUAL PURPOSE

word here; the cars stacked in Hugh Feggans garage all serve a purpose. Garage queens simply don’t exist. All are driven - some on winding roads, some on race tracks. More importantly, they all serve their own unique purpose - like life itself, it’s all about balance.⁣ ⁣ A 1969 911T and an early 996 GT3 serve as good examples of such balance. Each have their own strengths and weaknesses. Used properly, Hugh manages to dip his toes into the best both worlds have to offer. “Having variety is one of the best ways of developing a deeper understanding of these cars,” Hugh explains.⁣ ⁣ A firm believer of the mantra ‘form follows function’, Hugh respects the unique characteristics of each car, striking the perfect split between old and new, mechanical versus technical - and if you could, why wouldn’t you? “If you have the luxury of experiencing the two separate worlds, one car simply enhances the other.”⁣⁣⁣

photos & text by

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THOMAS WALK


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If you have the luxur y of experiencing the two separate worlds...

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one car simply enhances the other.⁣⁣ DUAL PURP OSE

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The real fun is

It's 6AM. The sun is trying to pierce through the clouds, the

such as the Minilite wheels and the Cibie lights on the hood

song of a 2.7L flat six at full chorus echoes through the trees.

announce this 911T as a capable weekend racer: “I never wanted

For Hugh, this is a ritual - the Sunday morning drive.⁣

the car to be over the top. Most importantly, I really wanted a

car that was as fun to drive as it looks!”⁣

driving slow

911 - without excessive modifications, as so many cars like it

Pushed by a very lively 2.7L power-plant, this car drives a

cars fast...

are guilty of having. “All the enhancements on the car don’t

point home: that less is more, that excessiveness would be

upset the balance, and that’s the trick, not to overwhelm the

to completely miss the point of an early car. It’s about feel,

simplicity of an early 911,” Hugh explains from behind the wheel.⁣

noises and smells - things newer, and arguably more capable

cars lack. “For me, early 911s have never been a horsepower

The ‘T, for the most part, is the creation of a fellow Melbourne

thing. They’ve always punched above their weight. It comes

Porsche figure, John Forcier. Hugh took possession of the Ossi

down to you as a driver. The real fun is driving slow cars fast

Blau 911T purely to get his kicks on the weekend, without the

and that’s when you learn to be a better driver,” says Hugh. It’s

need to pack racing gear: “I’ve always wanted a long hood,

a sophisticated car with enough of a tactile response to remind

but not a concours car or an ‘investment’. Something I could

you that you’re behind the wheel of early an air-cooled 911.⁣

sink my teeth into and drive.” Like any early 911, the ‘T doesn’t

flatter or compensate for any inadequacies as a driver - you’ve

On the other hand, Hugh suggests: “If you take all the things I

got to understand these cars. The magic is all in the details; the

love about an early 911 like the ‘T and give them steroids, you

perfected setup, the RS interior, tartan seats, and Wevo shifter

end up with a Mk1 996 GT3.”⁣

This 69’ 911T is a raw, responsive and no holds barred early

all compliment what you see on the outside. Only a few touches

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There’s a common thread of simplicity and balance.⁣⁣⁣

An hour north of Hugh’s home is Haunted Hills Hill Climb track. The ideal ribbon of asphalt to stretch the legs of the 996 Mk1 GT3, Clubsport package.⁣ ⁣ This is a very different proposition to earlier cars. True Porsche nerds like Hugh (note the Hans Mezger number plate) know that this is the definitive GT3; the one hand built at the Weissach Porsche Motorsport factory. The one that homologated the GT3: “Pre-GT3RS, pre-cup car, pre-anything. The most uncompromised version. It’s got that inherent racing pedigree.”⁣ ⁣ Only 77 were delivered to Australia, most were given a hard life. Some, like Hugh's example, survived and serve as fine kept examples - but that doesn’t excuse it from track use. “As you start to test the capabilities of these cars, you eventually find yourself needing to go to a track,” Hugh says. Really, it’s precisely what they came out of the factory to do. Equipped with a roll cage from new, harnesses and 355hp, and lacking traction control and ABS, there’s no mistaking its purpose. Other notable appointments include a lightweight flywheel, titanium rods, and factory bucket seats. Thankfully, given the Australian climate, there’s air-con.⁣ “It’s a happy medium. It has all the characteristics of an early 911 wrapped up in a more sophisticated package, yet not taking anything away from you as a driver. Most Porsche fans are pure driving enthusiasts. They want a raw, basic car they can push.” Hugh continues.⁣ ⁣ Sitting in the passenger seat doing laps, you observe that it’s not all about speed, but delivery. Something the ‘69T also does well, but in its own unique way. This car does that too, but with an enhanced sense of agility and aggression.⁣⁣ ⁣ These cars are thirty years apart; both follow in the same footsteps, putting driving engagement above all else. Paired together, you begin to appreciate the very basics that make these cars unique. “Fundamentals of good architecture and fundamentals of a good car all come down to some basic, key ingredients. There’s a common thread of simplicity and balance.”⁣⁣⁣

DUAL PURP OSE

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photos & text by

TED GUSHUE


There’s something perversely beautiful about the

with the lights off to see if that feeling could be

idea of breaking into a garage late at night just to look

recreated. Safe to say I went home a happy camper.

around and soak it up by yourself. Growing up I was

nside the garage lies a healthy chunk of Porsche’s

always obsessed with these leaked photos out of the

racing history. 962, 959, 935, it’s all right there. To be

Sultan of Brunei’s garages, dozens of uber rare cars

granted an intimate audience with that much history

in cavernous underground bunkers, photographed

is almost overwhelming. It’s one thing to see it in a

surreptitiously by guests without permission.

museum with a hundred other people. It’s another thing to walk around in a warehouse so quiet that your own breath reverberates off the body panels.

To me one of the best, and likely most documented garages in the world is that of Bruce Canepa in Scotts Valley, California. I stopped by to have a nose around

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MEET THE HOLBERTS photos & text by TODD HOLBERT

My grandfather, Robert Holbert (Pop), was an early adopter of racing Porsches in the United States. He went on to capture the first US Road Racing Championship, in no small part due to his efforts in a Porsche 718 RS61. My father, Al, was arguably poised to take Porsche Motorsports efforts in North America into the 21st century. In between, they fit a lot of racing and influence under their respective belts. In the ‘50s, there was a quickly growing interest in sports car racing in the northeastern US. Pop and his brother in law, Vince, had a Mobil gas station. Over time, they began to convert the station into a service garage, and in turn their efforts came to focus on the care and tuning of imports. After a midnight test drive in an MG TC he was hooked. My Dad and Uncle Larry grew up with various Porsche Spyders in the driveway outside their small brick home. For years, they were loaded on some version of American station wagon with an open trailer, and rumbled to Watkins Glen, Lime Rock, Thompson and Indianapolis to name a few. Pop quietly rose to become one of the premier sports car drivers in the US, and took a single trip to Le Mans driving a Spyder for the Porsche factory, proving he could hold his own against the racers from Europe. Exposure to the excitement of racing at a young age, a stint with Roger Penske and his driver Mark Donohue, and the family's involvement in the rise of Porsche as a serious brand in America laid an easy to imagine path in front of Dad; he was talented and driven enough to follow it. His career wound its way from sports cars, to single seat Can-Am cars, to NASCAR, to prototypes - including his own success with the Porsche factory at Le Mans - to open wheel, and ended at a time when I think he had finally settled into the position he had unknowingly been aiming for: as the first President of Porsche Motorsports North America. The Holberts and Porsche have a long and varied history of success both on and off the track!

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6

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1

1959, Warrington, PA. Gram and Pop (Ellie and Bob) posing in the driveway of their little

2

1961, Nassau, Bahamas. The "Anteater" was the creation of the man bending

3

1973, All hands on deck! Dad's first season in professional racing saw the assembly of the

brick and aluminum sided ranch, with the silver

down over the toolbox in the right front - Bernie

Holbert Racing team with trusted friends and family.

Porsche 718 RSK. There was no 'race shop' - the

Vihl. Bernie was a metal smith and boilermaker

Rick Rutledge, the real mechanic of the group, on the

racecar lived at the house, or in one of the service

by trade: after a first lap wreck at Marlboro, MD,

ground. Randy Brown - one of Dad’s oldest and most

bays at the Garage at the bottom of the hill. As

he rebuilt the nose of the Spyder into something

trusted school aged friends sporting the new Holbert's

cool as can be, leaning on the shiny new ride.

he thought improved on the Porsche factory

Porsche-Audi uniform. Scotty (Tom Scott) was a Phi

Sunglasses on, and a bottle of beer in hand.

aerodynamics. This car was bought from the

Gamma fraternity brother from Lehigh University. Bert

factory after a successful European campaign.

Everett, with the Goodyear hat, was a Porsche racer in his own right, and the father of another of Dad's close childhood friends. Pop is standing watch quietly in the background just over Dad's shoulder.

4

1988, Warrington, PA. Porsche Motorsports North America headquarters. Unloading

5

1989, Warrington, PA. These two cars shared a stable during 1987, while the newly

6

Between Sears Point and Elkhart Lake in 1986. Bob Holt in the Lowenbrau special rig, and Tom

with so much anticipation. Things would quickly

formed Porsche Indycar team tried to find some

O’Dell with the PMNA support trailer, taking a detour

go off the tracks. We lost Dad two weeks later,

speed in the Porsche 2708 package. Here both

to the Bonneville salt flats with a Porsche 928 S4 for a

and the DOT folks took a decidedly different

retired cars get an informal employee-arranged

production car speed run. She needed a quick repaint

interpretation of the intent of the Porsche 959.

photo shoot in front of the Holbert's Porsche-

from the original white to red so it could be seen on

Here, Tom Seabolt (PMNA) and Lou Getz (Holbert's

Audi dealership. The Porsche 962-103 would

the salt! I recall stiffer springs, the mirrors removed,

Porsche-Audi) watch the first US unveiling of the

spend the next two decades having some well

and a piece of lexan between the spoiler and rear deck

fantastic new Porsche supercar.

earned rest, on display in the Porsche showroom.

(to add stability) as the only mods. 171.926mph doesn’t seem very fast today!

7

1976, Sebring, FL. Here we go, pushing back into their third position on the

8

1986, Testing, HR1 at the Transportation Research Center. These things sprouted

9

1961, Le Mans. Pop's exploits racing Porsche Spyders with success in the States earned an

starting grid at Sebring. Thirteen hours later

wings, dive planes, ducts, tail extensions, louvers,

invite to drive for the Porsche factory at the famed

they'd be parking in the winners circle. Michael

and so on through the years. As racing always

La Sarthe track. Porsche Systems Engineering entered

Keyser put together the Benrus and Penthouse

moves forward, testing is imperative to keep at

three cars for this race: two coupes and this single

deals just a week or so before the race. Here,

the front of the field. HR1 was the first Holbert

Spyder. Pop was paired with Masten Gregory, and

Doc Bundy, George Dickinson, Rick Rutledge,

Racing-built 962, including the tub. A few small

through a rainy night fraught with accidents and battles

and the rest of the crew are outfitted in some

changes incorporated with lessons learned racing

with the larger Ferraris and Maseratis, they emerged

rad team uniforms.

the factory-built older sister.

5th overall and won their S2.0 class.

10

1980, Danbury, CT. The movie Arthur came out in 1981. A shot of Doc

11

1972, Blackhawk, WI. Dad and Rick Rutledge unloading the 914-6 from

12

1974, Lime Rock Park. This is a great picture. Bernie Vihl at the passenger window. Bernie

Bundy's SCCA D-Production Porsche 924 during

the new Holbert's Porsche-Audi box truck. This

was an important supporter of Pop's career, and he

movie production at the now gone Danbury Fair

was us headed towards the big time, and beat

worked in his father's boiler and pressure vessel shop,

Racearena. Long-time crew chief Tom Seabolt

the open trailer used in the '71 season. This two

so when it came time for a Holbert Racing refueling rig,

had to drive, because Dad and Doc were busy

man crew (with occasional help from family and

Bernie stepped up! Ricky Rutledge, another critical part

elsewhere. Doc would win the SCCA runoffs in this

friends) hauled around the eastern US as Dad

of Dad's career, at the window, with Pop listening in. Dad

car later that year.

learned the tracks and began to form a plan for

won this race by almost a minute.

the next steps in his racing career

MEE T T HE HOL BERT S

195


ABOVE

Dad's first race car was a second hand SCCA

like an old piece of furniture, he's not going anywhere!” When Rick passed, Dad

C-Production Porsche 914, which Pop was willing to

lost an important part of the team. He bought Ricky's red Snap-On toolbox from

finance with the dealership name. Rick Rutledge was the first Holbert Racing

his mother, to keep those tools which had kept his race cars so well prepared for

mechanic. Rick was a local hot-rodder, having his own garage before working at

so many years close at hand. I still have Ricky's toolbox in my garage today.

the Holbert's VW shop. His meticulous approach to his work was noticed; when it was time to try his hand at racing, Dad knew exactly who he needed. Three years after this picture of a line mechanic with a novice driver, Rick won

RIGHT

1957, Cumberland, MD. One of the many airport tracks peppering the US in the ‘50s. Pop kicking back in the

cockpit of his brand new Porsche 550A. After many years in MGs, a try in a

the 1975 IMSA "Mechanic of the Year". He could build engines, fabricate, set the

French Special, and a shot in a big American hot rod, Pop decided he needed

car up, diagnose problems - all with a common sense approach and a quickness

something new. He had just began selling Porsches two years prior. In the fall

few could match. In the mid 1970's it was not uncommon to see other engine

of 1956, with the persuasive help of his business partner, Don Hawk, and aided

builders and mechanics cornering Rick for advice. Ricky was a perfect fit for

by his growing reputation, Pop was able to order his own Porsche RS Spyder. In

Dad; methodical and thorough, dedicated and tireless. Other racers wondered

Spring of '57, the fourth 550 delivered to the US, arrived in Warrington, PA.

how and why Rick and the guys spent so much time preparing their car - "lots of Eight wins, four second place, and two third place finishes affirmed he had made

preventative maintenance, and pride in being ready when we arrive.”

a wise choice. He learned to coax the most from his cars as a mechanic and also

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Ricky wasn't a big socializer, he liked working alone. He had a special position at

as a driver, with a certain style - not flashy, but fast, and easy on equipment.

Holbert Racing, being allowed to work on what he wanted deep into his career.

Over the next six years, this quiet guy from Warrington, PA, would drive the best

When questioned about Rick's position on the team, Dad would respond, "Rick’s

racing cars Porsche produced, to a great many successes.

MEE T T HE HOL BERT S


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When the Paul Smith and Sports Purpose ‘Art Car’ joint collaboration debuted in July 2018, social media exploded and rightly so, because to us, it’s one of the most interesting projects in recent memory. We spoke to James Turner, director of Sports Purpose, to understand the story behind the build. “It all came about because I did some advisory work on a potential creative partnership for Paul Smith Design a few years ago,” Explains James. “We had a standing joke that our next collaboration might be to do a painted bicycle, as I love their work with Mercian Cycles in particular. Then I decided to build and early 911 race car for myself to use in our 2.0L Cup series, and specifically debut the car at the Le Mans Classic.”

BY PAUL SMITH photos & text by

NAT T WISS

The iconic colours across the length of the car are one of the signature Paul Smith colour swatches - the Artist Stripe. With 911 maestros Tuthill Porsche managing the build, and pulling in talent from the paint department at Singer, precise care was taken to ensure that the paint perfectly matched the swatches, and laser alignment ensured that the lines were exactly correct. In fact, they continue underneath the panels and underneath the car, all at millimetre-perfect precision.

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I was thinking about the colour and the car was Polo Red as standard. It’s fine as a colour, and obviously the rally guys used it often in period, but I wanted something a bit more fun. I just happened to be talking with Paul Smith and we talked about using their Artist Stripe on the car. So naturally, we went to work. I think one of the greatest touches on the car is that it lives true to the ‘Sports Purpose’ name - by which I mean the original Porsche manual for building a racing car at the time,

... I wanted something a bit more fun.

and it’s the fundamental idea that we built our business on. We can remove the side bars of the roll cage at any time and fit a passenger seat, and one day I’ll drop off my sons at school in this car. You really can’t do better than that.

BY PAUL S MI T H

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BY PAUL S MI T H


BY PAUL S MI T H

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year:

1963

models: engine:

356 RSR 2.4L

colour code: Custom builder:

THE OUTL AW

Emory Motorsports, based in North Hollywood, has been building, as they put it, “the most iconic, yet personalised Porsche 356s on the planet” since 1996, but none have pushed the boundaries of both engineering and the sensibilities of classic Porsche enthusiasts quite like the 356 RSR. As shop owner Rod Emory explains, the RSR “is a no boundaries little hot rod — some are going to love it and some are going to hate it, but at the end of the day I think people will appreciate it no matter what because of the level of detail, workmanship and craftsmanship that went into making it.”

photos by text by

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Rod Emory

DREW PHILIPS & C HRIS GREENWOOD

TED GUSHUE


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The car itself started out as nothing more than a rusted-out 1960 356B coupe before Emory and his team got their hands on it; a pure, blank canvas for them to work their magic. “We wanted to pull all the best pieces from various models and years of Porsche and bring them together in a package that is fun, exciting and kind of mind blowing”, Emory explains. The team set about replacing the original rusted bodywork with wider, more aggressively profiled aluminium panels — certain sections being hand rolled on an English wheel, a process similar to that used by fabricators in the original Gmünd factory.⁣⁣

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I want to build cars in the way that I want. This all-new body was then carefully mated to a 1990 964 C2’s chassis, allowing Rod to fit aggressive KW suspension, wider, grippier tyres and larger 964 brakes to ensure the car could handle the power from its 911 derived, near 400hp four-cylinder, twin-turbo engine.⁣ ⁣ That’s right. The engine, just like the removable aluminium body, is a completely custom design. Designed and built in conjunction with Oregon based Rothsport Racing, the architecture of the motor is all 964, but a new case and crank was developed to allow the team to downsize the engine to four cylinders — it is a 356, after all — while two hefty Garrett turbos make up for any loss in power.⁣ ⁣ Those two turbos are mounted in an exposed location at the rear of the car in the style of a Porsche 935. Something, as it turns out, is no accident. As Emory leans down to take a closer look at his creation, he’s keen to point out that the RSR takes inspiration from a number of iconic Porsche models: “There’s styling that’s reminiscent of the old Abarth Carreras, there’s the 935 tail section, a bit of 996/997 stuff going on in the front with the fender slope and headlight area; we even built special 935/956 style centre-lock Momo wheels for it”. A mutt, maybe, but one that’s impossible not to fall in love with.⁣

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THE PROTOT YPES text by NAT T WISS & PORSC HE NEWSROOM

These four prototypes that you see before you, in their own ways, represent huge changes at Porsche. Whether it’s a radical change in design or whether it’s a response to the changing times, these are the ‘what-ifs’ of the car world: concepts that never made it to the showroom, but played a huge part in shaping automotive history for years to come. This painstaking and iterative process is at the core of good design. Taking an idea and perfecting it, time and time again, until it can finally be shown to the world.

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PANAMERICANA This is the Porsche ‘Panamericana’ that was presented to Ferry Porsche for his 80th birthday in 1989. Without a doubt, one of the most eye-catching elements of this design are the exaggerated lines that run along the body. Every line runs smoothly into the next, across the entire car. Overall, the Panamericana development process lasted just a few months, and includes some elements that were seen again in the 993, the subsequent generation of the 911.

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T HE PROTOT YPES


CAYENNE CABRIO Nowadays, digitisation is opening up entirely new possibilities for engineers developing vehicles: the body, drivetrain, chassis, and electrics of a new model are now designed on the computer and their functions are simulated. Fifteen years ago, the world was very different: the rear of this car is an impressive reflection of this, because the Cayenne ‘Cabrio’ actually has two different rear designs. Normally, two different designs would result in two prototypes being built. In the case of this visually unique design study, however, the engineers chose to adopt a more cost-effective approach.

T HE PROTOT YPES

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CARRERA 3.2 SPEEDSTER The Porsche 911 Carrera 3.2 Speedster was built in 1987. A one-seater with no frills, designed for pure driving pleasure – just like the first Speedster in the 1950s. This prototype, using a standard 911 Carrera body, is the predecessor of the highly coveted and rare production version of the 911 Speedster.

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918 SPYDER ROLLING CHASSIS In the 2010s, advanced simulations allow for most car components to be digitally prototyped from the very early stages all the way to the final product. But, as Porsche began to entertain the idea of hybrid powertrains, it had to revert to real world testing. In the case of the 918 Spyder rolling chassis development car, there was no option but to try out the hybrid drivetrain on real roads and circuits. So, in the spring of 2012, selected journalists were invited to the Porsche test track in Weissach, where this car was intended to convince them of the feasibility of the 918 Spyder.

T HE PROTOT YPES

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DANIEL ARSHAM Welcome to Daniel Arsham’s studio in New York City. At his whitewashed warehouse Daniel employs a full time staff of nearly thirty artisans and designers to help realize his ambitious artistic installations and artifacts that have reached worldwide acclaim, and have been exhibited in major contemporary art museums on every continent. The Miami-born artist has what might be considered an obsession with the passage and fabric of time, blending materials and disciplines to articulate a “future past”, wherein archaeologists are carefully uncovering the relics of our modern era. He is also the cofounder of Snarkitecture, an architectural firm focused on the construction build out of stores for KITH and their founder Ronnie Fieg in locations around the world.

photos & text by TED GUSHUE

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DANIEL ARSHAM


DANIEL ARSHAM

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SEEN THROUGH GL ASS 222

TYPE 7

year:

2018

model:

Carrera T

engine:

9.5L

colour code: owner:

vinyl wrap

Sam Fane

"For me, driving has never been about A to B, it’s about what’s in the middle.” Explains Sam Fane, who when we spoke to him in 2019, had just begun his year-long around the world journey in his 911 Carrera T; “#DriveTheWorld is all about discovering the middle."

photos by text by

THOMAS WALK & SAM FANE

SAM FANE & TED GUSHUE


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Cars bring us together, but it ’s the people that make them interesting.

“Cars bring us together, but it’s the people that make them interesting - since I launched STG in 2014 I’ve been incredibly fortunate to meet some incredible people everywhere I traveled, but it always felt like a strategic mission, airdropped in and likewise out. When you arrive someplace you’ve never been after a long drive you immediately have a story to share that’s not 'Yeah, the airline food was crap. Didn’t sleep, but here I am!' My goal is to spend the next twelve months on the road, traveling across Australia, Europe, Canada, US and the Middle East. Ideally we would be going further together, but there are some limitations on timing when using sea container transport for the wet bits. Initially we were expecting to put around 60,000 miles on the clock, but judging by the last 10 days in Australia we’re going to blow right by that. We’re well past 2,500 miles already.”

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When you arrive someplace af ter a long drive, you immediately have a stor y to share.

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USA

NORWAY

AUSTRALIA

MONACO SEEN T HROUGH GL A S S

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C HRIS L ABROOY renders by text by

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C HRIS L ABROOY

TED GUSHUE


Q: Why did you start bending Porsches? A: I was bending and manipulating cars before I started doing it with Porsche. What happened is that I bought my first Porsche in 2014 and fell in love with the cars and the overall brand. It’s interesting, because as a child I was obsessed with the glamour of Ferrari and I did not pay any attention to Porsches. It wasn’t until I owned one that it all made sense.

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MIAMI BEAC H HUTS photos by text by

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After Hurricane Andrew ravaged the Florida coast in 1992, the city of Miami commissioned a number of architectural agencies to create new lifeguard huts - thirty-six to be exact - located every few blocks along South Beach to stand guard over the thousands of sunseekers and beachgoers that flock to the city every summer. Starting with ‘The Jetty’ on the southernmost tip, and terminating at South Pointe Park, on the northern stretch of the beach.⁣ ⁣ Much like the Moai figures on Easter Island, they are an expression for identity and culture on Miami Beach. With abstract roof lines and bright colours - often neon, they take the optimistic futurism of Miami's Art Deco, blended with the local surburban Cracker Style and the brightness of South Florida’s tropical fauna. True products of their environment.⁣

MARCO MAGISTRINI SPINELLI

NAT T WISS

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MIAMI BE ACH HU T S


MIAMI BE ACH HU T S

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L’ART OF WAITING

year: 2003 models: Carerra GT engine: 5.7L colour code: 980 owner: Arthur Kar

“In 1998 I began working as an apprentice mechanic at Sonauto in Levallois, a suburb of Paris. I worked there for one year before I became certified as a Porsche Mechanic.” Explains Arthur Kar of L’art de L’automobile - the hybrid automotive showroom and fashion label based in St Germain, Paris; “I was 16. It was a big deal for me. Sonauto was the original importer, dealer, and main garage that serviced Paris. There were others, but Sonauto was in my opinion the pinnacle. I spent five years as a mechanic there."

photos & text by

TED GUSHUE


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This is what Porsc he means to me. Family. ⁣

"The problem at the time, being a mechanic at Sonauto in Paris, it was difficult to be able to purchase the cars we were working on. Everything in my body wanted to own one since I was a kid in Beirut. My father was a mechanic in Lebanon, he and my mother would frequently joke that my first word was 'Golf' because of his GTI. ⁣

For me this is why Porsche and the GTI are linked in my life. I couldn’t have one without the other. I would not have been able to appreciate how special the Porsches are if I had not worked on them, and I would not have discovered Porsche if it was not for my Dad’s GTI."

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L’ART OF WAI T ING


This was the final straw for me, I knew that I would work to own this car one day. "Right before I left Sonauto in 2004 the Carrera GT was unveiled. This was the final straw for me, I knew that I would work to own this car one day. Fast forward 15 years and I am sitting in mine, looking back at a GTI just like my Father’s."⁣

L’ART OF WAI T ING

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ALONG THE WATC HTOWERS photos & text by

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ANDREA KL AINGUTI

TYPE 7


The Julier mountain pass, in Switzerland’s Graubünden region, is a scenic and challenging alpine road where untouched nature is the predominant sight. On the long drive to the summit, crystal lakes and lush pine forests slowly make their way for wide open and rugged high-altitude alpine scenery. Once the summit of the road is in sight though, an unexpected and almost surreal silhouette emerges between the harsh landscape. Thirty meters high, painted red and made entirely of wood, this is the Origen Tower, truly an unusual sight for a mountaintop. Envisioned in 2016 by Giovanni Netzer, director of the cultural organisation “Origen”, the tower is essentially a fully functional theatre stage that can accommodate 250 people at 2,300 meters above sea level, with performances hosted throughout the whole year, combining rough nature and culture in a unique way. Construction of the 410-ton tower was completed by the engineer Walter Bieler in only two months, during which the single elements of the main structure had to be built separately in a nearby town and then transferred up the mountain. Because of the strong alpine winds, the entire building had to be completed without the use of scaffolding, and the final structure had to be structurally sound enough to survive any potential avalanches. The project is meant as a temporary symbol of the fleeting art of theatre and is thus scheduled to be dismantled in 2020. But even after the tower disappears from the summit, this exquisite road should be on your road trip list.

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ALONG T HE WATCH TOWERS


ALONG T HE WATCH TOWERS

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PALM SPRINGS OR BUST We sent our contributor Daniel Piker to document 3 Pedal Posse’s run to Palm Springs Modernism week. What’s 3PP you ask? One of the founders, Mauricio, explains: “3PP is an inclusive community with a common appreciation for Porsches” The Palm Springs Run embodies the spirit of getting a group of extended friends to participate in an activity where people can enjoy their cars, but more importantly, enjoy the camaraderie and the feeling of a family away from home.

photos & text by

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DANIEL PIKER


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All of the activities are focused on connecting like-minded enthusiasts with a willingness to say hello to a fellow petrolhead, sharing a fun and hopefully memorable experience through spirited driving on beautiful roads such as the Angeles Crest Highway, and finally enjoying a mutual appreciation for modern architecture in Palm Springs’ Modernism week. In a group like 3 Pedal Posse, there is no discrimination between cars. Whether it be air-cooled or water-cooled, modified or stock, all stereotypes and judgment are thrown out the window; there isn’t enough of this kind of attitude in the car world and specifically the Porsche community. 3PP is on a mission to bring these different people together to enjoy a great week in Southern California!⁣

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PAL M SPRING S OR BUST


One of the main reasons people fall in love with Porsches is for their amazing driving experience and their timeless design. Porsche enthusiasts can all admire the passion that was put behind the making of these cars; from the soft curves of the 911 to the beautiful engineering of the flat six. With this mutual love, the appreciation for a mid century modern design is basically a given! Not only are these two things beautiful in their own regard, but when put together, they elevate one another to a new level.

PAL M SPRING S OR BUST

251


year:

1986

models: 911 Turbo Cabriolet engine:

3.3L

colour code: owner:

4632

Tristan Auer

“Interior design is universal.” Interior architect Tristan Auer explains: “It does not matter if we are talking about a car, or a house, an office, or a restaurant. You are still building the canvas on which others will paint their life story.

INSIDE OUT 252

A thoughtfully designed environment is for me like food, or water: it nourishes the body and the soul, it is a necessity. Each project I take on starts from a place of empathy. I learn as much as possible about the intended user before I begin the design process. I learn about their family, their friends, their childhoods. I learn what their lives are like before I apply my lens to it. I want my clients to feel at home the second they open the door, whether that be for their car or their house or their hotel room."

photos by text by

RÉMI DARGEGEN

TED GUSHUE


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Each project I take on starts from a place of empathy.

Atui consuppl. Quides Ahalis? Ibus auctam ve, corbitam issuludam ommor locchilius,

nonsulestra

murips,

nes

vive, Ti. Mus, abefecu ltorum atisserrit; Catatri igna, efacii sulegerei scibere hente, nos ac re, cul horio cerviusquid sentis,

cupieritiam

mentius

cauci

telabis. Nonsulabusules inument. Marem. Senihilicaes is acessum nonsilin intio, culocta nihic oca menatam esi publicae iptim aciente nihicibus auc iu morum Roma, spimus bon huitimi hilicaperum quit, conum in iti, quam Romnistiam temovit, prae perfex st vercenatque permis Caturbis, sedem, C. Suame cut verehem vivid ces Ad intem is co ta, condam num, nimus nultus facteri pes iustatabemus se deto esse fir ut..

254

INSIDE OU T


INSIDE OU T

255


Atui consuppl. Quides Ahalis? Ibus auctam ve, corbitam issuludam

Suame cut verehem vivid ces Ad intem is co ta, condam num, nimus

ommor locchilius, nonsulestra murips, nes vive, Ti. Mus, abefecu

nultus facteri pes iustatabemus se deto esse fir ut..um quit, conum

ltorum atisserrit; Catatri igna, efacii sulegerei scibere hente, nos ac

in iti, quam Romnistiam temovit, prae perfex st vercenatque permis

re, cul horio cerviusquid sentis, cupieritiam mentius cauci telabis.

Caturbis, sedem, C. Suame cut verehem vivid ces Ad intem is co ta,

Nonsulabusules inument.

condam num, nimus nultus facteri pes iustatabemus se deto esse fir ut..um quit, conum in iti, quam Romnistiam temovit, prae perfex

Marem. Senihilicaes is acessum nonsilin intio, culocta nihic oca

st vercenatque permis Caturbis, sedem, C. Suame cut verehem

menatam esi publicae iptim aciente nihicibus auc iu morum Roma,

vivid ces Ad intem is co ta, condam num, nimus nultus facteri pes

spimus bon huitimi hilicaperum quit, conum in iti, quam Romnistiam

iustatabemus se deto esse fir ut..

temovit, prae perfex st vercenatque permis Caturbis, sedem, C.

256

INSIDE OU T


Atui consuppl. Quides Ahalis? Ibus auctam ve, corbitam issuludam ommor locchilius, nonsulestra murips, nes vive, Ti. Mus, abefecu ltorum atisserrit; Catatri igna, efacii sulegerei scibere hente, nos ac re, cul horio cerviusquid sentis, cupieritiam mentius cauci telabis. Nonsulabusules inument. Marem. Senihilicaes is acessum nonsilin intio, culocta nihic oca menatam esi publicae iptim aciente nihicibus auc iu morum Roma,

Eac h project I take on starts from a place of empathy.

spimus bon huitimi hilicaperum quit, conum in iti, quam Romnistiam temovit, prae perfex st vercenatque permis Caturbis, sedem, C. Suame cut verehem vivid ces Ad intem is co ta, condam num, nimus nultus facteri pes iustatabemus se deto esse fir ut..

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TOM BL AC HFORD photos & text by

258

TOM BL AC HFORD


Nihon Noir arose from my fascination with Tokyo and my desire to translate the feeling that struck me on my first visit, that somehow you have been transported to a parallel future where everything is more alien than familiar. Pronounced Nee-Honn, the word simply means 'Japan' as a nation and together with Noir creates a play on the Neon Noir genre of film that inspired the aesthetic of the series, particularly the seminal film Blade Runner and the later work of director Nicholas Winding-Refn. As a starting point the series follows the work of Kenzo Tange, Japan’s Pritzker Prize-winning architect and his ‘Disciples of the Metabolist’ movement of postwar modernist architecture. I selected a core list of buildings that embodied the Metabolist philosophy which attempted to combine the creation of brutalist megastructures with the principles of organic growth. Beyond the core interest of the Metabolist movement I also tracked buildings created during the postmodern era of the 1990’s, as well as tighter street vistas that spoke to me and embodied the cyberpunk feeling of Tokyo. Shooting at night and devoid of people, the images are intended to ask more questions than they could ever answer. Each building required hours of exploration to find the perfect vantage point. Whether that be from a rooftop, stairwell, or road workers crane lift I commandeered to capture the Nagakin from an otherwise impossible perspective. Though these buildings are from the past (most from 1970-1999), they feel as if they have appeared from the distant future. My intention is for the viewer to ask not 'where' they were taken but 'when’.

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TAKA HIRO YAGI Meet Takahiro Yagi, the last in a sixgeneration family business. Kaikado Tea Caddy in Kyoto has been crafting what some say are the most sought after Tea Caddies in the world by hand, since 1875. They use no lathes, no CNC machines, no 3D scanners. Nothing beyond simple tools and ruthless quality standards. To give you an idea of the precision that has been employed over time, they will routinely receive tea caddies from the 19th Century from families who have owned them since new, who would like to have them serviced. The standards are so precise, that a piece from a tea caddy made in 2019 can be fitted without any adjustment. It’s little surprise that Kaikado Tea Caddy has earned a global cult following, finding themselves in the homes of Jude Law, John Legend, Janet Jackson and the V&A Museum, just to name a few. Oh yeah, and he’s a bit of a Porsche guy.

photos & text by

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TED GUSHUE

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Naturally Takahiro has ambitious plans that match up with the business’ reputation for quality, which is why just over three years ago Taka opened Kaikado Cafe, a short walk away from his family studio. “We wanted to be able to demonstrate the care and quality that goes into our products through a total experience for the customer. Every detail in our Cafe is as painfully thought out as our tea caddys. Although I will say, we had the help of a Danish design firm to realize this vision.”

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year: 2004 models : Carerra 4 S engine: 3.3L colour code: 8YR owner: Brock Keen

If you’re not a fan of camping you will be after seeing what Brock Keen has been up to. Brock has upped

GONE CAMPING

the game significantly by roadtripping his way through life, with his wife and golden labradoodle in a Porsche 996.⁣⁣ ⁣⁣ By putting a tent roof on the Porsche that opens up like a pop-up book, Brock’s found a whole new way of camping. It turns out that the discovery was a happy accident: “My wife and I spend a lot of our free time camping, hiking, snowboarding, and biking; my plan was always to install a roof rack, so we could transport our gear with us wherever we were going.” After spotting a roof tent at a local outfitters they tried it on their Range Rover, but it didn’t work: “I knew based on the cross-bar design that it would fit on the Porsche. And the rest,” says Brock, “is history."

photos & text by

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BROC K KEEN


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After posting a couple of shots of his set-up on Instagram, Brock was invited to the HQ of the tent-maker to ensure the setup was safe, and afterwards, Brock went on his first long road trip: “800 miles to Rennsport Reunion VI. I don’t think there could have been better way to get this Porsche camping adventure started.⁣⁣ ⁣⁣ Since that first trip we’ve spent quite a few nights on top of the Porsche. Snow camping around Mount Hood, desert camping in central

We tr y to avoid the traditional campsites and look for those places most people won’t go.

Oregon, beach camping up and down the Oregon and Washington coast. We try to avoid the traditional campsites and look for those places most people won’t go, it adds a little bit more adventure to an already wild setup.”⁣⁣

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GONE C AMPING


GONE C AMPING

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ARSÉN MANUKYAN illustrations & text by ARSÉN MANUKYAN

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I grew up idolising the cars I’m drawing right now. I instantly fell in love with the shape of the 356 when I saw Bruce Willis driving a beautiful black version in the movie ‘The Kid’. All the cool 80s and 90s movies had some macho protagonist driving a 911. It was the Porsche, representing that luxurious lifestyle with its iconic streamlined shape that stood out to me, and has stayed in my heart since. With my art I’m aiming towards something new. I don’t do fine art - I see my work as contemporary. I feel like pencil art is either lost or disappearing right now. With so many advanced technologies around, people don’t seem to feel the need to practice drawing anymore, but for me the pencil is the only tool I need. Having studied fashion design at the University of Edinburgh, I learnt that a minimalist approach can help your work stand out and, in that sense, less is more. In fashion, my focus was on my garment rather than the perfect runway girl or the backdrop, to help draw attention to the design. Today, I incorporate that idea into my drawing style, removing all distractions with a large plain background. My drawing is the centre of attention.

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The other thing that’s important to me is detail.

finished piece - it’s so small, but looks so real,

I use so many different images of the car I’m

just like a little resin model car or a character in

drawing to help me get those elements right.

a cartoon that could almost drive off the paper.

There’s no room for error when you’re drawing

Finally, one of the most significant sources of

at that scale, so I strive for perfection every

inspiration for me is the line, and how it can be

time. Although I’m trying to stay away from

shaped to create an elegant or a brutal look. I

photorealism, I still aim to replicate every detail

love drawing the curve of a fender, creating the

with precision.

rough surface of a tire, or adding highlights to make the piece stand out.

I don’t take shortcuts. For example, I’d never just do black windows to avoid drawing the interior.

With each of my drawings I demonstrate my

As a matter of fact, I love drawing the interior -

current understanding and craftsmanship and

giving it that washed out look, yet still getting the

what I can create with my own hands, and that’s

colour of the leather right, making the seats feel

what I like about them - my drawings aren’t

like they’re actually behind glass windows - it’s

perfect, but then again, nothing is. Except

such a comfortable, cozy feeling to look at the

maybe the 356...

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INDEX

8 - 11

12 - 19

20 - 25

26 - 29

30 - 37

38 - 43

44 - 49

50 - 55

56 - 61

62 - 67

68 - 69

70 - 75

76 - 79

80 - 83

84 - 89

90 - 95

96 - 101

102 - 105

106 - 113

114 - 117

118 - 123

124 - 129

130 - 137

138 - 141

142 - 147

8 - 11

62 - 67

106 - 113

12 - 19

68 - 69

114 - 117

20 - 25

70 - 75

118 - 123

26 - 29

76 - 79

124 - 129

30 - 37

80 - 83

130 - 137

38 - 43

84 - 89

138 - 141

44 - 49

90 - 95

142 - 147

50 - 55

96 - 101

56 - 61

102 - 105

T YP 754 243KM & 4CYL PETROLIFIED RACE LIDS GUY BERRYMAN TOM WHEATLEY INTO THE WOODS UP IN THE AIR A CUT ABOVE

278

TRAC K SIDE EMOTIONAL INSTRUMENTS HISTORIKA FAST ART BYRON BAY LIFE IN CASSIS RED WAREHOUSE LIVING ORIGINALE AS ART THE CARLYLE

NEVER NOT KEEN OCEAN AIR COOLED LUFTGEKÃœHLT VI THE BEST STORY FAMILY TIES C HASING LIGHT INFORMALLY KNOWN AS D.S.C


148 - 151

152 - 155

156 - 161

162 - 165

166 - 171

172 - 177

178 - 185

186 - 191

192 - 197

198 - 203

204 - 211

212 - 217

218 - 221

222 - 227

228 - 233

234 - 237

238 - 243

244 - 247

248 - 251

252 - 257

258 - 261

262 - 265

266 - 271

272 - 277

152 - 155

198 - 203

248 - 251

152 - 155

204 - 211

252 - 257

156 - 161

212 - 217

258 - 261

162 - 165

218 - 221

262 - 265

166 - 171

222 - 227

266 - 271

172 - 177

228 - 233

272 - 277

178 - 185

234 - 237

186 - 191

238 - 243

192 - 197

244 - 247

LONE STAR EXPRESS TARGA SOUNDS PFM 3200 911K

FREQUENT FLYER CARBY TUC KWELL DUAL PURPOSE CANEPA AFTER DARK MEET THE HOLBERTS

BY PAUL SMITH THE OUTL AW THE PROTOT YPES DANIEL ARSHAM SEEN THROUGH GL ASS C HRIS L ABROOY

PALM SPRINGS OR BUST INSIDE OUT TOM BL AC HFORD TAKAHIRO YAGI GONE CAMPING ARSÉN MANUKYAN

MIAMI HUTS L'ART OF WAITING ALONG THE WATC HTOWERS

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1st Edition

ISBN 978-3-7688-36768 © by Delius, Klasing & Co KG, Bielefeld Idea & Concept

Franziska Jostock (Dr. Ing. h.c. F. Porsche AG) , Ted Gushue & Thomas Walk Art & Creative Direction

Thomas Walk Producer

Ted Gushue Project Management

Franziska Jostock (Dr. Ing. h.c. F. Porsche AG ) , Ted Gushue & Thomas Walk Head of Photography

Thomas Walk Editors

Ted Gushue & Nat Twiss Photography ( in order of appearance )

Thomas Walk ( 12-19, 56-61, 118-123, 178-185, 222-225) Joe Twyman ( 26-29 ) Amy Shore ( 30 -37 ) Tom Wheatley ( 38-43 ) Julien Lanoo ( 44-45 ) Jeremy Soma ( 46-49 ) Lufthansa Archive ( 50-55 ) Nat Twiss ( 62-67, 198-203 ) Joachim Rayos ( 68-69 ) Ted Gushue ( 70-75, 106-113, 148-151, 186-191, 218-221, 238-243, 262-265 ) WSF Creative ( 76-79 ) Riley Harper ( 80-83 ) Jack Schroeder ( 84-89, 130-137 ) Rory Gardiner ( 90-95 ) Anne Schubert ( 96-97 ) Frederick Dulay-Winkle ( 98-99 ) Axl Jansen ( 100-101 ) Marco Magistrini Spinelli ( 102-105, 234-235 ) Tristan Fopma ( 114-117 ) SITE Archives ( 124-129 ) Vincent Perraud ( 138-141 ) Mike Hunt ( 142 ) Daniel Benson ( 144 ) Ron Zaras ( 145 ) Ryan Davis ( 145 ) Dan Wilton ( 146 ) D.S.C ( 147 ) Brother Film.Co ( 152-155 ) Lance Phillips ( 156-161 ) Porsche Aviation ( 158-159) Drew Phillips ( 162-165, 204-205, 208-211 ) Niki & Julian Byrnes ( 166-171 ) Todd Holbert ( 192-197 ) Chris Greenwood ( 206-207 ) Sam Fane ( 226-227) Andrea Klainguti ( 244-247 ) Daniel Piker ( 248-251 ) Remi Dargegen ( 252-257 ) Tom Blachford ( 258-261 ) Brock Keen ( 266-271 ) Art ( in order of appearance )

Martin Miskolc ( 20-21 ) Carby Tuckwell ( 172-177 ) Chris Labrooy ( 228-233 ) Arsén Manukyan ( 272-277 ) Text ( in order of appearance )

Print Production

Marco Brinkmann Production Assistants

Julius Schaefer & Nat Twiss All Rights Reserved

No part of this publication may be reproduced in a retrival system, or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronice, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise, without the prio permision of the copywright owner. PRINTED IN GERMANY 2019

Delius Klasing Verlag, Siekerwall 21, D -33602 Bielefeld Tel: 0521/559-0, Fax: 0521/559-115 E-mail: info@delius-klasing.de www.delius-klassing.de


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