Page 31

1. It teaches us that practicing worship takes time. Each time we read “evening passed and morning came,” it reflects God’s dedication to time. Though He was both inventor and comptroller of time, He allows Himself to work within its limitations. He completed Creation within the constraints of days, six of them, and at the conclusion of each of these, evening passed; then morning came. With the lights that He set in the sky, God established times—days, nights, years, seasons—because He knew that our lives would be constrained by time. Ecclesiastes 3:1–8 says:

To everything there is a season, A time for every purpose under heaven: A time to be born, And a time to die; A time to plant, And a time to pluck what is planted; A time to kill, And a time to heal . . . (NKJV)

And a lot of other “times to” as well. For God, there was a time to create. And though He could have shaped all that exists in one celestial swoop, He chose to express His creative genius over a series of days, a span of time. He took His time fashioning all the aspects of the universe, visible and invisible, that He knew we would enjoy. In turn, if we are to worship Him in a manner that He enjoys, we need to take our time: we must walk away from the busyness of life and spend time with God.

30

Called to Worship  

An exploration of worship in the Scriptures, Dr. Whaley's new book is a resourceful tool for ministry professionals, as well as seminary stu...

Called to Worship  

An exploration of worship in the Scriptures, Dr. Whaley's new book is a resourceful tool for ministry professionals, as well as seminary stu...

Advertisement