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Cyclist Network

A system created for city cycling


Cyclist Network

Wayfinding System

Preface This book details my proposed cyclist wayfinding system for the city of Bristol. The idea is that, once fully functioning, the system could then be used in other cities across the UK. Each city is different therefore the system would change accordingly. The book also gives an insight into the thought process behind its development and how it was driven by consulting cyclists of various abilities and needs. My aim was to let cyclists themselves drive the creation of the system. This strategy was used because I felt that current bicycle lanes and signs are somewhat bureaucratic and are not based on a full understanding of the community for which they are intended.

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Cyclist Network

Wayfinding System

Contents Research - The Existing System

5

- Data Gathering

10

- Interviews

12

- My Journey

19

Development - The Signage System

27

- Traffic

28

- Hills

30

- Bicycle Lanes

32

- Hubs

36

- Marking Routes

38

- Strategy

44

- Street Signs

46

- Mobile Devices

48

- Acknowledgements

52

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Cyclist Network

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Wayfinding System


Research

Wayfinding System

The Existing System Due to its simplicity the existing system works reasonably well and can be universally understood. Unfortunately this also means that it lacks the ability to distinguish between different skill levels of individual cyclists. This lack of personality means the system is unable to add to a cyclists experience other than simply informing them of where to be on the road, or with whom they are sharing it (ie. buses, motorists or pedestrians). Due to its simplicity as well as the fact that it is nationally understood, my aim was to use the current system as the foundation that I would improve upon. It would be pointless to scrap something that is already in place and more or less achieving its intended job. The ideal situation would be to provide additional tools that enhance its performance.

BY ENGAGING WITH THIS SYSTEM IT IS POSSIBLE TO HIGHLIGHT AREAS WHERE IMPROVEMENTS OR ADDITIONS COULD BE MADE.

Cheltenham Road – Cycle lane (left)

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Cyclist Network

Wayfinding System

These signs represent an overview of the system that cyclists are currently accustomed to. They have been created so that they can be understood by a variety of users and therefore speak a language that only needs a basic understanding. ‘You should be here’ or ‘you will encounter these or them’ is all it is attempting to communicate. Because of this it merely informs riders of how they should use systems which were created, mostly, for other modes of travel. Often cycle routes within cities are an adaptation or reclamation of a system created for either pedestrians or motorists. This cannot be changed because of the limited space a modern city has available.

– Cycle Path

— Cycle and pedestrian path

Central Bristol – Singn for cyclist and bus lane (right)

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Cyclist Network

Wayfinding System

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Cyclist Network

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Wayfinding System


Research

The Existing System

Bristol became the UK’s first Cycle City in 2008 and was awarded £22m. This has been used to create a system that spans across vast areas of the city. In total 28 miles of tracks and lanes were added or improved. These are often placed on the busiest streets in order to improve safety and encourage people away from using their motor vehicles and onto their bicycles. This is obviously a good idea but it has also had some negative effects on the more experienced cyclist. Now, rather than having the freedom of the streets they are forced into a situation that drifts between the world of the road users and that of the pedestrian. This difference in ability level is something that the current system cannot take into account and therefore is an area that can be improved.

Temple Way – Pedestriand stroll along cycle path. (left) Bristol City Centre – Cycle path running through the centre of a busy street. (right)

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Cyclist Network

Wayfinding System

Data Gathering The idea was to interact with a diverse range of cyclists, with a range of varying tasks, in order to generate solutions that would benefit them all. The first method I undertook was to create the cycle survey, asking a limited number of questions that would help me gain a basic understanding of how individuals approached city cycling. It soon became evident that there was a small range of distinct categories that people fell into. Generally speaking people would either highlight areas of danger or areas of speed. This gave me an insight into the different ways that cyclists interact with the city environment. It showed that they had a range of needs that are not addressed by the systems currently in place. I now knew that it was important to attempt to provide an in-depth layer of information that identified the problems and benefits of individual routes.

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Research

Data Gathering

Interviews

As the surveys were such a success I decided to take this method of primary research further. I conducted a range of interviews with carefully selected individuals that I felt would have widely differing opinions of city cycling. These are included on the following pages.

Cyclist Survey – These were handed to cyclists around the city. The results gave me an informed view of how they felt about city cycling. (Center)

The Maps – Participants were asked to draw a map of the route they use most frequently. The results from this proved to be some of the most interesting information i gathered. (Center)

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Cyclist Network

Wayfinding System

Sophie

– Professional

I mainly ride my bike from my house on Leighton Road to university. So basically I turn down Raleigh Road, on to North Street, then left down Ashton Road, go through the underpass and that’s basically it. I think it’s probably the safest route, If I could have it my way I would avoid the roads completely. I get pretty scared when I see a massive lorry coming up behind me, I get right over to the side so they can go past.

I think it’s probably the safest route, If I could have it my way I would avoid the roads completely. I don’t wear a helmet, which I probably should do but I think they make you look stupid. I don’t tend to ride in the centre of the city because I don’t think there are enough cycle lanes really and what put me off is because the day I got my bike I saw this guy come up to the roundabout

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and a car came up and missed him by a centimetre. I had been thinking about how my I wanted to improve my confidence and then I saw that. I was like fuck it. But then getting the bus is so expensive, I should probably come to terms with riding on main roads. I don’t like to ride at night either, I’ve got a light but I still don’t feel very safe. If I do ride at night I will be on the pavement as much as I can although I do realize that it’s not good for pedestrians. At the same time as worrying a lot I do like the positive aspects of cycling. It does cut down time and is cost effective; you also get some exercise as well. There’s other things you have to subconsciously do on a bike, like when you come up to a junction you’re trying to make eye contact with motorists so they know exactly what you’re doing. Obviously if you’re going straight ahead you have to just wait I guess, until they


Research

Data Gathering

can see you. I try and use hand signals as well but I get a bit worried that I’m going to lose my balance and fall off. I’m quite clumsy which is why cycling is bad as well. I fell off my bike recently, which was quite embarrassing. I skidded on the metal bit of the curb and came off. So now I’m constantly worried I’m gonna fall off. I try and obey the law when I’m riding, I’ll use cycle lanes and follow signs. In fact they just put some cycle lanes on the way up to Bower Ashton, which is good. Things like that definitely helped with the confidence side of things a bit. Its like designated safety.

I’d be more inclined to wear it. My mum constantly lectures me about safety and people who’ve had brain hemorrhages that she knows that have fallen off bikes but I still don’t wear a helmet. Yeah, so, I never ride through town because it’s too busy, I would never go down Park Street because it’s too steep and busy. I think I’d be fine but it’s like a stigma that I have in my head telling me I can’t do it. I over think things and my mind get’s the better of me really.

I’ve never really looked at any maps of the city, I guess you just kind of work it out for yourself. It would probably be quite helpful actually. I’m often prevented from doing things I want to do because busses are so expensive and walking takes too long whereas if I could see a cycle map to somewhere I wanted to go and I knew it had cycle lanes then I would do it. If you’re just cycling around you may not ever come across one.

If I could see a cycle map to somewhere I wanted to go and I knew it had cycle lanes then I would do it. Another thing about cycling is that you have to wear particular cloths so you don’t flash anyone. It’s a bit off point but I think if someone designed a cool helmet then

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Cyclist Network

Wayfinding System

Jez –

Teacher

I think one of the biggest problems for me when cycling is getting the bicycle to Bristol itself. I don’t live in Bristol but I like to cycle and when I have taken the bicycle on the train, I’m often regarded by the other passengers as a real nuisance, because I’m taking up so much space especially on a commuter train when its packed to the gunnels and we’re like sardines, and so its kinda frowned upon. I can understand it but what can you do, there’s a pay off balance. Getting through the station is relatively easy, you walk your bicycle through, there’s a lot of people who store the bicycles at the station but I’ve always had security concerns with that. Getting out of the station you’re already thinking five minuets ahead on your journey plan, how you’re going to navigate road crossings, how your’re going to navigate junctions. A concern is obviously how many pedestrians will be on the pavement because some of the roads I certainly would not cycle on.

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It’s not worth your while and even when the police see you they turn a blind eye because they understand the situation. They themselves probably wouldn’t fancy cycling on that road either.

Getting out the station your already thinking five minuets ahead on your journey plan, how you’re going to navigate road crossings, how you’re going to navigate junctions. Why I do cycle in the city, and I really do enjoy it, is that you kinda pick up the beat of the city on that particular day. I know that sounds really cheesy, but every day the city has a different feel about it, it’s partly to do with the weather and way that people behave in reaction to it. If I have time I like to take a scenic route along the river and I’ll choose one side or the other. But I tend to cycle between Temple Meads and Bower Ashton and the route


Research

Data Gathering

can vary quite a bit. If I’m feeling that I’ve got a little bit more time I might cycle up through Bedminster. You get to see a lot more, it’s not just being pre occupied about where you’re going or things that you might collide with but also the people you see.

If I’m feeling that I’ve got a little bit more time I might cycle up through Bedminster. I tend to see a lot of ex students, you can say hello in the mornings. You do feel part of the community on a bicycle, which you don’t feel with many other forms of transport. I don’t get into conversations with people so I still very much stay on track. If I was walking i’d have to stop and have those, perhaps uncomfortable moments with people, trying to remember their names, who they were, last conversation I had with them and all those sorts of things that come up in that interpersonal moment. Even if you know them rather well its always slightly awkward if you haven’t seen them for some time or your paths in life are very different. With a bicycle you don’t have that. You can say hello to people and its left at that, very pleasant.

in any shape, way or form. I enjoy the preoccupation of cycling. Even though your thinking about other things you certainly are concentrating on the one thing that you are doing at the moment, you can’t just let yourself go. Walking you can, it’s very unlikely your gonna fall off your feet as you walk along when with a bicycle it could happen at any given moment. Certain places have different dynamics. Coming up the river towards Bower Ashton there’s a picket fence with sharp points on the side of it, there’s some sort of formed engineering brick that they have. It’s flat, long, full of runners and you’re also conscious of this spiked fence and that kind of detracts a little bit from the experience. It’s always at the back of your mind that it’s just about eye height if you were about to fall over. The sound the bicycle makes also attaches you to the experience. So for me I feel connected to the city in a very different way on a bicycle.

You do encounter problems such as road surfaces, dog poo, you think about things that are going to walk out in front of you, like small kiddies, you think about all the previous accidents you have had and not wanting to revisit any one of them

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Wayfinding System

Alex – Student

The main route I take is from my house in Bedminster to Stokes Croft. It’s generally to got to the Bell (pub) to meet up with some mates or I’ll bike round to another friend’s house back where I used to live (same area). I generally ride at night or early in the morning. It’s hectic, not for enjoyment, get there as quick as I possibly can, just boost! I’ve only got one light and it’s at the back so the motto is I’ve got a light at the back so just boost!

It’s hectic, not for enjoyment, get there quick as I possibly can, just boost! At the start of my journey I have to cross over the bridge, where I sometimes get a bit pissed off with the people that are walking in the bike lane. It’s quite visibly identifiable as a bike route yet still people walk on the wrong side. I haven’t got a bell so I always shout ‘Excuse me’ but in a poignant way so they get out my

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way. Then I cruise past Bush House. I see it as three stages, there’s the first stage which is like the ‘get out of Bedminster stage’ that’s to the bridge. Then you’ve got the second stage ‘the inner city track’ which is from the bridge to the fountains. I always miss out or go on to the fountains because I don’t want to go on that massive roundabout. That’s just crazy, you’ve got buses, cars and pedestrians, and so I just go onto the really flat nice smooth bit. I just sort of weave through, if no one is there you can get some really nice pace. Then I cut across down straight all the way to Stoke’s Croft. Get in the bus lane, no cars. Head down, stand up, and bike as fast as you can. That’s the end of stage two and then you get to the bus station which is like the up hill course, that’s what I like to call it. You go up round past the coach station, up the back of Jamaica Street and just boost the rest of the way. I can probably get there in


Research

Data Gathering

twelve minuets. The way I go is illegal but it means I can avoid the bear pit and the roundabout. I go up past the taxi rank. It’s a leap of faith going up there. I make sure I have my hands on both brakes.

I don’t want to go on that massive roundabout. That’s just crazy, you’ve got buses, cars and pedestrians On the way back it’s more down hill so I can pick up a lot of momentum. It’s pretty much down hill the whole way apart from when you get to Bedminster. On the way back it’s a nice ride, I generally do that in the morning if I’ve stayed at my mate’s. I always have something ready in my head in rush hour, something like ‘there’s cyclist’s on this road as well’ or if it’s pedestrians ‘observation!’ that’s a good one if people are sort of meandering around not knowing what they’re doing.

I often take routes I shouldn’t and if the police pulled me over I would just say ‘well I’m not riding my bike on that roundabout, it’s too dangerous!’ If they had a map that highlighted where they’d spent money on cycle routes then I’d would be more inclined to take them. As for the bike lanes, if there is one, the motorists don’t care. Often they’re covered in glass anyway so I just ride in the middle of the road, which I’m not supposed to. I’ve already had loads of punctures so I’m not going to stay where I’m supposed to and fuck up my bike! I’ve lived in Bristol for three years now and I know which road’s are busy, It’s best to avoid the city center for instance. It would have been good if there was someone to tell me that when I first arrived!

That’s the problem with the bike lanes, you often have to share them with pedestrians, that’s generally pretty bad when you’re going through the centre of town. The Bristol to Bath cycle lane is fine but generally inner city is not that great. I can’t really see where all the money’s gone, its fine to have cycle paths but they should have made maps showing where they are. They could have put them at bus stops so you can stop off and think, ok, I need to cycle from here to here what’s the best way of doing it.

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Cyclist Network

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Wayfinding System


Research

My Journey Home

– First Floor Flat 72 Hampton Park Bristol BS6

University

– Kennel Lodge Road Bower Ashton Bristol BS3 2JT

This data prompted me to task myself with detailing my most common cycle route. The aim was to highlight areas that could prove difficult for other users. I myself have been riding bicycles on a regular basis for many years and would therefore consider myself to be a proficient cyclist. By doing this I hoped to understand what I would wish to be improved but also what other skill levels of cyclist would benefit from.

Start Point – Hampton Park (left)

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Cyclist Network

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Wayfinding System


Research

My Journey

Whiteladies Junction

Cotham Hill / Whiteladies Rd

This junction meets a large road that leads directly into the city centre and is an obvious route if you’re heading in from north of Bristol. It has a Zebra crossing as well as two sets of lights. It is a frequently used bus route. There is also a large supermarket in the shopping centre on this junction as well as other amenities such as cafes and bars. This means that there is also a large amount of pedestrians that interact with the space at all hours of the day.

Approaching Whiteladies junction – This junction is busy all day long. (above)

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Cyclist Network

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Wayfinding System


Research

My Journey

Clifton Suspension Bridge

Crossing

At certain times of the day the Suspension Bridge can get highly congested. You can also feel rushed because cars build up behind you as they cannot overtake. This could be very stressful for an unconfident cyclist and it may be better for them to use the footpath.

Approaching the bridge – There is often a que of cars and you often have to stop and wait. (top right)

Crossing the bridge – Can be stressfull. (bottom)

Navigating the cycle path – Could easily be missed and lead to an embarising situation. (top left)

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Cyclist Network

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Wayfinding System


Research

My Journey

Burwalls Road Bridge Rd – Burwalls Rd

This is the most dangerous part of my journey to university. After crossing the Suspension Bridge you reach the turning for Burwells Road. At a glance it may seem that it’s a road that gets little useage when infact at certain times of the day it becomes very busy.

Burwalls Rd – Rownham Hill

For me it is also the most enjoyable part of my journey and I often attempt to race down it without using my brakes. This has led to some close shaves and had I been warned that there are hazards I would have treated it with more caution.

There is a section half way down the hill where the road joins another. This road is constantly busy and arrives suddenly after a blind corner. Safety could be improved if warnings were provided.

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Cyclist Network

Wayfinding System

The Signage System After analyzing the information gathered I found that common themes were often highlighted. There seemed to be a divide between cyclists that revolves around confidence and skill. There was also a desire to use the system already in place. In my research there was often comment about the shortcomings of the current city cycle system. In response to this I realized that my proposal should incorporate a method the included cycle lanes and routes that benefited cyclists. It is worth noting that this system has been created for Bristol and that alterations would be made in order to deem it appropriate for a different area.

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Cyclist Network

Wayfinding System

Traffic

This symbol, based on the wheel of a bike and the face of a clock, will be used to represent how busy a route is. The less complete the circumference of a circle, the less busy a road. For example, a route leading through the suburbs will more than likely be allocated with a quarter circle as the majority of traffic will follow main roads, whereas a route that runs through the centre of the city will most probably be busy all day long so will receive a full circle. The half circle should be used on roads that experience large amounts of traffic only at rush hour. This could be due to the route being used for school runs or by people on their way to work. St Augustine’s Parade – Often congested with traffic. (right)

This symbol would prove useful to all cyclists. The less confident or more safety conscious would be able to avoid the route and select another. On the other hand someone who knew they would be in a hurry could decide that they would take the route but be slightly more alert. This would also help newcomers to the city for similar reasons.

- Not often busy

- Busy at points in the day

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- Constantly busy


Systen Development

The Signage System

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Cyclist Network

Wayfinding System

Hills

When cycling in Bristol you encounter many hills, so this symbol would only work in cities with similar geography. It works in a basic manner much like that of the system already used nationwide on roads across Britain. The aim of this symbol is to give cyclists the option of selecting in advance a route with a shallow or steep incline. This would be helpful as some cyclists may wish to avoid riding up or cycling down steep hills whereas others may wish to select those routes for exercise or exhilaration. Like the signs we are accustomed to they read from left to right and the numbers rate how steep the hills are. 1. being shallow and 3. being steep. If there are no hills then this symbol need not be applied and if there are both inclines and declines then the symbols (bottom right) will be allocated.

- Down Hill

1.

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2.

3.


Systen Development

The Signage System

- Up Hill

1.

2.

3.

When cycling in Bristol you encounter many hills, so the use of this symbol would only work in cities with similar geography. It works in a basic manner much like that of the system already used nationwide on roads across Britain.

- Both, Predominantly declines

1.

- Both, Predominantly inclines

3.

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Cyclist Network

Wayfinding System

Bicycle Lanes

This element is used to specify cycle lanes. I felt it was important to incorporate cycle lanes as it was evident in my research that many cyclist relied on them or felt that they improved the city cycling experience. For this element of the signage system 1. Means that the majority of the route has a cycle path whereas a 3. signifies that there are few to no cycle paths on that particular route. This should be useful in conjunction with the first element, as a road could be busy but that may not necessarily be a problem if the cyclist is aware that they will be able to ride on a safe cycle path for the majority of the journey.

Simple – Most of all of the route has cycle lanes and signs.

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Challenging – The mre challenging sections of the route have cycle lanes and signs

Hard – Little to no cycle paths or signage.


Systen Development

The Signage System

Baldwin Street – Marked well with cycle lanes. (right) Temple Way – Cycle underpass. (following Page)

Altough the centre of town is constantly busy there are many routes through it that include cycle lanes. This means that someone who was less confident on a bike and would often avoid busy roads would be more inclined to take the route.

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Cyclist Network

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System Development

The Signage System

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Cyclist Network

Wayfinding System

Hubs In order to analyze the diversity of routes available, I felt it was important to highlight a range of start and finish point of journeys. This led me to selecting main hubs in Bristol. These areas were selected because of the fact that they tent to attract people due to the facilities and amenities they offer. These places are therefore idea for providing a space dedicated to cyclists providing help and information.

Gloucester Road

1

Whiteladies

2

Stokes Croft

3

Broadmead

4

Park Street

5

Clifton

6

Bower Ashton

7

Southville

8

Bedminster

9

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System Development

Hubs

1

2

3

4 5

6

9 7

8

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Cyclist Network

Wayfinding System

Marking Routes By linking up the hubs it becomes possible to demonstrate how the system could help differnt cyclists. In this map I have selected 3 different routes from hub 2 to hub 4.

1 Via Stokes Croft – The longest route Sections of this route are busy in rush hour. There are hills but they have a very shallow incline. This route should be stress free but unadvised at night.

2 Via Park Street – The most direct route. Although it is constantly busy and is one of the main routes into the centre of bristol a large amout of the journey will be on cycle paths

3 Via the Hospital – Most direct (as the crow flies). If you didnt know Bristol then this would look like the fastest route, and it possibly is but you would need to be very proficient and have a decent bicycle in order for it to be worth it.

Due to the fact that maps are often flat they can deceive the viewer into thinking an unsuitable route is the correct option. This system hopes to aid cyclists in their decision making. Note: This information only aplies for hub 2 to hub 4. It will be totally different on the way back.

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1

2

3

4 2


Cyclist Network

Wayfinding System

Via Stokes Croft Here is a demonstration of which symbols would be selected for this route and why.

Traffic The majority of this route is on quiet backstreets but the final straight does include stokes croft, a road that can be busy at rush hour. Although this is only for a small amount of the journey it means that the route receives a half circle telling cyclists that it can be fairly busy at times. This route is down hill for most of the way

Hills but at no point does it become steep. It therefore receives the down hill symbol with a grade of 1.

Cycle Lanes There are only a few cycle lanes on this route. This is due to the majority of the roads being fairly quiet. There is, however, cycle lanes along Stokes Croft meaning it receives a 2.

1.

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1

2

4


Cyclist Network

Wayfinding System

Via the Hospital This route is far more challenging.

Traffic For the most part of the journey the roads are fairly quiet but then, at about half way, it hits two very large junctions, one of which is on a blind corer. Because of this it receives a full circle.

Hills This route switches between steep up hills and dangerous down hills.

Cycle Lanes There are no cycle lanes at any point on this route meaning its graded as 3.

3.

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2

3

4

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Cyclist Network

Wayfinding System

Strategy For a wayfinding system to function correctly it has to be deployed in the correct manner. So the intended audience will understand it and consume information easily it should speak in a language they understand. Because of this I have attempted to create a method of designation that allows cyclists to decide firstly which routes to highlight and secondly how busy, steep or safe they are. The idea is that the hubs would be the starting points that are built upon. For instance, with hubs 2 and 4 I selected the three main routes that could get you from one to the other. I was then able to break down the attributes of each one and allocate particular symbols to them. This would allow other cyclists to instantly tell which route would suit their individual needs. In order for initial routes to be selected and correctly labeled cyclists ranging in ability and confidence would have to be consulted. By working together they would be able to fairly distribute symbols so that the routes and the way in which they were labeled was consistent. (It’s worth noting that more hubs would need to be added in order to benefit the entire city).

After this stage had been completed the system could be rolled out across the city. The hubs would be put in place and would include a fixed map showing a range of routes leading to other hubs. It would also include a detailed map of the immediate surroundings in order to provide cyclist with a deeper understanding of the area. This detailed map would include places of interest such as cafes and cycle shops. There would also be a safe, sheltered area to lock up bikes. This system would work best if it were electronic. This would

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System Development

Stratergy

allow for constant updates as roads change or were made more cyclist friendly. It would also provide people with an opportunity to share information or add a route that they felt was an improvement on what had already been suggested. This could then be something that acted in much the same way as a social networking site. Individuals would be able to sign up and add information to a master map; this information could then — Hub design Below is a basic idea of what an electronic information point could look like. They would include: - Details of routes. - An insight into the immediate area.

2

- An opportunity to log in and add information. - Information about upcoming events. - Safety information aimed at cyclists.

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Cyclist Network

Wayfinding System

—

Street Signs Once a cyclist has selected a route from an information point they will then need signs to inform them they are going in the correct direction. I propose that these signs do not differ dramatically from road signs that are already in place. They should simply use a different colour or be placed in areas that have not yet been cluttered with street signs.

The colour used on the signs should be bright and vibrant so it can be seen at a glance.

2/4

This would be used to inform cyclists of which route the sign belonged to. ie. hub 2 to hub 4.

Like many road signs reflective material should be used so they attract attention at night.

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System Development

Stratergy

Sign placement

Road Signs – Often on corners of roads where cars cannot park making them relatively easy to see. (top left)

Street Lights – Tall, making them easy to see. Often placed on junctions. (top right) Cycle Lanes – Ideal for obvious reasons. (bottom)

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Cyclist Network

Wayfinding System

Mobile Devices The App This app would alow cyclists to update maps and share information with others about roadworks and hazzards such as glass.

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System Development

Wayfinding System

It would also mean that cyclists would be able to consult the system wherever they were. Due to technological advances this could also include GPS in the future.

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The aim of the wayfinding system is to encourage more people to use their bicycles. By highlighting roads and routes that are more suited for cyclists you therefore reduce the chance of accidents and will in turn generate confidence. My initial aim was to create a system that would be beneficial to all cyclists and I feel that this could be achieved. While unconfident cyclists will be able to instantly find the less challenging route others with more confidence will be able to share information about the fastest possible route from A to B. As for the people in the mid scale of ability and confidence the system should provide the individual with the chance to progress. Once they have come to terms with one route they can decide to challenge themselves further. Due to the fact that it works for all different levels of cyclist it should also work to build a stronger community that will look out for one another. The system also provides other advantages. Areas should be able to apply to become a ‘Hub’ by showing what their community has to offer. This would help support local businesses while also contributing to the sense of pride people have for their area. There is however aspects of the system that still need some fine-tuning and this would be achieved through testing.

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Cyclist Network

Wayfinding System

Acknowledgements Thanks to all the cyclists that contributed to the research. A special thanks to Alex, Sophie and Jez for the interviews.

Stock by – GF Smith

Created By – Tom Eves

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Wayfinding System

Cyclist Network  

ISTD entry - Merit

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