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1 0 3 M O U N T S T R E ET

LONDON


APRIL 2015

REGULARS 45 EDITOR’S LETTER 53 VOGUE NOTICES

Behind the scenes of the issue 60 VOGUE.CO.UK

On the website this month 183 NOTEBOOK

“I don’t think we should be put in boxes. All of us aspire to do a lot of different things” “GIRLS ON FILM”, PAGE 190

Fresh looks for April 287 STOCKISTS BACK PAGE A MIND’S EYE

Vogue’s creative director Jaime Perlman shares the objects she loves now

SPY 81 SHOPPING LIST: WHAT TO BUY NOW

East or west? Which direction will you take for fashion inspiration this season? 95 GINGHAM FOR GROWN-UPS

ARTS

Spring’s sartorial square dance

113 GREAT DAME

Actress Kristin Scott Thomas talks to Fiona Golfar about her two elevating new roles 121 STORY BOARD

Violet Henderson’s pick of spring fiction… 122 NEW LEAVES

… and spring fact 126 PUSHING THE ENVELOPE

Ingenious fashion-show invitations of note, and the new book that celebrates them

COVER LOOK 146 EVENT: THE VOGUE FESTIVAL 2015

Let the countdown begin… 151 VIEWPOINT: THE ACCIDENTAL HUSBAND

Novelist Adam Thirlwell on how his low-key marriage had surprising repercussions 155 REPORT: AFTER SHOCK

Following January’s attacks, Paris resident Natasha Fraser-Cavassoni senses new hope in the city of light > 34

128 ROCK LEGENDS

The power of crystals, by Aimée Farrell 99 RING CYCLE

The new breed of signet rings making an impression 102 GEOMETRIC VS FANTASY

Carol Woolton highlights spring’s jewellery divide 105 COVER STORY THE DIVINE NINE

Our hardworking workwear edit

132 FIGHTING TALK

Family arguments around the kitchen table provide rich pickings for playwright Sam Holcroft 139 PROFILE: ALL ABOUT EVE

Tales of groundbreaking photojournalist Eve Arnold, by her friend and biographer Janine di Giovanni

From left: Georgia May Jagger wears tulle dress embroidered with crystals and sequins, to order, Julien Macdonald. Cara Delevingne wears tulle dress embellished with sequins and Swarovski crystals, £3,499, Jenny Packham. Suki Waterhouse wears embroidered silk-tulle dress, £13,9 20, Valentino. Get the look: make-up by Charlotte Tilbury. Eyes: Rock’N’Kohl Bedroom Black Iconic Liquid Eye Pencil; Full Fat Lashes Glossy Black 5-Star Mascara. Skin: Beach Stick in Ibiza. Lips: Kissing Lipstick in Bitch Perfect. Hair: Kérastase Coiffage Couture Powder Bluff. Hair: Sam McKnight. Make-up: Charlotte Tilbury. Nails: Lorraine Griffin. Production: I0-4 Inc. Digital artwork: R&D. Fashion editor: Lucinda Chambers. Photographer: Mario Testino 31


insideVOGUE

APRIL 2015

IN VOGUE 246 THE LIFE OF ART

Fiona Golfar visits gallerists Stefan Ratibor and Kadee Robbins at their art-filled Austrian home. Photographs by François Halard

“Loewe’s magnetic twopiece transforms flyaway fabric swatches into a postmodern masterpiece” “MODERN MASTERS”, PAGE 234

252 THE DATA GAME

Is there a future for wearable technology, asks Lisa Armstrong

161 COVER STORY VINTAGE SHOPPING GUIDE

Seek and ye shall find this season’s key pieces in the most surprising places, says Harriet Walker 169 MARCH ISSUES

History repeats itself: fashion and politics are mixing once more, asserts Harriet Quick 173 HOME AGAIN

Designer Osman Yousefzada weaves stories from his formative years 177 GRANDE DESIGNS

Inside jeweller Aurélie Bidermann’s bohemian Paris apartment. By Fiona Golfar

FEATURES 222 COVER STORY “I WANTED TO CLAIM MY OWN NAME”

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie talks to Erica Wagner about life as an award-winning author and feminist. Portraits by Akintunde Akinleye

256 COVER STORY PARTNERS IN STYLE

“He plays Paul Weller to her Lou Doillon...” Four couples counsel on how to live in sync

FASHION 276 STUDIO PORTRAITS

190 COVER STORY GIRLS ON FILM

Nicola Moulton draws inspiration from make-up artists’ ateliers

“It was a riotous girl gathering,” writes Emily Sheffield of her time on set with Suki, Georgia May and Cara. “Concentrate!” shouts photographer Mario Testino for the umpteenth time

283 NATURE’S WAY?

Are bioidentical hormones the new anti-ageing wonder? Nicole Mowbray investigates

SUBSCRIBETO

206 HAWAII FIVE OH

Ride the wave of summer style with a totally tropical taste. Photographs by Josh Olins

228 FLOWER POWER

234 MODERN MASTERS

Erdem Moralioglu tells Alexandra Shulman about the “very specific woman” who inspires his work. Photographs by Christian MacDonald

For the new season, designers have given fresh meaning to the words artistic licence. Photographs by Zoë Ghertner

34

BEAUTY

265 COVER STORY NEW BEAUTY PHENOMENA

Spring’s biggest beauty buzzes 273 SCENTS AND FEELING

Alexander Vreeland has created a fragrance collection in tribute to his grandmother, Diana, writes Penelope Tree

Turn to page 129 for our fantastic subscription offer PLUS FREE GIFT


The spirit of travel. Download the Louis Vuitton pass app to reveal exclusive content.


The spirit of travel. Download the Louis Vuitton pass app to reveal exclusive content.


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Available at GIVENCHY and select stores worldwide - www.givenchy.com


BELOW: SUKI, GEORGIA MAY AND CARA, PHOTOGRAPHED BY MARIO TESTINO, ON FRIENDSHIP, FUN AND FILMS (PAGE 190). RIGHT: A FIRST GLIMPSE OF SUMMER (PAGE 206), SHOT BY JOSH OLINS. INSET: HORROR AND HOPE IN PARIS (PAGE 155)

A new FRONTIER ast September I was part of a fashion crowd who made a brief dash to Cupertino outside San Francisco (36 hours in and out) to attend the launch of the Apple Watch. It was a surreal experience to cross the globe to sit in a large conference theatre filled with Apple aficionados and Stephen Fry, to hear CEO Tim Cook proselytise about this new addition to the Apple family. The watch is its first step into what the company calls the fashion arena, and the fashion industry is watching this particular space with interest. For “The Data Game” (page 252), Lisa Armstrong was granted access to actually use the watch rather than just look at it (incidentally, Apple Watch is a product surrounded by more embargoes than the Chilcot Inquiry), and has written a great piece on how the wearable-tech scene is stacking up. When Harriet Quick was commissioned to write about fashion and protest (“March Issues”, page 169), we had

MARIO TESTINO; JOSH OLINS; PATRICK DEMARCHELIER; GETTY

L

no idea of the shocking murders that would take place in Paris this past winter. In her piece, she describes the placardbearing model march Karl Lagerfeld brilliantly staged to show his current Chanel collection. It was a scene that would later be echoed by the crowds who took to the streets and gathered in the Place de la République in the aftermath of the shootings, in a show of solidarity that reverberated not only around France but around the world. We asked Paris resident Natasha Fraser-Cavassoni to report on the fashion capital as it reacts to January’s

events, in “After Shock” (page 155). It can be tempting to consider that the frivolous side of fashion is an irrelevance compared with dramatic world events, but it is a temptation worth resisting. Mario Testino photographed the high-spirited party girls – and great friends – Cara Delevingne, Georgia May Jagger and Suki Waterhouse for this month’s cover story (“Girls on Film”, page 190), and I am sure that most people will feel, as I do, that there is a great deal to be said for fashion’s ability to cheer one up.

45


notices All about this month’s issue

ON THE SCENT

California GIRL

This month, Sixties model Penelope Tree, above, samples perfumes inspired by the Vogue editor who launched her career, the inimitable Diana Vreeland (“Scents and Feeling”, page 273). Fragrances can conjure moods and moments in time – so which hold sway over Tree? “Frankincense, coffee, sweet peas and Trumper’s Extract of Limes aftershave, which my father used to wear.”

For her inaugural Vogue shoot, photographer Zoë Ghertner, below, guided the team through the backstreets of Venice Beach for her sun-drenched fashion story in LA (“Modern Masters”, page 234). Although she first fell in love with photography doing black-and-white still-lifes in her high school’s darkroom, Ghertner now looks to the sky: “Sunlight is really important to my work, so living and shooting in Los Angeles is a constant source of inspiration,” explains the 30-year-old, who has devoted her recent art book, Simple Pleasures, to capturing brightly coloured shapes on vibrant backgrounds.

WAVE RIDERS ZOE GHERTNER; JOSH OLINS; PAUL RAFTERY; GETTY

THE LONDON LIBRARY

TOME RAIDER Adam Thirlwell looks back fondly on his fuss-free wedding in Manhattan in “The Accidental Husband” (page 151). Here, the novelist shares the bookshops – and a library – close to his heart: “THE LONDON LIBRARY IN ST JAMES’S SQUARE IN SW1, WITH ITS VAST IRON STACKS” “FOR THE BEST ART BOOKS – THE LIBRAIRIE DES ARCHIVES IN PARIS” “McNALLY JACKSON, NEW YORK – THE HIPPEST BOOKSTORE ANYWHERE”

PRO-SURFERS JOHN JOHN FLORENCE, ABOVE , 22, AND HIS YOUNGER BROTHER NATHAN JUMPED ON TO THE “HAWAII FIVE OH” SHOOT (PAGE 206). WRITER CATHY ST GERMANS, WHO HOSTS CORNWALL’S PORT ELIOT FESTIVAL AND SPENDS PART OF THE YEAR ON THE HAWAIIAN ISLAND OF OAHU, SUGGESTED THE SIBLINGS: “I REMEMBER THEM SURFING THE BREAK BELOW OUR HOUSE WHEN THEY WERE LITTLE. THEY WERE LIKE MINNOWS – FEARLESS BLOND BOYS RIPPING AMID SURFERS THREE TIMES THEIR AGE.”

53


notices 2011

TECHNICAL SUPPORT To animate Lisa Armstrong’s feature on wearable technology (“The Data Game”, page 252), help came in the form of Lucinda Chambers’s magpie eye – Vogue’s fashion director had held on to miniature robots used in a shoot with Freja Beha Erichsen and Patrick Demarchelier for October 2011: “I love robots, and children’s toys in general – the colours look great on shelves mixed with more serious things,” says Chambers.

Erica Wagner, above, former literary editor of The Times, travelled to the bustling metropolis of Lagos to sit down with the feted Nigerian author and feminist Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie on home ground (“I Wanted to Claim My Own Name”, page 222). “Life moves a hundred miles an hour here; everyone is racing to get somewhere, something is always happening,” Wagner recalls. The native New Yorker is currently at work on her own book – a history of the engineer behind the Brooklyn Bridge (published by Bloomsbury next year).

HOUSE PROUD François Halard, above, captured both the bohemian apartment of jeweller Aurélie Bidermann (“Grande Designs”, page 177) and the holiday home of artworld couple Stefan Ratibor and Kadee Robbins (“The Life of Art”, page 246) for this issue. Splitting his time between New York, Paris and the South of France, the interiors photographer never wants for architectural gems: “I’m influenced by many different styles,” he says. “There is always some dream house or place waiting to be discovered.”

54

Photo READY VOGUE ’S TRIO OF COVERGIRLS MAY BE THE MOST SNAPPED STARS OF THE MOMENT. LOOK BACK TO WHEN SUKI WATERHOUSE TURNED PHOTOGR APHER, AIMING HER CAMERA AT THE GIRL GANG FOR AN EXHIBITION HOSTED BY HER AGENCY IN 2013. CURATED BY ARTIST STUART SEMPLE AND NEXT MODELS’ KATY MOSELEY, I’LL BE YOUR MIRROR SHOWCASED THE TALENTS OF THE GIRLS ON THEIR ROSTER. CLOCKWISE FROM LEFT : SHOOT ME DOWN , HANKIE OVER A MODEL AND G WHIZZ .

PATRICK DEMARCHELIER; THOMAS LAGRANGE; JANIE AIREY; SUKI WATERHOUSE

2015

Into AFRICA


.co.uk

SIENNA MILLER AT THIS YEAR’S GOLDEN GLOBES

GIRL GROUP

As Cara, Suki and Georgia May team up for this issue, look back at a history of group Vogue covers – from Peter Lindbergh’s Nineties supermodels, above, to Mario Testino’s 2002 team of Brits.

ON BEAUTY The Globes, Oscars, Baftas, Brits and Grammys… It’s been an action-packed year so far on the red carpet, but it’s not just about the all-important gowns. Our beauty editor has collated the most glamorous hair and make-up looks from this year’s nominees, winners and guests – perfect inspiration for a spring makeover.

MORE MISS VOGUE Once you’ve devoured the latest Miss Vogue, which accompanies this month’s issue, get more online with our dedicated Miss Vogue channel – packed with daily doses of celebrity style, beauty looks and trend ideas.

THE PERENNIALLY POPULAR VOGUE SHOP

NEXT SEASON’S CHEAT SHEET LILY ALLEN AND GRAYSON PERRY – PANELLISTS AT LAST YEAR’S FESTIVAL

60

AS THE AUTUMN/WINTER 2015 SHOWS COME TO AN END, IT’S TIME TO REFLECT ON A MONTH OF COLLECTIONS. SWOT UP ON THE TRENDS AND TALKING POINTS IN OUR CHEAT SHEET – CONSIDER IT YOUR STARTING POINT FOR NEXT-SEASON STYLE

PETER LINDBERGH; RAYMOND MEIER; MORGAN O’DONOVAN; INDIGITAL; XPOSURE

VICTORIA BECKHAM

JASON WU

ALEXANDER WANG

PRABAL GURUNG

Have you bought your Vogue Festival tickets yet? Stay up to date with the latest news and announcements ahead of the fashion spectacular (which takes place on April 25 and 26) at Vogue.co.uk/voguefestival.

ALTUZARRA

FESTIVAL COUNTDOWN


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76


130 MOUNT STREET

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Shopping list

WHAT TO BUY

NOW Photographs by Rory Payne

Orient express

THANKS TO ALVA STUDIOS

Tie in the details: ribbon fastenings play up the quiet seduction of a demure high neck. Contrast with rich prints

COTTON TOP, FROM £865, ROSIE ASSOULIN, AT FARFETCH.COM. PALAZZO TROUSERS, £35, RIVER ISLAND. PEARL EARRINGS, £550, CATHERINE MARCHE. GOLD-PLATED CUFF, £550, AMRAPALI. BANGLES, £10 AS PART OF SET, CLAIRE’S. HAIR: CYNDIA HARVEY. MAKE-UP: NINNI. NAILS: LYNDSAY McINTOSH. MODEL: NASTYA STEN. FASHION EDITOR: LUCY BOWER

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CARA DELEVINGNE BAG

M U L B E R RY. C O M


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BOMBER JACKET, £30, BOOHOO.COM. TOP, FROM £120, ALICE & OLIVIA. CULOTTES, FROM £250, ASSEMBLY NEW YORK. EARRINGS, £280, OSCAR DE LA RENTA. THIN SILVER BANGLES, FROM £40 EACH. SILVER BANGLE, £150. ALL AMRAPALI. SILVER CUFF, £565, CATHERINE MARCHE

RORY PAYNE

Check your silhouette: fresh, billowing culottes are the perfect canvas for a decadent, Eastern-inspired bomber jacket

COTTON JACKET, FROM £300. COTTON SKIRT WITH BOW DETAIL, £258. BOTH TRADEMARK, AT MATCHESFASHION.COM. LEATHER OBI BELT, FROM £41, ELIZABETH KELLY. FAUX-LEATHER SLIDES, £28, OFFICE. TASSEL EARRINGS, £17, & OTHER STORIES

83


VOGUEspy WOOL JACKET, £690, E TAUTZ. RIBBED COTTON POLOSHIRT, £240, TORY BURCH. SHORTS, £30, NEXT. LEATHER WALLET, £170, LONGCHAMP. COILED BANGLES, £125 EACH, ELEANOR BOLTON

Update your kit: remix athletic ribbed knits with a masculine suit jacket and bold tribal jewellery. The look now is about a cleverly curated mix, rather than Nineties simplicity

PARKA, £115, AZY FOR URBAN OUTFITTERS. KNITTED TANK DRESS, £145, KAREN MILLEN. LEATHER SANDALS, FROM £270, ERIKA CAVALLINI SEMI COUTURE. RUCKSACK, £23, NEW LOOK. BANGLES, £10 EACH, FREEDOM, AT TOPSHOP

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VISCOSE-KNIT TOP, FROM £90, AMERICAN RETRO. TROUSERS, £85, FRENCH CONNECTION. COILED NECKLACE, £448, ELEANOR BOLTON. BANGLE, AS BEFORE

RORY PAYNE

Good sport


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Raw power

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Breeze into spring’s lighter mindset: raw cotton and slubbed linens are redefining wholesome beauty

87


VOGUEspy Mix and match earth tones: nothing enlivens softest linen like a flash of ruby or terracotta

LINEN TOP, £330, TIBI. LINEN SKIRT, £205, EILEEN FISHER. LEATHER ESPADRILLES, £360, THEORY. LINEN BAG, £265, ELENA DAWSON, AT DOVER STREET MARKET. ROPE, WORN AS NECKLACE, FROM £1.50 A METRE, ARTHUR BEALE. LINEN CUFF, £120 A PAIR, SOPHIE McELLIGOTT. HEADBAND, AS BEFORE. FOR STOCKISTS, ALL PAGES, SEE VOGUE INFORMATION

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LINEN JUMPSUIT, £265, GERARD DAREL. LEATHER SANDALS, £95, & OTHER STORIES. SUNGLASSES, £190, PAUL SMITH, AT DAVID CLULOW. LINEN CUFF, £120 A PAIR, SOPHIE McELLIGOTT. HEADBAND AND BANGLES, AS BEFORE


TAG HEUER FORMULA 1 STEEL & CERAMIC DIAMONDS Cara Delevingne challenges rules. Being free-minded is her motto. Like TAG Heuer, she defies conventions and never cracks under pressure. WWW.TAGHEUER.CO.UK


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DATE NIGHT JITROIS LEATHER SKIRT, £1,100

A demure, powderblue check flirts with a thigh-slit killer leather skirt – a flash of toned pins leaves far more to the imagination

RALPH LAUREN LEATHER SANDALS, £450

Gingham for

DIANE VON FURSTENBERG CROPPED TROUSERS, £298

LEON MAX COTTON-MIX TOP, £99

WEEKEND LUNCH

ANGELO PENNETTA; JODY TODD

The classic Fifties pedal-pusher works best with neat summer knits. For a retro spin, partner with glossy red mules

MIU MIU PATENT-LEATHER MULES, £515

GROWN-UPS Square up: here’s how – and where – to wear spring’s boldest look. By Naomi Smart

BEACH-SIDE A fraying, ribbon-tied raffia sunhat and contoured gingham one-piece make a romantic duo

GIGI BURRIS STRAW HAT, £280

LISA MARIE FERNANDEZ SWIMSUIT, £262, AT HARRODS

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GALLERY OPENING ALTUZARRA SILK-MIX DRESS, £1,350

EMPORIO ARMANI PATENT-LEATHER AND CRYSTAL BAG, £600

MARNI SILK SKIRT, £570

Graphic lines speak to the modernist lover. Don’t shy away: stick to the grid but brave colour-clash and fun accessories for added panache

OFFICE HOURS AFTER-WORK DRINKS

Blush-pink checks needn’t be girlish. A blouse/pencil-skirt dress is efficiency at its best, commanding instant authority

MICHAEL KORS TAFFETA DRESS, £1,600. LEATHER BELT, £610

GARDEN PARTY

RICHARD NICOLL WOOL AND GEORGETTE TOP, £395, AT MATCHESFASHION.COM

Host with the most: match pretty, embellished heels to an elegant fit-and-flare day dress and charm the most distinguished of guests

HERMES SILVER EARRINGS, £890

MULBERRY COTTON-DRILL SKIRT, £390 PROENZA SCHOULER SUEDE AND LEATHER MULES, £620 DOLCE & GABBANA CRYSTAL EMBELLISHED HEELS, FROM £570

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ALASDAIR McLELLAN; PATRICK DEMARCHELIER; HENRY CLARKE; SUDHIR PITHWA; JODY TODD

LOEWE WOVEN LEATHER BAG, £2,595

Transport gingham from day to night by elevating preppy squares and starched military styles with “wow” accessories. We’ll drink a toast to that


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Suzy Menkes, International Vogue Editor

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Speakers include:

ANTOINE ARNAULT CEO, Berluti

TORY BURCH CEO and Designer, Tory Burch

KARL LAGERFELD

Find out more at www.CNILuxury.com /

DAVID LAUREN Executive Vice President, Ralph Lauren Corporation

@CNILuxury SPONSORS INCLUDE: Thor Equities

UNDER THE PATRONAGE OF:

OFFICIAL HOTEL:

PRESENTS


FLÃ&#x201A;NEUR FOREVER


FROM TOP: GOLD AND DIAMOND, £995, TO ORDER, ANNOUSHKA. GOLD AND ONYX, £4,950, THEO FENNELL. GOLD AND CARNELIAN, £5,685, AS BY ATSUKO SANO, AT DOVER STREET MARKET. ENGRAVED GOLD, £550, ANNINA VOGEL, AT LIBERTY. GOLD COIN, £4,020, BULGARI. ROSE GOLD AND ENAMEL, £1,740, DINA KAMAL, AT DOVER STREET MARKET. GOLD PLATED, £425, HARLOT & BONES, AT LIBERTY. ENGRAVED GOLD, £1,745, WEMPE. GOLD-PLATED OVAL, £140, LINKS OF LONDON

VOGUEspy

Ring

CYCLE

A thousand-year-old fashion has our seal of approval once more

MARK MATTOCK

Who would have thought that a fashion trending this spring was first introduced during the reign of Edward the Confessor? The days when signets were used to authorise orders, seal letters or show status via the precious engraving of a family crest are long gone. Now, signet rings pose as slick metallic emblems of personal style. Set your seal on a variety of looks – a classic Oxford oval; a gemstone centre; or a modern, chunky Harlot & Bones design with a secret compartment, just like a medieval poison ring. They remain a portable mark of distinction but happily worn on a manicured pinkie rather than held in the custody of the lord chancellor. CW

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FLÃ&#x201A;NEUR FOREVER


VOGUEspy THOMAS SABO ZIRCONIA AND GOLD-PLATED PENDANT NECKLACE, £510

JESSICA McCORMACK BLACK-GOLD, DIAMOND AND EMERALD NECKLACE, £5,850

SOLANGE AZAGURYPARTRIDGE MALACHITE RING, £2,400

VAN CLEEF & ARPELS DIAMOND AND CHRYSOPRASE NECKLACE, PRICE ON REQUEST

FABERGE DIAMOND, SAPPHIRE, RUBY, SPESSARTITE, OPAL AND MOONSTONE BROOCH, PRICE ON REQUEST

FANTASY TIFFANY DIAMOND, CHRYSOPRASE AND BLACK-SPINEL BRACELET, £366,000

YUNUS & ELIZA GOLD RING, PRICE ON REQUEST

GRAFF WHITE- AND PINK-DIAMOND BROOCH, PRICE ON REQUEST

GEOMETRIC ESHVI RESIN RING, £115

GEOMETRIC CARTIER DIAMOND, ONYX AND CHRYSOPRASE BANGLE, PRICE ON REQUEST

DE GRISOGONO DIAMOND, RUBY AND EMERALD EARRINGS, £32,300

vs fantasy

BOUCHERON DIAMOND, BLACK-SAPPHIRE AND RUBY RING, £12,150

This season’s jewellery falls into two distinct camps, says Carol Woolton

T

here is no denying the cool, easy appeal of a geometric design – the simplicity of a circle, square or triangle makes total sense. Ancient shapes are sometimes the most modern, and these forms now look eternally new and current – precise tablets of clear colour, such as Solange Azagury-Partridge’s solid malachite cube ring and the sensible structure of a Cartier panther pared down to a graphic onyx-spotted diamond and chrysoprase circular bangle. There are no twiddly bits to distract the eye. A geometrical piece knows what it is: something solid, something timeless. But who can resist the pull of fancy? This season, admirers of the decorative will no doubt flock to jewellers’ bird-inspired designs. Some take shape as twinkling flamingos with pink-stone bodies or heads, some as swooping diamond swallows or golden, modern hawk heads, while others, such as those at Boucheron and Fabergé, look like Game of Thrones-inspired ravens and crows – all-out fantasy pieces set on golden wings to carry you away on a journey of desire. Q

TIFFANY DIAMOND, TSAVORITE, SPESSARTITE AND LACQUER BROOCH, PRICE ON REQUEST

TITO PEDRINI MALACHITE AND DIAMOND RING, FROM £21,120

LOUIS VUITTON TSAVORITE, ONYX AND DIAMOND BRACELET, PRICE ON REQUEST

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ALEXANDRA JEFFORD JADEITE AND LAPIS RING, £8,200

TIFFANY PLIQUE-A-JOUR, DIAMOND AND SAPPHIRE BROOCH, PRICE ON REQUEST


FLÃ&#x201A;NEUR FOREVER

For all enquiries: 020 7499 8856 Hermes.com


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OLD

BOND

S T R E E T,

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JERM Y N

S T R E E T,

D A KS. COM


VOGUEspy

BIMBA & LOLA JACQUARD, £350 ROSETTA GETTY CADY, £1,500, AT NET-A-PORTER.COM

GERARD DAREL SUEDE, £505

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WORK-IT WAISTCOAT The faultless punch of a power blazer merges with the womanly cut of a long-line sleeveless coat… Where do we sign up?

OUT OF OFFICE: IN NEW YORK

The divine NINE

Introducing the new workwear power players that will help you seal the deal. By Naomi Smart AS SEEN IN LONDON

OLIVIA PALERMO WEARING NOM DE MODE IN LONDON

3. BOARDROOM BLOUSE AS SEEN IN NEW YORK

Tactical waist pleating adds feminine flair to a plain shirt. Lean in and negotiate with wide-leg trousers

VICTORIA BECKHAM GAZAR, £1,550

JASON LLOYD-EVANS; MITCHELL SAMS; SUDHIR PITHWA; JODY TODD

VILSHENKO SILK, £495

2

BOSS LEATHER, £950

BOX JACKET Our advice? Deliver a neater take on the everyday workwear jacket. Its straighttalking silhouette will hold court in any negotiation

PER UNA COTTON, £85, AT MARKS & SPENCER

4 DIOR PALLADIUM AND CHALCEDONY, £2,400

CURB LINK Didn’t you get the memo? Forget delicate, and supersize your jewellery statements – look-at-me metal necklaces were seen at Dior, left, and Sacai. Go big or go home FOUNDCOLLECTED VINTAGE GOLD, £8,750

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VOGUEspy

5. HOPSACK SKIRT

AS SEEN IN NEW YORK

CELINE LEATHER CLUTCH, FROM £860

Prada’s s/s ’15 raw-edged seams set the bar for unkempt elegance. Follow Miuccia’s lead and think outside the box: a hopsack frayed skirt is the new style to covet now

6. #GIRL-BOSS BAG Investments and acquisitions! Nothing portrays the secrets of your success better than Céline’s assured Curve bag. Out of office? Offset with chunky knits and box-fresh high-tops SPORTMAX LEATHER, £2,650

POWERPOCKET DRESS

STAYPRESSED TROUSERS

7

A loyal shirtdress can easily raise rank, but why not upgrade your office ID? Power pockets come in twos, threes or fours, because everyone loves a team player

TIBI LINEN, £470

Wear the trousers: a sharp focus on tailoring needn’t be complex. Iron out any issues with just one knife-edge crease; its polished line will cut short any dispute

8

KAREN MILLEN JACQUARD, £180

OASIS COTTON-MIX, £45

WAREHOUSE COTTON, £48

KURT GEIGER LONDON LEATHER, £230

PAUL ANDREW LEATHER, £475, AT MODAOPERANDI.COM

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SNAPPED IN NEW YORK

9. THE STEP-UP SLINGBACK Seek the trust of a refined kitten heel. Its discreet lift doesn’t just help to elegantly climb corporate ladders, it will penetrate glass ceilings, too

JASON LLOYD-EVANS; SUDHIR PITHWA; JODY TODD

ACNE STUDIOS COTTON-MIX, £220


R EGE N T ST R E ET BROM P T ON CRO S S

SL OA N E S QUA R E

M A RY L E B ON E H IGH ST R E ET


arts Great

DAME Recently honoured as a dame of the realm, Kristin Scott Thomas now takes on the most British role of all. By Fiona Golfar. Portrait by Benjamin McMahon

HAIR: DIANA MOAR. MAKE-UP: LICA FENSOME. KRISTIN WEARS JUMPSUIT, VALENTINO. ROSEWOODHOTELS.COM

W

A NATURAL, ACERBIC WIT… KRISTIN SCOTT THOMAS PHOTOGRAPHED ON THE TERRACE OF THE GARDEN HOUSE SUITE AT ROSEWOOD LONDON, WC1. SITTINGS EDITOR: NAOMI SMART

hen Kristin Scott Thomas walks into a room everything becomes a little bit sharper. “Ugh, the driver brought me down Oxford Street, nightmare!” she shudders in that famous, crisp voice, flinging her pale woollen coat and red Miu Miu fur stole on to the sofa. Beneath, she wears jeans with a Breton top and a colourful kerchief tied around her neck, the effect of which is very European-effortless-chic. Scott Thomas surveys her surroundings, squinting (because she is a little short-sighted), and the makeup artist, the stylist, the manicurist – all of us – inhale a collective breath, gauging the temperature of her mood. Scott Thomas can’t help the effect she has on people. She is a daunting combination of severe beauty and innate elegance. At 54, her body remains the size it has been all her adult life – for that, she admits, she owes a fair bit to “Tim the trainer”. It is well known that when she gets bored or irritated she’s not unlike her heroine Dame Maggie Smith at her haughtiest. People expect the actress to be difficult. And yet, on the whole, Scott Thomas isn’t an ice queen. She may be late to >

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today’s photoshoot, but she texted ahead an apology. She arrives without an assistant or publicist or any of the typical celebrity accessories running after her. And by the time she has settled down with a soy latte to have her make-up done, she’s cracking jokes and enjoying a gossip. Scott Thomas is funny. Hers is a natural, acerbic wit first revealed to audiences in Four Weddings and a Funeral as she shot out lines like “I was a lesbian once at school, but only for about 15 minutes” with her signature languor. When I congratulate her on her New Year’s Honour, she hoots and says, “I’m a dame! Oh, yeah! I want to put that on my phone…” As she laughs, her hawk-like eyes crinkle up. “Awards are very nice, but you can be nominated and nominated, and often nothing much happens. While this is really thrilling – not just for me but for my mum and my children and my uncle in the Royal Navy, this makes them all so proud.”

BENJAMIN McMAHON. KRISTIN WEARS TOP AND JEANS, BOTH LOUIS VUITTON

B

orn in 1960 in Cornwall, the actress was the eldest of five. Her father was a Royal Navy pilot and her mother a former drama student whom Scott Thomas describes as “very skinny and glamorous”. The actress’s father died in a plane crash when she was five and her mother remarried another pilot. He, too, died in a similar accident when she was 11 years old. She is open about having been in therapy throughout her life. “I knew I was an actress even when I was tiny,” she recalls. “I was playing cowboys and Indians with my brothers and sisters, and when I got shot I remember thinking, now is this how one would really fall?” After her all-girls boarding school – excellent training ground for acquiring British hauteur – she attended London’s Central School of Drama, where she was told she wasn’t going to make it as an actress. Scott Thomas moved to Paris to get some distance. And it was there, while studying drama again, this time with a view to teaching it, she was cast in her breakthrough film, Under the Cherry Moon, directed by and co-starring her hero, Prince. Scott Thomas remained in Paris, marrying a gynaecologist with whom she has three children. She didn’t follow the usual British-actress route to Hollywood; instead she made films in her chosen home, in her adopted tongue, and scooped up awards as she did so. Projects such as I’ve Loved You So Long and Leaving have built her reputation as a celebrated European actress. But Scott Thomas particularly excels at playing a peculiar brand of British

woman – women who, in Four Weddings and a Funeral, The English Patient, A Handful of Dust and Gosford Park, appear too bored to breathe, but are really concealing depths filled with painful longing and constrained anger. It has been said before, and rightly so, that she has a knack for making the unlikable likable. “I’m always being regarded as ‘other’,” she says. “I’m British in Europe, European in Britain.” Following her divorce in 2006, Scott Thomas returned to England and has been welcomed back as a national treasure, winning plaudits for her role in Electra at the Old Vic last year. Next she takes on the role of “SHE HAS THAT EXTRA QUALITY Elizabeth II at the Apollo THAT MAKES AN AUDIENCE GO Theatre, in the second WILD FOR HER – run of Peter Morgan’s IT’S A RARE GIFT” The Audience, which dramatises the meetings between the Queen and the various prime ministers of her reign. Helen Mirren played the role the first time round. The play’s producer, Robert Fox, says of its new star, “She has that extra quality that makes an audience go wild for her. It’s a rare gift. Maggie Smith has it, so does Judi Dench and Helen Mirren. It’s to do with a generosity

“I’m always regarded as ‘other’ in both Britain and France” in her acting, a sense of giving everything she has to the audience, and they feel it and they love her for it.” I wonder if she is nervous about stepping into Mirren’s shoes? After all, the other actress did very much manage to make the Queen her own, and she will be starring in a simultaneous production of the play on Broadway. “Actually, not at all,” says Scott Thomas emphatically. “I see this as my interpretation of the Queen, and I certainly don’t want to step into her shoes literally. I am having all new costumes made for me.”

arts

Scott Thomas won’t only have new costumes to help her into the role. This is the first time she has worked with a living playwright, and she and Peter Morgan have co-operated closely. “This part is like a dress,” he says. “You want it to fit the person wearing it. There are things Kristin feels comfortable saying as the Queen that Helen wouldn’t. She never saw Helen in the play and is therefore only focused on her own interpretation.” It’s unusual for a playwright to rejig their work, but Morgan loves to tweak, and this time The Audience will no doubt have something to say about the looming election, as well as other current events. All this is why Scott Thomas so loves the theatre world. “I adore being part of a team. No waiting in trailers, no being bored to death doing retakes. It’s a tightrope walk every night and we all have to be there to support each other.” “Theatre provides a certain home to people,” says Ian Rickson, who directed Scott Thomas in her last five productions, including the highly acclaimed Old Times by Pinter. “Kristin is able to access her inner life: both pain and joy, and use them with economy in her work.” Q “The Audience” is at the Apollo Theatre, W1, from April 21 115


BRIGITTE

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www.cesare-paciotti.com


arts BOOKS:

Story

BOARD Violet Henderson picks riveting fiction for spring THE GIRL WHO COULDN’T STOP ARGUING Melissa Kite

WAR OF THE ENCYCLOPAEDISTS Christopher Robinson and Gavin Kovite Penned by two authors, this is the story of two friends, Mickey Montauk and Halifax Corderoy, known as the Encyclopaedists after a series of artinstallation parties they throw before leaving Seattle to begin their adult lives. When, months later, they live on different sides of the globe, they keep in contact by updating a shared Wikipedia page. Pacy, funny, sometimes heartbreaking, this is a fantastic read. (Hamish Hamilton, £17)

NATHANIEL GOLDBERG

WE THAT ARE LEFT Clare Clark It is 1910. Oskar Grunewald, a mathematically brilliant 10-year-old, visits Ellinghurst, the grand countryside residence of the charmed Melville family. Horrified by the privilege he finds there, Oskar wants nothing further to do with the place or its people. But four years later, the First World War breaks out and its terrible events make everyone see things differently, even Oskar. A wonderful, engrossing book. (Harvill Secker, £17)

Madison Flight was born arguing, so naturally, following some tempestuous teenage years, she grows up to be London’s best divorce lawyer. The Spectator columnist’s latest novel is both a glossy romp and a biting satire on sexism. Good enough to warrant booking a holiday – with a sunlounger to read it on. (Corsair, £9)

VANESSA AND HER SISTER Priya Parmar The Bloomsbury appeal continues. This novel, a series of imagined diary entries and letters, composed mainly from the perspective of the painter Vanessa Bell but with cameos from other Bloomsbury stars, including Lytton Strachey and Duncan Grant, sets out intense sibling rivalry between Vanessa and her more beautiful, more fragile sister Virginia. Captivating from beginning to end, but Virginia Woolf fans be warned – you might not like what you read. (Bloomsbury Circus, £13)

SATIN ISLAND Tom McCarthy “Me? Call me U” is how Satin Island’s narrator, an anthropologist who cannot stop observing, introduces himself to his audience. And while the novel’s plot may be (far) too complex to explain here, what can be described is the beauty of McCarthy’s sentences, which act as if they’re in verse as they run and run through short, dazzling and seemingly incessant clauses. (Jonathan Cape, £17)

THE GIRL IN THE RED COAT Kate Hamer Carmel is a special child – clever, gifted even – but she has a tendency to slip off into her imagination and that is where her mother, try as she may, can’t reach her. But when Carmel goes missing at a festival, this psychological distance turns into a physical separation which will last years. Mum and Carmel share the telling of this tale, which takes a direction you won’t be expecting. Best read in a single sitting. (Faber & Faber, £13)

THE BURIED GIANT Kazuo Ishiguro After 10 years, Ishiguro is back and it was well worth the wait. Moving on from the horrifying Never Let Me Go, his latest offering is set in a dystopian future world, where ogres rampage and men scour the frozen earth looking hungrily for food, armed against other men. And yet, amid this depravity, Ishiguro pens acts of humanity, some extraordinary, others as small as a husband and wife watching a sunset together in silence. (Faber & Faber, £20)

GOD HELP THE CHILD Toni Morrison Morrison’s eleventh novel begins with a mother’s horror at having given birth to a daughter who is “midnight black”, not paler-skinned like her – or, as she says, “what we call high yellow”. Through a chorus of psychologically damaged narrators – three African-Americans, and the white son of a prostitute – Morrison shows that it matters very much how a mother treats her child. (Chatto & Windus, £15)

A SPOOL OF BLUE THREAD Anne Tyler Anne Tyler is once again in Baltimore, with a new cast of characters struggling and straining against their middle-class, picket-fenced boundaries. A Spool of Blue Thread begins with the young, rebellious Denny phoning his parents to tell them he is gay, but as the story unfolds, so do many more of the Whitshank family’s secrets and revelations. (Vintage, £19) 121


arts

New L E AV E S Spring’s non-fiction bounty, chosen by Violet Henderson

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TEA WITH THE VIOLET BAKERY

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tongue. David J Linden’s Touch (March, £17) is about rediscovering that universal sensory language which we know instinctively but seem to have forgotten to the detriment of our relationships. Peter Ackroyd’s biography of Alfred Hitchcock (Chatto & Windus, £13) tells of a strange, brilliant man who smashed a teacup every morning to remind him of life’s transience. A more visual document of life and art is Stephen Sprouse: Xerox/ Rock/Art (Damiani, £35), a collection of 600 drawings by the designer. Debbie Harry’s foreword reveals that this book nearly didn’t happen after an irate landlord threw all Sprouse’s material into the rubbish. Perfect for whiling away seasonal showers, Patricia Mears and Emma McClendon’s Yves Saint Laurent and Halston: Fashioning the 70s (Yale, £30) compares the two master glamour-makers who defined the decade. And with Models of Influence (Harper Collins, £25) the daydreaming can continue, as Nigel Barker looks at the faces, and the careers, of 50 women who “reset the course of history”. Q

FROM TOP LEFT: A 1991 PORTRAIT OF CLAUDIA SCHIFFER BY ELLEN VON UNWERTH FOR AMERICAN VOGUE, IN MODELS OF INFLUENCE; YVES SAINT LAURENT AND MARINA SCHIANO AT THE LAUNCH OF OPIUM, 1978; AMARANTH IN THE GARDEN FORAGER; ALFRED HITCHCOCK; PATTI SMITH AS SKETCHED BY STEPHEN SPROUSE

ELLEN VON UNWERTH; SUDHIR PITHWA; SHAMLEY PRODUCTIONS/KOBAL; STEPHEN SPROUSE ARCHIVE/COLLECTION OF CAROL McCRANIE AND JAVIER MAGRI

ow the miserable months of abstinence are out of the way, we can get back to appreciating what really matters in life: Claire Ptak, founder of east London café The Violet Bakery, has brought out her first cookery book (Square Peg, £20). From buckwheat granola to ginger molasses cake, there is a little something for anyone with a sweet tooth. But for food that tastes and heals, The Garden Forager (Square Peg, £13) is an exquisitely illustrated encyclopedia of plants that may well be growing in your garden. Foodies with a more global outlook should turn to Farfetch Curates Food (Assouline, £16), which asks Jonathan Saunders, model Elettra Wiedemann and others where they like to eat (and drink) on their travels. Flirting with French by William Alexander (Duckworth, £10) celebrates one man’s journey to become French – he loves the culture, the people, the pastries, but cannot, for the life of him, fathom the native


arts

“I was excited when my good friend Vanessa Denza, now a legendary fashion headhunter, told me she had kept this, her invitation for the trendy 21 SHOP opening in 1961 (co-hosted by Vogue). She once worked there as a buyer. Jean Shrimpton was photographed for this invitation by David Bailey (then her boyfriend), and she appeared in the store, shimmying to a live jazz band. It became a groundbreaking moment for fashion retail.”

“JOHN GALLIANO famously constructed complete worlds around his designs – from lavish mise-en-scène to dramatic back stories – and his invitations were no exception. One year it was a leopard purse stuffed with lipstick, matches and banknotes, another a box containing sheet music and a ballet slipper. A much-coveted invite was a rusty old key for his autumn/winter 1994 show, held in an abandoned Parisian townhouse loaned by socialite São Schlumberger.”

“In an effort to woo the press, designers will often personalise their invitations. For their autumn/ winter ’97 show, CLEMENTS RIBEIRO

ALPHA PRESS; CATWALKING.COM

Pushing the “HUSSEIN CHALAYAN’s s/s 2000 invitation pictured young Lewis Dicker, son of Chalayan’s pattern director, with an apparently remotecontrolled aeroplane. Nobody could have guessed that this was a clue to what was to come. Later, on the runway, Lewis again appeared, operating the same device to open panels on a mechanical fibreglass dress worn by model Erika Wall, releasing frothy tulle petticoats. It was a perfect mix of science and art.”

E N V E LO P E

“Like fashion, invitations can also be influenced by cultural, social and even political events. When terrorists attacked Paris during the summer of 1995, security at the s/s ’96 shows was duly tightened. To aid guests through the numerous checkpoints, HERMES sent its invitation in a transparent plastic version of its trademark Kelly bag, which soon became the cult accessory of the season.” 126

The boundless creativity of fashion invites is celebrated in a new book

“The invitation which holds the most sentiment is this, the ticket to KENZO’s 1982 show. It represents the first major Paris catwalk show I ever attended, fresh from art school. At this time Kenzo’s presentations were the hottest ticket. I bagged mine by begging the guests as they arrived at the Louvre.”

F

irst as fashion editor in the Eighties for the cult style magazine Blitz, and thereafter for a fair few magazines and newspapers, Iain R Webb has zipped around the globe attending fashion shows. Which also means he’s seen every sort of invitation going – “from embroidered handkerchiefs and masks to faux passports and credit cards,” he sighs happily – because, of course, the fashion-show invitation doesn’t merely invite, it pricks the imagination and provides clues to the collection ahead. A self-confessed hoarder, Webb kept his favourite invitations, until one day it occurred to him that what he had collected was not just sentimental baggage but a record of fashion history that no one had properly curated – until now. And that is how his book, Invitations Strictly Personal: 40 Years of Fashion Show Invites (Goodman Books, £30), was born. Here, Webb talks Vogue through seven of the best invitations from his collection. VH An accompanying exhibition will be held at Somerset House, WC2, until March 22

CHLOE S/S ’98

HUSSEIN CHALAYAN S/S ’00

– at the time the toast of Cool Britannia – sent out cotton handkerchiefs individually embroidered with the names of their front-row guests.”

“For her debut show for CHLOE (spring/summer 1998) at the Opera Garnier in Paris, Stella McCartney mixed her signature ultra-cool tailoring with the feminine heritage of the house – that meant slick trouser suits and silk corsets. I like how the delicate glass buttons stitched on to her invitation reflected the romantic mood of the collection.”


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BACKGROUND: COLE & SON FORNASETTI MALACHITE WALLPAPER, £76

RABLABS MALACHITE BOX, £380

arts

L’OBJET PORCELAIN, LAPIS AND GOLD DISH, £30 LUKAS WEGWERTH CRYSTALLISATION NO 25, £900, GALLERY FUMI

DALE ROGERS AMMONITE MOUNTED AGATE SLICE, £8,500

NOOR FARES LABRADORITE RING, £1,450

Rock

ARIK LEVY FOR LASVIT PENDANT LIGHT, £2,759 FOR THREE, AT HARRODS

LEGENDS

VENUSROX.COM NATURAL PYRITES, £6,250

The magic of crystals is having a revitalising effect on design, says Aimée Farrell

THE RUBY TREE AMAZONITE TABLE, £36,000, AT HARRODS

THEODORA WARRE CRYSTAL EARRINGS, £80

EDDIE BORGO CRYSTAL CUFF, £720, AT MATCHESFASHION.COM

TOM DIXON FOSSIL BOOKENDS, £200, AT LIBERTY

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MERT ALAS & MARCUS PIGGOTT; SUDHIR PITHWA. FOR STOCKISTS, SEE VOGUE INFORMATION

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Tours to pick up stones along the way,” n the popular consciousness, crystals are explains maker Bridie Hall, who creates traditionally relegated to the exclusive faux-stone obelisks and mineralproperty of tree-hugging hippies. embellished frames, sold at Bloomsbury But no longer: in art, fashion and boutique Ben Pentreath. “I’m fascinated interior design, they’re making a colourful by their natural colours, shapes and comeback. Whether it’s their decorative forms. You see their patterns constantly beauty or the creep of mysticism into the reproduced in decorative art.” Take Cole mainstream, in today’s tech-obsessed & Son’s Fornasetti Malachite wallpaper, times, semi-precious stones tap into a which replicates the gemstone’s concentric primal need to connect with nature. swirls in the most majestic living rooms. Scientists have been trying, and And fashion’s new psychedelic mood failing, to recreate their natural beauty certainly chimes with crystals. The spring/ for centuries, and now the art world is summer collections saw rough-hewn, semitaking its turn. Berlin-based artist Lukas precious pendants dangle from the necks of Wegwerth plays with the process of models at Dries Van Noten and Etro. At crystallisation, growing crystals into the Chanel, Karl Lagerfeld dressed his placardcracks of broken ceramics. This jewel-like waving protesters in beaded strings of repair system is a contemporary take on jade, considered the most divine of natural the beauty of gemstone caves and yields materials by the Chinese. And the crystal some surprising results: “Crystal is a living balls that once decorated the coffee table organism, so as much as I try to control the in Coco Chanel’s atelier have been given a process something new and unexpected sleek makeover by Lebanese jeweller Noor always emerges.” Ayala Serfaty, an Fares, who sets spheres of rock crystal, artist from Tel Aviv, creates sprawling rose quartz and moonstone in diamondlight sculptures that look as if they’ve studded pendants inspired by primal been pulled from the earth’s crust. talismans. (She even served cocktails Though meticulously made from with frozen quartz crystals floating glass, these otherworldly works mimic in them at the collection’s Dover splintered, crystalline formations. Street Market launch.) For the Victorians, collections of Whether you choose to cheer up semi-precious stones were symbols a dreary corner of your sitting room of prestige. Now, Venusrox and Dale with Gilles Caffier’s tubular quartz Rogers Ammonite, two London table lamp or perform a soothing design stores, suggest that tastes are pink quartz and black tourmaline dialling back to a time when rare BRIDIE HALL GRANITE crystal “ritual” (as Victoria Beckham specimens were sought out for vast OBELISK, FROM £175, does before her catwalk shows), sums. “Gentlemen would carry AT BEN right now, crystals rock. Q a chisel with them on their Grand PENTREATH


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Fighting T A L K Playwright Sam Holcroft, inset, considers the drama of family arguments that detonate again and again around the kitchen table

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um’s crying now – tears dripping on to her plate, diluting her gravy. Dad’s shouting for “silence!” – thumping the table with his fists, setting wineglasses wobbling. Uncle Peter’s on his feet, jabbing a finger across the table – “Every time you do this! Every bloody time!” – while Auntie Jenny’s already pulling her children away. The roast’s gone cold, the family’s gone thermonuclear, and… It wasn’t supposed to be like this. Odds are you’ve experienced your own family meltdown, at one time or another. It probably started innocently enough: a birthday lunch or a wedding anniversary, or (indeed, most traditionally of all) a Christmas dinner. Everyone arrived with the best of intentions, all hugs, smiles and compliments. Gifts were exchanged, news was shared, sparkling wine flowed. And then everyone sat down. Possibly it was too hot, people sat too close together.

MUSIC:

Elbows clashed, bad manners grated, somebody spilt something, and that wine bottle continued to be in too easy reach. A backhanded compliment turned into a debate about politics or religion or climate change, and that got out of hand. On stage, in real life – it doesn’t matter – the kitchen table draws the family together, only to blow them apart. Currently on stage at the National Theatre is Rules for Living, the play I wrote about familial warfare. It’s set around the kitchen table during a family Christmas lunch, which, you won’t be surprised to hear, doesn’t go entirely as planned. However, staging a play around a kitchen table (or any kind of table) is notoriously tricky. Either you arrange your actors like The Last Supper, with everyone on one side of the table (which tends to look bizarre), or else you have

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actors sitting with their backs to the audience, blocking their view of the action. To try to overcome this problem, we’re staging our play in the round – making the audience feel more like they’re at a boxing or wrestling match than a family drama. Which, given the way things progress, isn’t entirely inappropriate… But back to the wider problem. Why do we keep fighting the same battles, year after year? Why do we fall back into the same old roles, the same destructive patterns, even after promising that “This year will be different”? At times, family arguments can feel almost scripted – we know who’s going to drink too much, who’s going to pick a fight, who’s going to storm out in tears, even before we cross the threshold. Storytellers have long been fascinated by dysfunctional families. From King Lear to August: Osage County, A View from the Bridge to Cat on a Hot Tin Roof, family strife is something we return to again and again. In Eugene O’Neill’s masterpiece about his own family, Long Day’s Journey into Night, he didn’t even bother changing his parents’ names (or hiding their various addictions, resentments and regrets). Instead, he ordered that the play should not be published until 25 years after his death. (His wife ignored his wishes, and it was published just three years after he died. A bad day for the O’Neill family, one suspects.) I’ve been asked a lot of questions about whether the play is autobiographical (no), whether the characters resemble my own family members (also no), and whether I’ve drawn on my own Christmas experiences, in depicting a family’s violent disintegration (no, no, no). At least, I don’t think I have. But I’m sure if any of my relatives disagree, they’ll let me know. Q “Rules for Living”, by Sam Holcroft, is at the National Theatre, SE1, from March 13

Introducing the soulful Benjamin Clementine

The 26-year-old singer-songwriter Benjamin Clementine is poised to lead an unplugged revival. This north Londoner followed up his breakout performance on Later with Jools Holland with a debut album, At Least for Now, released in January; this month he begins a British tour of stripped-back live performances. His act, honed during a four-year gigging spree in Paris, is “just a man and a piano”, he says. He’s being modest – add into the equation

impossibly refined good looks, the sharpest of suits and a gravelly voice that bears an uncanny resemblance to Nina Simone’s. Clementine’s elegant playing transports you into the world of smoky piano bars, with far-flung influences including French classical composer Erik Satie, Jimi Hendrix and Jake Thackray, pioneer of the English chanson. The homecoming performance at the Barbican on April 1 is sure to be a sellout. JH

ILLUSTRATION: NINA FUGA. WILL BREMRIDGE

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Chloë Grace Moretz/ Actress Coach Swagger 27 in patchwork floral Fluff Jacket in pink coach.com


PROFILE

All about

EVE Pioneering photojournalist Eve Arnold went to the ends of the earth to pursue her craft. For her friend and biographer, Janine di Giovanni, she was a lifelong inspiration ome time before Eve Arnold – the great Magnum photographer, feminist and role model for so many young women – died at the age of 99, I went to visit her in her London nursing home with one of my closest friends, Mariann, a no-nonsense Austrian businesswoman. It was winter time, a late Sunday afternoon. But I remember that Eve was having a good day. Her trademark grey plait hung down her back, she was able to move adeptly through the small apartment where she lived and was cared for, she was able to show us some of her photographs, and then sit and have something to eat. In advanced old age, Eve was still extremely attractive. Even though she was from a Russian-Jewish Philadelphia family, and despite that strong East Coast accent, there was something about Eve that always reminded me of a noble Chinese woman –

PIERLUIGI PRATURION; EVE ARNOLD, COURTESY MAGNUM

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perhaps because as a foreign correspondent, I identified so much with her extraordinary, groundbreaking book In China, and the long years of negotiation she had undergone to get into a country that was effectively cut off from the rest of the world. She was a fearless adventurer, often working alone, and one couldn’t help but admire this physically tiny, fierce woman. Eve, being a great photographer, had a “beady eye” – as the visual critic Liz Jobey once noted – and that CONTACT SHEET SHOWING January day, even though JOAN CRAWFORD APPLYING she was nearly 100 years MAKE-UP, 1959. ARNOLD SPENT A MONTH PHOTOGRAPHING old, was no exception. She CRAWFORD IN HOLLYWOOD FOR LIFE MAGAZINE; THE made comments about my ACTRESS ASKED TO BE SHOT WHILE HAVING HER LEGS bad haircut (“it’s horrible”) WAXED AND HER HAIR AND EYEBROWS COLOURED and said something so

EVE ARNOLD IN SPAIN, 1969. THAT YEAR, SHE SPENT FOUR MONTHS TRAVELLING THROUGH AFGHANISTAN. HER EXTRAORDINARY LIFE IS DOCUMENTED IN A NEW BOOK BY JANINE DI GIOVANNI

astute and sensitive to my friend – an observation that echoed deeply – that Mariann burst into tears when we climbed the stairs to leave. I wish I could relate exactly what she said, but neither Mariann nor I can remember – we just recall how powerful her connection was with other people. When Eve stared at you it was penetrating, and she was hypersensitive to the way that exterior could reveal the raw interior. A skill she used to become one of the most brilliant photojournalists of her generation. “She is,” Mariann said, that day on the stairway, “like an old oak tree. So solid.” Eve brought out strong emotions in most people, something I realised most recently when I was asked by Magnum > 139


PROFILE

ABOVE: ACTORS APPLY MAKE-UP FOR AN OPERA PERFORMANCE, CHINA, 1979. RIGHT: A NOTEBOOK FROM 1979. THAT YEAR, ARNOLD VISITED CHINA TWICE, FOR THREE MONTHS AT A TIME. COVERING 40,000 MILES, SHE PHOTOGRAPHED SCHOOLS, FACTORIES, FILM STUDIOS, PEASANTS, CITY DWELLERS AND GOVERNMENT OFFICIALS – CONTRACTING PNEUMONIA ALONG THE WAY. IN 1980, THE PHOTOGRAPHS WERE PUBLISHED AS A BOOK, IN CHINA, WHICH WON SEVERAL AWARDS, AND WAS EXHIBITED AROUND AMERICA

to work on a new biography. As I began the task of researching her life, I discovered a side to her I did not know from my own encounters. This came in the form of boxes and boxes of her life, which had been donated by her family to a library at Yale University in Connecticut. Imagine a lifetime stuffed into boxes – all your letters, all your diaries. And Eve was someone who kept everything. What a task that was to wade through her papers: along with a determined and clever young photojournalism PhD student, Tessa, I trawled through journals, plane tickets, sheets of negatives, ideas noted on

EVE ARNOLD, COURTESY MAGNUM

Imagine a lifetime stuffed into boxes – and Eve kept everything index cards, tearsheets and shot lists. It was overwhelming at times because Eve lived such a full, complete and passionate life, with hundreds of friends and acquaintances, some very famous (like Marilyn Monroe), some just close and dear companions. Tessa and I sat with our laptops and iPhones (to photograph letters) like a pair of detectives. In which box were the private letters from John Huston? Where were the negatives from Eve’s first trip to China, that opened the door to a world most people did not even know about that country?

Which box had her wonderful, inspiring letters from her pal Isabella Rossellini? How about that incident with Joan Crawford when she turned up drunk to a photo shoot, and demanded Eve photograph her in the nude (Eve warned her such pictures could hurt her career – she shot them, in the end, but never published them). Wasn’t Anjelica Huston divine as a young teenager when Eve photographed her in Ireland? And what about the many letters from the road Eve wrote to her only child, Franklin? Eve was such a public persona – one of the first women, along with Arthur Miller’s wife Inge Morath, to join Magnum – but she was also deeply private. There was so much of her private life that I did not know about, and was almost too shy (not good for a biographer) to ask. Her love life, for instance, was a mystery, and remained so even after I interviewed dozens of her friends. Even Frank, her son from a short marriage to the industrial designer Arnold Arnold, seemed not to know. Somehow I could live with this lack of information because the rest of her life was so rich. What I focused on was what she would have wanted me to – the work. But she did tell me about emotions – about loneliness, about being frightened when she was on the road, about coming >

BELOW: MARILYN MONROE AND CLARK GABLE, THE MISFITS, 1960. ARNOLD PHOTOGRAPHED THE CAST ON SET DURING FILMING IN NEVADA, AND BEFRIENDED DIRECTOR JOHN HUSTON. LATER, SHE WOULD SHOOT SEVERAL OF HIS FILM PRODUCTIONS, VISIT HIS HOME IN IRELAND AND PHOTOGRAPH HIS DAUGHTER, ANJELICA

ABOVE: A NURSE MEASURES A NEWBORN BABY, FROM THE ESSAY “A BABY’S MOMENTOUS FIRST FIVE MINUTES”, PORT JEFFERSON, LONG ISLAND, 1959. ARNOLD COMPLETED THE PROJECT AT MATHER HOSPITAL. AT THE TIME SHE HERSELF WAS SUFFERING FROM A DEEP DEPRESSION FOLLOWING A MISCARRIAGE


PROFILE glorious to me, and as I was putting together the pieces of how to live my life – how do you put yourself at risk, for instance, when you have a major responsibility to a child? – she was a reference point. Eve, with her camera bags and long grey plait – she went grey very early – with her apartment in Mayfair the starting point for

down with illnesses in remote places where she felt vulnerable and small. And for a young reporter, as I was when I first met her, these were golden words of advice that I needed to hear. aving lunch with Eve in the Chelsea Arts Club or her flat in Mayfair was like meeting with Scheherazade. The colourful stories she related of her work – in China, in New York, in Hollywood, on film sets such as Huston’s The Misfits (where she shot some of her best Marilyn photos) or in Afghanistan and the USSR – were one thing, but as a woman and a journalist, I also sought her advice on the private side. OK, so I should have a child

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trips and missions that took her all over the world, seemed to personify free spirit. She was a tough woman who didn’t tolerate silliness or small talk. She was happy to take on anyone – as I discovered when I went through her correspondence. She bartered with magazine and newspaper editors, even with the Magnum agency itself. “Where is the money?” she wrote in one furious letter to Magnum’s editorial director in 1966. “What do you expect me to live and work on????” Above all she had gumption and did not let anyone take advantage of her. You don’t get to stand along the ranks of Cartier-Bresson and Robert Capa if you don’t defend yourself. My favourite Eve Arnold photograph was one she sent me when my BATHROOM, FROM THE son was born – from a story called ESSAY ABOUT FLATMATES, “THREE GIRLS IN SEARCH OF “A Baby’s Momentous First Five A FOURTH”, KNIGHTSBRIDGE, Minutes”. Eve had suffered a LONDON, 1961. THAT YEAR ARNOLD WOULD MOVE TO miscarriage early on in her career, ENGLAND AND ENROL HER SON, FRANK, IN BOARDING and it prompted her to do a series SCHOOL. SHE SEPARATED FROM HER HUSBAND AND on birth in a Long Island hospital. LONDON REMAINED HOME FOR THE REST OF HER LIFE One of those was a photo in which a mother’s hand reaches out to clutch the finger of her newborn. It’s (like her, I have one son) – but how on on my wall in my study, and I look at it earth did I manage not to abandon my several times a day. It does that thing that a passion, my work, while at the same time wonderful photo always does – it captures looking after a baby? Eve laughed and told the moment, the high emotion. You can me how she had locked herself in sense the tears in the room as Eve closed the loo at Heathrow airport before a long her shutter to get the picture. trip, and cried. She was so anxious about Looking back on the time spent leaving her son behind, and knew the researching the book, the most treasured loneliness that grips the soul at 2am in moment I have of going through those a grubby room somewhere at the back of boxes is coming across one of Eve’s diaries. the world. I knew that feeling, too. In it, scribbled in her old-fashioned I had always seen Eve as one of the few American handwriting, were the words: female role models I could look to. My own “Lunch with Janine di Giovanni” and, life followed no map, and she was someone next to it, my long-forgotten phone who had married, divorced, had her beloved number from my youth. Q child, Frank (who was often her greatest “Eve Arnold: Magnum Legacy” (Prestel, £30), champion but also an editor and friend), by Janine di Giovanni, is published on April 1 lived alone, and travelled alone. She seemed

EVE ARNOLD, COURTESY MAGNUM

Above all, Eve had gumption and let no one take advantage of her


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EVENT FULL LINE-UP OF STAR SPEAKERS, NOW AVAILABLE ON

She’s in

FASHION

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The countdown to the Vogue Festival 2015 begins, with more speakers and more activities than ever before…

TALKS & DEBATES In an exciting line-up of events, hear from the personalities who star in the pages of Vogue. World-famous photographers, designers and industry heads will hit the stage for one-toone interviews and panel debates that take you to the heart of fashion and allow a rare opportunity to hear the stars of today speak.

Vogue Shop The official Vogue Shop returns with more exclusive collaborations and products only available during these two days.

PREVIOUS FESTIVAL SPEAKERS INCLUDE, CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT, ALEXA CHUNG, VALENTINO GARAVANI, NAOMI CAMPBELL, TOM FORD AND VICTORIA BECKHAM

Trying to break into the fashion world? This year, the Vogue editors and leading professionals will host a programme of masterclasses to give you a crash course in how to break into and succeed in the magazine world. Each class has limited numbers, allowing face-to-face tuition, so book now to meet mentors at the cutting edge of the industry.

WIN A VIP SHOPPING SPREE AT To celebrate the Vogue Festival, Harrods will be offering one winner £3,000 and two runners-up £1,000 each to spend in the store, along with two nights at the Mandarin Oriental Hyde Park. TO ENTER, post a picture of the travelling Harrods “Green Man” on Instagram using #MyGreenMan @Harrods #VogueFestival2015. The most creative and inspired images will be announced on April 27. For details on how to get a green man and enter the competition, visit Facebook.com/harrods

Beauty hall Let the experts update your look in our interactive beauty hall, with free makeovers from great hair and make-up brands.

VOGUE COVER SHOOT WITH CHANEL Play dress-up from a treasure chest of Chanel accessories straight from the runway. Slip on those oversized sunglasses, classic pearls and quilted leather clutch for a Vogue cover shoot by Vogue photographers.

The Vogue Festival 2015 in association with Harrods runs on APRIL 25 & 26 at the Royal College of Art and the Royal Geographical Society, SW7. For more information, and to buy tickets, visit Vogue.co.uk/voguefestival #voguefestival 146

ALASDAIR McLELLAN; DARREN GERRISH

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VIEWPOINT

The accidental

HUSBAND Novelist Adam Thirlwell and his wife wanted an informal wedding. He didn’t realise it would change everything

n a hot Wednesday morning in June two years ago, I was walking down Houston Street in New York with my girlfriend, Alison. I say girlfriend, but we had been together for over a decade. We were on holiday. London, our home, was a distant smudge in the heat haze. We went to Russ & Daughters and ate bagels with lox for breakfast on the bench outside. Then we walked south, down Centre Street, towards Manhattan’s tip, went into City Hall, and got married. To the wedding purist, I guess this was not the formal ideal. On arrival, the prospective married couple takes a numbered ticket, like in some Soviet grocery store, then waits for their number to come up on an electronic dotmatrix display. Ahead of us in the queue was a crowded Hispanic family in white satin. Whereas we were the less traditional. I’d bought a blue blazer by 1205; Alison was in a short-sleeved bouclé jacket by Mulberry, a Carven T-shirt with a screen-print of pale mountains, and a Balenciaga cream silk skirt. In other words, there was no limousine, no morning suit or white dress, no family, no wedding photographer, no speeches. Our witnesses were two friends I had called up a few days earlier: the American novelists Jeffrey Eugenides and Gary Shteyngart. Afterwards, we took two taxis uptown, and went to Shake Shack in Madison Square Park for burgers, fries and Brooklyn lager. That was our sun-dappled wedding breakfast. Then we went to the New Museum, where our friend Tacita Dean had a show of films that was closing soon: and so we sat there watching her film

HAIR AND MAKE-UP: CAROLINE SIMS. ALISON WEARS DRESS, DOLCE & GABBANA, AT BROWNS. SHOES, CHRISTIAN LOUBOUTIN. ADAM WEARS SWEATER, TOM FORD. JEANS, SAINT LAURENT. SHOES, CHURCH’S

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“HOW DO YOU RECONCILE THE PUBLIC WITH THE PRIVATE?” ADAM THIRLWELL AND HIS WIFE, ALISON, AT HOME. SITTINGS EDITOR: NURA KHAN. PHOTOGRAPH: RICK MORRIS PUSHINSKY

of the painter Cy Twombly – in his studio, in a diner. Because always at every wedding, we realised, there is a guest you do not know. And in our case, it was Cy Twombly. It was the most minimal wedding we could invent, and the most romantic day of my life. Since then, I have often mused on this wedding. I know some friends who see it as somehow inauthentic – in the absence of so many of our friends and family; while I have other friends who confide in me that they wish they’d done something similar – that their wedding was invaded by their

mother’s additions to the guest list or the catastrophes of the catering. The basic conundrum of every wedding, I guess, is simple: how do you reconcile the private with the public? How do you find the best way of putting your private commitment formally on display? Whether that happens in a country church, or London registry office, or villa outside Florence, the basic mystery remains the same. Our ideal – when we dreamed up the idea on the plane over to New York – had been improvisation. We were proud of our wedding’s casual charm – in opposition, > 151


VIEWPOINT perhaps, to the historical weight of those words, husband and wife. And yet, for instance, soon it became less casual. Retrospectively, it acquired its own rituals… On coming back to London, we bought two vintage rings for Alison: an eighteenth-century diamond cluster in a silver setting as an engagement ring, and a Tiffany wedding ring from New York dating to 1920. (There in Hatton Garden, they asked us when the sizing would need to be done by – was the wedding soon? Oh, we’re already married, we happily, and shockingly, replied.) As for me, I adopted my grandmother’s simple platinum wedding band, which my grandfather had bought for her during the Second World War, before he left to fight in north Africa and Italy. While on our anniversary we ritually eat lobster rolls – because that night, at our wedding dinner with friends at April Bloomfield’s John Dory restaurant on Broadway, in the steaming heat, we ate lobster rolls with waffle chips. Just as our one sadness was the absence of true wedding photographs – since it turns out that to rely on two novelists with iPhones is not a good formula for photographic coverage… (I was wistfully envious when a friend confessed to me that they had also got married with only two witnesses present – but one of these was a professional photographer, hired for the occasion.) Those retrospective rituals were the public image of a private shift: that this wedding, which had seemed so improvised, in fact represented a major difference. That night in the John Dory, Jeffrey Eugenides confessed to me that at first he had been perplexed by our wedding. He had worried that as a gesture it was frivolous, not serious enough for the weight of a marriage. Whereas when he saw us reading out our vows, happily tearful, at a podium in City Hall, he understood – it was pure sincerity. We wanted a wedding as closely fitted to our silhouette as possible. lison and I met when we were both just out of university. She was a human-rights lawyer, while I was writing my first novel. In the next decade, we shared each other’s careers, bought a house together, acquired a whippet. It wasn’t that we never thought about getting married; it was more that we couldn’t see what else a wedding would add. We thought, I think, that a wedding was superfluous. Our commitment was implicit, self-evident: why convert it into a ceremony?

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And yet, it turned out, a wife was different to a girlfriend. I couldn’t deny it. After the wedding, we went to Montauk, on the tip of Long Island, as a way of creating a honeymoon, and already I began to realise that we were yet another example of that universal philosophical category: the same but different. We were still ourselves, and yet we were transformed. But I wasn’t sure how precisely I’d define this transformation. The first time I mentioned this possible perception to a friend, who was also recently married, she agreed, and said that for her the difference of being married was that now she felt secure, in a way she had not felt secure before. And while I understood this, I was not so sure that this was the explanation for my new feeling, since I had always felt secure. Psychology was not enough.

I understood something else – I did not want to live in a world without rituals A few months later, Gary Shteyngart emailed me from New York. Had I seen, he wanted to know, the local section of that morning’s New York Times? I replied that no, amazingly, here in London I hadn’t immediately woken to check on the new food-truck craze in Williamsburg, or Hasidic self-improvement workshops. There in the “Field Notes” section was a profile of James Mitchell, the man who had officiated at our wedding. I couldn’t stop smiling. For James Mitchell, I felt a deep affection. He had performed so far, they reported, more than 27,000 wedding ceremonies. I could remember him so vividly, with his clipped moustache, and the theatrical way he’d concluded the ceremony, inserting a proudly rolled and crescendoing “r” to the adjective “great” in the phrase “by the power vested in me by the grrrreat state of New York, I now pronounce you husband and wife” – like we were inside some Hollywood romcom. And in this profile I found a clue to my new feeling of transformation, in something James Mitchell said. “On Sundays, I look forward to coming to work,” he told the New York Times. “It might be my fiftieth

or hundredth, but it’s still their only marriage ceremony…” It was the fact of the ceremony itself, I now understood, that made the giant difference. As if in pronouncing those vows in City Hall, our commitment had acquired a life of its own. We had done something larger than ourselves. I was, it turned out, deeply orthodox in the matter of weddings. For me, the ceremony was everything. The other paraphernalia – the dress, the reception, the honeymoon – were just variations on a party, problems of styling. The true thing is the fact of making a public pronouncement of your love – to two people, or 200, it doesn’t matter. This was what a wedding had done for us – just as it does for every couple: it transforms for a moment something irreducibly private into something public, and in doing so it gives that privacy a form. There’s such a temptation to be bohemian, or at least there is for me. I was always the novelist as enfant terrible. And yet now I understood something else, which I had understood almost accidentally – that I did not want to live in a world without rituals. But then, maybe that’s the deep truth of improvisation – that our most apparently casual actions reveal our deepest yearnings. No wonder, therefore, if in the new novel I was writing, marriage became its deep concern. (Even if the narrator of that novel destroys his marriage, for always in fiction I tend to act out my deepest fears.) And no wonder if I became a marriage zealot – recommending marriage to all my friends, the moment they met someone new... Yes, that wedding of ours – so full of lightness and sprezzatura – has become something far graver than we expected. Recently, my wife bought us two pieces of jewellery from Comfort Station, a jewellery shop in Shoreditch: a silver necklace for her, and a silver bracelet for me. Both pieces were stamped with a cryptic co-ordinate: 40°N 42' 54" 74°W 0' 5" – the precise cartographic location for Manhattan’s City Hall. Even that word, wife, which I had seen as so historical, so un-chic: I love using it now. Every time I use it, I think of our sunlit ceremony. No one knows how much is encoded for me in that word. It’s another public sign, like the wedding itself, of an endless privacy: the infinite privacy of our marriage. Q “Lurid and Cute”, by Adam Thirlwell, is published by Jonathan Cape at £14


REPORT

After SHOCK There’s nowhere more romantic than Paris in the springtime. But, asks Natasha Fraser-Cavassoni, in the wake of the Charlie Hebdo murders, will the city ever be the same again? here was no inspiration,” said Karl Lagerfeld when questioned about his latest couture collection for Chanel. “It came in a flash, but with no flashiness.” The playful energy of that show, with its colourful clothes and oversized mechanical flowers, brought to mind springtime. “After everything that’s happened, there’s a need for lightness.” He didn’t have to explain that this was a reference to the Charlie Hebdo massacres of January 7. I was on a Singapore Airlines flight when it happened, all set for an idyllic trip that meant fleeing Paris in winter: a case of spending one night in Jakarta, promoting a book on Biyan Wanaatmadja, Indonesia’s best-known fashion designer, and then having a three-day jolly in Bali, care of Biyan, with other Parisians who had worked on the project. As a divorced mother of teens, I have to prepare before I travel – daily lunch money put in envelopes, typed notes for the babysitter. For once, I paced myself well and had enough time to take the sedate Air France bus to Charles de Gaulle airport. Cruising along Boulevard Haussmann we passed lines of people outside Galeries Lafayette and Printemps. It was only 8am but Wednesday January 7 was the first day of sales; I was relieved to be missing out on the crush. Cut to my arrival at Singapore airport 13 hours later and the discovery of 25 “Je suis Charlie” texts on my iPhone. I found out

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about the catastrophe on a news website, having to reread the article five times because I was crying. At 11.30am, brothers Saïd and Chérif Kouachi, armed with assault rifles and other artillery, had forced themselves into the offices of the French satirical weekly magazine Charlie Hebdo in Paris. Bursting into the weekly staff meeting, they killed the editor, Stéphane Charbonnier, and his fellow cartoonists Jean Cabut, Georges Wolinski and Bernard Verlhac. Twelve people died in total. Eleven others were injured. The terrifying event shook France – famous for its tolerance of differing opinions – and, indeed, the rest of the world. At that moment I dearly wished I was back in Paris, my home of 25 years, comforting my two 13-year-old daughters, Allegra and Cecilia, and commiserating with friends. From the other side of the world, a fellow journalist forwarded an Instagram post by Elsa Wolinski, daughter of one of those murdered: “Papa est parti pas Wolinski” (Daddy has gone, not Wolinski). The dignity of her five words about her 80-year-old father set me off again. No doubt it was a mixture of vulnerability (feeling far away and hopeless) and utter shock. In the days that

PATRICK DEMARCHELIER; GETTY

Two terrorists had shot an arrow through the constitution

followed there were memorials, marches and, at the request of President Hollande, a minute’s silence in all schools. Both my daughters told me that they were surprised to see many of their teachers, both male and female, break down in tears. It sounded humane and touching. And I explained how the Charlie Hebdo murders were an affront to France’s admirable respect for the individual, its attitude to freedom of speech and how essential it is to voice your opinions. Yet two crazed terrorists representing the Islamic Jihad of Yemen, albeit born in France, had shot an arrow through the heart of the constitution. n my return to Paris six days after the attacks, soldiers with machine guns greeted my flight at Charles de Gaulle airport. I tried sharing this with friends, and the fact that policemen with rifles were now patrolling my neighbourhood, but people were only talking about the city’s unity rally held the previous Sunday which, >

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REPORT

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On a practical level, being fearful doesn’t help a citizen, because by walking instead of taking the Métro, the alternative could be being killed by a car bomb – and so it continues. I personally know this from my father, Hugh Fraser, a Conservative MP who, in 1975, was saved by a telephone call when the IRA planted an explosive under his car. (Tragically, our next-door neighbour, Gordon Hamilton Fairley, a leading cancer specialist, was killed.) While the Fondation Louis Vuitton, the Frank Gehry-designed exhibition space in the Bois de Boulogne, remains surprisingly unguarded, there are subtle signs of heightened security around the city: the double doors at many of the hôtel particuliers in which the fashion houses are headquartered used to be guarded by little more than an elderly concierge in a cubicle; now more robust electronic security systems have been installed. Yet among the people I speak to, there’s a confidence that visitors will still come, that it is business as usual. There’s chatter about two must-see exhibitions that open this month, both masterminded by Olivier Saillard: his Jeanne Lanvin retrospective at the Palais Galliera and his Yves Saint Laurent 1971 show at La Fondation Pierre Bergé-Yves Saint Laurent. Then there are new hotels (the sumptuous La Réserve Paris), new boutiques (Christian Louboutin’s beauty store, Olympia Le-Tan’s flagship and Kilian Hennessy’s perfume shop)… And although the architect Jean Nouvel refused to attend the inauguration of his auditorium at the Philharmonie de Paris – according to him it is “not finished” – music lovers have given their approval to its superior acoustics system. (The Philharmonie, which opened a week after the attacks, is in the nineteenth arrondissement, which was also home to the Kouachi brothers.) At the Théâtre du Châtelet, the Canadian opera director Robert Carsen is bringing us Singin’ in the Rain with an all-English cast and costumes by Anthony Powell. It’s hard to think of a more joyous musical comedy to put on the stage. Carsen, a brilliant talent, owes his first break to France. “The spirit of Paris as a city has always welcomed foreign artists and been open to avant-garde visual arts before anyone,” he tells me, praising its “huge appreciation of quality and innovation”. Also add its brave and buoyant attitude, felt now perhaps more than ever. Q

“We cannot live in terror, and have to move on”

uring the weeks that follow, it is hard not to be struck by the calm behind Paris’s exquisiteness, particularly when crossing the Seine’s glittery waters. The moody weather – either blustery or boasting powder-blue skies – seems to enhance both the buildings and people. Among fashion folk there is positivity: haute couture is adjudged a good season and we look forward to the prêt-à-porter shows, enlivened by the prospect of new creative directors at established houses (Hermès, Nina Ricci, Maison Margiela). Laure de Gramont, the literary scout and blogger, tells me she can perceive a change of heart and surge of optimism. “We cannot live in terror, and have to move on,” she says. Her defiance matches the growing mood. The goal behind terrorism is to terrorise; somehow the Parisians are too feisty in character to fear.

D  

JASON LLOYD-EVANS; MITCHELL SAMS; GETTY

with more than a million marchers, was the biggest in French history. I bumped into the designer Olympia Le-Tan, who described going with the artist André Saraiva and his little daughter. “We took turns taking her on our shoulders,” said Le-Tan. She and Saraiva felt the positive energy. “People want to be happy again in France,” said Saraiva. But over the following days, as I went about my work, not everyone wanted to talk about it, evading questions about who went, what it was like… APC’s Jean Touitou was characteristically blunt. “It was very left-wing,” he said, when we met at his headquarters just before the APC menswear presentation. “There was no one from the ’hoods and no conservatives.” I mentioned the Parisian suburbs: how the poverty and despair of the Muslim immigrants can lead to violence. “The government has refused to address this problem that has been going on for 30 years,” he replied. Still, others are more optimistic that the government will find a solution. Suddenly, François Hollande has become wildly popular – a huge change. It impressed the French that Hollande refused a bullet-proof jacket during the Unity Rally, unlike other world leaders. In fact, I agree with Colombe Pringle – writer, social commentator and former editor-in-chief of French Vogue – that “it was in that moment that he rose to the occasion and suddenly became France’s president. It was his unofficial inauguration.” Pringle (halfEnglish, half-French) has never liked the

Marseillaise, “but suddenly, during that march, I felt very French and very moved by the anthem’s words.” She also noticed that people smiled at the police, impressed by their courage during THE UNITY RALLY IN the events. “That PARIS, JANUARY 11. IN THE AFTERMATH OF THE is a definite change,” ATTACKS, THERE IS A DEFIANT she says, “and POSITIVITY IN THE CITY – ALSO FELT AT SHOWS SUCH something that has AS CHANEL’S COUTURE, LEFT not happened since the student riots of ’68, when the police became universally mistrusted.” I went to see Christophe Robin, famously the hair colourist for Catherine Deneuve, Isabelle Huppert, Kristin Scott Thomas and all the major French film stars. After the attack, his American clients cancelled. They have since trickled back to his salon at Le Meurice hotel. As L’Oréal’s colourist expert, Robin travels all over the world and has many Arab clients as well as Jewish ones. He said that “the Muslim issue and antiSemitism problem” have become such inflammatory subjects that his staff are now banned from talking about either religion. “It’s the first time in my 20-year career that I have imposed this, but it’s just not worth going there,” he said. “People get too angry, too quickly.”


W W W. T H O M A S S A B O . C O M / F I N E J E W E L L E R Y


[ THE EDIT ] A SEVENTIES SPRING

Kyla ankle boots £150, Carrie tote bag £165, Draycott brogues £120, Wells brogues £100, blouse £69, trouser £89, shirt £79. All Somerset by Alice Temperley.


jbrandjeans.com


shopping guide

CELINE BAG, AT CHIC & SEEK

If you’re searching for this season’s key pieces, a good vintage shop is worth its weight in gold. Harriet Walker finds the best ABSOLUTE VINTAGE

GLEN LUCHFORD; ISTOCK

LONDON ABSOLUTE VINTAGE AV has become an east London stalwart of the vintage scene over the past 10 years, providing colourful and characterful pieces that you can weave into your existing wardrobe for every day. Absolutevintage.co.uk

BLACKOUT II Blackout II has been serving up retro looks to tourists, fashion insiders and club kids for 20 years, offering pieces from the Twenties to the Eighties. Blackout2.com CENCI South London’s Cenci boasts one of the broadest collections in the capital but excels particularly at Sixties and Seventies separates. Ideal hunting ground, then, for summer suede or a nerdy

ribbed tanktop to fit right in with your current crop of Céline. Cenci.co.uk

CHIC & SEEK The location of a second-hand store will tell you everything

– the fact that this boutique is in Notting Hill is all you need to know about the calibre of stock. Online ordering available, too. Chicandseek.com THE EAST END THRIFT STORE Crammed with bright and breezy bargains that start at about £10. Or buy a bag for £10 or £20 and fill it to the brim. Such is the turnover of stock, this cult institution warrants repeat visits. Theeastendthriftstore.com 161


e shopping guid OUTSIDE LONDON

FOUND & VISION West London’s hotspot for some very clever finds, Found & Vision is loved by stylists, designers and fashion editors alike. Don’t be surprised if you see Kate Moss wearing a jacket from here, or an item that’s later reinterpreted on the season’s catwalks. Foundandvision.com MAIREAD LEWIN VINTAGE Where Kate Moss, Liberty Ross and Chloë Sevigny find all their best where-did-she-get-that looks. Mairead Lewin has one of the best eyes in the business; it’s impossible to leave without falling in love with something. By appointment only; 07968 940293 OXFAM BOUTIQUE “Posh Oxfam”, as it is known, is great for two reasons: it’s one of a few classed as a “boutique”, meaning some of the best pieces donated nationwide end up on its shelves; and you can guarantee a good haul from the wardrobes of Notting Hill. Prices reflect that, but they’re bargains nonetheless. How about a Burberry trench for £60? Oxfam.org.uk

COW, BIRMINGHAM Streetwear styles and acid brights form the basis of this vintage chain’s stock, with a dose of reworked pieces made from remaindered cloth in a similarly eco-conscious club-kid vein. Wearecow.com

SUNGLASSES, AT WHAT ALICE FOUND

TRAID A chain of well-appointed shops that carry good-quality, affordable pieces. It isn’t haute vintage, but it certainly isn’t a jumble sale. The windows of its Brixton branch deserve a shout-out. Traid.org.uk

WHAT THE BUTLER WORE The premier Sixties and Seventies vintage shop in Britain specialising in that era’s zeitgeisty one-offs from the likes of Mary Quant and Ossie Clark. It caters to all budgets and taste brackets without coming over too fancy-dress shop. Whatthebutlerwore.co.uk

WHAT ALICE FOUND, BOURNEMOUTH Stylist Nicki Grainger’s boutique is touted for its original and quirky take on vintage. Using her fashion eye, Grainger knows no bounds, sourcing pieces from as far as LA to delight. Whatalicefound.co.uk GREEN BRICK, BRIGHTON Set on the site of what was Brighton’s Biba store in the Sixties, Green Brick chooses its vintage on the strength of its labels, so it’s full of brands you already know, some from within the past five years, others much older. 21 Queens Road

WILLIAM VINTAGE William Banks-Blaney’s atelier boasts daywear (Sixties Cardin) and a host of rare formal RADIO DAYS couture (Fifties Dior) DIOR DRESS, AT Wardrobe assistants of stage presented online or THE VINTAGE SHOWROOM WILLIAM VINTAGE and screen hurry to Radio by appointment at his The expansive collection Days for good-quality, authentic Marylebone boutique, of menswear at the Vintage pieces from the Twenties SNOOPER’S PARADISE, and if he doesn’t have Showroom is so impressive, onwards, presented in an BRIGHTON what you’re looking for, it’s spawned its own book. Don’t environment that pays no heed Filled with cheerful fashion he will likely be able to be put off by the menswear part to anything that happened finds, costumes, kitsch homeware source it for you. Amanda – vintage fits are cut smaller, ideal after 1980. and books from every era, “pile Harlech and Alexa Chung for the modern gamine. Radiodaysvintage.co.uk it high, sell it cheap” might be are fans. Williamvintage.com Thevintageshowroom.com this store’s mantra. Don’t miss Snooper’s Attic upstairs, for bespoke millinery, handmade jewellery, alterations and more. r Liberty r Browns for vintage r John Lewis for r Michael Costiff at 7 Kensington Gardens If you like your Hermès bags vintage jewellery Dover Street Market By choosing to specialise in Hermès, Browns mines a rich seam of Kelly and Birkin bags from the past 50 years, often available in rare shades and skins, and selected by experts for absolute authenticity. HERMES KELLY

The jewellery team at John Lewis sources all kinds of one-off pieces from Eighties Christian Dior costume jewellery to minimal Susan Caplan pieces from the Nineties. What’s more, it’s all available to buy online.

vintage well curated and of the couture bent, Liberty offers a broad selection of pieces sourced by the agency Designer Vintage, all dry-cleaned and restored, and with an alteration service offered, too.

BAG, AT BROWNS EARRINGS, AT JOHN LEWIS VINTAGE

Rei Kawakubo herself invited Costiff to open his World Archive shop within Dover Street Market, so convinced was she by his flair for eclecticism. His vintage picks are some of the most fascinating around, worth a visit for the browse alone.

JEMPORIUM VINTAGE, CAMBRIDGE Jemporium is a good resource for anyone interested in street fashions of the past 30 years. There’s a lot of old Adidas (but good old Adidas), Harris tweed, velvet blazers and Fair Isle knits. Jemporiumvintage.co.uk

GLEN LUCHFORD; MARIO TESTINO; ISTOCK

Department stores


inVOGUE ARMSTRONG’S VINTAGE, EDINBURGH Ask anyone from Edinburgh for shopping tips, vintage or not, and Armstrong’s will be on the list. Established in 1840, it claims to be Britain’s largest vintage shop, although visiting it feels like walking into a Tardis. It’s packed to the rafters and appeals to students and grand dames alike. Armstrongsvintage.co.uk GODIVA, EDINBURGH There’s something rather Alice In Wonderland about this indie boutique, all gilt mirrors and overflowing trinket boxes. The vintage offering is in tune with the store’s naive, folksy styling; checked flannel shirts abound. Godivaboutique.co.uk HERMAN BROWN, EDINBURGH Who is Herman Brown? Nobody in Edinburgh has ever met him,

but the shop that bears his name extols a Hitchcockian sort of elegance with trench coats and headscarves sourced from vintage fairs around Europe and brought to you by this bustling, student-friendly shop by the College of Art. Hermanbrown.co.uk THREADBARE, EDINBURGH Threadbare’s brilliant selection spans everything from authentic Victoriana to psychedelic polyester. Depending on your shopping personality, you’ll either thrive or wilt in the face of this jampacked basement spot. 66a Broughton Street THE REAL McCOY, EXETER From the 1880s to the 1980s, this emporium boasts 100 years’ worth of fashion to buy or to hire. The store also offers reworked pieces that feel more contemporary. Therealmccoy.co.uk

Fine jewellery r Found Collected

If there isn’t anything in Peter Byworth’s stock of estate jewellery that sets your heart alight (unlikely, with a pristine selection of Cartier, Boucheron, Bulgari and Van Cleef & Arpels), he will source whatever it is you’re looking for – and invariably find it in a matter of days. Foundcollected.com

r John Joseph

Located at Grays Antique Market, John Joseph specialises in engagement rings, but everything here is

breathtaking, from the diamond line bracelets to the art-deco earrings and sapphire selection, mostly dating from 1800 to 1940. John-joseph.co.uk

r Latest Revival

Flicking online to view contemporary designs by Rodarte, Eddie Borgo and Monique Péan, you’ll also come across the estate jewels and vintage flea-market finds sourced by founder Dalia Oberlander. From an Eighties precious red spinel and diamond ribbon bow brooch to a pair of Chanel costume quilted purse earrings. Latestrevival.com

JUNK, MANCHESTER The team at Junk upcycle vintage pieces by hand on-site. From retro denim shirts to this season’s oriental trend, you’ll find it all here. Junkshop.co.uk

r The Real Real

In addition to this site’s ready-to-wear haul of Saint Laurent, Alaïa and Céline, don’t miss the vintage estate jewellery on offer by names like Cartier, Van Cleef & Arpels and Tiffany. Therealreal.com

r SJ Phillips

When super-chic jewellers Noor Fares and Sabine Ghanem both recently got engaged, they headed to Bond Street to find antique rings from SJ Phillips. Arguably the best antiques shop in the world. Sjphillips.com

THRIFTETTE IN AFFLECKS PALACE, MANCHESTER Affordable, on-trend vintage makes this go-to a hit with the town’s student population, who flock here for tie-dye crop-tops and fringed kimonos to beef up their nu-Nineties look. Thriftette.blogspot.co.uk, Afflecks.com

OXFAM ORIGINALS, MANCHESTER The Originals offshoot of Oxfam focuses on alt-retro pieces for FOXTROT VINTAGE the latterday mod. Of CLOTHING, which there are plenty MARLBOROUGH in Manchester. Think Paul Despite the small-town Weller, but womenswear. setting, Foxtrot Vintage Facebook.com/Oxfam. has a wealth of pieces Originals.Manchester garnered from AUCTIONS and loved by the – Kerry Taylor – Ask a fashion editor POP locals – but that how she got hold of BOUTIQUE, doesn’t mean it those Seventies Yves MANCHESTER isn’t worth a day Saint Laurent trousers and This Manchester trip if you’re her answer will probably be brand rarely not from round Kerry Taylor. The mistress disappoints with of the high-fashion auction, there. Think its well-priced Nineties Chanel Taylor knows not only no-label finds. and Sixties mink. her fashion history but Pop-boutique.com Foxtrot-vintagewhere to find it. Kerrytaylor clothing.com auctions.com RETRO REHAB, MANCHESTER UNCLE SAM’S, This store has been OXFORD providing discerning A student hangout for almost Mancunians with carefully four decades, Uncle Sam’s selected and hand-repaired offers a tightly honed edit of pieces for a decade. As spick retro Americana and vintage and span as vintage gets – no people-pleasers, such as denim dropped hems or pulled seams jackets and skirts and band tees. here. Retro-rehab.co.uk 25 Little Clarendon Street 163


inVOGUE CHANEL BAG, AT RESEE

ONLINE 1ST DIBS Aggregates some of the rarest second-hand pieces you’ll find online, from Junya Watanabe biker jackets to Charles James couture. One can happily while away an entire afternoon browsing. 1stdibs.com ASOS MARKETPLACE Asos’s pre-owned offshoot site means you can search by item and scroll through the choices. There isn’t much that goes back further than the Eighties, but it’s a way in for the uninitiated. Marketplace.asos.com

BRIDAL DAYS OF GRACE, EXETER This selection of vintage wedding gowns spans the late nineteenth century to the Fifties, specialising in unusual detailing, with a highly personalised service. Daysofgracevintage.co.uk ELIZABETH AVEY, LONDON At 18, Avey turned an obsession with her grandmother’s frocks into a business when she opened her first shop. The bridal arm launched in 2008, offering everything from Edwardian lace designs to Twenties flapper dresses and Seventies bohemia. It’s worth a visit even if you’re not getting married. Elizabethavey.com GLORY DAYS VINTAGE, YORK This vintage wedding-dress shop has at least 150 styles at any one time, ranging from the Thirties to

now, and will advise on gowns to suit your shape and personality. Glorydaysvintage.co.uk HALFPENNY LONDON Multi-talented Kate Halfpenny, the award-winning stylist, costume and bridal designer, has outfitted everyone from Kate Moss to Rihanna. Along with her bespoke creations, there is a selection of bridal dresses dating back to the 1800s ready-to-wear – or made to fit. Halfpennylondon.com HEAVENLY VINTAGE BRIDES, LONDON From lacy prom puffs to slinky bias-cut siren gowns, Heavenly Vintage Brides has a selection of more than 50 reconditioned vintage dresses, dating from 1900 to 1970, with prices ranging between £400 and £1,400. Heavenlyvintagebrides.co.uk

DECADES Owner Cameron Silver is the original king of vintage who can be found at the shows, soaking up the trends. The selection at his LA stores is edited according to current tastes so it feels consistently fresh. Now online. Decadesinc.com ETSY.COM Four shops not to be missed on the online marketplace: 1. Etsy.com/uk/shop/ GarishVibeVintage 2. Etsy.com/uk/shop/vdpshop 3. Etsy.com/uk/shop/ HuzzarHuzzar 4. Etsy.com/shop/ TanakaVintage

SCARLET VINTAGE If your version of vintage is all florals and tea dresses, you’ll be in seventh heaven at Scarlet Vintage. Scarletvintage.co.uk

THE STELLAR BOUTIQUE Stella McClure cut her teeth as a stallholder on Portobello Road for three years, selling to regulars including Kate Moss and Stella McCartney. Now, her fashion website with a vintage section boasts everything from babydoll WATCH, AT dresses to bomber jackets. VESTIAIRE COLLECTIVE Thestellarboutique.com

HARDLY EVER WORN IT Here, high-end labels are as good as new but traded in by their owners to make space for more buys. One woman’s trash is another woman’s treasure… Hardlyeverwornit.com

VESTIAIRE COLLECTIVE Powered by a team of specially trained “fake-hunters” based in Paris who check every single piece on the site, Vestiaire Collective offers some of the highest standard of pre-owned designer wear around. Authenticity guaranteed. Vestiairecollective.com

Paris vintage r Anouschka

If you’re in the market for pristine vintage couture, Anouschka sells it direct from her apartment. 6 Avenue du Coq. By appointment only; Contact@anouschka.fr

haute couture by Schiaparelli and Madame Grès; and the third for the little black dress. Well, this is Paris, after all. 20-24 Galerie de Montpensier

r Didier Ludot

r Gabrielle

Three stores: one for accessories Geppert and ready-to-wear by the likes Loved by of Dior and Givenchy; one for international 164

fashion editors and stylists for its offering of Chanel and Hermès. 31 Galerie de Montpensier

r Les 3 Marches

de Catherine B Catherine B has collected vintage Chanel and Hermès for more than 20 years. With an impressive archive

of about 1,500 pieces, chances are you will find that perfect Kelly bag here. Catherine-b.com

r Quidam de Revel

The hotspot for Sixties designers such as Paco Rabanne and Pierre Cardin. Also available to hire. 26 Rue de Poitou. By appointment only; 33 1 42 71 37 07

DAVID BAILEY; HENRY CLARKE; ISTOCK

e shopping guid

RESEE Vogue veteran Sofia Bernadin and former fashion editor Sabrina Marshall teamed up to bring us Resee, a highly curated website of rare vintage and second-hand finds. Forget any anxieties of having to sift through here – each item is as special as the next, from Hermès Birkins to Chanel bouclé jackets to YSL capes from the Seventies. The presentation is minimal and modern, which adds to the allure. Pieces from the past you’ll want to wear and hold on to forever. Resee.com


LIZZY JAGGER

MCMWORLDWIDE.COM


inVOGUE

March ISSUES

CHANEL

Fashion is flirting with political activism for the first time in a generation. Is there a better way to get a message across? By Harriet Quick

GISELE LEADS THE MARCH AT CHANEL S/S ’15

gained traction for their provocative interventions. The upsurge in protest and its symbols looms large in our consciousness, as more and more people take to the streets for causes as diverse as Occupy and the Berkeley march against police killings. Protests against Boko Haram raged in Nigeria, where the ongoing war saw more than 4,000 civilians killed in 2014. In early January, millions walked in unity marches and all-night vigils following the terrorist atrocities at the French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo and elsewhere in Paris. In cities as far-flung as Taipei

LEONARDO DICAPRIO AT THE PEOPLE’S CLIMATE MARCH IN NEW YORK, SEPTEMBER 2014

and Lima, the “Je Suis Charlie” banner was hoisted high along with that humble tool of writing, the pencil, to honour the 17 murdered people and our right to a free press. PROTESTS PARIS, Protest hasn’t been so IN JANUARY 2015 popular since the Sixties and Seventies, decades that were awash with movements – from John Lennon and Yoko Ono’s stay-in-bed peace effort to student protests in Paris, pacifist “be-ins”, feminist marches and anti-nuclear sitins across the Western world. Army salvage, denims, T-shirts and painted naked bodies were the look back then. What becomes interesting is how fashion filters outrage and, conversely, how protesters use the power of fashion to make statements. The synergy gave fertile > MEADHAM KIRCHHOFF

JASON LLOYD-EVANS; MITCHELL SAMS; GETTY

J

ust when we thought spring fashion was going to float by on a bed of Seventies nostalgia and embroidered flowers, it became disobedient at the ready-to-wear shows. A clutch of designers twiddled the dials to create a cacophony of stylish protest at a time when sore spots in the world were also erupting. In Hong Kong, pro-democracy protesters were occupying Central, brandishing their upturned umbrellas, while the People’s Climate March took to the streets of New York waving sunflowers and wearing backto-the-land tweed caps – well, at least Leonardo DiCaprio did. That the collections collided with these largely peaceful demonstrations is pure coincidence. The Hong Kong and NYC protests are the latest in a trajectory of awareness-making gatherings that have burst out over the last couple of years. In Italy, we’ve seen anti-Berlusconi groups with bare breasts and wreaths. (Feminist graffiti images later filtered through to Miuccia Prada’s “bra top” fur coats.) In Russia, the anti-Putin activists Pussy Riot

169


LOUISE ALSOP

“Choice and difference are valid points of view within the context of clothing as much as they are on the street,” says Kirchhoff. Angst and attitude are also key to Luella Bartley and Katie Hillier’s reboot of Marc by Marc Jacobs. Their “girl” likes to wear layered rave tees (rave was a form of protest at the time of the 1994 Criminal Justice Act), latex pencil skirts and ruckedup tops. They are appealing to a generation that wants an alternative to saccharine versions of femininity. Bartley says that as a designer she has to be careful when using signs and symbols, precisely because it can seem trite. But can high fashion and protest be happy bedfellows? The days when Katharine Hamnett stamped “58% don’t want Pershing” on T-shirts may seem aeons ago, but in our age of instant media such proclamations are more rife than ever. Fashion is a cipher, and if our times are thick with turmoil and outrage, that energy will trickle through. In the early twentieth century, West End department stores actively courted the Suffragette movement, running ads for comfortable skirts, blouses and “becoming hats for demonstrations”. Will the next feminist uprising adopt Jeremy Scott’s Barbie-doll-style dresses? Now there’s a thought. Q

PHYSICAL DEVELOPMENT When Sacai designer Chitose Abe isn’t busy with her own line, or skateboarding in her Nike sneakers, she’s reworking the sports giant’s familiar silhouettes. It’s a natural fit for the catwalk star, whose hybrid designs teeter on the edge of performance wear. Her guest collection includes a not-so-classic windbreaker reinvented with a spray of feminine pleats and a silken tennis skirt, Abe’s favourite piece in the high-performance, hyper-coloured line. Look out, the swoosh just became the new mark of high fashion. JH

CHITOSE ABE’S DESIGNS GIVE THE NIKE SILHOUETTE A FEMININE EDGE

JASON LLOYD-EVANS; MITCHELL SAMS; NICO FOSTER/HOLLANDSE HOOGTE/EYEVINE; CAPITAL PICTURES

PUSSY RIOT PERFORMING IN RED SQUARE, FEBRUARY 2012

“It’s a lyric stolen from a Johnny Thunders song,” says Alsop. “Maybe it is ironic; you can interpret it as you will.” Alsop has always considered herself an outsider, and merrily channels that emotion into her punkish designs. “I think my generation does feel frustrated and anxious,” she says of student debt and rising house prices. For a/w ’15, London menswear talent Christopher Shannon featured generic plastic-bag motifs on his sweaters with slogans such as “Thanks for nothing” and “Broke” (in Coca-Cola script). All cutting-edge fashion can be seen as a protest against what has gone before. Meadham Kirchhoff ’s show (titled Reject Everything, Embrace Everyone) was choreographed chaos. A pile-up of pink latex macs, graffiti leggings and babydoll dresses stormed out on street-cast boys and girls of every shape, size and ethnicity. Imagine the tidy, harmonious world of Benetton mulched through a juicer and you’ve got the gist. For Benjamin Kirchhoff, the show was also a rejection of the current fashion system that is smothered by a bland get-the-look formula and an obsession with product as opposed to design. MEADHAM KIRCHHOFF

ground for Karl Lagerfeld to stage a Chanel protest – after all, nothing is more Parisian than a demonstration. Punch “feminism” and “fashion” into Google now and you will draw up a fascinating scrapbook of images. Cara Delevingne and crew can be seen waving “History is her story” placards on the Chanel catwalk, interspersed with photo reportage of the radical feminist group Femen. The show caused a backlash that raged through social media, arguing whether fashion had the “right” to take on the feminist cause. It’s a moot point. Those “Votez Coco” badges that adorn Chanel handbags could take on a whole new context worn with a niqab in Saudi Arabia. “Anything that raises the feminist cause in the public consciousness is a good thing,” says Edward Meadham of the duo Meadham Kirchhoff. “Fashion is in a coma. Society has lulled itself into a false sense of security and false liberalism. There is no real gender equality. For my part, I still get harassed as a gay man on the street.” The look of disobedience is rippling out from emergent talents right through to luxury bastions. Central Saint Martins graduate Louise Alsop sent out a dress at her Fashion East debut that looked like a scream from the millennial generation. The frayed-edge denim sack dress was appliquéd with “Born to lose” badges. Shredded T-shirt dresses followed.

JOHN LENNON AND YOKO ONO’S “BED-IN” FOR PEACE, MARCH 1969

MARC BY MARC JACOBS

inVOGUE


THE FIRST SUV THAT TAKES YOU TO NEW YORK AND BACK

FR EED OM E VE NT

16 FE B RUA RY - 31 M A RC H

That SUV is the Jeep Grand Cherokee For a limited time, between 16th February – 31st March the most awarded SUV ever* comes with 2 return Virgin Atlantic flights to New York.† You’ll also get 0% APR representative finance**, 3 years’ free servicing+ and as always, exceptional features.

Visit your local dealer or jeep.co.uk before 31st March.

Jeep with ®

Model shown is a new Jeep Grand Cherokee 3.0 litre V6 Summit with special paint at £51,465 OTR. OFFICIAL FUEL CONSUMPTION FIGURES FOR THE NEW 2014 JEEP® GRAND CHEROKEE DIESEL RANGE IN MPG (L/100KM): EXTRA URBAN 43.5 (6.5), URBAN 30.4 (9.3), COMBINED 37.7 (7.5), CO2 EMISSIONS: 198 G/KM. Fuel consumption and CO2 figures are obtained for comparative purposes in accordance with EC directives/regulations and may not be representative of real-life driving conditions. Factors such as driving style, weather and road conditions may also have a significant effect on fuel consumption. *Claim relates to the Jeep Grand Cherokee nameplate over its lifetime. †Promotion applies to new Jeep Grand Cherokee vehicles purchased and registered between 16th February and 31st March 2015 inclusive. Terms & conditions apply, see jeep.co.uk for full details. **HP finance, subject to status. 12% deposit required, 3 year contract. Jeep Financial Services, PO Box 4465, Slough SL1 ORW. +Jeep Grand Cherokee Service Plan (“Service Plan”) is now available on all new Jeep Grand Cherokee models registered between 3rd January and 31st March 2015. Up to 3 years/30,000 miles (whichever comes first) free servicing offer applies to all new Grand Cherokee models. Retail sales only. The Service Plan will cover parts, lubricants and labour as part of the manufacturer’s standard servicing schedule – ask dealer for full details. Service Plan membership card will be sent to you following vehicle purchase. Promotion only valid at authorised Jeep dealers and service agents. Terms and Conditions apply. Participating dealers only. To find out more please visit jeep.co.uk. Jeep® is a registered trademark of Fiat Chrysler Automobiles US LLC.


inVOGUE

Home AGAIN

In the first of an occasional series on designers’ childhoods, Osman Yousefzada writes about growing up in Eighties Birmingham

CORBIS

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he railway track was at the bottom of our back garden, past the apple tree and the vegetable patch where my parents grew beans, spinach, courgettes and mint. Every so often trains would rush past behind a small fence, one that I could easily hop over to pick the wild blackberries in summer. It was here, amid these rows of terrace houses, that I was born. Well, to be precise, I was born at Queen Elizabeth Hospital in Birmingham, but this is where I grew up. I still remember creating a shrine in the outhouse of this back garden to my sister’s replica Barbie (bought at a local jumble sale), offering her tangerines and homemade cakes, being caught as I prostrated before her and the severe reprimand that followed. It was my mother who had put her head round the curtain and found me with my arms outstretched (it must have been something I had seen on our small blackand-white TV), bowing to my queen of dolls! My mother has always been focused, very OSMAN YOUSEFZADA TAKES A BOW AT THE END OF HIS S/S ’13 SHOW

precise. Making decisions seems easy for her and I sometimes wish I were more decisive. One of my most vivid memories of my mother is of her carrying her sewing machine on her head, my elder sister and me holding on to the abundance of her dress, layers and swathes of opulent synthetics, as we marched across the tracks towards the house on the other side, towards the woman who could afford to pay for her clothes to be made. That house was semi-detached and much larger than ours. My mother, my sister and I would spend the day there, while my father was out at work. We were offered food and we played with children I can hardly remember the names of now. My mother would listen to the woman chat while she cut and sewed and, in no time at all, she had > 173


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I remember the colours, the fabrics, the stream of people barter), she managed to learn to knit, too, creating patterns using multicoloured threads. That winter we all got new jumpers. The first floor was rented to an east African family of Indian origin. A floor of empowered women, who looked after their elderly father. These women became like sisters to my mum, they were her support group, her promoters and protectors. Jason was our ginger cat, and the greatest mouse-catcher in town. We used to feed him scraps from the local butcher. My mother was obsessed with making everything sparkle. Everything shimmered; even Jason willingly underwent a weekly Friday bath – lathered up and washed, he was then towel-dried and placed in front of the paraffin heater in the sitting room, left to dry on top of a pile of old newspapers. Friday was always the day dedicated to cleaning. The house would smell of joss sticks, it was heady. The vinyl would shine, every surface was mopped down with Dettol,

and even Mum would glisten more than usual on that day. Apart from Ali Campbell from UB40 living on our street, I was too young for anything to mean that much to me. I was almost oblivious to the kerb-crawlers and ladies of the night who brightened up the bottom of the road. The outside world for me was Park Hill Primary School in Moseley, with Mrs Morris and her art projects, and my errands to Allen’s, the local corner shop. Ann of Allen’s had a dowager hump and a serious demeanour. She moved slowly in her brown work coat behind the most amazing counter filled with cream cakes, iced buns and raspberry-jam doughnuts. Her coat matched her old brown till, and she would push levers to clunk out totals. My regular paraffin run after school took me to Allen’s. I think it was her son who dispensed the blue paraffin – the smell was intoxicating. High on fumes and on my way out I would pass Ann’s counter, the wooden shelves behind it filled with jars of hypnotic sweets. Later on I discovered pastel-coloured toffee bonbons, but for now I was good and took home the change. My two younger sisters, who took over my paraffin run, learned the hard way not to spend the change. Treats were always homemade cake and fruit. But when one day one of them decided to buy a packet of Snaps tomato-flavour crisps with the leftover money, she was briskly sent back to the shop to return the crisps for a refund. This is all patched together from my fragmented memories. When I talk to my parents, it reinforces them, but some things I remember vividly: the colours, the fabrics, the differences, the stream of people, the opening and closing of doors, the darkness, the light, the space in between. And, of course, nothing in childhood is complete without a nod to a fairy tale. Mine was Rumpelstiltskin. Making something out of nothing. Q

THE DESIGNER WITH MARISSA MONTGOMERY AND POPPY DELEVINGNE

GETTY; JASON LLOYD-EVANS

There were two other floors, which were both rented out. The attic floor – where I would eventually live my years of teenage angst, of not fitting in on so many levels, before escaping to London – was rented to McEvoy and Mary. Mary, who loved my mum’s cooking, would pop by on her way out or in. She used to exchange her knitting skills for food. My mother took it all in, and in between cooking, feeding us and sewing for everyone (either for cash or

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totally transformed a flat, colourful piece of fabric into a dress. She came from generations of tailors; I suppose it was in her blood. My dad, a carpenter, worked nearly every day – on building sites, putting in doors and window frames on houses, or making tables or cabinets. When he came home his dinner would be ready for him on the table. He would eat first, and we all ate later. Back in his village he was a strong man, he used to lift large boulders at weddings – a custom that sealed the deal, allowing the groom to take the bride home. On Sundays, he wore his Sunday suit and oiled his hair to resemble Cary Grant, and then waited for his friends to come round. They used to laugh loudly, and I’d watch as the room filled up with cigarette smoke. I remember being in charge of bringing food and hot tea from the kitchen, back and forth, refilling each and every cup. Some of Dad’s married friends brought their wives. The men would sit in the front room, and all the women in the room at the back. The back was where I felt most free, there among the colourful clothes, with those exotic birds chattering away. Always, always, my mother would end up behind her sewing machine making something, because someone inevitably brought some fabric. Within moments, after a cup of tea, they would have new curtains or a cover for their settee or, with the aid of an image from a fashion magazine, a new dress. Then, as her business grew, the house became a mecca for women. They all – tall, short, large or petite – enchanted me. They would come in groups or pairs, or one by one. I was young enough to be allowed to be around them; I would open the front door and show them in. They would take off their outer robes, adjust their chemise and unravel themselves. Some had the latest permed hair while others wore big puffed sleeves and painted their lips bright red. We all had to help out, but mostly me (much to my father’s disapproval). Back then we all lived on one floor. It comprised a front room, a back room and a small kitchen/sitting room. My elder brother would sleep in the front room, and my elder sister, mother, father and I would sleep in the back.


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inVOGUE BIDERMANN IN HER SITTING ROOM. ITS FURNITURE IS A MIX OF HER OWN DESIGNS, MID-CENTURY PIECES AND FLEA-MARKET FINDS. SHE WEARS A DRIES VAN NOTEN COAT AND HER TRADEMARK STACKS OF BANGLES. SITTINGS EDITOR: FIONA GOLFAR. PHOTOGRAPHS: FRANÇOIS HALARD

Grande DESIGNS

HAIR: CYRIL LALOUE. MAKE-UP: HELENE VASNIER

Jeweller Aurélie Bidermann’s new Paris apartment, in an eighteenth-century hôtel particulier, is as bohemian and colourful as the pieces she creates. By Fiona Golfar

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visit Aurélie Bidermann’s apartment of many colours on the Quai d’Orsay on a beautiful day in spring. Beyond sprawls the Left Bank and the Louvre; above, the blue sky is lightly covered with Monetesque clouds. For a woman with a successful jewellery business, selling beautiful bohemian designs around the world, and an array of glamorous friends – including

socialite Bianca Brandolini, French Vogue’s Capucine Safyurtlu, and the owner of Miami Beach’s cool concept store the Webster, Laure Heriard Dubreuil, whose arms clink with Bidermann’s customised flat, gold bracelets – Bidermann is unexpectedly warm-hearted and welcoming. With her mane of blonde hair and a boho elegance (she opens her front door in an

emerald-green-and-black patterned jacket by Dries Van Noten, one of her favourite designers, worn casually over a pair of jeans), she leads me through to a large open-plan dining/sitting room which takes up most of the first floor. This apartment is a new home. And Bidermann is delighted by it. So she should be: light and feminine without being girly, it is a chic reflection > 177


inVOGUE BIDERMANN’S BEDROOM – THE GOLD LEAVES ON THE WALL WERE INSPIRED BY CLAUDE LALANNE

CLOCKWISE FROM ABOVE: A GOLD SPIDER SITS AMONG SEMI-PRECIOUS STONES ON THE SITTING-ROOM COFFEE TABLE; SHADES OF CORAL AND TURQUOISE RECUR THROUGHOUT THE FLAT; A LEAF NECKLACE IS USED AS AN ORNAMENT; THE BUILDING’S FACADE

LEFT: GOLD AND DIAMOND CUFF, £40,975, AURELIE BIDERMANN, AT NET-A-PORTER.COM

of her many passions. She explains that it was once part of an eighteenth-century hôtel particulier (a grand townhouse), and one wealthy family would have occupied the entire building. These current reception rooms, on the floor above the original stables, were the servants’ quarters, and as such are low-ceilinged and snug, the beams painted white. Lining the walls from floor to ceiling are deep shelves. The first thing she built when she moved in, they are filled with books of every shape and size, stretching through travel, art, fashion and photography. The well-informed jewellery designer briefs me, with an enthusiastic lack of particularism: “I’m mad about Thirties, Sixties and Seventies furniture and style,” she says of her eclectic approach to décor – artfully designed layers of texture, colour and shape. A large white sofa designed by Charles Tassin, an interior designer much admired by Bidermann, sits beneath an Andy Warhol sketch, while opposite are a pair of Fifties wooden chairs discovered in a flea market and upholstered in their original fuchsia covers. The windowseat is covered in cushions in a bold turquoise velvet, and a bright abstract painting by Tony Cox, with vivid splashes of colour, draws the eye above the original stone fireplace. Everywhere there are flashes of gold and turquoise: bowls of bracelets and rings are scattered around the room as decorations. Chunks of semi-precious stones sit alongside a gold spider on the low circular gold and marble table that Bidermann designed herself, and on top of a Sixties curved bamboo side table there is a gold and blue Cubb lamp from the May Galerie with a bright blue and gold bowl beside it. Nowhere is left untouched by her love of texture and layered fabrics. A chic, bright blue striped carpet – “I designed it,” she says with the authority of someone used to having total creative control – was inspired by Paul Smith’s striped carpets >

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Bowls of bracelets and rings are scattered around as decorations


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inVOGUE and the hues of Mexico. Perhaps even more ingenious is her placing of woven raffia rugs on top, perfectly breaking up the room.

W ABOVE: THE FIFTIES STANDARD LAMP WAS A FLEA-MARKET FIND. THE RAFFIA SHADE IS BESPOKE AND THE TABLE AND CHAIRS ARE BY ERCOL

e eat a lunch of fresh summer salads, which Bidermann has prepared for us, at an Ercol wooden table and chairs – where she regularly entertains, as she loves to cook. Bidermann is entirely lacking in froideur. Friendly and approachable, she speaks faultless English with the prettiest of sing-song French accents. Born in Paris, into the affluent bourgeoisie, who brought her up to be passionate about art and music, she skipped university to work for Sotheby’s, first in London and then in New York. Eventually, Bidermann returned to Paris to finish her studies in art history at the Ecole du Louvre. But whereas art interested her, it was jewellery that captivated her, as it had done ever since she was a little girl. “I adored the charms my grandmother wore, and her Van Cleef jewellery,” she recalls. And so, in her early twenties, she was on the move again, this time to Antwerp to study gemology. But it was while studying in India, at Jaipur’s famous Gem Palace, that Bidermann learnt the art of colour and created her first collection from the gold and rainbowhued gems she still uses today. Bidermann hasn’t stopped travelling since (and now has stores in New York and Paris that she regularly attends to). For six months of any year, she lives out of her well-worn Globe-Trotter, her adventures fuelling her design: ruby or emerald scarabs that can be worn as charms; gold-hoop earrings set with coral, telling of her love of the beach; colourful plaited silk and gold bracelets inspired by Brazil; and golden corn ear charms, memories from summer weekends spent in the Hamptons. Her Instagram account gives a glimpse into this nomadic lifestyle – including the glamorous parties, the poolside lunches, or taking pride of place at a Beyoncé and Jay Z concert – wherever it is, Bidermann has been there and taken a snap. And yet the designer is conscious not to come across as someone you can’t relate to,

she captions her aspirational pictures with chatty questions. For instance, she wonders, what do her 26,000 followers think of her gold bangles as they hover over her denim skirt in sunny Corsica? The short answer is, they “heart”. After our lunch, Bidermann continues the tour, her wrists clinking with the sound of her many bracelets which she wears in a cluster at all times. It is when you climb the white wooden stairs to the first floor of her apartment and cross the small landing that leads into her bedroom that you grasp the true historical significance of her home. There are high ceilings, polished parquet floors, french windows that lead on to wrought-iron balconies: “This is where the nobles lived,” she explains as she moves, ever the art director, to give the arrangement of necklaces hanging behind her four-poster bed – a delicious, pillowed affair made up in sheets from her favoured linen shop, Caravane – a casual tweak. “I slept in this bed as a teenager and we are still together!” she says, laughing. In an adjoining dressing room is a huge day bed covered in large cushions, which Bidermann converts into a spare room when friends come to stay. Right now, it’s a thoroughfare to her corridor of closets. Inside hang pieces from her favourite designers – Céline, Valentino, Marni, Dries Van Noten and fabulous finds from a treasure trove in New York, Marlene Wetherell Vintage. And all is immaculately organised. But then, Bidermann enjoys the freedom of living alone and not having to worry about sharing her rail space. Later, when we walk down the Quai Voltaire, Aurélie muses, “I’m very much my own master.” She wants to show me her beloved Dries Van Noten shop, only a few doors down from her home, where she is greeted by an unusually effusive saleswoman (she is clearly a good client). “Most of my contemporaries,” she says, continuing her reflection, “are married with young families. But I am single and my business is my baby, and for now that suits me just fine.” And with that, because Aurélie Bidermann is a real girl’s girl, she starts pulling clothes from rails and suggesting I try them on. Q

ABOVE: BIDERMANN’S MANY BRACELETS PILED ON TO A MANNEQUIN HAND. BELOW: THE TABLE AND LAMP ARE BY CHARLES TASSIN, A FAVOURITE OF THE DESIGNER

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“I’m very much my own master – my business is my baby and that suits me fine”


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BURBERRY PRORSUM

DOLCE & GABBANA JEWELLERY YELLOW-GOLD PENDANT, PRICE ON REQUEST

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Double base Burberry’s Fresh Glow formula was used on all models in the spring/summer show – this golden beauty is designed for every skin tone. Smooth one pump over the face, or mix with foundation for a boost of clear-skinned radiance.

As the season gets under way, build your wardrobe with striking pieces that work harder. By Tatiana Hambro BURBERRY FRESH GLOW LUMINOUS FLUID BASE, £34, BURBERRY.COM

DOLCE & GABBANA COLLECTABLE DOLLS, PRICE ON REQUEST

JITROIS LEATHER TROUSERS, £2,000, JITROIS.COM ROSE & WILLARD LEATHER AND JERSEY TOP, £350, ROSEAND WILLARD.COM

JASON LLOYD-EVANS; MITCHELL SAMS; SUDHIR PITHWA

LASER QUEST The world leader when it comes to leather (and credited with the first stretch-leather trousers), Jitrois continues to innovate with its latest collection of covetable garments. Cutting-edge laser techniques create complex patterns – such as the rose print on these trousers (above right). British label Rose & Willard also uses lasers to cut leather into thin waves across its Calamus top (above left).

BOX SETS

Halfway through the Dolce & Gabbana show in Milan, models walked down the runway carrying mysterious boxes. Inside were collectable dolls, each with a name and corresponding catwalk look (Carmela, above left, and Angelica, right), wearing replicas of this jewellery (above right). A Sicilian souvenir indicative of the elegant humour we’ve come to expect from the brand (Dolcegabbana.it).

DOLCE & GABBANA JEWELLERY BLACK-JADE, SAPPHIRE AND YELLOW-GOLD EARRINGS, PRICE ON REQUEST

COMPTOIR DES COTONNIERS SHOES, £205, COMPTOIRDES COTONNIERS.CO.UK KIKI McDONOUGH YELLOW-GOLD BRACELET, £9,600

KIKI McDONOUGH ROSE-GOLD BRACELET, £4,900

Chain gang For a sophisticated take on statement accessories, wear these chunky chains from British jeweller Kiki McDonough on the same arm, or put one on each wrist for extra pow (Kiki.co.uk).

SOLE PROVIDER INSPIRED BY MEN’S TAILORING WHEN IT DESIGNED THESE OXFORDS, COMPTOIR DES COTONNIERS KEPT THE SHAPE SLIM. IN SOFT LEATHER WITH A DAZZLING COPPER FINISH, THEY’RE A SURE-FIRE WAY TO STRIDE INTO SPRING’S SUNSHINE OR SHOWERS

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SYBARITE DIAMOND AND YELLOW-GOLD RING, £2,300

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LEFT: WANG PEI YI FOR SHANGHAI TANG SILK JUMPSUIT, £575. BELOW: MASHA MA FOR SHANGHAI TANG DRESS, £430. BOTH AT SHANGHAI TANG.COM

SYBARITE DIAMOND AND WHITE-GOLD RINGS, FROM £2,500 EACH

IN THE RING Sybarite’s trio of charm rings has us transfixed. With each design guaranteed to lock some serious style on your finger, it’s impossible to pick just one.

AUTOGRAPH TOP, £35, AT MARKS ANDSPENCER.COM

Red stripe Bright, bold and better than ever, stripes are back in a big way for the months ahead. Paul Smith nailed it, naturally. PAUL SMITH DRESS, £785, PAULSMITH.CO.UK

HOLD UP Things are getting personal over at Michael Kors. The new London store offers an in-house service for its new Bespoke Miranda tote. Rather than the traditional leather version (above), select from myriad exotic skins before choosing all the details – hardware, lining and monogramming – to create a bag that reflects you personally, in every sense of the word. Bespoke Miranda, from £6,955, at 29 Sloane Street, SW1

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China’s appreciation of Western brands is well documented. Now, two award-winning designers, Masha Ma and Wang Pei Yi, are set to reverse the trend as their capsule collections are championed by Shanghai Tang. View the full collections online to catch this finely wrought vision of the future (Shanghaitang.com).

Slide rule HUNTER’S FIRST SPRING/SUMMER COLLECTION SHOWED AT A CENTRAL LONDON LEISURE CENTRE ALONGSIDE AN AQUATIC VISUAL INSTALLATION BY ARTIST MAT MAITLAND. SO IT WASN’T TOO MUCH OF A SURPRISE WHEN THESE BRANDED POOL SLIDES APPEARED ON THE RUNWAY. TEAM WITH SOCKS FOR A CITY LOOK

BOBBI BROWN PRETTY POWERFUL POT ROUGE, £19, BOBBIBROWN.CO.UK

POWER BLUSH

HUNTER ORIGINAL SLIDES, £55, HUNTERBOOTS.COM

The Pretty Powerful campaign from Bobbi Brown continues to empower women though education. You can do your bit by dabbing a little pink on to lips and cheeks. All proceeds go to Smart Works, a charity that provides clothes and training for unemployed women.

MARIO TESTINO; SUDHIR PITHWA; JODY TODD

MICHAEL KORS TOTE, FROM £915, MICHAEL KORS.COM

East of Eden


555 Kingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Road, London, SW6 2EB 124 Holland Park Avenue, London, W11 4UE Harrods Brompton Road, London, SW1X 7XL T +44 (0)20 7229 5148 www.therugcompany.com Cobalt Motif by Rodarte


CHLOE SUNGLASSES, £225, CHLOE.COM

notebook JOSEPH DENIM JACKET, £245, JOSEPHFASHION.COM

Hello, sailor

JOSEPH

KAREN MILLEN COTTON TOP, £145. COTTON SKIRT, £199. KARENMILLEN.COM

HALCYON DAYS PALM CUFF, £350. EYE BANGLE, £75. TIGER BANGLE, £75. ALL AT HALCYON DAYS.CO.UK

No longer reserved for off-duty style, denim enjoyed a real renaissance this season. It was a primary focus for Joseph’s spring/summer collection, with strong separates in darker hues – such as this take on the classic jacket, featuring chic double buttons and cute pockets.

Always a summer staple, white has been reworked this season. We love the peek-a-boo circular cutouts on this playful two-piece by Karen Millen.

PRIME RUNNER

Take a bow ALREADY BORED WITH YOUR FLATS? THESE DAINTY DELIGHTS ARE GUARANTEED TO KEEP YOU SMILING WITH EVERY STEP

SONIA RYKIEL DUNGAREES, £950, AT NET-APORTER.COM

We loved this Jonathan Saunders print when we first saw it on his silk shirts and skirts. But, thanks to the Rug Company, it doesn’t stop there: the design house continues to collaborate with the best names in the business to deliver seriously fashion-friendly flooring. Hutton Runner, by Jonathan Saunders for the Rug Company, from £735 a sq m (Therugcompanylondon.com)

EVE LOM BRIGHTENING CREAM, £75, EVELOM.COM

SISLEY INTENSIVE DARK SPOT CORRECTOR, £92, SISLEY-PARIS. CO.UK

OVERALL IMPRESSION

CARVEN SHOES, £270, AT 85 PELHAM STREET, SW7

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New creative director Julie de Libran blew some cool, Left Bank breeze into her debut collection for Sonia Rykiel, and Net-a-Porter took note, stocking the brand for the first time in four seasons. Formerly of Louis Vuitton, de Libran worked playful sass into classics, such as these hammered-satin dungarees. “It’s a great alternative to the little black dress,” she says, “for the woman who wants more freedom to stride about.” We say, vive la France!

BRIGHT SIDE Spotted – two new products to tackle pigmentation problems. Use Eve Lom’s Brightening Cream as you would a daily moisturiser. Or Sisley’s Dark Spot Corrector has a rollerball tip for a more targeted treatment.

JASON LLOYD-EVANS; MITCHELL SAMS; SUDHIR PITHWA

WHITE OUT


MARIO TESTINO. HAIR: SAM McKNIGHT. MAKE-UP: CHARLOTTE TILBURY. NAILS: LORRAINE GRIFFIN. FASHION EDITOR: LUCINDA CHAMBERS. TOWELLING ROBES, DYED BY STYLIST, £55 EACH, THE WHITE COMPANY

Candy coated Right now, we’re crushing big on pretty. We’ve developed a new-found enthusiasm for deliciously playful candy colours that sweeten up the scene via tiered tulle party frocks and babydoll dresses; fun flights of fancy that prove irresistible among girlfriends. With that comes a sense of free-spiritedness, and where else to feel more alive than by the ocean? A new wave of surfer-girl style rides out in Hawaiian prints and sunny Seventies separates. (The good news? You don’t have to be a surfing pro to master it.) It’s the sort of wardrobe that invites a summer romance. Spring: we’re calling it a love-in.

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Girls ON F I L M Vegas, Vogue covers and vamping it upâ&#x20AC;Ś Suki, Cara and Georgia May are having the time of their lives. Emily Sheffield on this yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s triumphant trio. Styling by Lucinda Chambers. Photographs by Mario Testino

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“I DON’T THINK WE SHOULD BE PUT IN BOXES,” SAYS CARA. “ALL OF US ASPIRE TO DO A LOT OF DIFFERENT THINGS” From left, Suki wears silk babydoll, £162. Tulle bra, £87. Both Fifi Chachnil. Georgia May wears tulle babydoll, £149, Fifi Chachnil. Lace bra, £288, La Perla. Cara wears silk babydoll, £167, Fifi Chachnil. Lace bra, £110, Agent Provocateur. Knickers, £26, L’Agent by Agent Provocateur. Hair: Sam McKnight. Make-up: Charlotte Tilbury. Nails: Lorraine Griffin. Production: 10-4 Inc. Location: Chiltern Firehouse. Set design: Jack Flanagan. Digital artwork: R&D. Models: Cara Delevingne, Georgia May Jagger and Suki Waterhouse

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icture a cold, mattgrey January morning in London: the kind of day that emanates a flat torpidity, sucking energy and light and wishing you to bed. Not a day to be spent standing around in your knickers. Unless you are Cara, Georgia May and Suki – that’s Cara Delevingne, Georgia May Jagger and Suki Waterhouse. You may have heard of them. They do not have a problem with leaden skies; in no way is their energy deflated. Their perfect little bottoms wiggle as they stand, backs to the camera, first names cheekily displayed on the gossamer fabric of their pants. (Although there will be no bosom on show in this shoot, decided by Georgia May, today’s ringleader.) There’s a lot of giggling, the Vogue crew behind them forgotten. “Concentrate!” commands Mario Testino wearily for the umpteenth time. “I need a Taser!” mutters Sam McKnight, as Cara flings her bra top over his head, goosing his bottom while he tries to adjust their hair. Same height, similar tawny wild manes, the gleam of winter tans, and the clipped vowels of private education in their excited patter, together the girls radiate an intoxicating boom of beauty, English class and energy. You are drawn in by their vivacity and friendship, and simultaneously excluded by it. “We need to be spooning,” shouts Cara. “Shotgun in the middle,” she adds, squirming into position. They grin naughtily as they press together. “We’re going to do a threesome,” Cara adds, with a throaty, infectious giggle (her assured one-liners are a constant backdrop). All three fall about. “Hello?” shouts Mario. “Control yourselves, girls!” They sing in unison to Georgia May’s iPhone: “I like the way you work it…” These three are having a moment. The evidence is in the campaigns they share; their combined millions of Instagram followers; the film roles they are racking up; and the fervent press interest (they would say intrusion) they draw: questions posed over their sexuality, their boyfriends – and yes, that’s Bradley Cooper, Oscarnominated actor, Facetiming Suki again today. Although Cara is now single (“I’m a sexual pariah,” she jokes), every nuance of every romantic move is front-page fodder, her life displayed as a perpetual drama. But what rolls off them like sunshine is that they are having the time of their lives. They are 23 – no more teens and torrid emotions – they are confident and

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incorrigible, casually throwing their opinions about. There was little commandeering of a cogent interview, more a riotous girl gathering, squashed in the hair and makeup room, as every question was invariably bantered into inconsequentiality. The girls were more interested in planning that night’s sleepover at Georgia May’s than giving too much rhetorical specificity to their career ambitions. What we did learn: that Georgia May and Suki were at school together in Roehampton and have been friends since the age of 14, after bonding on the netball court. “Georgia let me win,” recalls Suki, grinning at her friend. “We are both Capricorns, we’re born only a week apart,” adds Georgia May. Cara laughs: “So they always talk about themselves a lot, both of them.” They became friends with Cara much later because she boarded at Bedales in Hampshire. “We went to day school with normal people,” quips Suki. “You wish you

“I don’t think any model with a voice should be viewed as oppressed,” says Georgia May. “We are in control of our own image” went to Bedales, you just didn’t get in,” Cara chucks back. And so it goes on. “Cara and I shared our first Glastonbury together,” offers Georgia May. “Yes, that’s where we fell in love,” Cara interjects. They share a look. Suki is outraged: “I was there, too! What the fuck?” They can’t decide who is the bossy one, but maintain Georgia May is the mother figure. (During the interview she monitors the conversation and is quick to defuse any comment that can be taken out of context.) While Suki is the most grounded (she also focuses hardest during the day, but then it was her first Vogue shoot, unlike the other two). And Cara says the girls never let her talk when they are together (this does seem true). “It’s very hard to get a word in edgeways,” she complains, eyebrows comically manoeuvring her tiny forehead. On exercise, there is not much clarity. Cara may or may not do yoga, although

Suki is confirmed as the sporty one. “I just like a little workout! But I don’t want to be made out to be the dumb, sporty one,” she moans comically. Style-wise, Suki loves vintage and furry things, the others say. While Cara is the tomboy and Georgia May “always has silky and textured pieces”, adds Suki, pointing out the black velvet jacket her glamorous friend is shrugging on. And they definitely don’t fancy the same men. Best night out together? Georgia May’s twenty-first birthday in London. It was fancy dress and Cara came as a whoopee cushion. Vegas was where they held Georgia May’s following birthday, and that was their second-best night out. “We stayed in a room with a bowling alley, we went to see Céline Dion, we bumped into Tyra Banks…” lists Georgia May, keeping the conversation clean. Suki and Cara then relate how they terrorised the Chippendales during their stage act – something involving, they giggle, a banana and Cara trying to give them a wedgie. They got thrown out. Growing up in the public eye has its drawbacks. It’s not all Vegas capers. Both Suki and Georgia May have been modelling for seven years, Cara for five. But experience has bought levity when it comes to the press and public opinion. All three admit to an earlier obsession with what was written about them. “It leads to self-hatred,” says Cara. “Yes, in a way you are putting yourself out there to be judged, but at the same time we are real people, so it hurts. I had a call from my agency recently saying someone’s about to release a story that I have had sex with 2,000 people and keep a little black book of them. They were basically out to name any single person that I’ve ever had my photo taken with,” she continues. “Yeah, that’s the other thing,” Georgia May interrupts. “Anyone you stand next to, you’ve had sex with.” “It’s hard for Cara because the paparazzi really abuse her privacy, she’s not even allowed to walk to the shops,” continues Georgia May. “I taught her how to lose the paparazzi, there are certain ways you can get rid of them.” When asked how they equate being feminists with the sexualisation of their bodies, they respond firmly that modelling is one of the few industries where women earn more than men. “Yes, there are a lot of downsides as far as body image is concerned,” cedes Georgia May. “But I don’t think any model with a voice should be viewed as oppressed. We are >204 MARIO TESTINO


“WE NEED TO BE SPOONING,” SAYS CARA. “SHOTGUN IN THE MIDDLE!” Knickers, £54 each, Fifi Chachnil; bespoke embroidery by Hand & Lock. Leather and faux-fur sandals, £550, Sophia Webster for Shrimps

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A MODERN PIN-UP SHOULD BE DRIPPING IN CANDYCOLOURED JEWELS (AND LITTLE ELSE) This page: Georgia May wears vintage cardigan, from £18, Beyond Retro. Lace bra, £110. Matching knickers, £95. Both Agent Provocateur, at Harrods. Brocade belt, £185, Miu Miu. Patent-leather courts, £575, Christian Louboutin. Swarovski-crystal earrings, £294, Vickisarge. Necklace, £45, Coast

COVER UP: A FLIRTATIOUS CANARY STOLE SENDS DOLCE & GABBANA’S WONDROUS ROSE MINIDRESS INTO BLOOM Opposite: brocade dress, £3,250, Dolce & Gabbana. Faux-fur jacket, £450, Shrimps. Tulle bra, £87, Fifi Chachnil. Swarovskicrystal earrings, £294, Vickisarge. Shoes, as before

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“CARA AND I SHARED OUR FIRST GLASTONBURY,” SAYS GEORGIA MAY. “THAT’S WHERE WE FELL IN LOVE.” SUKI IS OUTRAGED: “I WAS THERE, TOO!” Bath towels, from a selection, Woods Fine Linens. Patent-leather mules, £515, Miu Miu

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SUGAR AND SPICE AND ALL THINGS NICE… FROTHY PETTICOATS MAKE LIGHT WORK OF DRESSING-UP Opposite: Suki wears vintage bustier dress, £495, Elizabeth Avey. Vintage petticoat, £22, Beyond Retro. Bra, £45, L’Agent by Agent Provocateur. Leather courts, £595, Christian Louboutin. Swarovski-crystal earrings, £134, Vickisarge

NOTHING IS SASSIER THAN A STANDOUT SIXTIES EYE. GLIDE CHARLOTTE TILBURY THE FELINE FLICK EYELINER, £22, OVER THE LASH LINE FOR A FLAWLESS FINISH This page: nude silkorganza dress with gold embroidery, from £3,990, Oscar de la Renta. Vintage cardigan, as before. Vintage earrings, £65, Linda Bee

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CROWNING GLORY: DOE-EYED STARLETS CREATE RED-CARPET SENSATIONS IN CLASSICAL LACEWORK AND SPRAYS OF ORGANZA From left, Suki wears rose pleated silk-organza bustier dress, £3,495, Burberry Prorsum. Hairbands, from £277 each, Sam McKnight for Vickisarge. Vintage earrings, £25, Gillian Horsup. Georgia May wears nude lace dress, £4,340, Alberta Ferretti. Hairband, £325, Jenny Packham. Cara wears white beaded brocade dress, £6,500, Dolce & Gabbana. Hairband, £312, Jenny Packham. Swarovski-crystal earrings, £54,Vickisarge

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SAVE A PEEKABOO NECKLINE FOR THE FLASHBULBS – WRAP UP IN A HUGGABLE TEDDY-BEAR COAT AT ALL OTHER TIMES Opposite: faux-fur and shearling coat, £1,300, Coach. Pleated silk-organza bustier dress, £3,495, Burberry Prorsum. Tulle bra, £87, Fifi Chachnil. Brocade belt, £185, Miu Miu. Patent-leather courts, £575, Christian Louboutin. Vintage earrings, £38, Gillian Horsup

BARDOT GETS A MODERN MAKEOVER: THINK A DISTRESSED BEEHIVE AND GUTSY GLAMOUR. RUFFLE UP WITH KERASTASE COIFFAGE COUTURE POWDER BLUFF, £19.50 This page: satin coat, £1,375. Cropped silk blouse, £505. Both Miu Miu. Vintage earrings, £25, Gillian Horsup

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in control of our own image; we hire our agents and PRs, not the other way round. And you learn quickly as you go along what you want to put out there, what you don’t.” If there is a message they do put out, it is of a supportive sisterhood. As friends they clearly lack any bitchy rivalry. “There’s always room for everyone to do whatever they want,” admonishes Suki. But that doesn’t equate to a lack of ambition. They’d like to define themselves as entrepreneurs. “I don’t think we should be put in boxes,” says Cara. “I hate that. Being an ‘actress slash model’. I think all of us aspire to do a lot of different things.” Georgia May is focused on modelling, her photography and is also designing three ranges of clothes for different brands. Cara has three films out this year. The first is Paper Towns, where she stars alongside Nat Wolff, premiering on June 5, followed by Pan in August, in which director Joe Wright takes on Peter Pan and

“We’re going to do face masks, we’re going to watch movies, we’re going to catch up!” says Georgia May, of their sleepover then, later this year, the much-hyped screen adaption of Deborah Moggach’s novel Tulip Fever (where she met her recent beau Jack O’Connell). Suki, meanwhile, was in Atlanta last year filming Insurgent, the second in the hugely successful Veronica Roth trilogy and has just come off the set of Pride and Prejudice and Zombies, her body taut from performing stunts. Fiscally, their hard work is paying off. Cara and Georgia May have already bought their first homes; Suki says she just met with a mortgage broker. It is to Georgia May’s they are now headed. “We’re going to do face masks, we’re going to watch movies, we’re going to catch up!” says Georgia May. I have lost their attention and they are drifting off, phones aloft, debating whether to drop into the Jimmy Choo party first, how they can get Cara to her audition, Georgia May gently bossing the others about. There’s a collective swish of dark blonde hair and a gathering of overcoats, and they are gone, a vortex of fun, young, ambitious energy swirling into the night. Q 204

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“GEORGIA AND I ARE THE INSOMNIACS,” SAYS CARA. “SUKI FALLS ASLEEP. THEN SHE WAKES IN THE NIGHT AND GOES TO THE FRIDGE” Babydolls and bras, as before. For stockists, all pages, see Vogue Information Watch Vogue’s exclusive film of the girls having fun on set, on Vogue.co.uk

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Hawaiian prints, languid leather and lashings of fringe infused with laid-back cool redefine summer style this season. Styling by Clare Richardson. Photographs by Josh Olins

RIDE OUT IN DIANE VON FURSTENBERG’S SHIRT AND CROP-TOP SET. A BURST OF YELLOW BRINGS THE SUNSHINE Cotton shirt, £114. Cotton bra top, £76. Both Diane von Furstenberg. Bikini bottoms, £53, La Perla. Cotton shorts, £175, Sandro. Turquoise, bamboo and coral necklace, throughout, £194. Bakelite horn pendant on leather thong, throughout, £90. Both Aurélie Bidermann. Hair: Esther Langham. Make-up: Maki Ryoke. Set design: Mike McHale. Production: Hana Productions. Digital artwork: Hempstead May. Model: Julia Bergshoeff

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SHELL NECKLACES, HIPPY BEADS – AND REAL-DEAL HAWAIIANS MAHINA GARCIA AND NATHAN FLORENCE – MAKE FOR THE AUTHENTIC SURFER EXPERIENCE Opposite: vintage bikini top, from £10, Rokit. Cotton shorts, £130, Etro

TANNING GOALS: A DEEP MAHOGANY LEATHER SKIRT MELTS INTO BRONZED SKIN LIKE HOT CHOCOLATE This page: bikini top, £10, H&M. Leather miniskirt, £950, Jitrois

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PALM FRONDS AND WILD FLORALS – CRAFTED INTO A CROWN OR WORKED AS A PRINT – HAVE THE POWER TO PUT YOU AT ONE WITH NATURE This page: green silk shirt, £301, We Are Handsome. Red floral bikini top, £60, Paul Smith

THE SEASON’S RETRO MOOD EXTENDS TO DENIM. THE SHAPE OF JEANS TO COME? HANG LOOSE – IDEAL FOR DOWN DAYS Opposite: silk shirt, £380, Acne Studios. Bikini top, £150 as part of set, Tommy Hilfiger. Denim jeans, £455, Gucci

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NET PROENZA SCHOULER’S WOVEN FRINGED DRESS NOW; IT’S THE CATCH OF THE DAY This page: woven silk dress, £1,990, Proenza Schouler, at Harrods. Flip-flops, £18, Havaianas

ALTUZARRA’S CORAL PRINT FEELS TOTALLY FRESH, AND GENUINELY FUN TO WEAR Opposite: bikini top, from a selection. Cotton skirt, £550. Both Altuzarra

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THERE’S A HEADY, GROWN-UP APPEAL TO BE FOUND IN MOODY FLORALS. FENDI’S MIDNIGHT ORCHIDS STAND OUT AGAINST BLACK AND SEDUCE DURING DAYLIGHT HOURS, TOO Silk-mix shirt, £800, Fendi. Bikini bottoms, £8, H&M. Beauty note: a casual middle parting perfectly captures surfer-girl spirit. Use Pantene Mousse Ice Shine, £4, for sleek movement around the face

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SUSPENDED FROM SPINDLY STRAPS, WEAR CHLOE’S CROCHET COVER-UP FOR EVENING SUNDOWNERS WITH A CHAMPION. MEET SURFER JOHN JOHN FLORENCE Opposite: white embroidered cotton/linen dress, £2,750, Chloé

AN ASYMMETRIC NECKLINE AND A GRAPHIC CUT-OUT ANIMATES ARAKS’S OTHERWISE SIMPLE WHITE ONE-PIECE This page: swimsuit, from £235, Araks, at Farfetch.com

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DEFINE LUXURY CASTAWAY: CUE A LINEN-SILK TUNIC TRIMMED IN A LEATHER FRINGE This page: natural linen and silk top with leather fringing, £555, Paul Smith

THERE’S AN UNDENIABLY SEVENTIES FEEL TO LOUIS VUITTON’S SANDY-COLOURED VELVET FLARES AND COLOUR-POP EMBOSSED LEATHER TOP Opposite: embossed leather waistcoat, £7,515. Cropped velvet flares, £1,395. Both Louis Vuitton. Beauty note: a bronzed glow and a smattering of freckles; summer skin doesn’t get better than this. Use Bobbi Brown Brightening Brick in Peach, £34, to add a hint of shimmer

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A HALTERNECK SWIMSUIT THAT DOUBLES AS A BODYSUIT IS THE TRICK FOR FLAUNTING DEFINED SHOULDERS. FLAME RED WILL SET PULSES RACING This page: swimsuit, £475, Mugler, at Joseph. Suede trousers, £3,995, Chanel

THE A-LINE MINI IS BACK IN A BIG WAY THIS SUMMER AND TRUSSARDI’S BUTTER-SOFT SUEDE VERSION PROVES IRRESISTIBLE TO THE TOUCH Opposite: polo shirt, from £150. Suede skirt with leather buckle, from £750. Both Trussardi. Straw hat, £293, Ryan Roche. Bag and towel, stylist’s own. With thanks to the Halekulani Hotel, Honolulu. For stockists, all pages, see Vogue Information

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Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie at Lagos Lagoon, wearing a dress she designed herself. Hair: Kemi Lewis at KLâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Naturals. Make-up: Stella Ikelionwu at Stellaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Addiction

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CLAIM NAME

She’s an award-winning novelist, a TED talk sensation and Beyoncé’s favourite feminist. But Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie has many more stories to tell, as Erica Wagner discovers. Portraits by Akintunde Akinleye ’m on the shore of Lagos Lagoon with Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie on a late afternoon in January. It is harmattan season, when a hot wind blows across the Sahara, bringing dust that makes the sun glow dark gold as it hangs over the palm trees on the opposite shore. Adichie, in a neat-waisted patterned dress and teetering lavender heels that are utterly unsuited to the sandy ground, is about to pose for Vogue’s photographer; but as we climb out of her car she asks me what I think of Lagos. She has just discovered that this is my first visit to Africa – and she’s thrilled that my baptism takes place in her native Nigeria (“Not bloody Kenya!” she said, laughing, as we drove). What can I say? That I’m overwhelmed: by the pell-mell energy of the place, the urge to get on, to get ahead that you can feel in every encounter. But I’m overwhelmed, too, by the way in which, in the space of a single day, I’ve been drawn into the embrace of Adichie’s life here, eating her food, meeting her parents, laughing with her friends, lounging on her sofa, talking about feminism, literature, our favourite TV shows, the fact that we both adore orange nail polish and are thrilled to discover we happen to be wearing the very same shade on our toes. Snap! >

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changed her from a successful author into a celebrity, although “celebrity” is a concept she clearly distrusts. “The things I think will do really well are not the things that do really well,” she says, laughing. You might guess from looking at photographs of her that she is a very serious person, but her laughter comes easily and often. She said yes to the 2013 TED invitation mainly because it was organised by her brother, Chuks, who works in information technology and development, and she wanted to help him out. “But I thought, I don’t have anything to talk about. I’m not the kind of person who can manufacture things when I don’t care deeply about them. But my brother said, well, there is this one thing you give us endless lectures about…” A mock-serious look crosses her face. “Because it’s known in my family, you don’t

“My family says, ‘Oh, you’re such a man!’ But I don’t see why I shouldn’t speak my mind” want to demean women in my presence! And I knew this wasn’t a comfortable subject, particularly for the people I was addressing, an African audience. “I was still writing it when I went up to speak, and afterwards, clearly people had listened, clearly people felt strongly about it – but I let it go. So they put it online, and only then I heard about people using it in their classes, about people arguing about it at work and school.” But the approach from Beyoncé was unexpected. The collaboration is not something Adichie has discussed much, wary that too much talk of pop music would shift the focus away from what she cares about. “I am a person who writes and tells stories. That’s what I want to talk about. There’s an obsession with celebrity that I have never had. But the one thing I will say is that I really do think Beyoncé is a force for good, as much as celebrity things go. I know there has been lot of talk in the past year about how feminism is ‘cool’ now, but I think if we are honest, it’s not a subject that’s easy. She didn’t have to do this, she could have taken on, I don’t know, world peace. Or nothing at all. And I realise that so many young people in our celebrity-obsessed world, well, suddenly

they are thinking about this. And that’s a wonderful thing. So I don’t have any reservations about having said yes.” Feminism – gender equality – is a cause she cares about passionately. You don’t have to spend long in Nigeria to witness the deeply patriarchal nature of the culture, where men are always greeted as “sir” and women are lucky to be greeted at all. But Adichie was brought up in a progressive household. Born in 1977 in eastern Nigeria, she grew up in Nsukka, a university town. That part of the country is still, she says, the place where her soul is most at home; she dreams of having a farm there one day. Her father, James, was professor of statistics and, later, vice-chancellor at the University of Nigeria; Grace, her mother, was the university’s first female registrar – no small achievement. As it happens, her parents were staying with her when we met, in the beautiful stone-floored house she built about a year ago. Married 51 years, they have a pride in their daughter that shines in their faces, as does her love for them. Right from the beginning, her books were distinguished by strong female voices: Kambili in Purple Hibiscus, Olanna in Half of a Yellow Sun, Ifemelu in Americanah. he oppression of women, she says, “Makes me angry. I can’t not be angry. I don’t know how you can just be calm. My family says to me, ‘Oh, you’re such a man!’ – you know, very lovingly… But of course I’m not, I just don’t see why I shouldn’t speak my mind.” She got into trouble for speaking her mind in Nigeria: when an interviewer addressed her as Mrs Chimamanda Adichie, she corrected him, saying she wished to be known as “Ms”, which the journalist reported as “Miss”. Her insistence on her own family name was all over the news here last spring. She should be happy to be addressed as “Mrs”, she was told, since she was, after all, married. She laughs now, but it’s clear the story still disturbs her. “It was the lack of gratitude on my part for having a husband. And yet I didn’t want to proclaim it: I wanted to claim my own name.” Her husband, Dr Ivara Esege, is assistant professor of family medicine at the University of Maryland, in Baltimore. They have a house in Columbia, outside the city, in what Adichie calls “a really mixed neighbourhood. In the US, ‘mixed neighbourhood’ usually means two black people, but this is really mixed: Africans, African-Americans, people from everywhere.” Here in her house in Lagos

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Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie was 26 when she published her first novel, Purple Hibiscus, which was shortlisted for the Orange Prize for Fiction and won the Commonwealth Writers’ Prize. The books that followed, Half of a Yellow Sun – set during the Biafran conflict in Nigeria, a decade before she was born – and Americanah, a modern love story set between America and Nigeria, have also been garlanded with international prizes and critical praise. Salman Rushdie remembers meeting her at a PEN literary festival in New York, not long after Purple Hibiscus was published: “She did a one-onone conversation with Michael Ondaatje in a packed auditorium at Hunter College. At that time she was just out of the egg, so to speak, and it was plain that she hugely admired Ondaatje, but what was so striking was her own confidence and authority. She very much held her own, and spoke fluently and powerfully, and all of us there that day could see that someone very remarkable had just arrived. A star is born, I remember thinking, and so it was.” Indeed it was, and her stellar qualities would go on to find her an extraordinarily wide and diverse audience. Her 2009 TED talk, “The Danger of a Single Story”, has had – wait for it – more than eight million views; it is a sophisticated yet charming and accessible essay on how we might see the world through another’s eyes. But that viral explosion is nothing compared with what happened to the talk Adichie gave in 2013 at TEDxEuston, a series of talks in London focusing on African affairs. Entitled “We Should All Be Feminists”, the speech, which addressed a feminism beyond race or class, took on a very different life. Before she had realised the impact her words were having, she got a call from Beyoncé, who eventually sampled the talk in “Flawless”, a song on the eponymous album she released, to the world’s surprise, on iTunes that December: it reached the top of the iTunes charts in 104 countries and sold nearly 850,000 copies in three days. Beyoncé first discovered Chimamanda when she came across her talk online. “I was immediately drawn to her,” says Beyoncé. “She was elegant and her words were powerful and honest. Her definition of a feminist described my own feeling: equality of the sexes as it pertains to human rights, equal pay and sexuality. She called the men in her family feminists, too, because they acknowledged the need for equality.” Adichie insists – and I believe her – that she was taken aback by the success of both of those talks which, it could be argued,


black men who commit crime and women her character Ifemelu’s experience is drawn there’s a photograph of him as a little of any colour who report a rape. And I think from her own. “In Nigeria I’m not black,” boy on a bookshelf, and one of Adichie at the similarity is that you are expected to be she says simply. “We don’t do race in Nigeria. about the same age just below. Although perfect and pure before you can get any We do ethnicity a lot, but not race. My she’s not comfortable bringing him into sympathy, any human empathy. ‘Well, the friends here don’t really get it. Some of them the conversation, occasionally she lets kid stole cigarettes, so he asked for it, sound like white Southerners from 1940. something slip, like telling me about a pack right?’” Brown was alleged to have stolen a They say, ‘Why are black people complaining of crayons he gave her recently. Crayons? box of cigarettes. “Like, ‘Well, she wore a about race? Racism doesn’t exist!’ It’s just “I do all these drawings for my clothes,” short skirt.’ It’s so ugly. And with the film not a part of their existence.” But it has been she says. “Really terrible drawings. But of Half of a Yellow Sun – I remember part of hers in America, where her experience I love to do them, and he gave me the Thandie Newton saying to me that it was “is always shaped by race. Somebody sends crayons so I could add a little bit of colour.” important to her because you don’t usually a limo to pick me up, and I just notice an It’s clear that Adichie sees no contradiction get to see black love on the screen this way.” attitude that the white, older male driver in being a woman of fashion and a feminist. She had almost no involvement with the has. He’s thinking, that’s who I’m picking The dress she wears for the shoot is one she film “because my book means so much to up? And I can’t help thinking, if I were designed herself; she works with local me”, but she was pleased with it, despite white, would he have a problem? If I were tailors to have her designs brought to life. the fact that it was a small production. black and male, would he have a problem?” In the middle of the day we eat a “It was very indie; they shot wonderful lunch prepared by it in 12 days or something. Mr Taiwo, her cook: jollof rice, I sometimes imagine what it vegetable soup, roasted chicken, would have been if it had been moin-moin (a savoury cake of a grand production. But I do black-eyed peas, which Adichie think it’s a film that was especially loves) and garri, a lovingly done.” As, doubtless, Nigerian staple that she really Americanah will be: optioned doesn’t love but wanted me to by Brad Pitt’s company Plan try. Her family, she says, tease B, it is to star Lupita Nyong’o, her about her dislike of it. She the Mexican-Kenyan actress mimics them: “‘Oh, you say you from 12 Years a Slave, for are such a proud Nigerian! But whom Adichie “writes with how can you be if you don’t like the voice of a modern Africa, this?’” She throws back her where ideas of tradition and head and laughs. (It clearly is modernity interact… She is quite a big deal, this: she wrote witty, frank and compassionate, a piece about it for The and her writing feels timeless New Yorker a few years ago. I and contemporary at once.” confess, I didn’t adore it either. Adichie with Zadie Smith for a talk at the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, New York, last year; and delivering her talk at TEDxEuston in London, 2013 Nyong’o was an admirer of Made from pounded cassava Adichie’s books long before she was cast in She has focused her attention on gender root, it’s like really, really dense school mash.) Americanah: “For the first time I felt that inequality because here in Nigeria, that’s her After we finish, Adichie’s favourite makesomeone had found the words to express primary experience of inequality. In Nigeria up artist, Stella, arrives to get her ready for sentiments, analyse situations about the she would know why a driver would have a the photographs. Having a make-up artist rich and varied African immigrant problem with her: “Because I’m a woman.” come to your house is more common in experience, in a way I never could.” But all the same, she says she was Lagos than it might be in London, but it Adichie’s novels and stories, for those “personally furious” that Ava DuVernay’s took Adichie a while to find someone who who have yet to discover them, strike a film about the American civil rights would give her the natural style she prefers delicate balance. Yes, they deal with pressing marches, Selma, was almost entirely – a lot of Lagos make-up is pretty dramatic. political issues of gender and race. But they overlooked by the Oscars. “I took that very “Why pay for it if you can’t see it? That’s are voluptuously, deliciously readable, too, personally. It’s almost a slap in the face for a the thinking!” Adichie says, laughing again. and charming and funny and smart. And person who wants to believe in some kind of Stella, a tall, elegant woman in a long they are part of a wave of remarkable progress; 2014 was such a difficult year for black dress and silver bangles, highlights writing from the African continent: work America and race.” She doesn’t even have Adichie’s truly extraordinary beauty by authors such as NoViolet Bulawayo, to mention the riots in Ferguson, Missouri, perfectly, a shimmering gold on her eyelids Dinaw Mengestu, Taiye Selasi, Teju Cole following the shooting of Michael Brown the only really glossy touch. Adichie suggests and many others is creating a truly global by the police, or the death of Eric Garner in I might like a go in the make-up chair, literature. But it’s recognition in Europe New York, and the protests that followed; but Stella doesn’t have with her the right and America that brings such authors real those events hang in the air between us. shade of foundation for me. This, of course, success, and some have argued that this is, “Even when I’m not in the US, I follow is the experience many women of colour in itself, a new expression of colonialism. what’s going on, I’m very emotionally have in Europe. “Oh, yes,” Adichie shrugs. Adichie dismisses this: “We can either have invested. And I find myself thinking that “I always carry my own base with me.” a conversation about making ‘Africa’ some maybe I’ll write an essay about it: looking at Talking about race with Adichie is exclusive, bad space, or we can have a larger the idea that there’s something similar in fascinating. “I only became black when I conversation about the publishing world. > the way that American society looks at came to America,” she writes in Americanah; 225


It’s just a question of power and money and infrastructure, rather than one of Africans being self-hating or something.” She herself is proving to be a major force in the development of local authors: for the past eight summers she and her Nigerian publisher have hosted a writing workshop in Lagos. These days there are 2,000 applicants for 20 places – she wants to keep it small, “otherwise it loses something”. It’s clear that this is a project dear to her heart: she loves teaching, she says. “I want to make it valid, to dream about books and writing. Because in Nigeria it’s very hard; people will say to you, what do you mean, ‘writing’? Nigerians are a very, very practical people. And while I admire practicality, I feel we need to make a space for dreaminess.

“Nigerians need to make a space for dreaminess. But life is short” But life is short. I’ll say, don’t give up your job. Get up earlier, make the space. If it matters to you, make it matter. I wrote Purple Hibiscus when I was an undergraduate. I was my sister’s unpaid housekeeper, I was cooking, taking care of my nephew – I got up at 2am to write.” In her company you can almost see her at work: before supper we stopped for a smoothie in a local bar and gallery with one of her best friends, Chioma, and I watched Adichie’s face as Chioma told a startling story about an encounter she’d had at work. Adichie took it in the way that real writers do, storing everything away carefully in preparation for eventual transformation into fiction. It was quite something to see. But no, she won’t reveal anything about her next project. When I ask if she’ll tell me what she’s working on now, she shakes her head firmly: “I can’t!” To spend time in Lagos with Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, to stand on the shore of the lagoon as she poses, laughing, for Vogue’s photographer, to drive through the city’s crowded roads, to share a drink with her and her friends, was very special. But for all her fame and success, she remains down-to-earth. When I ask her if she sees herself as a feminist heroine, she looks puzzled. Her heroines, she says, are “the nameless women in the market, who are holding their families together. They are traders and their husbands are out drinking somewhere... It’s those women I admire. I am full of admiration for them.” Q 226

“Her writing feels timeless and contemporary at once.” Adichie at the Lagos studio of her friend, artist Victor Ehikhamenor

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“It’s that enigma, that figuring out who she is, which compels me.” Erdem Moralioglu, photographed in east London. Grooming: Larry King. Sittings editor: Florence Arnold

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Flower

POWER Erdem Moralioglu talks to Alexandra Shulman about independence, why he never takes no for an answer and the “sphinx” that drives him. Photographs by Christian MacDonald

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t is London’s first really wintry afternoon and Erdem Moralioglu is considering the design of the carrier bags for his first store. It might be bleak outside the Rich Mix cultural centre where his team work above the cinema and café (“I get 10 per cent discount,” he confides as he collects me from the lobby), but in the Erdem office all is colour and bustle. The carrier bags pile up on the floor of the small office he has carved out for himself from the open-plan. Should there be a black trim on the bright white card? How high should the grosgrain handle be located? Would the lettering of Erdem be best placed top-centre or slightly lower? Should the address of the store be in a cursive script? The notion of including the shop’s Mayfair address on the bags is very Erdem. “I like the idea of it being my centre, like Chanel and Rue Cambon. Of course, the reality right now is 34 Bethnal > 229


and his designs are womanly without being stodgy and exuberant without being garish. It is substantial testament to his work that, despite the march of androgyny and minimalism in the fashion of recent seasons, his business is growing in large increments. “His fabrics are outstanding and his clothes are never ‘bling’ or vulgar; they are something you want to keep and treasure, pieces you can bring out season after season,” adds Burstein. If you want to make an impact in a sophisticated but feminine way, Erdem is your man. Anne Hathaway, Jessica Chastain, Gwyneth Paltrow and Kristin Scott Thomas have all been snapped on the red carpet in his designs. Benedict Cumberbatch’s fiancée Sophie Hunter chose Erdem for her first post-engagement appearance, and recently Keira Knightley, a longtime fan of his clothes, wore his tiered purple lace to the Screen Actors Guild awards. “The two evening dresses that he’s made me for red-carpet events have been among my favourites,” she says. “He always designs his evening dresses with pockets, which makes me so happy. I can be totally dressed up but have my hands in my pockets and feel really boyish.” And don’t forget the Duchess of Cambridge’s fondness for a bit of block-colour Erdem lace.

“Hav i ng a t w i n, I’m not a f r a id of wome n , of b o d ie s . I’m not t r y i n g t o f l a t t e n t h i n g s”

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rdem is a member of a generation of designers who are still referred to as “young designers”, but at 37 Erdem is not really young. His label may be celebrating its tenth anniversary but it’s taken a lot longer than a decade to reach the point of a store opening in South Audley Street and more than 200 stockists across the world. It’s taken, he would tell you, most of his life. Erdem’s Turkish father was a chemical engineer and his mother came from Birmingham. They met in Geneva where she was working as a secretary at DuPont. They married and emigrated to Montreal where the twins were born – Erdem is 15 minutes older than Sara. “My sister and I are the only ones in the family born in Canada so we’re this anomaly – the freaky, weird twins,” Erdem says, as he hands me a faded black-and-white snapshot of his mother, who died in 2007. The small

photograph shows an attractive young woman sitting on a grass slope. “She had this amazing bone structure. She had blonde, blonde, blonde hair with greyblue eyes. My father was dark, dark, dark with black eyes and black hair. My sister is like me but she probably has greener eyes,” he concludes. Erdem’s eyes are a deep toffee colour, and when he removes his dark-rimmed glasses (which he usually only does for sport) you can see that one has an Asiatic almond cast while the other is more oval. Without the glasses he looks more Turkish. With them he looks like a healthier version of his hero Yves Saint Laurent – as you would expect from the product of an outdoorsy Canadian childhood, spent swimming and skiing. Sara, like her brother, lives in London, and makes documentaries for the BBC. Currently, as his house is being renovated, he and his partner Philip Joseph are sleeping in her sitting room. Does she wear his clothes? “She wears head-to-toe me every day. I forced her,” he jokes, before qualifying, “But my sister has such a strong character, she’s completely independent. I would never be able to tell her what to do. We’re so, so, so close. She knows me inside out.” Is she married? “No.” As is the case with many designers, his mother was a huge influence on him, reading her children books in bed on Impressionism, Manet, Sargent – traces of which can be found in so much of her son’s work. “I think that was a kind of homesickness. My father was homesick, too. I think they were two people who met and fell in love and had kids in a country they didn’t want to be in,” he says. As a child he would read and draw constantly and was fascinated by the life of his mother and her friends. “You know you hear about designers who had mothers who would wear couture? She wasn’t like that at all. She never wore make-up. She was very pared back. I remember she would wear just red lipstick. Just a little bit of red lipstick” – he dabs his lips – “and she would wear Shalimar. And I thought that was… amazing.” Erdem’s accent is hard to categorise. Canadian no doubt, although that leaves plenty of room for interpretation as few people can identify a Canadian accent, which can vary from the Yukon in the northwest across to French-speaking Montreal. He is bilingual. “I remember looking at her clothes and, not having the desire to wear them myself, but being obsessed by these things that made a woman a woman. She would have a friend over for tea and I was >

NATHANIEL GOLDBERG; JUERGEN TELLER; JOSH OLINS; NICK KNIGHT; GETTY

Green Road, above the cinema,” he acknowledges. But nobody could doubt that he’s in for the long haul. That afternoon he is meeting with a representative of Vanners, the silk mill, to look at fabrics. He shows me how a new technique developed for jacquard affects the depth of the float on the surface so that it is possible to have a lighter fabric carrying a greater degree of intricacy. He tenses and folds the swatches, strokes their surfaces, fingers the weight as they are laid out on a white table in the room where moodboards are stacked up for his pre-autumn collection. This afternoon he is sourcing for autumn/ winter ’15. In the fabrics’ weft and warp he sees a world of potential. Even for his graduation collection in 2003, he would hop on the Eurostar to Paris and search out flawed furnishing toile de Jouy and old lace and defective scraps from Marché Saint-Pierre and mix them with waxed African cottons from Shepherd’s Bush Market in a nostalgic but modern textile mash-up. Erdem is one of the British designers who have changed the perception of the British fashion industry in recent years. London Fashion Week – once thought of as home to a bunch of wildly creative visionaries who, through a combination of wilfulness, naivety and lack of any business strategy, would inevitably crash and burn – is now scrutinised not only for an enviable array of talent and imagination but also as the home of some flourishing twenty-first-century fashion brands. Christopher Kane, Nicholas Kirkwood, Mary Katrantzou and Jonathan Anderson join Erdem under the collective gaze, each with a distinctive and highly individual footprint. Erdem’s designs – and this is still rare among London designers – are eminently wearable for women of all ages. “His client is not a young girl looking for the next big thing; they are for the woman who has self-confidence and wants to look good for a special occasion,” points out Joan Burstein, founder of Browns boutique and one of Erdem’s early supporters. His signature prints, while often rooted in the natural world – flowers, leaves, butterflies, birds – are never twee


Clockwise from above: Vogue March 2015; with Ruth Wilson at the Met Gala, 2014; Keira Knightley at the Screen Actors Guild awards in January; Arizona Muse in “Best of British”, Vogue February 2011

Claire Danes, photographed for Vogue, November 2013

Above, from left: Alexa Chung at the 2014 Serpentine Gallery party; the Duchess of Cambridge on a tour of Canada, 2011; Jessica Chastain at a film premiere, 2014. Below: Erdem with his twin sister, Sara, at the British Fashion Awards 2011

A dress created for Vogue to commemorate the Olympics, September 2012

Gwyneth Paltrow at the premiere of Iron Man 3, 2013

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was the worst. The worst thing that could ever happen. It was quite sudden and it was… That was very difficult. And really, truly, the world fell from underneath me.” In spite of a van being stolen containing a large order to an important American department store and his head of production resigning, he managed to channel the grief into producing what would be one of the pivotal shows in his career, held at the Bluebird restaurant on the King’s Road. “It had to be this kind of beautiful thing because it had to be for her, in a weird way.” This conversation is taking place a month after the meeting with Vanners, and it is now five weeks before Erdem’s autumn/winter ’15 show. We are once again in his office, lined with books on makeshift timber shelves. Behind him is a pile of blue Smythson boxes for a project he is working on and hung on the wall beside his desk is a violet-winged butterfly behind glass that his sister gave him, an old YSL poster and a cuckoo clock. A cafetière of coffee and china cups and saucers have been produced. “I have never seen them before in my life,” he whispers as they are set down. He sits upright at his desk wearing New Balance trainers, Uniqlo jeans and a black shirt from Gap – although he loves Marni shoes and knitwear, such as the blue mohair sweater beside him, and his newest buy is a Prada coat. “I shaved today,” he adds. “Sometimes I try to grow a beard but it doesn’t work. I just look homeless with a beard.” He has a quick humour but also a self-awareness that makes him pause before responding to questions and even after answering, frequently adding qualifers. “Sometimes I run along the canal but I haven’t gone running in ages now,” he says, when I ask whether he exercises. “I listen to really bad music. No, not bad but, like, a Beyoncé situation to keep me going. No. We can’t write that I listen to Beyoncé while running along the canal. It’s so lame.” He has to be CHRISTIAN MACDONALD

THANKS TO JJ LOCATIONS (JJLOCATIONS.COM) AND HOUSE OF HACKNEY (HOUSEOFHACKNEY.COM)

At the end of his first year, he returned obsessed with how they looked.” It wasn’t to Montreal to be with his dying father. only his mother and her friends who gave “I was offered the opportunity to repeat him this peephole into womanhood but a year but I decided that I wanted to the even more primal connection of graduate with my class. He ended up having a female twin. “I’ve always had a passing away just before Christmas which link. It’s an interesting thing when you’re was really, really sad. I was very determined a twin of the opposite sex. Going through that my mum and my sister were going to every stage of your development with come to that graduation show and it was someone who is the opposite sex is going to be… great.” something I can’t escape in how I approach In a cheering message to other fledgling what I do. I’m not afraid of women, of designers, success didn’t immediately follow bodies. I’m not trying to flatten things.” For the last two years “There was never of school, Erdem was a stage that was determined to move easy, but I didn’t from the local high to a know anything else” private school – “I had to escape the suburbs. Really, I was like, I have to go to school downtown” – and it was there that he put together his portfolio to apply to the only fashion college in the country, Ryerson. “That was a big time of change and it involved having to tell my parents that I wanted to do fashion. My mother was really apprehensive at first because she thought, ‘God, that’s going to be a tough life’, whereas my father, having grown up in Turkey, really understood it more as a trade. It was like telling your parents you want to be an actor.” At college, a thirdhis time at the RCA and, despite many year exchange to the University of Central job interviews with design houses, there England took him to Birmingham. were a number of rejections before Diane “My mother was horrified. She was like, von Furstenberg took him on as a design ‘I worked so hard to get away and assistant. “My time there was brief. It was now you’re going back?’” he remembers. a good learning curve. I think,” he says, in Discovering the superior fashion education a diplomatic attempt to gloss over what was offered in Britain, he decided to apply clearly not a shining episode in his career. for an MA at the Royal College of Art. “I think she’s amazing, but it was there He won a place but then had the problem I really decided that I definitely wanted to of how to pay the enormous foreigndo my own thing. I resigned and came back student fees. At the time his father was and there was a funny competition called very ill with cancer and all the family Fashion Fringe which I thought if anything resources and focus were on caring for would be an excuse to update my portfolio.” him, but Erdem applied for, and won, a He won the “funny competition”, which Chevening scholarship from the Foreign provided him with a studio space in the and Commonwealth Office, a grant usually East End where he designed a small awarded to a more academic candidate. collection, bought by Harrods. “They’d never given it to a fine-arts In 2007, only four years after his father’s student, let alone a fashion student,” he death, his mother died of vasculitis. “That explains, understandably proud.


pressed to come up with any music he admits to liking. “Antony and the Johnsons. When I’m running slowly,” he finally suggests, scrolling down on his iPhone. “Arthur Russell, he’s great. You’d like Arthur Russell. The last track I downloaded? I think it was the Lana Del Rey song from the Snow White soundtrack. This is such blackmail material.” He met his partner, Philip, an architect, at the Royal College. They have been a couple ever since, and are in the process of renovating a house together in Dalston that will combine Philip’s architectural rigour with Erdem’s more magpie eye. “We tend to stay in at weekends and go out during the week,” Erdem says, after admitting to not being able to cook (“It’s a skill I’m working on”) and a fondness for pubs. “I have a vodka soda or… a little-known fact about me? I love Guinness.” While Philip is a keen moviegoer, Erdem describes himself as more of a back-row-aisle kind of person, ready to exit on the rare occasions he’s at the cinema, preferring the ballet and theatre.

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he previous day, Janine from his production company, two of his marketing team and Philip gather for a site visit at the Old Selfridges Hotel where Erdem has decided to show for the third time. Despite “a slight sinus situation”, Erdem is crisp and focused as they discuss the use of the space, the projected number of guests (currently 523), how many loos are needed and the design of the set. Everyone listens to what Erdem says, and Erdem kind of listens to them. “Erdem always has a very clear idea of the girls and the experience,” Janine says. (Read as: “He already knows exactly what he wants and always gets it.”) “Philip is busy,” the designer says teasingly. “He’s got this show, our house and the shop to do. We’re not allowed to talk about this in bed.” Someone suggests that they need to employ a client liaison officer. Like Erdem’s whole creative output, the show set is determined by his vision of a woman. A very specific woman. “She” is a kind of alter ego that inhabits a large proportion of his thoughts, if not his body, and her imagined life, her demands, her appearance informs his designs, his shows – even the prospective changing rooms of the store. For the set of this autumn/ winter ’15 show, he was inspired by an installation he saw at the previous

autumn’s Frieze Masters and he is planning something similar (a crowded collector’s apartment) for this woman to inhabit. The woman seems to have changed since we met a month back, when he described her as “a gallery owner with two galleries, maybe one in Bond Street and one in, like, Redchurch Street”, who maybe lived in Italy but, if it were London, would be in Bloomsbury and who would mix Danish collectable furniture with fleamarket finds. Since then she seems to have suffered a downturn in fortune and today, as he talks through his ideas for the set, he describes the jingling of the keys in the lock of her small flat as she returns from an unsuccessful visit to her father to ask for money – although she appears to still be a dab hand with the old flea-market treasures. She is a proper muse, unlike the paid style helpers employed by many designers, and you can see her on the moodboards, in his neat-headed sketches pinned everywhere, and in the photographs of Romy Schneider, Marella Agnelli and various other chic women of the last century pinned up in the studio. “I’m interested in a kind of nipped-in-ness that becomes quite undone,” he explains, looking at a wall of the sketches beside a scan of the undersides of seventeenthcentury silks from the V&A’s archive at Blythe House. “I like this weird, distressed thing.” As well as fabrics of faded grandeur, she will also probably be loving a high neck and a high waist (or trapeze shape), a short hem and flat riding boots with “brogue spats”. “She exists in my sketchbooks, she exists in the back of my head. She’s what I think about when I go to bed and she’s probably what I think about when I wake up. She’s a constant thing. I imagine what’s happening to her. Where she’s going to go. She’s not my sister. She’s not my mother,” Erdem emphasises. “She’s not a tangible thing. She starts flat and then she becomes three-dimensional. She’s a sphinx. You struggle with her, you dance with her and try to get your head around her. It’s that enigma, that figuring out who she is, which compels you. Or compels me.” She has been so compelling that, if everything runs to plan, by May Erdem

should have his name above the door (or, at any rate, in Victorian mosaic tiles in the vestibule) of a large corner building on South Audley Street, opposite Thomas Goode, just along the road from Harry’s Bar and round the corner from the boutiques of Mount Street. He and Philip are showing me around the building site where, in three months, Belgian marble will have been laid for the ground floor and sweeping staircase (“We got enough to do several stores,” explains Philip, “we need to think long term”), and silkvelvet carpet for the sumptuous bespoke area on the floor below. The original glass pavement lights are being restored from decades under cover and will allow a soft light into the lower rooms. The old coal vaults – complete with ancient piles of coal – are being turned into stock rooms and an online space. “If you told me five years ago that I would be standing in the vault of my own Mayfair shop, I would never have dreamed it would be possible,” he says. And how has it been possible, given that it is very unusual for a designer to remain entirely free from any outside investment? He won the BFC/Vogue Fashion Fund Award in 2010 which gave him a helpful cash injection to grow his infrastructure, but the expenses involved in opening a Mayfair store, running an online business, producing four collections a year and employing a staff of 47 might defeat many others. “Everything is planned for. We have worked out what we can do,” he says with a bemused look, as if it never crossed his mind there might be a problem and with a distinct unwillingness to elaborate. “Independence is something I have been able to afford. It’s as circumstantial as it is choice at the moment,” is his opaque explanation. Whatever the hows and whys, his determination and clarity of vision are not in doubt. “In retrospect, there was never a stage that was easy, but I didn’t know anything else,” he says, as we stand in the space that will be his bespoke area. “I think my strength has always been an inability to accept no. I’ve never been good with the word no.” Q

A t t h e s h ow s i t e , e ve r yo n e listens to what E r d e m s ay s . Erdem kind of listens to them

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JUST LANDED: TAFFETA SKIRTING PLAYS A PRETTY COMPANION TO PETER PILOTTO’S ENERGISED SHERBET COLOURS Silk dress, £1,680, Peter Pilotto at Mytheresa.com and Selfridges. Tutu skirt, from £23, The Tutu Shop. Leather and mesh sneakers, £395, Jimmy Choo. Hair: Esther Langham. Make-up: Saraï Fiszel. Nails: Marisa Carmichael. Production: Connect the Dots. Digital artwork: Hyperion Digital. Model: Ally Ertel

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modern masters Exercise artistic licence with this season’s standout pieces: abstract ideas, paintbox colour and unbridled craftsmanship make for wearable works of art. Styling by Lucinda Chambers. Photographs by Zoë Ghertner

MAIN ATTRACTION: LOEWE’S MAGNETIC TWOPIECE TRANSFORMS FLYAWAY FABRIC SWATCHES INTO A POSTMODERN MASTERPIECE Crêpe top, £695. Crêpe skirt with leather patches, £1,050. Both Loewe. Leather and mesh sneakers, £395, Jimmy Choo

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THERE AREN’T ANY RULES TO WEARING THE NEW HIGHDENSITY TEXTURES; HERE, ERDEM FLUFFS HIS FEATHERS Opposite: embroidered silk top with feather detailing, to order, Erdem. Beauty note: all works of art require a blank canvas. Blend Clarins BB Skin Perfecting Cream, £30, into skin for a flawless final masterpiece

MARY KATRANTZOU’S RICH BROCADES COME WITH A KNOWING FRAGILITY: REVEAL THE UNEXPECTED EROGENOUS ZONES VIA SHEER FRAGMENTS This page: embellished PVC and tulle dress, £8,640, Mary Katrantzou. Leather and mesh sneakers, £395, Jimmy Choo

ZOE GHERTNER

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CHARLOTTE TYDEMAN’S EMBOLDENED SILHOUETTE ELEVATES THE STATE OF UNDRESS TO GALLERY-WORTHY STATUS Opposite: hand-painted sponge and silk-tulle tunic, £800, to order, Charlotte Tydeman

SUCCUMB TO THE EXPERIENCE OF WEARING COMMES DES GARÇONS’ SHREDDED SCARLET DRESS – OR RATHER, LETTING IT DRIFT OVER YOUR BODY This page: cotton dress, £1,660, Comme des Garçons. Neoprene and lace sneakers, from £950, Dolce & Gabbana

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BLOWN-UP FLORALS SIGNAL A WILD CHARM, FIRMLY OUTLINING THE NEW ROMANTIC MOOD Opposite: jacquard dress with leather sleeves, £1,710, Marni

MARGIELA’S PLUSH PATCHWORKING ENSURES THAT PINSTRIPE IS NEVER WORKADAY This page: patchwork satin and wool top, from £490. Asymmetric wool skirt, from £300. Both Maison Margiela. Tulle petticoat, £9, The Tutu Shop

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DOUBLE-DUTY: A TWISTED SHIFT PUTS THE POLISHED DAY-TO-NIGHT DRESS BACK ON THE AGENDA This page: wool-crêpe dress, £1,110, Roksanda

AS FAR AS OPTICAL PRINTS GO, JUNYA WATANABE’S BOLD GEOMETRY IS GEARED TO CAPTIVATE Opposite: wool top, from £455. PVC skirt, £745. Both Junya Watanabe, at Dover Street Market. Mesh sneakers, £70, Adidas Originals

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WELL-GROUNDED: TAKE ALEXANDER McQUEEN’S ELABORATE GLAMOUR IN YOUR STRIDE AND PAIR WITH PAINTDIPPED TRAINERS This page: silk-chenille pompom dress embroidered with enamel flowers, to order, Alexander McQueen. Leather sneakers, £230, Y-3

LET CRINKLY WAVES FLOW IN THE WIND WITH ABANDON. TOUSLE WITH TONI & GUY HAIR MEET WARDROBE CASUAL ROUGH TEXTURISER, £7.50 Opposite: wool dress with leather bodice, to order, JW Anderson. For stockists, all pages, see Vogue Information

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orty-five minutes from Vienna – nestled at the end of a long drive, in the heart of a rural village surrounded by fields of strawberries and asparagus – is the holiday home of one of London’s most influential art-world couples: Stefan Ratibor and Kadee Robbins, and their young family. The stylish and charismatic Stefan, who is Austrian, switched his job at Lazard bank for one at Christie’s in 1998, eventually overseeing the launch of the Gagosian Gallery in London, of which he is now director. American-born Kadee, meanwhile, is the London director of the venerated Michael Werner Gallery. Their Austrian home, an elegant manor house in a small park, was built in 1686, just after the Turks had laid siege to Vienna and destroyed many of the local homes. Named Freihof Goldgeben (Freihof means “free farm”; that is, not attached to a large estate), it was designed to support the local farms, and its rooms – each with a different vaulted ceiling – are characterful and charming. Stefan had long loved this part of Austria and was delighted when he found the house in 2002. “It had belonged to an old lady who had been an opera singer. It was all totally overgrown with a forest that practically came up to the front door surrounding it,” he remembers. He had wanted to find a home somewhere near his extensive family – Stefan is one of five brothers; his mother has 17 grandchildren. (What’s more, he is related to the original Von Trapp family – a connection that delights his wife, Kadee, because The Sound of Music is one of her > 246

The gardens at Freihof Goldgeben have been transformed with sculptures, including Alpha (2008), by Franz West. Sittings editor: Hamish Bowles


the life

OF ART When London gallerists Stefan Ratibor and Kadee Robbins want to relax, they make for the art-filled Austrian home that they renovated together. By Fiona Golfar. Photographs by Franรงois Halard 247


Left: Kadee on the front steps of the house. Above: the antique chairs and table – left to Stefan by an aunt – are offset with a modern lamp by Poul Henningsen and Tattoo (For Reflection) (1997), by Douglas Gordon. Below: Tracey Emin’s neon I Kiss You (2004) lights up the orangery. The glass table was designed by Annabelle Selldorf and given to the couple as a wedding gift. The carpet is by Franz West

Above: the interior walls of the house are painted white or pale grey to contrast with the couple’s art collection and furniture, including Aaron Young’s Untitled painting from 2008 and the bright lipstick red of Ico Parisi’s Fifties Italian chairs. Below: a muddle of hats and coats on the rack in the hall

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favourite films, and she can sing every song, which she does.) Both came to London to start their careers in the art world, he from Austria by way of an English boarding-school education, and she from New York, the child of Anglo-American parents. Kadee was supposed to study for a PhD at the Courtauld, but never quite finished it, she merrily admits. This blonde American with a great sense of fashion and an easy warmth made an instant impression on Ruth Rogers, the River Café restaurateur, who says she met her after a mutual friend in the art world told her, “‘This girl has just arrived in London and is the best student ever and you’re going to love her!’ And I did, immediately.” The two women have been inseparable ever since. Stefan and Kadee, who are both in their mid-forties, were great friends before they

Clockwise from above: Gardar Eide Einarsson’s Logo painting from 2008; the hall’s stone stairs and floor are typical of the region, although the floor was laid to Selldorf’s design; the driveway leading up to the house; family heirlooms alongside Forties pieces by Guglielmo Ulrich, Jeff Koons’s Inflatable Flower (2000), a Franz West sculpture and Bomber Harris (2008), a painting by Adam McEwen

“The house had belonged to an opera singer. It was all totally overgrown… a forest practically came up to the front door” became romantically involved: their rival galleries would exhibit at stands just a stone’s throw from each other at international art fairs, and the two dealers would often find themselves at the same parties and art events. So their myriad friends were unsurprised when they fell for each other in 2007. “We were at Art Basel when it happened, of course,” laughs Kadee. Rogers describes them as “very similar: both have a deep involvement with their families and both are intensely curious people”. As luck would have it, by the time they became a couple Stefan had already begun work on refurbishing his sevenbedroom Austrian house. But Freihof Goldgeben is now very much a family home; following their marriage in 2008 they had three children, Agathe (six), Albert (two) and Lily (one). It is important to Stefan and Kadee alike that the children get to know both sides of their heritage; the early part of each summer is spent with Kadee’s family in Southampton, > 249


New York, and late summer, Easter and Christmas in Austria. Early in the refurbishment project, before Stefan and Kadee had become a couple, he had engaged the New Yorkbased architect Annabelle Selldorf. Stefan had seen how Selldorf married the classical with contemporary at the Neue Galerie in New York, he says, and he knew that he wanted her to help him transform the house. Generations of inhabitants have much altered this home, but Stefan and Selldorf wanted to take it as close to its original form as possible. For the floors they used local stone, laying it not in the traditional diamond shapes, but in rectangles. othing is ornate, besides the original fixtures. “It’s one of the most personal houses I’ve ever worked on,” says Selldorf. “For Stefan and Kadee art is art, it’s not about just looking at the past, it’s about looking at everything.” And, indeed, there is such an atmosphere of shared sensibilities and mutual passions in this home, it’s easy to see what she means. There is a light, contemporary feel and yet the bright, uncluttered spaces she has created are comfortable with a mixture of inherited furniture, antiques and art by many of the artists with whom the couple work. Rooms have been given graphic lines, and painted entirely in white or pale grey, allowing the simplicity of the house to sing – and both furniture and artworks to make their presence felt. “You get incredibly close to the artists sometimes and it is one of the privileges of the job to get to know them well,” observes Stefan. He gestures to a playful Franz West sculpture which sits in all its pale yellow glory in the park in front of the house’s impressive façade. West was a dear friend of Stefan’s, and before his death he visited the house to install this piece, a vast twisted knot, in person. There was nothing West liked more than the idea of children – or adults, for that matter – climbing on it, says Stefan.

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Inside the house, the walls host works by Ed Ruscha, Douglas Gordon, Richard Prince, Aaron Curry, Tracey Emin and Adam McEwen living alongside comfortable modern sofas, eighteenthcentury chairs and coffee tables covered in recent purchases of Greek and Roman antiquities. “The house is full of amazing things, of course,” says close friend Alannah Weston, deputy chairman of the Selfridges Group. “Fabulous gilt furniture next to Franz West chairs, Twomblys next to a whimsical collection of asparaguses. But above all it’s extremely cosy, with masses of children and family of all ages.” Once Stefan and Kadee got together, her own vision for the house fitted in perfectly with his. In fact, laughs Selldorf, “The only change we had to make was to make more space to allow for her to have a dressing room.” And, of course, the children’s rooms, but then this house was always meant to feel like a family home. That it most certainly is – filled with children and their cousins and friends. Days are spent in the best of lazy summer style: swimming in the pool, going for walks in the woods and lying in hammocks reading books, and eating. Dishes from Stefan’s grandfather’s recipe book are often served, the household eating in the large dining room – or on their laps in front of a box set. “We eat lots of soufflés, rich ham puddings, venison and game, loads of stuff in aspic, and always cakes,” says Stefan with relish, and it’s well appreciated by guests. Weston says, “My memories of their home are all about food: from the amazing breakfasts, for which they have this ingenious machine that lets you boil your own eggs, to the trips to a shop in Vienna for special cheese straws.” “Everything is always so rich, every dish that gets made here is old-school European and seems to contain at least six eggs. No wonder all we want to do is sleep,” admits Kadee with a huge laugh, echoing the humour and sense of good living that emanates from this couple, who are certainly smart and well matched, sharing as they do the belief that home and family are the most important things in life. Q

“For Stefan and Kadee art is art, it’s not about just looking at the past, it’s about looking at everything”

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Top: Never, Never (2000), a pair of photographs by Douglas Gordon, tucked into a corner of the master bedroom. Above: the chairs around the card table in the sitting room were a present from Kadee’s parents in New York; the painting, Je Veux (2002), is by Franz West. Bottom: Nate Lowman’s Tombstone (2006) brings a touch of black humour to the garden


The monastic air of this bedroom is warmed by a carpet bought in a market in Isfahan in Iran. Between the windows is a 2004 print by Glenn Brown. Above the bed hangs New Wood, Old Wood (2007), by Ed Ruscha

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AS WEARABLE TECHNOLOGY GATHERS MOMENTUM, LISA ARMSTRONG ASKS WHETHER IT CAN REALLY IMPROVE OUR LIVES – OR OUR WARDROBES. PHOTOGRAPH BY THOMAS LAGRANGE

hem. May I have your attention, please? We don’t have very long. Any minute now, the exercise police are going to yell at me to get up and move my arse. Or worse. As a matter of fact, this has already happened – this morning. I was mid delicate negotiation with the head of PR at a French fashion house, and the police beeped to say I may not be using my foam roller correctly. By police, I mean those tracking devices that are now so fashionable among the under-35s that when I wore my Nike Fuelband for several months last summer, it attracted more attention than my Céline trousers. Admittedly the trousers were navy, like all my trousers. But still.

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MAKE-UP: KIRSTIN PIGGOT

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Fibre-optic dress, Richard Nicoll with Studio XO, spring/ summer â&#x20AC;&#x2122;15. Apple Watch, available from April. Fashion editor: Lucy Bower

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It’s not as if the Nike Fuelband, with all respect to Nike, is an item of great beauty. I’ll describe it to you, in case you’ve been living in a yurt with no internet connection for the past year. It’s a black, chunky rubber strap with a strip of rose gold, and it goes from chunky to bulky towards the middle where, presumably, its chip is embedded. It tracks the number of steps you take daily, and every so often, if you’ve been sedentary for too long, it flashes up with the words “Go Lisa”. (Obviously it won’t do that if your name isn’t Lisa. You have to program it. If waiting six weeks to have your four-ply Burberry blanket cape or Vuitton Neverfull mongrammed is old-school luxury, self-customising your wearable technology is new-school.) Appearance-wise, that’s it for the Fuelband. You don’t look at it and shriek, “That’s hideous, I can’t possibly.” But nor would you mistake it for Cartier. Or even Freedom at Topshop. On the other hand, it does something that Cartier and Freedom so far do not. It flashes electronically. It has dots (also electronic) that skitter around its teeny screen, making your wrist resemble a miniature sports stadium or the BT Tower. Who knew that looking nerdy would eventually not look nerdy but aspirational and – holy grail – modern? Or that the technical tie-in would become to fashion what the art collaboration has been: an emblem of the well-dressed mind? When I say techie, I don’t just mean those digitally savvy designers such as Erdem, Mary Katrantzou or Peter Pilotto, who were among the pioneers of computerised prints, although their aesthetic appreciation of what could be done with a screen undoubtedly helped open the fashion world’s eyes to the potential of geekiness. I’m referring to a growing sentiment among the observant that the biggest changes in what we wear in the future won’t be to do with hemlines and colours, but about connectivity and appcompatibility. Most tech experts reckon that the Apple Watch will be a game changer. Cowen, the investment bank, estimates that the wearable-technology market will hit $170 billion by 2020. How do I know? Because I have become addicted to the Wearable Technology column on Businessoffashion.com. This is where tech journalists patiently chronicle the scientists, optimists and lunatics of the fashion and technology worlds as they flirt and occasionally shack up with one another. Sometimes these relationships bear fruit. Last year Google, for instance, schmoozed Diane von Furstenberg big time. The 254

result was Google Glass by DVF, a range of spectacles with a micro screen attached to the top right-hand lens. Wearers could use this screen to receive email and browse the internet. Interesting, you have to concede. I trialled them during London Fashion Week last season, and things began swimmingly. I could read Google maps without having to hunt down my phone in the depths of my bag, an activity that had been known to take longer than the search for Bin Laden. I could take pictures and videos of models and colleagues without them realising (creepy) and, on one scintillating occasion when I couldn’t operate the off-switch, the dustmen. That was the beginning of the end for me. And it was only 11.30am. They weren’t completely terrible, these

Who knew that looking nerdy would eventually not look nerdy but aspirational and – holy grail – modern? glasses. Alison Loehnis, president of Net-a-porter.com, which launched them in Britain, wore the sunglass version to the Emilia Wickstead show and managed to look fabulous. DVF herself flamboyantly worked a pair as she wove her way around the long, horseshoe-shaped catwalk at the end of one of her shows in New York. At the time – and I don’t think I was alone – I wondered whether she was suffering from “exhaustion”. I later discovered she was using her Google Glass to film the front row, which lent her a somewhat leering mien because the incessant distraction of that little screen seriously interfered with the wearer’s ability to make normal eye contact with fellow humans. Here we reach the first of several little wrinkles in the wearable-tech narrative: it can make you look a prat. Google Glass (you had to refer to it in the singular, like “pant”) worked hard on that. It was connectivity that was the problem. When Glass (which, by the way, cost £1,200) lost connection with my phone for the eightieth time, I put us both out of our misery. I recount all this in the past tense, because Google recently announced that it

was abandoning Glass to devote itself to its driverless car. I hope they resolve the connectivity issues. Until they do, I’m not going anywhere near California. For California is the Paris of the wearabletechnology world, the Avenue Montaigne of smart fashion. It is in Santa Clara, for example, that Intel, hitherto a drearysounding company of drearily designed software and chips, is based. At the end of last year, Intel teamed up with Opening Ceremony on a jewelled bracelet that receives email and texts and now sells in Barneys for $495. Not absolutely everything is Californian. In January, during Las Vegas’s Web MD’s Fashionware Show, belts with hidden phone chargers and LED dresses swept down one catwalk. A decade ago Hussein Chalayan showed dresses that lit up. And two years ago Asprey brought a stylish tote with internal phone chargers to market. From this I think we can assume that the tech crowd is still working out how many useful practical applications there are for digital fashion. For while there may be an increasing number of wearabletech products launching, their benefits, so far, are not significant. ut wait. What about a mindaltering gizmo that’s legal? Last October Will.i.am announced he was launching Puls, a smart bracelet that claims to be able to determine your mood via the tone of your voice and then improve it. One online reviewer described an early developer model as “objectively the worst product I’ve touched all year”. But the telephone had its share of detractors. So did the steam train. Moodmetric, a Finnish company, may do better with what it claims is the smallest ring containing a biometric sensor. Obviously, that should have read “smallest so far”. Things change fast in the wearable-tech world – way quicker than the switch from drainpipes to flares, which pretty much took a decade. By the time you read this, the smallest biometric ring may require another ring with a magnifying app to locate it. Meanwhile, Moodmetric’s ring reads your emotions by measuring tiny changes in your skin triggered by your nervous system and then relays this info back to you via an app on your phone. I know. Your brain did a reasonable job of keeping humans biometrically up to speed on what Moodmetric calls emotional fitness for 200,000 years. Reasonable, but not infallible. Plus, this ring is meant to alert you to stress flashpoints so that you can avoid them.

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Tech fashion is ruthlessly trend chasing. This season it’s mood enhancement; winter 2016 could be all about turning your torso into a camera. East Londonbased menswear label Ada & Nik debuted a leather jacket during the January London men’s collections with an in-built camera that allows the wearer to capture photographs without any conscious effort. If it catches on, it will make our mania with selfies look like a golden age of reticence. And don’t imagine you’ll be able to drag out the Hot New Techie Breakthrough of Spring 2015 in three years’ time and pass it off as vintage. The chip will probably be obsolete. As it is, my hot look of last summer – the Fuelband that earned me such kudos among 25-year-olds – is about to become a museum piece, because Nike has junked its hardware division to focus on software that will be compatible with the Apple Watch. Sooner or later all this wizardry will have a genuinely practical application. How long before, as Nick Verreos, Fashionware’s show host, put it at that Vegas event, “fabrics eventually become high-tech, too; a sweatshirt could become warmer and thicker in the cold and then lighter when you want it to. You could control all of that by an app. There are all types of wearables that could really impact fashion.” For the moment, however, high-end luxury fashion seems cautious, perhaps understandably. “Wearable tech is very much part of the zeitgeist,” says Loehnis (she of that stylish Google Sunglass appearance). “But we need to remember that it’s still in its infancy. Initially the products that were brought to market looked more like gadgets than fashion.” There’s evidence, though, that the earlyadopting fashion consumer wants more tech with her fashion, provided it looks good. “This is evolving,” says Loehnis, “and we’re willing it on.” In the not-too-distant future, Miuccia, or Karl, or Raf will surely recognise this opportunity and, in the process, grab a new generation of consumers with different perceptions of luxury from ours. The key is to identify what might be genuinely useful, and then make it look irresistible. Loehnis cites the rings from Kovert Design, a London start-up, as an example of usefulness. Kovert’s rings are aimed at those trying to digitally detox. If you want some time out from your phone, or are in a meeting, you can program the ring to alert you when important messages (from the nanny, for instance) have come in. Crucially, Kovert prioritised design. According to Kate

Unsworth, founder and CEO of Kovert Designs, “Silicon Valley has this misconception that if the technical feature is well built enough, consumers will lap it up, no matter what it looks like. Ever seen a smartwatch on the Champs-Elysées?” Loehnis is also impressed by the performance and popularity with Net-asporter’s customers of Bodyism’s Octavia leggings which, she explains, “use your body heat to promote collagen synthesis, therefore helping to sculpt legs and reduce cellulite”. The sports world is filled with techie innovations that could benefit high fashion and luxury collections – some already familiar, such as the wicking that draws moisture away from our skin. Nike alone patents a new idea every 24 hours.

There’s a strong possibility that all that beeping, pulsing and light-flashing is turning us into twitching wrecks “Things are moving so fast it’s very easy to get excited about all this new innovation,” says Loehnis. “But the questions we always try to keep in mind are what will this piece of technology do for her? How will it make her life easier?” At the moment, fitness and health are the most obvious and useful applications for wearable technology. Which is why I tried out a bunch of winking, twinkling fitness devices for this article – just to see what it’s like to be linked up digitally 24/7. Some were inoffensive and just about Champs-Elysées-worthy. (Actually, can we clear something up? The Champs-Elysées is not chic.) One was so hideous it failed even the Champs-Elysées test, so I handed it straight over to my husband. After three days even he decided it was unacceptable. The Misfit Shine, a streamlined disc “crafted out of aircraft-grade aluminium” was probably the best looking and, in theory, links to various apps that can track your sleep patterns and log your food as well as exercise intake. Unfortunately it regularly failed to sync with these apps. I spent so much time during one cross-training session trying to get it to transmit properly

that the trainer nearly banned me. It is now resting in peace on a shelf at home, alongside Google Glass and the Garmin Smart tracker – another wrist device that, despite some brutal reviews on Amazon, started off quite well. However it, too, stopped talking to my phone… And so it went on. Some people adore turning their wrists or bra strap into a Nasa-inspired dashboard. If you’re the sociable kind – and by this I mean the sort of person who has 900 friends on Facebook – you can turn various parts of your body into a Tower of Babel, connecting them with apps that will swap personal information with millions of other like-minded, logged-in souls, providing on-screen encouragement, commiseration and, let’s be honest, rubbing their sorry faces in the dust when you’ve trounced them on the treadmill. Some 25 million women have downloaded Nike+ fitness apps and through them, according to Nike’s CEO Mark Parker, are “making lifelong friendships”. That in itself alarms some: how long before life- and health-insurance companies insist members wear some kind of technology to keep tabs on our lifestyle choices? There is, too, the not-insignificant issue of accuracy. When Yahoo instigated a bonus scheme for employees who daily achieved their 10,000 steps, the smart alecs soon worked out that they could reach target effortlessly by attaching their wrist devices to their desk fans. None of these gizmos differentiates between fast and slow steps. The recommended number of daily steps for an active person is 10,000 a day, but it’s equally important to get your heart rate up to 75 per cent of its capacity on a regular basis. Not all steps are created equal: 5,000 leisurely steps around Dover Street Market, although useful, are not as valuable as a power walk or a jog. Yoga and Pilates don’t rack up any steps. Also, all the devices rely on your honesty when it comes to logging your food consumption. And when did anyone last tell their food diary the truth? By far the most profound question with all this wearable technology, however, is what it’s doing to what I’ll call the human essence. There’s a strong possibility that all that beeping, pulsing and light-flashing is turning us into twitching wrecks. There’s an even more serious concern that hooking ourselves in to all those algorithms night and day is deadening our instincts. The nadir of my digital life came when I found myself spending an hour before bed trying to sync my Garmin with a sleep app that promised soothing soundtracks, including rainfall. When I realised that it actually was > 286 255


Partners IN STYLE

Misha and Alexander in his Paddle 8 office in New York. Misha wears a top and trousers from the s/s ’15 collection of her label, Nonoo. Hair: Yohey Nakatsuka. Make-up: Satsuki Soma. Sittings editor: Emily Sheffield

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ISABEL ASHA PENZLIEN

You say Bauhaus, I say baroque. Four couples tell Vogue what happens when two aesthetic visions come together under one roof. Photographs by Linda Brownlee and Isabel Asha Penzlien


“Every decision is very much the two of us,” says Alexander. “Neither is allowed to get anything for the house without sign off”

MISHA NONOO & ALEXANDER GILKES As with most aesthetic ventures, it is only with careful editing that the final picture emerges. An exacting process complicated when two strongwilled characters, each with their own clear visual sense, need to marry their tastes. But such is the reality of coupledom. And despite the current bickering between Alexander Gilkes and his wife, Misha Nonoo, over who has creative ownership of what (form, colour, texture or pattern), evidently their sparky synergy works. Their Brooklyn townhouse is a perfect mix of refined elegance, both contemporary and traditional, lightened with exotic details that keep the whole youthful. Alexander describes himself as having a “strong Protestant aesthetic, it’s all about rigidity and form but then I love details with texture and colour.” “I think I added the colour!” asserts Misha. Both British, they share a taste for travel. He has lived in Chile, St Petersburg and Paris, while she grew up in the Middle East “visiting souks every weekend,” she relates, “so I like prints and bold, block colours.” The pair met in London during a brief tenure working at Quintessentially before crossing to New York, keen to exert their entrepreneurial spirit. Gilkes, a former auctioneer at Phillips de Pury, who on the surface has the languor of a nineteenth-century explorer, set up Paddle 8, an online curated art exhibition and auction site, while Misha founded her fashion label, Nonoo. Reflecting her interior choices, she designs pieces with strong, minimal, structured shapes, paired with bright prints. They both agree, Gilkes explains, that what you collect in your home and in your wardrobe should be “an amazing archive of your intellectual path”. ES

Misha is a ruthless clearer, while Alexander develops emotional attachment to pieces but, whether at home or work, they both endeavour to create “busy bits next to clean, bigger plain canvases”. Left: the antique marble fireplaces in the hallway and bedroom (below) were sourced in France. Above: the couple both enjoy the juxtaposition between the traditional and the contemporary, for example an old bust (found in the L’Islesur-la-Sorgue antiques market) is placed next to a plastic toy. Right: a vintage Scots Guards uniform and bearskin is displayed in the hall. Below: the bedroom

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Above left: blue-andwhite crockery and antique-effect walls lend a country feel to the kitchen. Above: Karel Appel’s painting A Couple hangs above the livingroom fireplace alongside vinyl sculptures made by the couple as placeholders for their wedding. Right: in the conservatory is a cactus ornament from the Conran Shop. Below: Philip wears a jacket and shirt by his own label; Charlotte wears a skirt by Ostwald Helgason

CHARLOTTE WEARS SKIRT, OSTWALD HELGASON, AT BROWNS

Keith Coventry’s Estate Painting, hanging over the mantelpiece, was a gift from the artist. The popcorn television cupboard and paintpalette table are by Philip for his own label, the Rodnik Band

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Charlotte in one of her homemade skirts. Philip wears his own label, the Rodnik Band. Hair: Ben Jones. Make-up: Sandra Cooke. Sittings editor: Nura Khan

Top: the Shark chair was designed by Philip for the Rodnik Band, available at Made.com. Above: a pop-art painting by Philip hangs in the kitchen. Below: above the Niki de Saint Phalle Bird Woman figure is a photograph by Charlotte, from her series A Day at Home, showing the same part of the living room prior to refurbishment

CHARLOTTE & PHILIP COLBERT Behind a classic Victorian house-front in east London is the eccentric Colbert world – a pop fantasy inhabited by husband Philip’s surrealist creations. A Yellow Submarine sofa, popcornbucket TV cabinet, cartoonish shark chair and miniature Duchamp urinal ornaments are bathed in the peach glow of rustic, Mediterranean-style walls. “It’s the South of France, not Hackney!” Philip exclaims. A self-declared “Willy Wonka”, Philip is sporting a black bomber jacket with manga-eyed lobsters (his wedding suit featured the same print) by his label, the Rodnik Band. “The Beastie Boys’ satirical style and explosive energy are my ideal,” he says, making it hard to believe that when he met screenwriter and photographer Charlotte Goldsmith, he only ever wore black. “Charlotte’s look is more subtle,” he says. With her ruler-straight fringe offsetting magnifying-glass-size spectacles, his wife has the air of a Man Ray muse. Her wardrobe is a curiosity shop of “New Wave essentials” – homemade Fifties-style skirts (the current favourite is appliquéd in the style of Matisse’s The Sheaf) and red berets (to complement her husband’s trademark red socks). “I imagine consulting Elsa Schiaparelli when dressing,” she says. “I add eccentric accessories, like Delfina Delettrez’s Dalí-inspired jewellery and Natacha Marro’s curvy shoes, over Vanessa Bruno and Isabel Marant basics.” For evenings out, Goldsmith wears her husband’s label: “Stepping out of our Mini dressed entirely in his designs is like being in a theatre piece,” she laughs. “Some people worship classic sophistication,” adds Philip, “for us it’s about escapism and fantasy.” JH 259


LAURA JACKSON & JON GORRIGAN

Above: a German turn-ofthe-century school map hangs in the open-plan living area. Left: Jon collects photographs from around the world. These crime-scene photographs of car crashes from the Seventies are some of his favourites. Below left: among the pictures propped against a wall is the couple’s most treasured artwork, a self-portrait of Jon’s grandfather (second from right). Below: the photograph above the bed was taken by Stephanie Sian Smith, a friend of the couple

LAURA WEARS DRESS, MIH JEANS. JON WEARS SWEATER, HOWLIN’ BY MORRISON. JEANS AND BOOTS, HIS OWN

Since they met three and a half years ago, television presenter Laura Jackson and her boyfriend, photographer Jon Gorrigan, have become skilful curators of a vintage fashion world. The rough edges of their warehouse flat in Dalston are buffed away by mismatching furniture upholstered in velvet and corduroy. The mood is unplanned but organised, largely due to Jon’s eye: “We both love the Sixties,” Laura says, “but Jon is more considered: he’ll wait ages until he’s found the perfect piece, like the Gerald Abramovitz lamp and our retro sideboard. I’m more impatient.” The scattered, chintzy details are Laura’s input. The expansive walk-in wardrobe (once a spare bedroom) is neatly divided in two. Her side: a late-Sixties, Left Bank-style universe – think Yves Saint Laurent velvet suiting and Peter Pan collars. (Shelves heave with Jane Birkin basket bags and Chanel ballet pumps.) His: rails of early-Seventies sportswear punctuated by countrified “proper English brands” – sweaters by Pringle of Scotland or John Smedley, and Church’s loafers. When it comes to identifying their fashion pin-ups, boyfriend and girlfriend do so with precision – he plays Paul Weller to her Lou Doillon. “If the outfit is really girly, she’ll appear with especially messy hair,” he says. “Really girly” is a doll-like smock dress – her lash-skimming fringe shaken out and the remainder of her tumbling hair pinned back into a loose bun. And she knows his style mantra by heart: “It was Noel Gallagher who said that if your jumper matches your shoes, you’re ready for a night out.” JH

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Barry, the coupleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s whippet, snoozes on the elegant moss-green sofa (another of Jonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s discoveries) which dominates the space. Hair and make-up: Lica Fensome. Sittings editor: Nura Khan

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EMILIA WICKSTEAD & DANIEL GARGIULO There’s a touch of Mad Men about the choice of mid-century-modern furniture in the impressively clutter-free west London home of designer Emilia Wickstead and her financier husband Daniel Gargiulo. Wickstead’s label’s characteristic fresh take on demure dressing resonates through the house: she applies her measured love of black to antiques, reinventing them with a lick of masculine charcoal paint, while the confectioneryhued palette of her designs extends to upholstery (market finds are covered in fabrics from past catwalk collections) and her own paintings – a hobby that provides “a therapeutic step away from a normal working day”. How does Gargiulo feel about living in Emilia’s style world? “It’s very amusing, Emilia constantly moves things around until picture perfect,” he teases. The pair, who are also business partners, are a lesson in how style opposites attract. Gargiulo’s bespoke work suits were a feat of persuasion for Wickstead and a revelation for the garrulous Brazilian, whose off-duty uniform consists of vintage T-shirts borrowed from his brother or father, nylon running shorts and Eighties Nike plimsolls, with a suit jacket thrown on for good measure. Wickstead’s wardrobe embodies the polish of her elegant catwalk creations. “For starters, I don’t have any casual clothes,” she notes. Her take on tailoring involves immaculate creasefront trousers with a men’s cashmere sweater (M&S stocks her favourites) and a matt red lip. It’s a style jump from her husband’s sombreroprint “mischief shirt”, which is reserved for his nights out with friends – but then, what would chic be without a hint of playful wit? JH

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Emilia and Daniel in the library. Hair: Ben Jones. Make-up: Sandra Cooke. Sittings editor: Naomi Smart

Right: the couple’s favourite artworks hang over the library fireplace. Below: the two Takashi Fukushima paintings on the dining-room mantelpiece originally belonged to Daniel’s father. Tweed from Emilia’s a/w ’14 collection covers the Driade chairs


Above: the designer collects decanters from Skandium and Driade. She also sources them from markets. Below: a favourite photograph of Emilia and Mercedes sits on a cricket stool – one of a set – along with fresh flowers from a stall on the Fulham Road Above: the bureau in the living room was bought from an antiques warehouse in Italy. One of Emilia’s own paintings hangs above it. Below: Emilia and Daniel’s two-year-old daughter Mercedes’s pretty, pastel-hued bedroom

LINDA BROWNLEE

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SOLAR powder Remember when Johnson’s Holiday Skin launched and the gradual-tanning market was born? Vita Liberata’s self-tanning bronzer could well be another contender for a new tanning category. It’s a powder bronzer that gives instant colour, but also builds up a natural base tone that will last for five days. Vita Liberata Crystal Minerals, £35, Vitaliberata.co.uk 265


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VOGUEbeauty PATCH WORK FAIRYDROPS TOKYO SCANDAL QUEEN MASCARA, £18.50, AT THISISBEAUTYMART.COM

BALMAIN

Dream Dots and Sarah Chapman’s Spot Sticker are transparent patches that form a hygienic, breathable barrier over blemishes, diminishing inflammation and redness. They really work – and are almost imperceptible, so you can wear them at your desk (we’ve been known to). Similarly, Mizon’s Cotton Shower Sheet Essence patches are infused with lightweight but powerful hydrating ingredients such as shea butter. Apply directly to dry, flaky areas. Sarah Chapman Spot Sticker, £19, Sarahchapman.net

DREAM DOTS FOR SPOTS FROM £11 FOR 24, DREAMDOTS FORSPOTS.COM

MIZON COTTON SHOWER SHEET ESSENCE, £7.50, AT CULTBEAUTY.CO.UK

ASIA major

SHAY & BLUE WATERMELONS EAU DE PARFUM, £55, AT HARVEY NICHOLS

A lot of beauty innovation is coming from Asia: at Beauty Mart, sales of the Magic Peeling Mitt, £4, a double-sided exfoliating glove from Korea, have soared by 400 per cent. The Skin Lounge’s Pearl Brightening Mask, another Korean export, uses hyaluronic acid and green tea to pep up dull-looking skin. Japan’s bestselling mascara, Fairydrops Tokyo Scandal Queen Mascara, £18.50, has a unique, patented bobble brush that fits perfectly under lashes to give maximum volume. Lastly, we love Eyecandy’s Rainbow Volume S Brush: the S-shaped bristles create little air-pockets at your roots, giving hair extra “oomph” in an instant.

JAMES COCHRANE; PAUL BOWDEN

ON THE SCENT Since launching in 2012, Shay & Blue has quickly become the British fragrance brand to watch. Department stores are astounded by its ability to outshine the big fragrance guns, and founder Dominic De Vetta reports devotees making pilgrimages to the brand’s boutique in Marylebone. Standouts include Blood Oranges and Amber Rose. New this spring: Watermelons.

THE SKIN LOUNGE TRIO SEOUL COLLECTION, £18, AT THISISBEAUTY MART.COM

EYECANDY RAINBOW VOLUME S BRUSH, £12, AT VICTORIA HEALTH.COM

SOLID SUCCESS POMMADE DIVINE £20, AT LIBERTY

POMME Aid This balm was the precursor to multi-use creams: used in eighteenth-century France, it remained a staple for soothing countless skin issues such as scars, burns and spots – until sales dwindled some decades back. Then, a few months ago, Liberty reintroduced it, and grateful customers are re-ordering in droves. Smelling like apples (from where the word “pomade” comes) and cinnamon, it is miraculous for cuticles, too.

Bobbi Brown’s Shimmer Brick is now a beauty staple. Over the years there have been many incarnations, but its delicate spectrum of skin-enlivening tones has always proved a winner. Now there’s a new evolution: the Brightening Brick, which is brighter in colour and lighter on the shimmer. We think it will eclipse the original in the beauty-buying public’s affections before the year is out.

BOBBI BROWN BRIGHTENING BRICK, £34

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VOGUEbeauty VERSUS

NUDESTIX CONCEALER PENCILS, £24 EACH, AT SPACE NK

NAKED PASSION Eyeshadow is not often the stuff of waiting lists, but the latest Urban Decay Naked palette has been causing a frenzy. Launched 18 years ago, Urban Decay soon had a cult following, but later fell off the beauty map. Now it’s back with a bang, opening its first UK boutique in Covent Garden. Such was the buzz about a recent drop of Naked on the Run palettes that there was a waiting list of 15,000 for the 75 boxes. Fans cite colour payoff and longevity as the cause of their ardour.

NUDESTIX MAGNETIC EYE COLOR, £24, AT SPACE NK

URBAN DECAY NAKED ON THE RUN PALETTE, £37

BUFF UP

GREEN revolution There’s no disputing Poppy King’s position as the Lipstick Queen, but her newest offering (available in this country from May) is set to outshine the rest: when her green lipstick launched in Barneys last year, the store was unable to keep it in stock. Although it looks mightily unappealing in the tube, it transforms on contact to your own unique pinky shade, guaranteed to be flattering whatever your colouring. £22, at Space NK

WHAT TO TRY NOW YOUR TICKET TO SUBTLE RADIANCE, YSL’S SOFT-FOCUS TOUCHE ECLAT BLUR PRIMER LEAVES SKIN LOOKING AIRBRUSHED, WHILE THE MINUTE FLECKS OF GOLD DISPERSE TO ADD BRIGHTNESS

REMEMBER THE PHENOMENON THAT WAS DIOR’S NAIL GLOW? MEET CHEEK & LIP GLOW, A SHEER NEON GEL APPLIED WITH A SPONGY WAND. ONLY A SMALL DAB NEEDED FOR INSTANT RADIANCE

Keep the focus on flawless skin with a judicious dash of colour LOOK NO FURTHER FOR OLD-TIME GLAMOUR ALLIED WITH MODERN TECHNOLOGY. JOAN COLLINS’S COMPACT DUO COMBINES TWO OF HER BEAUTY ESSENTIALS: PRESSED POWDER AND LIPSTICK

LAURA MERCIER FLAWLESS SKIN INFUSION DE ROSE NOURISHING OIL, £43.50

YSL TOUCHE ECLAT BLUR PRIMER, £29.50

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DIOR CHEEK & LIP GLOW, £27

WHEN SKIN IS LEFT BARE, IT NEEDS SOME SERIOUS ATTENTION, SO MASSAGE IN LAURA MERCIER FLAWLESS SKIN INFUSION DE ROSE NOURISHING OIL BEFORE APPLYING MAKE-UP

JOAN COLLINS TIMELESS BEAUTY PAPARAZZI READY COMPACT DUO, £34

RETURN with the tide After a 10-year hiatus, John Frieda’s Beach Blonde line is coming out of retirement to make waves again. Thanks to Beach Blonde devotees petitioning for the range to return, the original beach hairstyling products are back, with some new and improved additions, too. Our favourite is still the Beach Blonde Waves Sea Salt Spray, £7. Timeless. John Frieda Beach Blonde Collection, at Boots

A SCULPTING PRODUCT FOR REAL WOMEN, CLINIQUE’S TRIOS OF SHADES CAN BE USED INDIVIDUALLY TO DEFINE AND HIGHLIGHT, OR SWIRLED TOGETHER FOR A PINCH OF COLOUR

REVLON PHOTOREADY PRIME + ANTI-SHINE BALM, £10

IDEAL FOR SPRING/SUMMER, REVLON’S BALM MINIMISES PORES, SMOOTHS SKIN AND DEALS WITH SHINE. MAKE-UP ARTIST GUCCI WESTMAN WON’T PREP MODELS’ SKIN WITHOUT IT

CLINIQUE SCULPTIONARY CHEEK CONTOURING PALETTE 01 DEFINING NECTARS, £28

PLUMP, HEALTHY LIPS ARE A MUST IN SUMMER, SO WE’VE BEEN APPLYING LANCER’S SERUM. IT GIVES ENOUGH OF A TINGLE TO LET YOU KNOW IT’S WORKING TO BOOST LIPS BY 40 PER CENT. NATURALLY LANCER VOLUME ENHANCING SERUM, £40, AT HARRODS.COM

JAMES COCHRANE; PAUL BOWDEN

A make-up range made entirely of nude tones and in stick form, Nudestix is a streamlined collection created for sisters Ally and Taylor Frankel by their mother, Jenny, who also created the professional favourite Cover FX cosmetics. The streamlined, high-quality range gives you everything from concealer to eye make-up in a pencil form for quick and easy application.


johnfrieda.co.uk

Together, we can live frizz-free. The John Frieda brand was the first to fight frizz. Now it’s the first to end it*. New Forever Smooth Primer actually works within the structure of hair. For the first time ever, hair is truly immune to frizz. Me & John & Forever Smooth. Together we can. *with continuous use


johnfrieda.co.uk

Together, we can work miracles. Miraculous Recovery, an intensive, hair-transforming deep conditioner by John Frieda, gives hair a second chance. Strand by strand, hair is nourished, comes back to life, smooth and beautiful. Me & John & Miraculous Recovery. Together we can. *with continuous use


VOGUEbeauty Sacha!” she exclaimed, pulling the younger boy, with twinkly eyes and black pudding-basin haircut, towards her to give him a hug. “They’re back in New York after living in Morocco for the last four years. They rode to school across the desert on horseback, and came home in the evening on camels! A bit of all right, eh, boys?” “She always had a romantic picture of us in her head, whatever we were doing,” Sacha told me recently. “Though she was known for her strong opinions on just about every subject, she never tried to tell me what to do with my life. Even when I was visiting her in her Vogue offices, where she was firing on every cylinder, she took the time out to hear about whatever

CECIL BEATON; PAUL BOWDEN

“She was known for her strong opinions, but she never tried to tell me what to do”

ABOVE: DIANA VREELAND IN 1954. BELOW: SMASHINGLY BRILLIANT AND DARINGLY DIFFERENT (WHICH LAUNCHES IN MAY), SCENTS FROM HER GRANDSON’S COLLECTION. PRICES START FROM £135

Scents and

FEELING Alexander Vreeland’s collection of fragrances in honour of his grandmother, Vogue editor Diana, are as brilliant as the woman herself, says Penelope Tree on’t you think these two boys are the most beautiful creatures you have ever seen in your life?” Diana Vreeland asked me. I was 18, in love with an older man, and about as interested in adolescent boys as I was in carburettors. “This is my darling Nicky.” She gestured to a boy with a serious expression and a dark brown pudding-basin haircut. “And this is the divine

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interested me. She encouraged me to live my own life, and trusted my judgement.” A dozen years after the encounter in Mrs Vreeland’s apartment, I moved to Sydney. Not long afterwards, I opened my front door to find one of the most handsome men I had ever seen in my life standing there, smiling at me. It was the divine Sacha, now known as Alexander and living in Australia himself. This time around there was an immediate rapport between us, and over the course of 40 years – despite many moves and upheavals on both sides – our friendship has continued to flourish. An important part of our bond is our shared link to Alexander’s grandmother, whom he has always called Nonina. Since his move back to New York in the mid-Eighties, Alexander has had an extensive career in the fashion industry. However, in Australia he was the director of the Americana Leadership College, an organisation that explores human potential. Many people at the time thought that Alexander and Nicky (who turned his back on a promising career as a photographer to become a Tibetan Buddhist monk) were both reacting to their worldly upbringing by choosing more spiritually orientated vocations. However, in ways that may surprise the fans of Vreelandiana, in fact > 273


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here’s only one very good life, and that’s the life you know you want and you make it yourself,” Mrs Vreeland declared in her late sixties, during a filmed interview. Moved by the enduring interest in his grandmother from so many quarters, Alexander put several years of thought into launching the Diana Vreeland luxury brand, starting with a range of six fragrances. “The biggest challenge was to create the type of quality worthy of her name,” he told me. “With everything we did, we wanted to have a bold presence, make a statement, in the same way as if Nonina were in the room. “Due to the success of The Eye Has to Travel, a film by my wife [Lisa Immordino Vreeland],” Alexander

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words and emphasised others. When people read her words today, they can relate to them, they retain a vital energy.” Consequently, each fragrance is named after one of Mrs Vreeland’s resonant catchphrases, and inspired by her travels and wide interests; Absolutely Vital, Perfectly Marvelous, Outrageously Vibrant, Simply Divine, Extravagance Russe and Smashingly Brilliant. Daringly Different will be added to the collection in May. As Mrs Vreeland had such a passion for colour, each fragrance has its own play between the jewel tones of the bottle and a contrasting shade of tassel. My current favourite, Extravagance Russe, was created as a tribute to Mrs Vreeland’s love of Russia, and the exhibitions she curated at the Costume Institute at the Met on the Ballets Russes, and the tsars and tsarinas. For the latter, she asked the House of Guerlain to recreate one of its original fragrances, Cuir de Russie, and had it pumped ALEXANDER VREELAND through the air-conditioning AND HIS WIFE, LISA, AT THEIR HOUSE IN BRIDGEHAMPTON, ducts. “Looking back on where NEW YORK. BELOW: fashion photography was THREE SCENTS FROM THE COLLECTION before she became fashion director, it is remarkable how staid and conservative those images were compared with the much more modern woman Nonina celebrated and brought to life, with more movement, body awareness, travel, outrageousness, fun and, above all, romance!” Alexander told me, as we sampled each fragrance. Simply Divine, based on tuberose, is the most romantic scent in the collection. The most sophisticated is Daringly Different, an iris and oud combination. In the words of her old friend, Pierre Bergé, the business brain behind the Yves Saint Laurent empire, “This fragrance collection is a huge tribute to Diana Vreeland; one even walked through her red lacquer she would be extremely proud and door. At home, she even went so far as to surely wear each one.” Alexander adds, have sandalwood injected via a long “The atmosphere of creativity and hypodermic needle into the upholstery. fearlessness around Nonina, and the “I decided not to be literal, or recreate possibilities, dreams and imaginative the fragrances Nonina wore,” Alexander leaps she inspired are messages that, more told me, “but imagine if she were 35 years than ever, we need to see reinforced. And old today, what she would wear? There’s no I feel that fragrances can trigger that point in being nostalgic, as she was always dimension in us.” Q very forward-thinking and all about the Diana Vreeland fragrances and body present. Another element we worked with lotions are available at Selfridges and was her love of words, the dramatic way she Net-a-porter.com pronounced them, how she repeated some continued, “it suddenly became clear there was a huge international audience of all ages interested in Nonina. And, of course, who could forget that she had a real passion for fragrance? Smell evokes so many pictures and memories, which is why it ties in so perfectly with Nonina’s legacy.” Indeed, everyone who visited Mrs Vreeland, either at her Vogue office or at her apartment, recalls alighting from the elevator and smelling her incense and scented candles wafting down the corridors. The exotic aromas created an atmosphere of warmth and luxury before

BEN HOFFMANN; PAUL BOWDEN

they were very much following in their grandmother’s footsteps; turning inward to find inspiration and direction. Although she came from an outwardly privileged background, Diana Vreeland was essentially a self-made woman. Due to a torturous relationship with her critical mother, who openly preferred Diana’s younger, more beautiful and clever sister, Alexandra, her childhood and adolescence were often unhappy. “I was always her ugly little monster,” she said of her mother. “I was the most hideous thing in the world. I wanted to kill myself.” She retreated into her imagination via journalwriting and dance, and following a difficult two-year incubation period, she dreamed up “The Girl”, an idealised version of herself and everything she wanted to become. In 1917, six decades before the advent of self-help books, she wrote, “I am Diana Dalziel. I’m going to treat myself as a goddess, with respect, and I am only for art and the arts. I dare change myself today and make myself exactly how I want to be. I dare do anything on this earth. Where there is a will, there is a way.” As she remained faithful to her dreams, in time “The Girl” became “The Woman”, creative, confident and bold; destined to fulfil her potential, and encourage countless others whose spark she recognised.


VOGUEbeauty Home from home Until now, Lisa Eldridge has shot her pioneering “how to” make-up videos at home (albeit with a professional lighting rig that’s the envy of the blogging world). Now the Lancôme make-up creative director has moved to a purpose-built studio and taken her vintage cosmetics out of storage (including one of the biggest collections of Seventies Biba make-up in existence). Will her new surroundings influence her videos? “Definitely,” she says. “It’s beauty heaven.”

LISA’S NEW SPACE. THE “WOW” NEON SIGNAGE IS SEVENTIES WOOLWORTHS

Studio PORTRAITS

“THIS IS A PLACE TO DREAM,” SAYS LISA

Part workspace, part classroom, part research library and part testing lab: three new make-up artists’ studios are a beauty addict’s dream, says Nicola Moulton

Factory acts

HORNE DESCRIBES HIS INTERIOR AS “GOTHIC MEETS PSYCHEDELIC MEETS GIRL’S BEDROOM”

HORNE’S TWITTER HANDLE IS @YODAOFCOSMETICS

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David Horne’s new make-up studio, the House of Glam Dolls, is a riot of colour, texture and beauty memorabilia. But there’s industry, too: you’ll find classes of beginners learning how to contour, and make-up students taking the Vintage Make-up Course (covering key looks from the Twenties to the Eighties). Or turn up on Sunday afternoons to witness make-up-artist “tea and sympathy” sessions, where professional make-up artists share recent product finds. It’s been dubbed “the beauty equivalent of Andy Warhol’s Factory” and there’s no doubt great things will emerge from here.

PRODUCT TESTING IN OPERATION

Land of opportunity Sharon Dowsett’s studio in Clerkenwell already has its own hashtag, #Dowsettland. Beauty journalists drop by to talk trends, make-up artists browse the library and Dowsett’s assistants experiment with thousands of products. The organisation is impressive: “Someone said I was the Howard Hughes of make-up. I took it as a compliment,” Dowsett says.


Nature’s

WAY?

Bioidentical hormones are being hailed as a new antiageing treatment, but some experts are sounding caution. Nicole Mowbray investigates our skin looks 10 years younger. You exercise furiously to maintain the metabolism of a twentysomething. You take supplements to stop your joints creaking and your energy levels from plummeting. But your hormones? Aren’t they a lost cause, immune to the possibility of cheating one’s biological clock? Perhaps not. Over the last few years a new, apparently more “natural” alternative to conventional HRT has grown in popularity: the so-called bioidentical hormones. Unlike the traditional synthetic ones, bioidentical hormones are derived from plant sources and have the same molecular structure as the hormones in the body. These “new” types of hormones are increasingly being used to replace, balance or supplement our own natural levels and, as a result, hormone treatment is now being used not just for major body changes, such as reduced fertility and the menopause, but for less specific, more “everyday” purposes such as energy boosting and anti-ageing. Suzanne Somers, 68, an actress turned natural-hormone evangelist, has been the pin-up girl for bioidentical-hormone treatment in America for the past two decades. After writing several books on the subject and helping to make it a mainstream topic, she’s inspired thousands of women – and men – to look to bioidentical hormone replacement therapy (BHRT) as “the foundation of successful anti-ageing”. Without these plant-based hormones, she says, “any creams or lotions are only nibbling around the edges.

TIM GUTT

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“I began writing and lecturing about bioidentical hormones 20 years ago, shortly after the Women’s Health Initiative warned women that synthetic hormones were harmful and perhaps even fatal,” she continues. Then, she says, BHRT was new in the United States and qualified doctors were difficult for patients to find. Now, however, there are thousands of prescribing doctors and specialist pharmacies there who offer these products. “BHRT keeps your organs and glands youthful,” Somers says. “This is reflected on the outside with youthful skin. I have some wrinkles, but my skin is elastic and young… When my house burned down five years ago, the first

thing I replaced that day were my hormones. BHRT is the juice of youth.” Dr Anu Arasu, of the Marion Gluck Clinic in London, agrees. “Hormones play a role in preventative medicine,” she explains. “They are needed to keep our bones strong, our skin young, our hearts healthy and our brains active. When our hormone levels decline, the number of diseases related to ageing rise, so they do have a protective effect… The reason bioidenticals are preferable to synthetic hormones is that they are identical in structure to the body’s own hormones, which means the efficacy and safety are better. The International Menopause Society has decreed there is no maximum >

“Cells just work better with a basic amount of oestrogen”

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VOGUEbeauty products,” he says. “In my opinion, pharmaceutical-grade HRT is the same as – if not better than – compounded bioidenticals because these are often not very precise. Certain catchwords are also extremely enticing to the public... People use bioidenticals because there’s a perception that they are ‘better’ for them, but BHRT probably offers no significant benefits over pharmaceutical-grade hormones. Added to that, most people don’t need HRT. Our hormones fluctuate and do not need to be massively controlled in the way that people are trying to control them. People may blame their hormones for feelings of illness or poor skin but there could be many other reasons for these symptoms. “There is also still an unanswered question around the issue of heart disease, breast cancers and cervical tumours occurring from unnecessary hormone manipulation, which is why the majority of high-quality university-based physicians are highly discouraging of human-growth-hormone injections or hormone replacement.” Lancer isn’t the only cosmetic doctor sceptical about these new natural supplements, a limited number of which are available on the NHS. Dr Mica Engel of London’s Waterhouse Young Clinic believes that, despite being thought of by many devotees as being little more than “the second generation of vitamins”, hormones of any kind often promise great results but could expose users to danger. “Some cancers, such as prostate and breast, are considered hormone-sensitive, which means they can have their

“Bioidentical hormones don’t prevent ageing, but they do slow it down”

BEAUTY BITES

STELLA McCARTNEY STELLA EAU DE TOILETTE, £57

A lighter version of the original rose scent, Stella McCartney Stella eau de toilette is small enough to pack for overnight, and the nude, dotty bottle design is typical of Stella’s cool, modern style. CIATE WHITE CHOC POT, £7

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development stimulated by testosterone and oestrogen respectively,” she says. “While it is not known if they are able to generate a tumour, they certainly contribute to the development of pre-cancerous lesions. Testosterone use is also linked to cardiovascular problems, including increased muscle growth around the heart and a five-fold increased risk of strokes. In my opinion, the benefits are not worth the risks to your health.” Dr Gordon disagrees. Aside from giving women a full health and wellbeing check before beginning their treatment, he says the safety of his patients is his numberone priority and that careful prescribing of bio-identicals can significantly reduce any risk. “Take progestin [synthetic progesterone] as an example,” he says. “Although progestin pushes up LDL cholesterol, which is the bad kind, oestrodial and progesterone both push up the good cholesterol and dilate the arteries, so in actual fact there is no increase in heart attack or stroke risk. “What I do is about improving quality of life and finding what is right for that person. In all the years I’ve practised obstetrics and gynaecology, I have never come across a treatment that has such a massive benefit to women as bioidentical hormone therapy, and the cost-benefit ratio is massive, too. It’s much more beneficial than the side effects.” Ultimately though, like all anti-ageing treatments, bioidentical-hormone therapy will only ever be part of the larger story. “Of course, BHRT doesn’t prevent ageing,” says Dr Gordon, “but it slows it down. The most important thing is that people’s quality of life improves. How you look in the mirror when you go out in the morning is one thing, but how you feel is a whole other ball game.” Q

Good things come in small packages

Polish-remover pots have revolutionised varnish removal, so we’re pleased to see a petite version now available for on-thego maintenance. The chocolate fragrance and nail-conditioning ingredients, such as marula oil, just add to the charm of this little Choc Pot. Ciatelondon.com

SKIN & TONIC MINI GENTLE SCRUB, £9

This clever miniature French pink clay scrub from Skin & Tonic is a must-have travel companion. Add water to create a paste to unclog sun-cream-blocked pores or add a teaspoon of yoghurt or honey for an instant brightening mask. Skinandtoniclondon.com

L’Occitane’s famous hand cream gets a new, lightly scented fine floral makeover with orchids and orange blossom from Grasse. The chic, travel-size design remains, but with a spring-like pastel hue. LM-S L’OCCITANE NEROLI & ORCHIDEE HAND CREAM, £8

SUDHIR PITHWA

duration that people can be on BHRT, and some stay on it for the long term to protect the memory and keep the skin young. We prescribe the lowest dose necessary, which is determined by looking at someone’s symptoms and blood tests.” With the mention of younger-looking skin it’s no surprise that the beauty world is also catching on to the idea of bioidentical hormones. “Hormones are responsible for maintaining collagen production,” says the renowned obstetrician and pioneer of the natural-birth movement Dr Yehudi Gordon, “so they make the skin appear younger. Taking bioidentical hormones plumps up fine lines. There is also an oestriol cream that can be rubbed on to the exposed areas of the skin which can help. But bioidentical hormones don’t only benefit the skin,” he says. “Every body tissue has receptors for the sex hormones; oestrogen is the dominant sex hormone in women, and the body’s cells just seem to work better if they have a basic amount of oestrogen. That’s why we only need prescribe relatively low levels.” Not everyone is such a fan, however. Dermatologist Dr Harold Lancer – whose very business is younger-looking skin (he has the biggest private dermatology practice in the world on Rodeo Drive in Beverly Hills) – says that although BHRT was popular in America about five years ago, fewer people are using it now. “The truth of the matter is bioidentical hormone replacement is really a marketing tool. As distrustful as the public are of pharmaceutical-grade medicine, it is regulated and produces very reliable


<255 THE DATA GAME

raining, I took the radical step of entrusting my sleep to nature instead of to the synthetic version. According to the latest book on the state of our digital souls, The Glass Cage, by Pulitzer Prize-finalist Nicholas Carr, “automation… can narrow our perspectives and limit our choices. It can open us to surveillance and manipulation.” The idea behind all this wearable tech, that the human body is somehow not quite as efficient as we need it to be, becomes, according to Carr, selffulfilling. Wearing technology constantly can distance us from firsthand experience as well as obliterate the need to read maps, drive cars and solve the mental problems that force the brain to make vital neurological connections. As Carr points out, “Psychological studies show that we perform best when fully involved in a task.” In other words, instead of waiting for your wrist tracker to tell you to drink some water, ask yourself: do I feel thirsty? Yet, used correctly, wearable technology can provide a valuable nudge. It takes, according to current research, a minimum of 21 consecutive repetitions – or around 5,000 muscle twitches – to forge a new habit. Millions of sedentary types find it helpful to be reminded to get up and move every hour, and knowing that you’re only 2,000 steps from your daily goal can be a powerful incentive to walk up the escalator on the way home. As for that random message about my non-existent foam roller? I went and bought one. But it wasn’t until I went for a run in Hyde Park – or rather a fast walk; it was pouring with rain again and we had umbrellas – with the Apple Watch and Jay Blahnik, the trainer who’s been working with Apple on its fitness functions, that I met a piece of wearable technology that was genuinely useful, wearer-friendly and good-looking. On looks and performance, Apple Watch is light years ahead of the nearest competition. (Actually, there’ll probably be myriad copies in about 10 seconds.) As for functions – it monitors your heart, distinguishes between general movement and activity that’s brisk enough to count as exercise, features an all-day activity tracker and a workout app that work together and displays all this on your wrist, without you having to connect it to an app. It also allows you listen to music via Bluetooth headphones. And unlike the other monitors, whose size seemed to be in inverse proportion to their immensely complicated instruction manuals, it’s more or less intuitive to use. Its most compelling aspect, however, is that it combines the fitness stuff with all the other apps you can get on your phone. It works out where you are if you’ve got lost, logs a call, takes a text and lets you pay for your cold-pressed juice at the end of your workout – provided you’re synced up to Apple Pay, which, if you live outside America, you currently won’t be. But that’s a matter of time. What it can’t do – and won’t for some time, because it’s another zillion million dollars or so of research away – is thermodynamically measure your calorie input and output. So it’s back to painstakingly filling in the food diary on your app, which believe me, is every bit as tedious as doing it with a pen and paper. No, more so, because the keys and controls on all these devices are so fiddly. And if we’re being picky, we could argue that for all its sexy looks and functions, Apple Watch is still a watch, rather than an actual item of clothing. But the consensus is that the world is ready for this. By 2020 we could be completely reliant on not just wearable but fashionable technology – to measure our blood pressure, pay for our purchases in Dover Street Market (it may be handy to have those two graphs flash up simultaneously), pulse discreetly when we’re slouching, and very possibly tell us when we’re ovulating and whether we need to charge up our hormones. In the meantime, please excuse me. I’m off to roll some foam. Q Lisa Armstrong is fashion director of “The Daily Telegraph” 286


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A & Other Stories Stories.com Acne Studios 020 7629 9374 Adidas Originals 0870 240 4204 Agentprovocateur.com Alberta Ferretti 020 7235 2349 Alexander McQueen 020 7318 2222 Alexandrajefford.com Aliceandolivia.com Altuzarra.com Americanretro.fr Amrapali 020 7584 4433 Annoushka.com Apple.com Assemblynewyork.com Aureliebidermann.com Azy for Urban Outfitters Urbanoutfitters.com B Ben Pentreath 020 7430 2526 Beyondretro.com Bimbaylola.com Boss 020 7259 1240 Boucheron 020 7514 9170 Bulgari 020 7872 9969 Burberry.com C Cartier 020 3147 4850 Catherinemarche-designs.com Céline 020 7491 8200 Chanel 020 7493 5040 Charlotte Tydeman Ctydeman.com Chloé 020 7823 5348 Christian Louboutin 0843 227 4322 Claires.co.uk Coach 020 3141 8901 Coast-stores.com Cole-and-son.com Comme des Garçons 020 7518 0680 D Dalerogersammonite.com David Clulow 0844 264 0870 De Grisogono 020 7499 2225 Diane von Furstenberg 020 7499 0886 Dior 020 7172 0172 Dolce & Gabbana 020 7659 9000 Dover Street Market 020 7518 0680 E Eileenfisher.com Eleanorbolton.com Elizabethkelly.etsy.com Emporio Armani 020 7823 8818

Erdem.com Erikacavallini.com Eshvi.co.uk Etautz.com Etro 020 7493 9004 F Fabergé 020 7491 7256 Fendi 020 7927 4172 Fifichachnil.com Foundcollected.com Frenchconnection.com G Galleryfumi.com Gerarddarel.com Gigiburris.com Gillian Horsup 020 7499 8121 Graff 020 7584 8571 Gucci 020 7235 6707 H H&M 0344 736 9000 Hand & Lock 020 7580 7488 Harrods 020 7730 1234 Havaianas-store.com Hermès 020 7499 8856 I Isaarfen.com J Jennypackham.com Jessica McCormack 020 7491 9999 Jimmychoo.com Jitrois 020 7245 6300 Joseph 020 7610 8439 Julienmacdonald.com Junya Watanabe 020 7518 0680 J-w-anderson.com K Karenmillen.co.uk Kurt Geiger London 020 7781 7480 L L’Agent by Agent Provocateur Lagentbyap.com L-objet.com La Perla 020 7399 0620 Leon Max Maxstudio.com Liberty 020 7734 1234 Linda Bee 020 7629 5921 Linksoflondon.com Loewe 020 7499 0266 Longchamp.com Louis Vuitton 020 7399 4050 M Maison Margiela 020 7629 2682 Marks & Spencer 03330 148 555 Marni 020 7245 9520 Marykatrantzou.com Michael Kors 020 7409 0844 Miu Miu 020 7409 0900 Mulberry 020 7491 3900

N Newlook.com Next.co.uk O Oasis-stores.com Office.co.uk Oscar de la Renta 020 7493 0422 P Paul Smith 0800 023 4006 Prismlondon.com Proenzaschouler.com R Rablabs.com Ralph Lauren 020 7535 4600 Richardnicoll.com River Island 0844 576 6444 Rokit.co.uk Roksanda 020 7613 6499 Ryan-roche.com S Saint Laurent by Hedi Slimane 020 7235 6706 Sandro 020 7486 9176 Selfridges 0800 123 400 Shrimps.co.uk Solange Azagury-Partridge 020 7792 0197 Sophia Webster for Shrimps Shrimps.co.uk Sophiemcelligott.com Sportmax 020 7499 7902 Sunglasses-shop.co.uk T Theodorawarre.eu Theo Fennell 020 7591 5000 Theory 020 7985 1188 Thomassabo.com Tibi.com Tiffany 0800 160 1837 Titopedrini.com Tommy Hilfiger 020 3144 0900 Topshop.com Tory Burch 020 7493 5888 Trussardi.com Thetutushop.co.uk V Valentino 020 7235 5855 Van Cleef & Arpels 020 7493 0400 Vickisarge 020 7259 0202 Victoria Beckham 020 7042 0700 Vilshenko 020 3176 5560 W Warehouse.co.uk Wearehandsome.com Wempe.com Woodsfinelinens.com Y Y-3 020 7240 1802 Yunus-eliza.co.uk

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287


VOGUE’S EDUCATION GUIDE NEW Masterclass for Personal Stylists With Celebrity Stylist Nicky Hambleton-Jones I I I

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Fashion your career at Ravensbourne

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Our graduates have: • shot covers for Vogue (British, Italia and Paris), Pop and I.D. • shot campaigns including Louis Vuitton, Missoni and Gucci. • worked with a variety of celebrities from Lady Gaga to Uma Thurman.

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BARBADOS, THE MONACO OF THE CARIBBEAN

For your own piece of paradise, Saint Peter’s Bay offers luxury 3 and 4 bedroom beachfront residences with five star service. Amenities include access to pristine beaches, watersports, fitness centre, 160ft lagoon style pool, yoga, polo and golf. Allow yourself to be captivated by the Caribbean. Prices start at US $1,895,000. To get a taster of the island and residences, consider renting from US $860 per night between 7th Jan and 14th April 2015.

Contact UK Sotheby’s International Realty for more details +44 20 3553 1049 | sandeep.dhariwal@sothebysrealty.co.uk | sothebysrealty.co.uk © 2015 UK Sotheby's International Realty. All rights reserved. Sotheby's International Realty is a registered trademark licensed to UK Sotheby's International Realty in the UK. Each office is independently owned and operated. All information non - contractual, approximate and subject to error, change and withdrawal without notice.


9 0 M I N U T E S F RO M LO N D O N . A M I L L I O N M I L E S F R O M E V E R Y WH E R E . EXQUISITE LAKESIDE LIVING

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Visit: redrow.co.uk/elements

Elements The Mallards, South Cerney, Gloucestershire GL7 5TQ | Register your interest | Call: 01285 238556 CGIs for illustrative purposes only. 90 minute journey includes 1 hour 15 minute train journey from London Paddington to Kemble and 15 minute drive from Kemble to South Cerney. Times correct as of January 2015 by National Rail enquiries.


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Images are computer generated and indicative only. Interior photograph of the Hepworth show apartment with indicative views from the 39th fl oor. *Price correct at time of going to press.


S U N N I N G H I L L

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A MIND’S EYE LIA DI GREGORIO GOLD AND PEARL RING, £1,690, AT DOVER STREET MARKET

Salvation Mountain, a painted hillside in the Californian desert, is enrapturing. It looks like a mirage

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KLAUS HAAPANIEMI WOOL RUG, FROM £5,790, TIINATHESTORE.COM

I gravitate towards fragrances that are not overtly feminine This was the first piece of art I bought: a porcelain selfportrait by my friend Jared Buckhiester

DS & DURGA COWBOY GRASS EAU DE PARFUM, FROM £70

PRISM BIKINI TOP, £122. BOTTOMS, £86

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My Prism bikini has been my most loyal travel companion

Bill Hayward’s Seventies book Cat People speaks to me and my feline tribe

Jaime Perlman Vogue’s creative director reveals the pieces, interiors, images and designers inspiring her now. By Naomi Smart

SAINT LAURENT BY HEDI SLIMANE LEATHER PLATFORMS, £885

My chunky black shoe of the season

This Brea Souders photograph was a standout for me at last year’s Paris Photo festival

SUNBURN IN NAPLES (2010), BY BREA SOUDERS

BREA SOUDERS/BRUCE SILVERSTEIN GALLERY, NY; MICHAEL TROW; SUDHIR PITHWA; JASON LLOYD-EVANS; GETTY. WITH THANKS TO THE ALBION CAFF, E2

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contents IMMY WATERHOUSE PAGE 74 6 EDITOR’S LETTER 8 CONTRIBUTORS Behind-the-scenes stars of Miss Vogue. FASHION AND STYLE 13 WHO’S YOUR FASHION CRUSH? Our round-up of the girls with truly lust-worthy style. By Julia Hobbs. 16 STREET STYLE DECODED Unlocking the DNA of a hit look. 19 LET’S BOUNCE Tip-top hip-hop accessories. 20 HOT SHOTS Invest in these look-at-me pieces. 25 CATWALK CRIB SHEET Know your trends? Study our runway report before you hit the high street. 31 FIFTEEN FASH-HITS Game-changers for your wardrobe. 36 STYLE STARS The class of 2015 – up-and-coming young designers to keep your eye on.

OLIVER HADLEE PEARCH

64 MISS VOGUE’S NOTEBOOK Get set for summer.

74 SCENE STEALERS New faces, new fashion: the latest It girls in this season’s freshest looks.

102 THE IT BRIT Chart sensation Charli XCX talks pop, power and pizza. By Nell Frizzell.

88 WILD STYLE Miss Vogue visits Tokyo, street-style capital of the world.

106 FRESH FACES Four young foodies with the recipe for success. By Louisa McGillicuddy.

94 HAILEY’S COMET It-girl actress and model Hailey Baldwin burns bright in body-con. 110 GO SHOP Where to buy what you see inside. 112 GYPSY QUEEN Revisit the carefree style of Seventies songbird Stevie Nicks. FEATURES 10 IT GIRLS FOREVER Give it up for all the girls who’ve rocked our world. 22 ELECTRIC AVENUE Switched-on shoppers are changing the way we buy, says Laura Weir.

BEAUTY 53 THE LOOK BOOK Miss Vogue’s secret beauty directory. 57 SHADOW PLAY Eyeshadow is back on the beauty radar. 59 MY BODY BEAUTIFUL Three fashion insiders reveal their tips for staying happy and healthy. 62 PERFUME PARADE Runway trends in fragrance form. 84 THE SILCONE SLOPE Under pressure to present a perfect image, young girls are turning to Botox and fillers, reports Lottie Winter.

39 THE RISING SON Actor Jack Kilmer is following in the family business. By Laura Weir. 42 SPOTLIGHT Gigs in the comfort of your own home. Plus, our pick of the best pop-ups. 47 FINDING MISS V Discover who came out on top in our search for a star intern. 66 GIRL IN THE SPOTLIGHT From fashion to Hollywood, everyone is falling for Cressida Bonas. Violet Henderson steps into her world.

COVER LOOK Cressida wears crêpe minidress, £750, Mulberry. Make-up by Dior. Eyes: Addict It-Lash Mascara; Diorshow Khôl in Black. Lips: Rouge Dior Baume in Poppy. Face: Skinflash Radiance Booster Pen. Hair by GHD: Curve Classic Wave Wand; Smooth & Finish Serum. Hair: Cyndia Harvey. Make-up: Lauren Parsons. Digital artwork: Robert Moore Studio. Fashion editor: Kate Phelan. Photographed by Sean Thomas

Editor Emily Sheffield Art director Felix Neill Chief sub-editor Lucy Olivier Sub-editors Vanessa Harriss, Stephen Patience Merchandise editor Helen Hibbird Picture editor Rachel Lucas-Craig Picture researcher Katie Lowe Supplement co-ordinator Daisy Toogood Contributors Violet Henderson, Julia Hobbs, Louisa McGillicuddy, Lauren Murdoch-Smith, Naomi Smart, Laura Weir, Lottie Winter and the Vogue editorial and advertising teams Editor-in-chief Alexandra Shulman Publishing director Stephen Quinn Creative director Jaime Perlman © 2015 The Condé Nast Publications Ltd, Vogue House, Hanover Square, London W1S 1JU. Vogue is distributed by Condé Nast & National Magazine Distributors Ltd (COMAG), Tavistock Road, West Drayton, Middlesex UB7 7QE. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part without written permission is strictly prohibited. Not for resale. 5


MISS VOGUE editor’s letter

It’s a girls’

WORLD

eautiful, powerful, compelling – the It girls who capture our imagination display all these characteristics. They amp up the room temperature as soon as they enter, make real our dreams of glamour, shine a light on the impossible and buck against the establishment. In my teens, growing up in the middle of nowhere in Oxfordshire, it was a young, untarnished Paula Yates who promised a life of wild possibility beyond the strictures of school. Then there was Grace Jones, Debbie Harry and Siouxsie Sioux – they were larger than life, they loved to shock, and their fierce, have-it-all attitude spoke to young women in what was still a man’s world. Today, there is ample opportunity for women to shine (and enrich our Instagram accounts). They express their individuality from London to Tokyo, be it the cool intelligence of Emma Watson, the irrepressible energy of Cara Delevingne, or the punchy, fearless attitude of Charli XCX. Cressida Bonas didn’t want to be known as a royal girlfriend – to be reduced to someone’s other half – and it is her own talent and ambition that are taking her centre stage now. This is what makes a modern It girl.

B

CLOCKWISE FROM LEFT: HAILEY BALDWIN, CHARLI XCX AND A TOKYO STREET-STYLE STAR

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MISS VOGUE contributors

FRAN IS CRAZY ABOUT MIU MIU

SUSIE LAU

FRANCESCA BURNS

Fashion comentator and editor of the StyleBubble.co.uk blog Secret talent: Inventing delicious sauces – and then never being able to replicate them again. Ultimate It girl: Loulou de la Falaise. Must-have fashion item for spring/summer ’15: A Faustine Steinmetz shredded denim jacket.

Miss Vogue’s fashion director Ultimate It girls: Sarah Stockbridge and Debbie Harry. Style crush: Manuela Pavesi. What’s on your playlist: Lana Del Rey, Martha Wainwright, Mazzy Star. Must-have fashion item for spring/summer ’15: The entire Miu Miu collection.

The dream team The stars of Miss Vogue reveal what makes them tick – from style heroes to summer songs LILI SUMNER Model and street-style star Ultimate It girl: Dorothy Parker. Style heroes: My little sisters. Summer playlist: Spacemen 3, Fat White Family and Curtis Mayfield. Summer glamour look: Crochet bikini, big shades, cowboy hat and a jug of sangria. Getting-ready song: “Sexy Boy” by Air.

IMMY WATERHOUSE, It-girl model and Suki’s sibling Best party look: Messy hair. Dream date: Romeo Montague. Ultimate It girls: Jemima Kirke, Michelle Phillips and Brigitte Bardot. Best breakfast: A fry-up. Keep-fit routine: Yoga. 8

SISTERS IMMY AND SUKI. INSET: LEO DICAPRIO AS ROMEO MONTAGUE, IMMY’S PERFECT DATE

Actress, model and girl-about-LA Retro style pin-up: For me, it has to be Marilyn Monroe. She will never go out of fashion because she was the most beautiful woman. Summer glamour look? It’s going to be a Saint Laurent kind of summer – the s/s ’15 collection is a killer. Mix in some Topshop and I’ll be ready to go. Ultimate It girl: Kate Moss for sure, she is always so on point and that’s a real skill.

GETTY; REX FEATURES

HAILEY BALDWIN


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TWIGGY, ’60s

It Girls FOREVER PARIS AND NICKY HILTON, ’00s

She’s the face of her generation – young, wild and free. Give it up for the It girl

JANE BIRKIN, ’60s KATE MOSS, ’90s

JERRY HALL, ’70s CHLOE SEVIGNY, ’90s

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MISS VOGUE style

ELIZABETH HURLEY, ’90s

JADE JAGGER, ’90s

he It girls we know and love for their outrageous sense of fun and glamorous connections come in various guises. Ever since Clara Bow swept to global fame in the Twenties with her lead role in the film It, the holy grail of cool has belonged to those beautiful girls that just can’t stay in. From Tara Palmer-Tomkinson in her Nineties heyday to Cara, Suki and Georgia May today, there will always be well-bred British misbehavers - the posh girls who swap boarding-school dorms for nightclub dancefloors and always seem to be having ALEXA CHUNG, ’00s a good time, be it with royalty or rock stars. In Los Angeles, New York and London we find the international fashion addicts “THERE WILL ALWAYS BE who are anything but anonymous. As the WELL-BRED BRITISH MISBEHAVERS; new millennium dawned, the Hilton THE POSH GIRLS WHO SWAP sisters rewrote the rules on how to shop BOARDING-SCHOOL DORMS FOR like an heiress. It was no coincidence that NIGHTCLUB DANCEFLOORS” they arrived on the scene at the same time Britney Spears was busy blasting out sugary pop. BROOKE SHIELDS, ’70s The duo caught the zeitgeist, partied with P Diddy and specialised in all-pink shopping sprees. Fastforward to the present day and it’s Alexa Chung and her obsessively documented brand of cool that fascinates. The title of Alexa’s book? What else but It. The one genre of It girl that has reigned supreme throughout all eras, however, is the model. Staring out from the cover of Vogue, she is untouchable, epitomising everything it means to be young, wild and free. Like her Sixties counterpart, Twiggy, Kate Moss has triggered fashion trends from her front doorstep and stolen the hearts of rock stars since her teens. La Moss redefines the adventurous style and mischievous spirit that will always and forever be It. Who wouldn’t want to be her, just for one night? Julia Hobbs

ANDERS OVERGAARD; HELMUT NEWTON; KIM KNOTT; PETER LINDBERGH; KAI Z FENG; BRUCE WEBER; GLEN LUCHFORD; MARIO TESTINO; BARRY LATEGAN

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Who’s your fashion

Crush?

Meet the new fashion pin-ups: clever, creative and cool, they’re setting the style agenda. By Julia Hobbs 1. CAMPAIGN STAR AND CARA’S BFF KENDALL JENNER HAS POLISHED STYLE PERFECTED. COPY HER IMMACULATELY PRESSED TAILORING.

4. HEDI SLIMANE’S LATEST MUSE GRACIE HARTZEL DOES DOWNBEAT ROCK’N’ROLL GLAMOUR ON AND OFF THE CATWALK.

7. HAILEY BALDWIN’S UNIFORM? SKINNY LEATHERS, SKYSCRAPER HEELS AND DARK GLASSES (THE PAPARAZZI SHIELD).

2. ACTRESS LORRAINE NICHOLSON’S LOOK SWINGS FROM CALI BEACH TO PALE AND PREPPY. DAD JACK NICHOLSON MUST HAVE IMPARTED RED-CARPET FASHION ADVICE.

5. LONDONER ADWOA ABOAH TAKES A CRAFTY APPROACH TO TAILORING. ADD EXPERIMENTAL MAKE-UP AND RETRO SPORTSWEAR TO NAIL THE MODEL’S LOOK.

8. FKA TWIGS – FIERCE BEAUTY MEETS FEMININE GLAMOUR? CHECK. THE BRIT SONGSTRESS HAS CORNERED RADICAL CHIC.

3. QUEEN OF DISHEVELLED, BOARDING-SCHOOL CHIC, EDIE CAMPBELL IS ALSO A CHAMELEON OF HIGH-FASHION HAIRSTYLES.

6. JAGGER OFFSPRING AND VOGUE COVER STAR GEORGIA MAY KNOWS HOW TO MAKE LIGHT WORK OF CLASSIC ROCK STYLING.

9. WHEN NATURAL BLONDE JEAN CAMPBELL OPENED LOUIS VUITTON’S S/S ’15 SHOW, SHE DEFINED THE NEW MOOD OF UPTOWN BOHEMIA. START GROWING YOUR HAIR NOW! 13


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10. FEMINIST ARTIST PETRA COLLINS RARELY STRAYS FROM VINTAGE LEVI’S AND A CLASSIC TEE. WHEN THE SEVENTIES STYLING WORKS SO WELL, WHY SHOULD SHE? 11. LILY-ROSE DEPP (VANESSA PARADIS AND JOHNNY DEPP’S DAUGHTER) BLENDS MUM’S CAREFREE PRETTINESS WITH DAD’S PUNK SPIRIT. 12. ARTIST PHOEBE COLLINGS-JAMES MAKES OUR LIST FOR HER EASY ELEGANCE. 14

13. SUKI’S LITTLE SISTER, MODEL IMMY WATERHOUSE, DOES LOW-KEY LONDON CHIC WITH A HIPPY TWIST.

16. TAVI GEVINSON HAS SWITCHED FROM TEEN KITSCH TO TWENTYSOMETHING CUTE.

14. BINX WALTON‘S ANDROGYNOUS STYLE JUSTIFIES OUR LOVE OF A CHUNKY HOODIE AND SCUFFED HI-TOPS.

17. ONLY ZOE KRAVITZ COULD TEMPT US TO THROW ON A WORN-OUT BAND TEE AS A MINIDRESS. THE HEIRESS TO DAD LENNY’S LOOK BRINGS FRESH APPEAL TO ROCK’N’ROLL STYLE.

15. NOT JUST A PRETTY FACE: NO ONE MASTERS A RED-CARPET ONE-PIECE AND TOWERING HEELS QUITE LIKE GIGI HADID.

18. WHEN MIA GOTH ISN’T SPORTING A FULL CATWALK LOOK AT A PREMIERE, SHE’S LOOKING JUST AS CHIC IN FRAYED JEANS AND A VEST.

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Think of upswept shades as the make-up-free equivalent to perfectly applied eyeliner flicks. Tortoiseshell frames (rather than severe black) work best with spring’s off-key hues.

Prada’s s/s ’15 show demonstrated the power of the ponytail: here, a sharp centre-parting takes means the difference between girlish and grown-up.

A skinny-fit polo does demure with a bodycon edge. Invest in one now. This girl’s not going to be caught dead colour-blocking. Copy her chaos theory with fuzzy prints in petrol shades. A high waistband plays a trompe-l’oeil trick, elegantly extending the legs (vital with those sneakers).

Bin your belt: the new minimalists lets clean lines do the talking.

Go fake-tan free: pale legs keep the look super-natural.

RETRO REMIX

A super-sized bag would spoil the clarity of this pared-down look. Smartphone and coin purse are all you need.

It’s the mix of old-school elements that makes this look modern. The good news? It suits all shapes and sizes

Adidas Superstar sneakers add a subtle retro spin. Plus, Edie loves them.

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JASON LLOYD-EVANS

Pins look even longer when you don’t wear socks, plus it’s a cinch switching up to heels after dark.


MISS VOGUE looks Heavy brows still say hip – and note the lack of blusher.

THE NEW PREPPY Unfussy accessories and a vibrant burst of fruity colour instantly power up summer tailoring

This girl’s working a retro coat shape, but that’s the only vintage thing about her look.

A double-breasted cut marks out an investment jacket: preppy styles pay dividends in the long run.

Know your summer prints – a pixelated pattern keeps this dress modern.

The first rule when wearing a jacket over a minidress: make sure the hemline of your dress peeks out at the bottom.

Go foundation free, but add a softly smoky eye. That’s your day-to-night make-up sorted.

Switch on the sunshine: wearing tangerine is a confidence trick with a nod to this season’s Seventies mood. Think of it as Vitamin C for your wardrobe.

Large lapels pass the fashion-forward test: when it comes to your collar, the bigger the better this season.

A white handbag carries a princess edge. Pick a portfolio style for double the debutante effect.

Street style DECODED What elevates a look from so-so to special? Julia Hobbs maps the fashion DNA of two spring sartorialists

Espadrille flatforms give your height a sneaky boost

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MISS VOGUE shops

Let’s BOUNCE

From bucket hats to bum-bags and bandanas, old-school urban accessories feel fresh all over again, says Florence Arnold

SUPREME COTTON HAT, £44

TEVA GROSGRAIN SANDALS, £45

EYTYS LEATHER HI-TOPS, £196

PAUL BOWDEN

ADIDAS BY STELLA MCCARTNEY BUM-BAG, £45

CLAIRE’S BANDANA , £4.50

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THOMAS SABO SILVER AND ZIRCONIA EARRINGS, £179

TOMMY HILFIGER SUEDE HI-TOPS, £350

CARVEN LACE DRESS, £690

Relive designer Ken Scott’s Sixt ies heyday in Seafarer’s psychedelic bell-bo ttoms

CHANEL LEATHER CLOGS, £555

ASPINAL OF LONDON LEATHER PASSPORT COVER, £45. PERSONALISATION, FROM £15

SEAFARER COTTON FLARES, FROM £270, AT HARVEY NICHOLS

DIOR SUNGLASSES, FROM £290

SUDHIR PITHWA

FENDI LEATHER BAG, FROM £700

CELINE PORCELAIN BROOCH, FROM £245

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PLAY COMME DES GARCONS COTTON T-SHIRT, £93, AT DOVER STREET MARKET

LE KILT WOOL KILT, £360, AT DOVER STREET MARKET


MISS VOGUE shops SHRIMPS FAUX-FUR JACKET, £395

PANDORA SILVER AND ZIRCONIA PENDANT, £129

EMPORIO ARMANI PVC BAG, £515

Hot SHOTS Stop-and-stare pieces are the new investment buys. Think bold pattern, lush colour and a show-off designer name. After all, why splash out if no one’s going to notice? By Naomi Smart

MIU MIU JEWELLED SATIN SNEAKERS, £930

e ls bow down at th Punk-rock rebe ccarello’s Versus Va altar of Anthony

VERSUS SILK-MIX SKIRT, FROM £148

LOEWE LEATHER COIN PURSE, £150

KG KURT GEIGER LEATHER SANDALS, £130

DKNY COTTON-KNIT DRESS, £215 21


Cyber-savvy fashion lovers are shaking up the way we shop. From sampling to “stalking” and swapping, Laura Weir gets the lowdown on the new retail revolution

AVENUE WAVEY GARMS * “If someone is wearing a *really cool outfit you’d say ‘her outfit is soooo wavey!’” Gabrielle Roberts is explaining what Wavey Garms actually means and how the vintage fashion Facebook group she runs with her boyfriend is leading the social shopping revolution.

Gabrielle Roberts (standing centre) and friends in their Wavey Garms finds 22

PICZO. SITTINGS EDITOR: NURA KHAN. HAIR: KOTA SUIZU. MAKE-UP: LICA FENSOME

ELECTRIC


MISS VOGUE spotlight Wavey Garms works like this: people buy and INSTA-SHOPPING With 18- to 24-year-olds sell clothes (“garms”) that they think are cool five times more likely to follow an embedded (“wavey”). Users request to join the Facebook link to an online store than those aged 55-plus, group and then post pictures of things that they it’s no surprise that big brands like Michael want to sell. Other members can then directKors are getting on board with social shopping. message them and negotiate a price, which is The brand recently launched #InstaKors – cue then paid, usually via PayPal. an email in your inbox every time you “like” a The Wavey Garms page now has 14,000 shoppable post. The personalised email then members, selling everything from vintage sends the liked image, along with direct links Versace to iconic Moschino – imagine a to the products featured so that you can buy second-hand shop sponsored that bag, then and there. “I’ve by the Fresh Prince of Bel-Air said it before, but we really do and you get the picture. live in a selfie world,” admits “The girls that use Wavey brand founder Michael Kors. Whoever coined the phrase “one person’s Garms all have one thing in trash is another person’s treasure” had “If fashion is a reflection of the common,” says Gabrielle. obviously just been to a Bitch’n’Swap world we live in, Instagram “We love late-Nineties and event. It’s the latest swapsie sensation is the three-way mirror.” early-Noughties style. It’s sweeping the nation (and the perfect way Also check out Stylect: like to fast-track your spring cleaning). The more than just shopping – idea is very simple: head over to whoever Tinder for your feet, this people make friends, they has the biggest living room app helps you find the shoes (you’ll need the space) with of your dreams as you swipe organise to meet and party, all your unwanted clothes. and I’ve known couples through 50,000 pairs. Once everyone has arrived, getting together on Wavey spread everything out across the floor and let the Garms. Some members are THE GLOSSY POSSE Beauty paying their way through fun begin. See something you like? Stash brands are equally hung up on it in your pile. When the inevitable occurs uni with the money they are and two people want the same item, the the idea of social shopping. making on the site.” “Bitch” part comes into play, dictating that “We call them glossy-posse each person must try it on, make their parties,” explains Alice, 20. case and let the others objectively decide “We all order sample boxes CHARITY-SHOP STALKING who looks best. Not bitchy per se, but a The latest charity shopping critical eye to make sure the clothes go to full of new beauty products, trend sweeping the nation the best home. then we sit around and try has a similar appeal. Groups things out, with a few bottles of girlfriends are meeting of wine and a take-away.” up through their Whatsapp Alice is talking about groups to go shopping (nothing unusual there), Birchbox, and the leagues of other sample but these charity-shop stalkers are catching services which pop up on teen Instagram trains to provincial towns across the UK to streams on a Saturday night. Think of these scour charity shops for hidden gems. “We businesses as the Netflix of the beauty world, or always travel after 9.30am because it’s cheaper the modern-day Avon, if you will. A monthly on the train,” says Alida Beavis, 24, who lives subscription gets you a box of new skincare, in Brighton and is the ringleader of her “charity hair and make-up treats, meaning you can trial chicks” vintage stalking group. “Bournemouth a selection of the latest products before is amazing and so is Hastings,” she reveals. committing to the full purchase. It’s social “We go to towns where there are lots of OAPs shopping at its best. “We do glossy-posse parties more than we go out,” admits Alice. as they donate the best stuff. Once we buy, we “You get to watch TV, shop and catch up with might wear it a few times, then we Instagram friends. What’s not to love?” Q it and sell it on.”

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bitch ’n’

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swap

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FEMME FATALE

ROBERTO CAVALLI

Upgrade your nighttime look: metallic shine, rock’n’roll glitter and dazzling star prints signal the return to Seventies styling.

NO 21

Catwalk Crib Sheet

Need a spring fashion reboot? Miss Vogue’s runway round-up is brimming with inspiration for your next high-street shopping spree

MIU MIU

GLAM GROUPIE

ERMANNO SCERVINO

TOMMY HILFIGER

WORDS: JULA HOBBS. JASON LLOYD-EVANS; MITCHELL SAMS

LOUIS VUITTON

Wear ladylike shapes with a tough new attitude. A candycoloured Fifties coat clashed with a plaid pencil skirt makes an unexpectedly pretty pairing

EMILIA WICKSTEAD

RODARTE

ROCHAS

TOM FORD

MISS VOGUE trends

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BODYCON

JASON LLOYD-EVANS; MITCHELL SAMS

DIOR

GROUND-ZERO

H BY HAKAAN YILDIRIM ANTHONY VACCARELLO

Modern punk plays out in feisty flashes of colour, while oversized graphics, glossy PVC and frayed edges keep the mood carefree.

ZADIG & VOLTAIRE

VERSACE

POP PUNK

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ALEXANDER WANG

THOMAS TAIT

ISSA

MAXIME SIMOENS

This summerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s cling comes with plenty of figure-friendly tricks: look for clever panelling and graphic prints to flatter your shape, but be sure to keep the rest of your look minimal.


MISS VOGUE trends

PURE WHITE

VALENTINO

LOUIS VUITTON

BLUMARINE MARA HOFFMAN

BOHEMIAN

TOPSHOP UNIQUE

SONIA RYKIEL

CHLOE

The new day dresses are drenched in Summer of Love spirit: cue rainbow prints, floaty fabrics and hippy-chic artisan embellishments...

LACOSTE

NAUTICAL Bold, horizontal stripes are anything but conservative this season. Mismatch a Breton crop top with seafaring shorts for a fresh take on the holiday wardrobe.

RICHARD NICOLL

MICHAEL KORS

EMPORIO ARMANI

ETRO

PAUL & JOE

ANNA SUI

HIPPY CHIC

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MISS VOGUE trends HIP-HOP JEANS The new boyfriend cut is big and baggy with serious turn-ups. We’re loving the bandana top, too.

LOUIS VUITTON

ANKLE-GRAZING SKIRT Pack away that denim mini and invest in summer’s Seventies-style maxi.

DENIM

POLISHED PANTS A dark wash and visible stitching make super-groomed straight-legs the smart girl’s choice.

JOSEPH

UTILITY DRESS Avoid cutesy looks; the functional day dress is your hard-working update on last season’s boiler suit.

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THE FULL LOOK Be brave and combine layer upon layer of faded blues, starting with a simple button-up tee.

DECORATED DENIM JACKET Fuzzy trims, glossy PVC patches and cartoonish appliqués make this normcore staple feel fun again.

JASON LLOYD-EVANS; MITCHELL SAMS

HOUSE OF HOLLAND

FENDI

SONIA RYKIEL

MM6 MAISON MARTIN MARGIELA

No ordinary blues... When it comes to jeans, this season is bursting with wearable ideas.


CHEEKY SINCE 1973 SHOP AT PEPEJEANS.COM


S k ater D re ss £ 4 0

M I S SG U I D E D.CO.U K

SCO R E SO M E N E W W I T H D R E S S E S F RO M £10


MISS VOGUE trends 1. HOOP EARRINGS Supersize is the new supercool. Our faves? Serious shoulder skimmers in classic gold. Scoop up multiple pairs on the high street, or visit Gillian Horsup at Grays Antiques Market for glossy Eighties originals.

CLAIRE’S EARRINGS, £5

SCOTT TRINDLE; JODY TODD

PRIMARK FAUX-LEATHER SANDALS, £16

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GLADIATOR SANDALS The style gods have spoken: laced-up pins were spotted at Valentino, Erdem and Rodarte this season. Play down glam factor and pair yours with frayed denim and skater skirts.

Fash-Hits

Inject instant fashion flair into your wardrobe with Miss Vogue’s new-season edit. By Naomi Smart

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MISS VOGUE trends 3. SUMMER POLONECK Gym-kit stripes kick it both on and off the pitch. Our tip? Run with a tracksuit-style zip-up – Topshop Unique and River Island give good fashion game. Team your polo with suede shorts to score major style points.

CALVIN KLEIN UNDERWEAR BRA, £28. KNICKERS, £18

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RIVER ISLAND COTTON-MIX TOP, £32

ROCKINS CREPE-DE-CHINE SCARF, £90

Echo the catwalk swagger of Tommy Hilfiger’s “New York dolls” this season (check out the original band too). Let gem-encrusted silver leather take centre stage, with no need for a supporting act.

BODEN LEATHER BOOTS, £129

6. ROCK’N’ ROLL SCARF Scarves as whip-thin as the rock gods who wear them. Treat yours like a necklace and pair with an undone silk blouse, à la Saint Laurent.

7. LADYLIKE MINI BAG

Look to Miu Miu s/s ’15 for a stylish homage to cult John Waters’ movie Female Trouble. Think sugary pastels and high-school tartans paired with a deliciously kitsch white granny bag.

FILLES A PAPA COTTON T-SHIRT, £60, AT BROWNS FOCUS

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RETRO TEE

J BY JASPER CONRAN FAUX-LEATHER BAG, £49, AT DEBENHAMS

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Rewind to 1992, when Herb Ritts shot Kate Moss and Marky Mark in their Calvins, and the branded undies signalled understated cool. Wear yours peeking over low-slung trousers, for that too-hot-to-handle look.

Scan vintage stores and Ebay for off-the-wall treats emblazoned with old-school Americana, or look to Filles A Papa for witty new designs. Team with a blazer and mini for a touch of geek chic.

KARIM SADLI; SUDHIR PITHWA; JODY TODD

GLAM-ROCK BOOTS

NINETIES KNICKERS


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www.bobbibrown.co.uk


MISS VOGUE trends 9. NAUTICAL TUNIC Ahoy there! The spring collections were brimming with nautical nods – think rope belts, sailing-canvas shifts and stylish sou’westers. We love Topshop’s shipshape tunic, paired with box-fresh hi-tops.

KORO KIMONO COTTON KIMONO, £45

TOPSHOP COTTON DRESS, £40

COUTURE KIMONO

The East continues to enthrall, with Japanese graphics at Carven, judo belts at Marni and kimono dressing at Dries Van Noten. Commission your own bespoke creation from Koro Kimono.

11. RACING AVIATORS

ARIES EMBELLISHED JEANS, £259, AT MATCHESFASHION.COM

Forget cat’s-eye styles or oversize designs, and accelerate towards pimped pilot sunnies. Mirror lenses at Acne and Dior set the pace.

WILDFOX SUNGLASSES, £168

13. NOUGHTIES POP Fashion flashback: Storm’s iconic bubble watch strikes again – a sugar-sweet pastel-pop accessory. Each one is finished in lasered glass that reflects a rainbow of colours.

12. DECORATED DENIM Give an emoji thumbs-up to custom denim. Invest in Burberry’s ostrich-trim jacket, Marques Almeida’s crystal-encrusted jeans, Aries’ foil-embellished numbers – or DIY at home.

SUMMER OF LOVE

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SELF-PORTRAIT LACE DRESS, £240, AT SELFRIDGES

Return to romance: MOTM Jean Campbell was a vision in white at Louis Vuitton, while at Chloé, broderie anglaise gave dresses a virginal loveliness.

15 ASOS.COM CROCHET DRESS, £45

HAUTE HIPPY California dreaming: homespun crochet designs nail this season’s Seventies spin. Look to Just Cavalli and Emilio Pucci for inspiration.

DANIEL JACKSON; SUDHIR PITHWA; JODY TODD

STORM WATCH, £90


>>>*3(<+0,70,936;*64


n a studio tucked away in Hackney, a gaggle of young designers is clambering around a paintsplattered set. Some are standing on tables, others sat on chairs, and one – Ryan Lo, dressed in iridescent dungarees – is twerking on a stepladder. Welcome to the class of 2015 and the winners of New Gen, a fashion fund and mentoring programme sponsored by Topshop, which has become a rite of passage for “ones to watch” in London.

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This season there were 10 New Gen winners in total and Miss Vogue has gathered together eight of the rising stars who represent the creative fashion that London is so famous for. From Faustine Steinmetz and her handwoven denim to Sadie Williams’s glorious metallics, each designer has a unique vision of what the future of fashion looks like. “The world is too dark for dull, samey clothes,” says Sarah Mower, US Vogue contributing editor and

WORDS: LAURA WEIR; SITTINGS EDITOR: VERITY PARKER. HAIR: NAO KAWAKAMI. MAKE-UP: JENNY COOMBS. NAILS: LYNDSAY MCINTOSH. SET DESIGN: TRISH STEPHENSON

Say hello to the future of British fashion: designers with your style in their sights. Photographed by Rory Payne


This year’s winning New Gen designers, from left to right: Sadie Williams, Claire Barrow, Faustine Steinmetz, Danielle Romerill, Paula Gerbase, Ryan Lo, Molly Goddard and Marta Jakubowski

chair of the New Gen committee. “These designers have the knack for arresting people in their tracks with their irresistible things.” One of this year’s winners, Molly Goddard, is perched on a table in one of her frothy prom dresses, worn over baggy jeans. “My clothes are for a woman who likes a bit of rebellion,” she says, and there is nothing soft about Goddard’s ambition. “I can’t wait to do a full-blown catwalk show,” she reveals.

Claire Barrow, best know for her politicised prints, is no less assured: “If you haven’t got anything fresh to say you shouldn’t be a designer,” she declares. “I want to make a difference with my work.” “No pink, no glitter this season,” announces Lo, who has stopped twerking and is posing like a pro for the photographer. “This is a collection for sophisticated women; it’s for these women,” he gestures to his fellow New Gen-ers. “I’ve come of age.” Q 37


ASHLEY SMITH #MODERNVAGABOND


MISS VOGUE spotlight

the rising

SON

From Saint Laurent catwalk star to indie film hero: meet Jack Kilmer, Hollywood’s hottest son. By Laura Weir. Portraits by Charlotte Wales

ith his grunged-up long locks and River Phoenix pout, it’s no surprise that 19-year-old California native Jack Kilmer is being hailed as Hollywood’s breakout star and fashion’s new hippy heartthrob. Kilmer Jnr is the son of Val Kilmer of Top Gun fame, and is best known for his role

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in Palo Alto, a cult-hit flick directed by fellow Hollywood progeny Gia Coppola. His girly-boy good looks have also caught the eye of Saint Laurent creative director Hedi Slimane, who cast Kilmer alongside Dylan Brosnan (son of Pierce) in the label’s s/s ’15 campaign. With Kilmer’s role in under-the-radar flick Len and Company set > 39


MISS VOGUE spotlight the silver screen, Kilmer Jnr never had his big brown eyes set on following in their footsteps. “I actually didn’t always want to be an actor,” he admitted in a recent interview. “It’s funny, people asked me as a kid all the time, ‘Do you want to do what your parents do?’ And I always said no.” Rewind to when Kilmer and his old schoolmate Gia were lounging around the Coppola family beach house. She (the

to shake up Sundance this year, and a Saint Laurent show under his skinny belt, this fresh-faced thespian is one to watch (and swoon over). Kilmer’s mother, actress Joanne Whalley, met his father on the set of Eighties fantasy flick Willow. Yet despite a seemingly genetic flair for

MOVIE MAISIE WILLIAMS, RIGHT, AND FLORENCE PUGH IN THE FALLING (RELEASED ON APRIL 24 )

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granddaughter of Hollywood legend Francis Ford Coppola) started to tell him about her directorial debut, Palo Alto. Coppola was on the hunt for a new male lead to play the role of Teddy, a sweet-natured stoner boy – and Kilmer, who had been skateboarding all day in the sunshine with his friends, struck her as being the perfect fit. The film was launched to critical acclaim and Kilmer’s status as Hollywood catnip was confirmed. His catwalk debut for Saint Laurent followed. “Strangely, I wasn’t nervous,” he declared. “The lights cloud your vision and the music is very loud. It’s as if there is no audience.” No audience? It might feel like no one is looking on, but we’re following Kilmer’s rise. Q

FALLING HARD… A twisted celluloid tale has us head over heels The year is 1969. Schoolgirls Abbie Mortimer and Lydia Lamont do everything together. But beautiful, defiant Abbie gets all of the attention, and when she abruptly loses her virginity, the cracks in their relationship reach breaking point. From the mischievously hemmed miniskirts right down to the cotton knee-socks, The Falling – a new film by writer-director Carol Morley – taps into fashion’s current love affair with retro. Its all-girl cast was hand-picked at open auditions in Oxfordshire schools, where Morley found a rising star in 18-year-old Florence Pugh – nominated for best British newcomer at the London Film Festival for her part as the mesmerising Abbie. Meanwhile Maisie Williams (Game of Thrones’ Arya) brilliantly captures that awful, gnawing feeling of growing apart from your best friend. Off screen, however, the girls couldn’t have been closer. Pugh, a talented guitarist, led karaoke sessions with the crew – listen to her own raspy acoustic covers on her Youtube channel. LMcG

CHARLOTTE WALES

“PEOPLE ASKED ME, ‘DO YOU WANT TO DO WHAT YOUR PARENTS DO?’ AND I ALWAYS SAID NO”


MISS VOGUE spotlight LISTEN UP: RISING STARS MARIKA HACKMAN

Never mind Marika Hackman’s ethereal beauty – the skilful melodies of this former Burberry model will transfix you. Catch the 23-year-old’s captivating gothic folk on tour, March 23–April 15. Play: “Animal Fear”. @MarikaHackman

RAURY

ALL BACK TO MINE Live music comes home

Open up your own front room and play host to the next rising star. Songs from a Room hosts intimate free gigs from homes across the country. With acts revealed just hours before the show, this pop-up shines a light on stripped-back performances. Now running across 100 international cities, you can expect anyone from up-and-coming singers to headline acts to show up at your door. The likes of George Ezra, Hozier, Tom Vek – even Robert Pattinson – have all taken to the stage (or the carpet). Sofarsounds.com

The Atlanta-born rapper has only just graduated from high school, but Kanye, Lorde and Outkast have all fallen for his soulful brand of hip-hop. Stream his debut album at Indigochildproject.com. Play: “Cigarette Song”. @Raury

CINEMA

Prepare to lose yourself (quite literally) at SECRET CINEMA, currently plotting its next immersive movie theme park. Facebook.com/secretcinema The NOMAD CINEMA will drift across the likes of Hyde Park Lido and Brompton Cemetery for more alfresco screenings this summer. Whereisthenomad.com Hop aboard the FLOATING CINEMA, which meanders down the country’s waterways hosting screenings from a converted barge. Floatingcinema.info 42

FOOD

THEATRE

THE GINGERLINE, a foodie pop-up along

Tread the boards with this month’s mystery production from YOU ME BUM BUM TRAIN, where actors direct the audience. Bumbumtrain.com Jump down the rabbit hole with LES ENFANTS TERRIBLES, who transform the Waterloo vaults for Alice in Wonderland in April. Lesenfantsterribles.co.uk The curtain has fallen on PUNCHDRUNK’s The Drowned Man, which took over a sprawling Paddington office block, but stay tuned for their next adventure. Punchdrunk.com

east London’s overground line, changes tracks to the Jubilee Line until the end of March. Gingerline.co.uk The MILE HIGH supper club whisks diners on a culinary world tour, with a menu themed round changing destinations. Dinemilehigh.com Take pleasure in THE ART OF DINING, run by chef Ellen Parr and set designer Alice Hodge. Its next masterwork is a satire on the Seventies middle classes, inspired by Abigail’s Party. Theartofdining.co.uk

CASS BIRD; PIP; BIRGIT & RALF; CARLOTTA CARDANA; HYDAR DEWACHI; JASON JOYCE

PICK OF THE POP-UPS


MISS VOGUEspotlight

THE FORMIDABLE JUDGING PANEL: DESIGNER HENRY HOLLAND, FOURTH LEFT, AND MISS VOGUE STAFFERS BAY GARNETT, JULIA HOBBS, EDITOR EMILY SHEFFIELD, LAURA WEIR AND NAOMI SMART. INSET: WINNER NAOMI PIKE

MISS

HAIR: DIANA MOAR. MAKE-UP: ARABELLA PRESTON AND STEPHANIE G-M

Finding

Eight hours, six Vogue judges, 20 fabulous finalists… Here’s what happened when we staged our own high-fashion take on the TV talent show – our search for a star intern. Photographs by Laura Coulson he scene was set: 20 contestants, chosen from hundreds of applicants, a line-up of judges that would make even Dragons’ Den look welcoming (Henry Holland is very scary – when he’s not laughing, that is) and a list of challenges to test even the most fervent fashion follower, all set in the Condé Nast College of Fashion & Design.

T

The prize: three months’ paid work on Miss Vogue’s digital channels in our Mayfair offices. The “Harry Styles Challenge” was our favourite – the guy wouldn’t have stood a chance against this lot! They wanted him to kiss them, do a striptease, cross-dress and sing an Elvis song. The talent was so impressive, the styling so elevated, we deliberated long after darkness fell. > 47


MISS VOGUE spotlight

MISS V’S CHALLENGES

CONTESTANT LUCAS ASIN PONDERS HIS NEXT MOVE

Watch all the action from the day on Vogue.co.uk/miss-vogue

1. Julia Hobbs, our fashion features associate, has got stuck in traffic and we only have 10 minutes left to interview Kendall Jenner for our cover story. You are the only one there. What three questions would you like to ask her? 2. From the rail behind you, pick two looks and show us how you would style them on yourself for Miss Vogue – note, they should reflect current trends for s/s ’15. 3. Tell us in one minute why we should we pick you? 4. We have a five-minute slot to make a Youtube film with Harry Styles. What would you get him to do?

JOY MATASHI TAKES THE STYLING CHALLENGE

LAURA COULSON

RUNNER-UP HARRIET CLARK

OUR TALENTED FINALISTS CELEBRATE TOGETHER

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MISS VOGUE PROMOTION

BIRDCAGE WALK WALLPAPER, BY NINA CAMPBELL, £56 PER ROLL, OSBORNE & LITTLE. VISIT OSBORNEANDLITTLE.COM

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: ROSE RING IN SILVER WITH CUBIC ZIRCONIA, £85. BUTTERFLY NECKLACE IN SILVER WITH CUBIC ZIRCONIA, £115. HEART NECKLACE AND EARRINGS SET IN SILVER, £99. DAZZLING DAISY STACKING RINGS IN SILVER, FROM £45. PRIMROSE RING IN SILVER WITH WHITE ENAMEL, £45. DAZZLING DAISY STACKING RING IN SILVER, £65. CHARM BRACELET IN SILVER, £55; WITH 14CT GOLD & STERLING-SILVER CHARMS, FROM £55. HEART NECKLACE AND EARRINGS SET, AS BEFORE, £99. ALL PANDORA. PANDORA.NET

in BLOOM

The prettiest of petals prove to be divine inspiration for Pandora’s jewellery box must-haves. Photograph by Chris Turner


johnfrieda.co.uk

Together, we can work miracles. Miraculous Recovery, an intensive, hair-transforming deep conditioner by John Frieda, gives hair a second chance. Strand by strand, hair is nourished, comes back to life, smooth and beautiful. Me & John & Miraculous Recovery. Together we can.


1. Lash hit

WORDS: LAUREN MURDOCH-SMITH. ALASDAIR MCLELLAN; PAUL BOWDEN

Long, fluttery eyelashes might not be in your DNA, so take advantage of Benefit’s brilliant lash-boosting treatments. Book in with Claire at Benefit’s Covent Garden boutique for an LVL treatment (Length, Volume and Lift) and they’ll straighten your lashes, making them look longer and thicker, and allowing you to ditch mascara for up to six weeks. £45. Benefitcosmetics.co.uk

The Look Book From affordable kit to genius therapists, Miss Vogue’s grooming directory is a treasure trove of insider hangouts and best-kept beauty secrets 53 61


2. Web workouts How To Exercise is the very latest vlogging hit – a modern take on the old-school fitness video. Let’s face it, gyms are expensive and a big commitment. Instead, log onto Fitness Blender to devise your ideal exercise plan and train at your own pace. Fitnessblender.com

3. Braidy bunch The next generation of hair bar comes in the form of The Braid Bar, a walk-in braiding service. Check out their Instagram account @The_Braid_ Bar for inspiration. Braidbar.co.uk

B A N G S

4. Beauty on a budget Sally’s Beauty Supplies might look like a trade-only store but it’s actually a beauty addict’s paradise. Packed full of wholesale products and professional brands (426 to be precise), you can buy salon-size shampoo and at-home spa kits without breaking the bank. Sallyexpress.com

6. A cut above Having a trim might seem simple but finding a good snipper is harder than you think. Trust the team at Percy & Reed for a perfect cut, because at P&R an inch means an inch and every inch counts! From £48. Percyandreed.com

T Whether you’re working up the courage to chop, you’ve already taken the fringe plunge or you’re midway through growing yours out, head to The Bang Bar at the Atelier Hair Lab Liberty for the finest fringe maintenance. From £10. Liberty.com

7. Wigs and weaves If you can’t live without hair extensions but the dent in your bank balance is taking its toll, head to your local wig shop for salon-quality clip-ins and weaves at half the price. Our favourite? Julia Knows Beauty in south London. Juliahairandbeauty.co.uk 54

8 .G O LD STA R Vita Liberata is the go-to tanning range when you’re in need of instant luxe colour with zero drying time and no tell-tale biscuit smell. It’ll look and feel natural, and gently fade after two to three weeks. From £10 for a half body tan. Vitaliberata.co.uk

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CASS BIRD; JAMES COCHRANE; PAUL BOWDEN; BRUCE WEBER

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MISS VOGUE beauty 10. Wax working A Miss Vogue favourite, Strip offers the best and least-painful waxing treatments out there. Their hot-wax defuzz is the most comfortable, making it perfect for first-timers. Bikini hot wax from £23. Stripwaxbar.com

11. Creative colour 9. Pamper party Hit Barber & Parlour in Shoreditch for a girly grooming session plus cocktails. Once you’re suitably primped, head downstairs to catch a movie at the Electric cinema. Blowdry from £20; nails from £15. Barberandparlour.com There’s a new wave of beauty apps offering treatments on the go. Priv, dubbed the “Uber of the beauty industry”, offers anything from a gel manicure to a Pilates class, all within an hour of booking – whether you’re at the gym, at home or in the office. Services start at £18. Also try Milk Beauty for treatments straight to your door. Milkbeauty.co.uk

A P

For hair colour on a budget, Redken and Lisa Shepherd have teamed up to launch Color Bar Express. Prolong your highlights with Root Rage (£15) or enjoy one of the six colour treatments on offer, each for no more than £30. Lisashepherd.co.uk/color-bar

I L A N A R T DIY nail art couldn’t be easier, thanks to our latest online discovery – Sparkly Nails. Like an Asos for nail supplies, you’ll find everything from foils to “dangles” and dotting tools, all at low prices with next-day delivery. We’re addicted! Sparkly-nails.co.uk

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14. Best-ever brows Whether you need to check in to Blink’s Brow-Hab to rescue overplucked brows or you just need a simple tidy-up, you’re in safe hands at one of Blink’s 23 brow bars, where every therapist is a true eyebrow master. Treatments start from just £17. Blinkbrowbar.com

1 5 . G O F O R A B L O For a last-minute appointment, head to Blo. Gwyneth Paltrow’s latest venture comes straight from NYC, the city that expects fast, quality beauty treatments. Situated in Covent Garden, you can pop in for a last minute blowdry or a party ’do. Alternatively, book a “Blo on the go” and have a stylist come to you. Think braids, blowdries and up-dos galore. From £28. Blomedry.com 55


Applications now open!

WANT TO GET AHEAD IN FASHION?

NEW! weekend courses for 16 −18 year olds

Come and learn from the experts at London’s most exciting new fashion college. Our inspiring courses include the

Fashion Certificate Fashion Foundation Diploma Intensive Summer Course Plus: One Week Fashion Styling and Journalism Courses To find out more and apply visit:

www.condenastcollege.co.uk


MISS VOGUE beauty

TOO FACED CHOCOLATE BAR PALETTE, £45

BOBBI BROWN ULTRA FINE EYELINER BRUSH, £22.50

1. Nude Rules Apply cool, neutral shades as a subtly pretty everyday look, or use as a base for a more dramatic eyes. Tip: Take the palest shade up to the brow bone and layer from pale to dark. To add depth, use the brownest shade in the crease of your eyelid.

CLINIQUE CHUBBY STICK SHADOW TINT IN MASSIVE MIDNIGHT, £17

3. The Modern Feline Flick Nothing beats the classic Dolce Vita flick. Shadow provides more colour variety and creates a softer finish than liner – perfect for less-than-steady hands! Tip: Dip a wet liner brush into your eyeshadow, paint a line and blend for a smudgy look. If you like a sharp shape, draw the winged line and top with a shadow for colour depth and variation.

ANGELO PENNETTA; PAUL BOWDEN

URBAN DECAY NAKED PALETTE, £37

HOURGLASS MODERNIST INFINITY PALETTE, £56

BECCA OMBRE NUDE EYE PALETTE, £34

LORD & BERRY SETA EYESHADOW IN NOUR, £10

TOPSHOP MONO EYESHADOW IN LUNAR, £5

Shadow Play It’s all about eyeshadow – beauty’s comeback kid. Time to master the classics, says Lauren Murdoch-Smith

4. Molten Metallic 2. Rainbow Bright Take inspiration from luscious peacock shades seen on the catwalk at Maison Margiela spring ’15 couture. Don’t be afraid to play with colour – just keep the rest of your face understated. Tip: Highlight the inner corner of your eye with yellow, then blend purples and blues towards the outer edges with a “blown-out” effect that makes the look soft and super-wearable. LORD & BERRY SETA EYESHADOW INPOOL, £10

MAYBELLINE COLORSHOW EYESHADOW IN LUSTROUS BEIGE, £5

MAC PRESSED PIGMENT IN BLACK GRAPE, £17

5. Glitter Smoky

SISLEY PHYTO 4 OMBRES IN 2 MYSTERY, £57

NARS EYESHADOW IN NIGHT PORTER, £18

MAX FACTOR EXCESS SHIMMER IN COPPER, £8

Who can resist the power of pewter and gold? The long-wear technology in new eyeshadows means goodbye greasy eyelids and hello dazzling metallics. Tip: Start with a cream textured shadow to build layers easily. Stick to sheer layers but add a powdered metallic for a heavy-metal finish (the cream shadow will help fix it).

MAC GLITTER BRILLIANTS IN 3D PALE MINT, £17

The smoky eye is a failsafe, and a touch of glitter gives it a fresh twist. Stick to catwalk-inspired tones of bronze, black and silver, and don’t stint on the glitter. Tip: Use a base shadow, such as Benefit’s Creaseless Cream Shadow, £15.50, and brush away unwanted flecks with a fan brush. A touch of concealer will also clean up any mess.

URBAN DECAY HEAVY METAL GLITTER EYELINERS IN, GLAMROCK, RIGHT, AND MIDNIGHT COWBOY, FAR RIGHT, £14 EACH

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W BOOK NUO CK A B IS L A IV T S E F E THE VOG

APRIL 25 & 26

TO FIND OUT MORE, VISIT VOGUE.CO.UK/VOGUEFESTIVAL

MAX FARAGO

AT THE ROYAL COLLEGE OF ART AND THE ROYAL GEOGRAPHICAL SOCIETY, SW7


MISS VOGUE health

BodyBeautiful

My

Contrary to popular belief, the fashion world doesn’t run on coffee, stress and cigarettes. Here, three industry insiders share the secret to happy, healthy living... MY FAVOURITE PART OF MY BODY IS MY BUM. I got the nickname Perky at school because of it, LOL!

THE FIRST THING I DO WHEN I WAKE UP IS TAKE OUT MY EARPLUGS AND STRETCH. I love to do yoga before breakfast. I make porridge with coconut milk and honey every morning.

I USUALLY EXERCISE ALONE. It’s hard to find same schedule.

a friend who has the

S A WEEK. ON AVERAGE I EXERCISE FOR THREE HOUR amp in I would never go to a gym, but I love Barry’s Bootc of your London because they make you work every part body, but especially tummy and legs. It hurts. MUSIC FESTIVALS ARE A GREAT SECRET WORKOUT. What’s a better de-stresser than dancing to indie disco?

PICZO. WORDS: JULIA HOBBS. SITTINGS EDITOR: NURA KHAN. HAIR: KOTA SUIZU. MAKE-UP: LICA FENSOME

I OWN is a pair THE MOST FLATTERING ITEM OF CLOTHING make my legs black knee-high platform boots, because they or Rag & Bone look longer when I wear them with opaque tights shoes! ballet flat jeans. I would never wear FOCUS ON YOUR BREATHING. It’s the best . way for getting rid of nerves before a big event

Photographer BELLA HOWARD, 28, started her own fanzine, ByBellaZine, at school, and since then she has shot campaigns for Adidas, Topshop and House of Holland

I’M NOT A FAN OF EXERCISE APPS, I prefer to keep it simple with a good soundtrack – I love anything by Hole.

A VICTORIA’S SECRET BRA IS THE ULTIMATE IN FEEL-GOOD FASHION. Every girl should own one. I’M A BATH GIRL. My beauty routine can be summed up in three words: pretty simple really. The three beauty essentials I couldn’t live without are Weleda Skin Food, a Tangle Teezer and any brightening eye drops.

MY FAVOURITE MAKE-UP LOOK IS HEAVY BLACK EYELINER, because all my female rock idols did their eyes like that.

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Make-up artist ISAMAYA FFRENCH, 25, subverts beauty traditions with her bold, painterly approach. Her collaborators include Vogue photographers Harley Weir and Tyrone Lebon

I USED TO BE A COMPETITIVE HI GH DIVER AND DANC ER, but now I stay in sh ape with capoeira – it’s great for all-round fitness.

MY BODY IS ITE PART OF to my knees! MY FAVOUR wn used to be do ten (on the MY HAIR. It of o to it ng washi ressers as I’ve stopped various haird of n tio da en od for it). go be recomm to ed is is suppos apparently th low maintenance… ry So now it’s ve

MY BEAUTY RO UTINE IS SUPERSPEEDY: shower, coffee and eyeline r. The first thing I do when I wake up in the morning is wish I could have a lie-in .

s INERS - Adida I LIVE IN TRA Gander are my n ya R 7X750 by urites. absolute favo

IF I’M F

EELING PARTIC EN UL KETTL ERGETIC I W ARLY E IL BELLS I love y . On laz L DO oga. E ie it come verything help r days, s to ton ing you s when r bottom .

O BEEN TO AYS HAS OMEN’S LW A E R E W TH NUS ON E MUCH O APES AND THER H S Y D rtant to o BO p im ’s It WILL BE. about ALWAYS er that exercise is od. go g in k rememb o as lo at, as much feeling gre

I MAKE TIME TO CO FROM SCRATCH. OK MEALS M is curry. I was a profe y favourite dish ssional chef for five years and was asked to go on Masterchef when I was it down. Big regret 19 but turned !

CISE TO FIT EXER IT IS TRICKY K SCHEDULE, OR INTO MY W ICK TO EARLYST SO I TRY TO . WORKOUTS to MORNING r ta os ur E e r th I’m waiting fo d spin classes. ar bo on e uc introd

a long MY RELAXATION SECRET, after . day shooting, is Nathan for You on HBO U RESSED YO THE LESS ST MAKE-UP SS ARE, THE LE lps. A light tan he YOU NEED.

PICZO

MY BIGGEST BE AUTY ERROR WAS BLEACHIN G MY EYEBROW S. They looked like neon slugs.

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MISS VOGUE health I HAVE THE SAME BREA KFAST EACH MORNING : bran flakes with a sprink ling of flax seeds and almond milk, plus a her bal tea.

I LIVE IN MY GYM MY FAVOURITE

KIT – leggings, tee and Nike Roshe tra , hoodie iners. Easy.

PART OF MY BO

DY IS MY WAIST . It’s one of the sexiest parts of a wo man.

THE GYM IS HEAVEN (but only if it has a jacuzzi and sauna). On average I put in five hours a week.

GYM IS A NO-NO. A FULL FACE OF MAKE-UP AT THE ealer and a touch conc of bit is wear I’ll The most of bronzer – nothing too heavy.

EXERCISE IS ABOUT BEING SOC IAL – I love to work out with friends for motivation. We’ll do parkour, Pilates or free weights. I’m currently working on my abs.

SLEEP IS MY BEST BEAUTY TIP. Sle eples My best advice for getting rid of nerve s nights are the worst. s or stress is: don’t just do it. It’s neve think, r as bad as the idea in your head. I INCORPORATE FITNESS INTO MY DAY. On busy days, when I can’t make it to an exercise class, I walk instead of taking a cab. Dancing to drum’n’ba ss also counts!

Londoner JADA SEZER, 25, balances a life as a Nike ambassador with a flourishing modelling career N LBD IN THERE SHOULD BE A BODY-CO your shape EVERYONE’S WARDROBE. You earn so it’s important to be proud of it! I ADORE TOPSHOP’S JAMIE JEANS – they are so flattering.

THE MOST IMPORTANT PART OF MY BEAUTY ROUTINE IS CLEANSING, especially after a long day on set.

MY THREE BEAU TY remover, then coco ESSENTIALS ARE Bioderma make nut oil and Dermalo -up gica Overnight Re pair Serum for a boost while I’m sleeping .

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Cut-out chic As seen at: Fendi, Balenciaga and Erdem Rosie Huntington-Whiteley modelled the cut-away look at Balenciaga this season, and now you can tap into the trend via the model’s first fragrance, Rosie for Autograph, £14.

Bohemian beauty

Flower power

FENDI

As seen at: Valentino, Marni and Miu Miu Florals aren’t just big in fragrance; flower prints blossomed at the collections, too. Try Jo Malone’s Lily of the Valley & Ivy Cologne, £42, a limited-edition English country-garden scent that will last all day. VALENTINO

DIOR

As seen at: Dior, Emilio Pucci and Roberto Cavalli Nothing beats the smell of fresh hair, and thanks to Miss Dior Hair Mist, £34, it can be a 24/7 reality. A quick spritz offers a lasting waft of patchouli and chypre for whoever passes by.

Perfume parade Stuck in a fragrance rut? Take inspiration from the latest catwalk trends and match your scent to your style, says Lauren Murdoch-Smith

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JASON LLOYD-EVANS; PAUL BOWDEN

Seventies redux

As seen at: Stella McCartney, Gucci and Fendi Denim is having a moment, which in scent terms translates as a stylish aromas that can take you from day to night. Elie Saab Le Parfum Resort Collection, £47, with fig, jasmine and frangipani, is a denim devotee’s must-have.

STELLA MCCARTNEY

As seen at: Saint Laurent, Burberry and Tommy Hilfiger Inspired by the energy and excitement of live music, Burberry Brit Rhythm for Her, £50, is a powdery floral scent with a lemon and orange twist, but it’s the moody amber dry-down that gives it a rock’n’roll edge.

Jean pool

CHLOE

SAINT LAURENT

I’m with the band

As seen at: Chloé, Derek Lam and Tom Ford The movie Love Story has long been a favourite Seventies fashion reference. Now try Love Story, the fragrance, from £47. Chloé’s neroli and jasmine aroma is a fresh nod to Seventies style.


MISS VOGUE PROMOTION BEST FOOT FORWARD PALMAIRA SANDALS, FROM £40

The

FLAT PACK

With juicy hues too good to choose from, one pair of Palmaira Sandals isn’t nearly enough

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he same summer conundrum comes around year after year: you need a pair of flats that are comfortable enough to take you from am to pm; cool enough to wear to work or a wedding; and available in a shade to suit every mood. That is, if you haven’t already discovered Palmaira Sandals. With a cocktail of rainbow hues from which to choose – hot-pink, mermaid iridescent, sunset orange, racy leopard-print (the list goes on) – this brand is what we would call a sartorial saviour when the sun comes out. Modern bohemia was never so authentic, nor did it look so good. Q Visit Palmairasandals.com

TREAT YOUR FEET INDULGE YOUR STYLIST’S EYE THIS MONTH, AS MISS VOGUE READERS GET FREE DELIVERY ON ALL ORDERS. VISIT PALMAIRASANDALS.COM BETWEEN MARCH 1 AND APRIL 1, 2015. DISCOUNT CODE: MISSVOGUETOES


AMERICAN EAGLE OUTFITTERS SUNGLASSES, £12, AE.COM/UK THOMAS SABO SILVER AND TURQUOISE ANKLET, £80, THOMASSABO.COM

STEP TO IT Not booked your holiday yet? Let buying into beachwear be your first move. Equally perfect for sandy shores by day and cobbled streets by night, Palmaira’s Menorcan sandals (made locally on the island) come in endless fresh colours and super-soft leathers, so you can sport a different pair on every occasion. Sandals, £45. Palmairasandals.com

SEAFOLLY BIKINI TOP, £54. BRIEFS, £44.50. BOTH SEAFOLLY.COM

WORK IT OUT INTIMISSIMI SPORTS BRA, £32, INTIMISSIMI.CO.UK

ADIDAS STELLA SPORT LEGGINGS, £35, ADIDAS.CO.UK

We’re all spending more and more time in our gym kit (whether it’s actually in the gym or not), so investing in Stella McCartney’s new line for Adidas and one of Intimissimi’s brand new sports bras seems like a worthy choice.

MICHAEL MICHAEL KORS CROP TOP, £100, MICHAELKORS.COM

Miss Vogue’s

Notebook

A FRAYED SEW Wear this fringed denim number on its own as a crop top, or use it to add raw edge to a preppy shirt. MARC JACOBS DAISY SORBET EDITION, £52, DEBENHAMS.COM

New sandals, sportswear and the Seventies trend... Tatiana Hambro gets you prepped for summer

FRUIT PUNCH EYE DROPS IT’S THE TOPS To support young people in the fight against Aids, drug abuse and other teenage health issues, DKNY has collaborated with Bottletop to create bright bags and clutches from upcycled metal tabs, like the kind you pull from a can of Coke. That’s style best served with a cool dose of philanthropy. Clutch, £250, DKNY X Bottletop. Dkny.com

Carat’s ear cuff, a delicate “evil eye”, gently clasps on to those parts of the ear you’ve never dared to pierce. Ear cuff, £76. Caratlondon.com

With top notes of passionfruit and pear, the latest scent from the Marc Jacobs Daisy collection is good enough to eat. ENDLESS JEWELRY LEATHER BRACELET, FROM £45. CHARMS, FROM £15, ENDLESS JEWELRY.EU


PANDORA GOLD STUDS, £145 A PAIR

MISS VOGUE notebook CHANEL HAIR MIST, £34, SELFRIDGES.COM CLAIRE’S HAIR BOWS, £5 FOR 3, CLAIRES.CO.UK. BABYLISS BIG HAIR, £45, BABYLISS.CO.UK

THE STUD Pandora’s studs come in simple shapes and clean designs HYDRA – wear as many as your ears will allow. Pandora.net

TIME TRAVEL Hail the Seventies trend with help from River Island, whose spring/ summer collection offers retro classics aplenty, including flares, colourful jacquards and this caramel minidress. Dress, £60. Long tassel necklace, £10. Shoes, £40. Riverisland.com

HAIR RAISER Job interview? Date? Or just a bad hair day? There’s nothing a good blowdry and spritz of Chanel won’t sort out. DIOR EARRINGS, £380, DIOR.COM

GOLDEN LOBES BRIGHT FUCHSIA MOSCHINO

Channel your inner Barbie Girl this season, as well as your sense of humour, with Aspinal’s fun mini bag. Leather bag, £295. Aspinaloflondon.com

Whether you opt for a classic pearl or the more modern marbled version (above), wear just one earring for asymmetric cool.

SUDHIR PITHWA; JODY TODD; PAUL BOWDEN

BUCKLE UP Wear this cropped minidress as a nod to the current dungarees trend. Dress, £30, H&M Studio. Hm.com

KIKO MILANO BRONZER, £15, KIKOCOSMETICS.CO.UK

STRONG BASE

Summer calls for skin that’s been kissed by the sun. Get the look with Maybelline’s silky new foundation and use a multi-shade bronzer to sculpt. MAYBELLINE FOUNDATION, £9, BOOTS.COM

COOL CANVAS Golden Goose resurrects the joys of childhood with its popular Francy sneaker. The latest limited edition comes complete with colouring pens, ready for customisation. Let your creative juices flow right down to your feet. Sneakers, £292. Goldengoosedeluxebrand.com 65


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Cropped cotton sweater, £30, River Island. Suede miniskirt, £305, Sandro. Vintage earrings, £55, Gillian Horsup. Rings, throughout, Cressida’s own. Hair: Cyndia Harvey. Make-up: Lauren Parsons. Nails: Pebbles Aikens. Fashion editor: Kate Phelan

GIRL IN THE SPOTLIGHT

She’s seduced high fashion and Hollywood, and these days everyone is just a little in love with Cressida Bonas. Violet Henderson hangs out with the budding star as she claims centre stage. Photography by Sean Thomas 67


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who sprang from board to board to board in There’s a Monster in the Lake. The play, which began its life at the Hay Festival, received good reviews but Cressida’s were even better, and soon the production decamped to London for a longer run. She has also shot her first (small) big-screen role in Tulip Fever, co-starring Jack O’Connell and Cara Delevingne. The film, which has a rumoured release date of November, is already being hyped as something very major indeed. Although Cressida is most excited about her upcoming video project with filmmaker and artist Martha Fiennes, and “daring less conventional projects”. Cressida has also secured a new association with the British fashion house Mulberry. She is an accomplished contemporary dancer (not many people know that) and Mulberry has captured her in a short film, twirling in the Bee dress that was designed specially for its new “THE PAPARAZZI ARE NOTHING MORE star. What a canny THAN A LOT OF NOISE AND NONSENSE” move by the Somerset brand, to associate with the girl who captures As the sun comes out, Cressida makes tracks, that very English fashion sensibility – picturepulling her pink Ray-Ban sunglasses off her perfect in dungarees, trainers and bare skin at head and on to her nose. When she steps into Glastonbury, or a wisp of silken elegance at a the daylight the effect is immediate. Paparazzi summer wedding. circling Alexa Chung and Nick Grimshaw turn, Of course, most beginnings start with shouting, slipping, their flashbulbs blinding an ending, and 2014 was also the year that and panic inducing. Cressida continues, head Cressida and Prince Harry finished their very down, hair over her face. Google the pictures; private two-year relationship. Cressida won’t you’ll find hundreds. be discussing her relationship with Harry here or in any interview hereafter because London, Bond & Brook Café, January 2015. although the paparazzi may continue to chase Cressida is dressed in her signature offher in the hunt for any royal clues – Cressida duty wear – black jumper, black wide-legged pines for prince; vengeful Cressida finds a new trousers and box-fresh white Nike high-tops. boyfriend; Cressida crosses road – she’s not the Her hair is half-tied with a scrunchie and she sort to kiss and tell. isn’t wearing any make-up – which is how she But this is an awkward time, caught as she looks her best, because hers is a youthful, laidis between the last phase of her life, in which back sort of beauty. “I always try to wear only publicity was fearfully avoided via back exits what I feel comfortable in,” she says, “instead of and baseball caps, and its next phase, her trying to look like someone else. That’s never career, which demands red carpets and photo worked for me.” shoots. She’s not oblivious to this conflict Trying to be someone else, on the other either, so when she talks about the paparazzi, hand, seems to be working out just fine for her response is reasonable and muted. “Mostly, Cressida, as she has begun to forge a career as they’re nothing more than a lot of noise and an actress and a dancer. Last year, she played nonsense. As my mum says ‘Worse things > an a cappella-singing, cockney-talking wolf, lastonbury, hospitality tent, 2014. It’s here that I first meet Cressida Bonas, known by tabloid newspapers as Prince Harry’s on-off girlfriend, but soon to be better recognised as the It actress (who can really, really dance). In a muddy field we are introduced by a mutual friend and drink cider together. Cressida is wearing denim cut-offs and a silk bomber; she’s up for dancing when this rain is over, she says, preferably to electro swing. Also in the tent are Bradley Cooper, Rita Ora and Will Poulter (to whom Cressida “snuggled up”, a newspaper will report the next day under the headline “So long Harry”. The friends just had a conversation). Cressida, or Cressie as her friends know her, is sweet, giggly and knowledgeable about music. I like her.

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“I always try to wear what I feel comfortable in,” reveals Cressida. Silk/cashmere sweater, £195, DKNY

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happen at sea.’” The actress���s voice is worth noting; it’s fey and faraway and she speaks the Queen’s English with a hint of huskiness that, when she later claims to being “a bit of a dreamer”, makes her description believable. But on everything else she is open and easygoing. Ryan Gosling is her ultimate celebrity crush. Despite the media’s best attempts to prove otherwise, she doesn’t currently have a boyfriend. And “I can bend my thumb back against my hand – it’s my party trick.” She lives in London, in a shared flat in Ladbroke Grove, with her closest friend Georgia Forbes. “It doesn’t matter what sort of day we’ve both had at work, when we’re together we laugh. Usually I don’t even know what we are laughing about.” Cressida is trying to learn to “be still, which I find hard because I love moving”. For her the prospect of not doing anything or even not having a purpose is “terrifying”, so she balances her acting and dancing with a desk job at Mubi, an online cinema platform where she works on the marketing team. On weekends she trawls Portobello market, “usually ending up going home with something I never end up wearing”. Gielgud Theatre, later in the month. Cressida arrives early for the evening performance of The Curious Incident of the Dog in the NightTime. She waits for me with a box of Maltesers, water and a programme, and greets me with an enormous hug. The curtain rises. During the interval we remain in our seats and demolish the Maltesers. “I’m definitely addicted to sugar,” she admits, not unhappily. And she resumes the same bouncy chat of SEAN THOMAS

before, only this time she focuses on the theatre, from the problems of the fourth wall to the Stanislavski system: Cressida clearly knows her stuff. But something more revealing of her character comes later, after the interval, when an older woman in the audience gets confused, shouts and somehow becomes horribly tangled up in the performance. Cressida instinctively reaches for my hand, looking heartbroken. At 26, she is relatively old to be starting out as an actress. But, in fact, she is not new to performing; at the age of nine she was a This picture and opposite: junior associate at the striped sweater, £25, H&M. Jersey leggings, £24, Royal Ballet School. American Apparel. Chinese She grew up in a Mary-Jane slippers, from £5, Goneblue.com house full of “drama – but drama in the best possible way, there was so much singing and dancing, mostly to musicals”. Later she studied drama and dance at Leeds University and contemporary dance at Trinity Laban in London. Her mother, Lady Mary-Gaye Curzon, whom she describes as “an unbelievable storyteller who has a voice for everyone”, and her historian father divorced when Cressida was five years old. But she remains close to both parents and to her 10 siblings (five half, five step – hers is a complicated family tree) all of whom are as golden as she. And we really are talking golden: the actresses and models Isabella Calthorpe, her half-sister, and Gabriella Wilde, her stepsister. And yet, in spite of all this, her parents continue to have reservations about her career. “They think it’s not a proper way of earning a living, and,” she adds, “they think I’m too sensitive.” London, Miss Vogue cover shoot. The crew has gathered in a large private garden in south > 71


gives the set designer, Michael Howells, a kiss, and he cheers, rosy-cheeked and delighted. An hour later, the after-party is in full swing. Over the pool golden balloons dance in the breeze; Dominic West, Gillian Anderson, Ethan Hawke, Laura Carmichael, Rosamund Pike and many more have gathered to meet Mulberry’s new star. Everyone has heard that the film mogul Harvey Weinstein is impressed by this budding actress. It was he who cast her in Tulip Fever. There is a “IN REAL LIFE I’M SHY, PARALYSINGLY SO. buzz in the air. A photographer asks WHEN I’M PERFORMING, I FEEL FREE” Cressida to stand with the actor Freddie Fox for a picture. (Freddie Beauty, yes. Charisma, without doubt. But makes a cameo in the Mulberry film.) Cressida “it” also encapsulates an ability to translate gives her friend a hug, because she is a big what a director or a photographer wants into hugger and a little nervous. In the papers the a character that lingers beyond the performer’s next day she has a new boyfriend. interpretation. When you see “it” dancing right At 10am, Cressida emails: “I didn’t see you at in front of you, it’s enthralling. all last night! Did you have fun? Hope I will see A week later Cressida calls me. We talk you later? XX.” about the day. “Are the pictures all right?” she eventually asks, a little bit shyly. I say Four Seasons Hotel, Los Angeles, Bafta tea yes, they’re a bit better than all right. “Am I party. In the centre of a huge reception room is a smiling in some of them? I was worried I buffet table groaning under scones, cakes, even looked moody a lot of the time.” She pauses. Yorkshire pudding and roast beef. Through an “Although I was thinking if there was ever a open door floats the roar of the press covering time to pose, that was probably it.” And she the red carpet, which Cressida has just walked cackles with laughter down the phone. alone in another pretty Mulberry Bee dress, There would seem to be two Cressidas. The this time white. shy, sensitive Cressida who gets embarrassed If she’s nervous today, she doesn’t seem it as like the rest of us and walks around with a she greets me and we weave our way through “head full of worries”. This Cressida wouldn’t the crowd, passing Marion Cotillard, Felicity bust a showy shape on the dancefloor among Jones, Eddie Redmayne and every director and her friends. And then there is the stage producer you’ve ever – and never – heard of. Cressida who can do hundreds of dance One such producer stops us in our tracks to moves, all improvised, in front of strangers. the bar. “Will you take a look at Cressida!” he She’s aware of the contradiction: “I don’t really exclaims to me. “She’s got such presence! And understand it; in real life I’m often so shy – believe me, I know, because I know talent. Will paralysingly so – but when I’m performing, it’s you take a photo of her and me on my cell?” He totally different. I feel free.” throws me his iPhone, puts his arm around her shoulder and I take a couple of snaps. Chateau Marmont, Los Angeles, the launch of “That’s the best photo I’ve ever seen!” he Cressida’s film with Mulberry. On a big screen shouts as he takes back his phone. “Now, Cress, the actress hops, skips and pirouettes through a when are you going to audition for me? Can you derelict house on a carpet of grass. The credits come in tomorrow? Or what about the day after roll to big applause from the crowded room. The that?” Cressida looks at me, winks, then turns to actress is in the audience, looking like a modern him and throws back her head and laughs. Jean Shrimpton. She is every inch the polished Cressida Bonas, watch this space. Q Hollywood star, her skin tanned, hair glossy. She London. Everyone is freezing. Everyone, that is, except Cressida, who is wearing a Breton top and black leggings and dancing on a low wall at the edge of a pond to a Sixties beat rocking out of an amped-up iPhone. With limbs like elastic, she moves to the music, one elegant hand going here, another there. Her performance is captivating, as they so often are when the performer has “it” – whatever that indefinable star quality may be.

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Lace dress, £45, Miss Selfridge. Silver and mother-of-pearl earrings, £138, Butler & Wilson. Trainers, Cressida’s own. For stockists, all pages, see Go Shop Watch an all-singing, all-dancing Cressida perform in our exclusive film on Vogue.co.uk/miss-vogue

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LUCAN GILLESPIE, 16 Scouted by her model agency while out shopping with her mum, she shot her debut campaign soon afterwards, posing for JW Anderson. Have you ever let your best friends cut your hair? “No, never! But they’re allowed to plait and brush it”

Fashion’s new It girls bring you summer’s standout looks. Styled by Francesca Burns. Photographed by Oliver Hadlee Pearch

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KESEWA ABOAH, 20 The model and younger sister of Adwoa has moved from London to New York to study art. What’s your signature fashion piece? “My red and yellow My Crazy Scrunchies”

THE NEW-RETRO HEROINE: MATCH VINTAGE PIECES WITH CAREFREE HAIR. NOURISH LONG LOCKS WITH PUREOLOGY STRENGTH CURE FABULOUS LENGTHS, £16.50 Opposite: bra top, £95, Michael Michael Kors. Suede shorts, £205, Paul & Joe, at Harrods. Leather clogs, £560, Marques Almeida. Necklace, £10, Freedom, at Topshop. Bangles, Lucan’s own

THE VISIONARY: NEW-RAVE BEAUTY IS IN THE EYE OF THE BEHOLDER. BREAK THE MOULD WITH MINI BUNS AND ARTFUL MAKE-UP This page: cropped cotton top, £45, Cos. Necklace, £12.50, Freedom, at Topshop. Hair: Alex Brownsell. Make-up: Janeen Witherspoon. Nails: Ama Quashie

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MATILDA LOWTHER, 17 As busy as her fashionable cousins Adwoa and Kesewa Aboah, Matilda’s big break was opening the Burberry a/w ’14 show. In between modelling she studies at City & Guilds of London Art School Hair up or hair down? “Down always, apart from when I am painting”

THE FASHION BLUE-BLOOD: CONTRASTING SHADES PACK MORE PUNCH THAN A SINGLE COLOUR. APPLY BLEACH LONDON TOTAL BLEACH, £7, TO ONE SECTION This page: off-the-shoulder sweater, £270, Red Valentino. Silver cross, £10, H Samuel

THE GLOBAL GYPSY: WEAVING TOGETHER COLOUR AND STYLE, BLEACH LONDON’S IN-SALON HAIR TAPESTRIES ARE THE TOP FESTIVAL ’DO Opposite: cotton dress, from £320, Jeremy Scott, at Farfetch.com

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IMMY WATERHOUSE, 20 Suki’s little sister is making waves of her own in front of the camera, and recently shot for American Vogue. What do you steal from your sister? “Clothes. Unfortunately she has got a lot better at hiding them!”

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JESSICA BURLEY, 18 Discovered at the Notting Hill Carnival, within weeks she was walking for Burberry. Where do you want to be aged 21? “In Vegas, marrying Elvis”

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ELLA RICHARDS, 18 The model and granddaughter of Rolling Stone Keith starred in Tom Ford’s a/w ’14 campaign, though her go-to summer look is strictly low-key: think denim cut-offs and a bikini. Ever wished you were a brunette? “No! Blondes have more fun”

THE NEW ROMANTIC: A FACE-FRAMING BRAID UPDATES AN FKA TWIGS FRINGE. COMBINE WITH RIMMEL APOCALIPS MATTE LIP LACQUER IN BURNING LAVA, £6.50 Opposite: cotton dress, £540, Carven. Crystal earrings, £310, Prada. Hoop earrings, from £70 a pair, Pandora

THE ENGLISH ROSE: EMBRACE YOUR NATURAL ALLURE WITH FREE-FLOWING LOCKS AND A BEAUTIFULLY BARE FACE This page: cotton T-shirt, £95, Aries, at Matchesfashion.com

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LILI SUMNER, 20 The New Zealander’s wild beauty was perfect for Saint Laurent’s s/s’15 show of Seventies rock’n’roll muses. If your wardrobe had a soundtrack, what would it be? “The Boogie Nights soundtrack”

THE GLAM-ROCK INSIDER: IT’S OFFICIAL, XL CURLS HAVE RETURNED. PRACTISE YOUR TONGING TECHNIQUE AND MASTER PERFECT SPIRALS This page: bikini top, £14, American Apparel. Sequin shorts, £15, H&M. Earrings, £525 each, Loewe. Necklace, £185, Michael Michael Kors. Bracelets, Lili’s own

THE ROCK-STAR HEIRESS: MATCH A DECADENT SEVENTIES SILHOUETTE WITH SMOKY EYES AND TOUSLED LAYERS Opposite: belted playsuit, £205. Choker, £125. Both Tommy Hilfiger. Tights, £20, Fogal, at Selfridges. Bangle sets, from £8.50, Freedom, at Topshop

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ELLA RICHARDS What’s your dream road trip? “It’s got to be Route 66”

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LILI SUMNER When did you first bleach your hair? “I dyed it pinkish at 14. It has been getting blonder ever since”

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LUCAN AND JESSICA What’s your summer skin routine? “Sunscreen, lip balm and big sunglasses”

THE WILD CARD: CLASH A VINYL SKIRT WITH PRINTED TEE AND TWIST RIBBONS THROUGH REBELLIOUS HAIR. MAKE-UP RULES DON’T APPLY Opposite: cotton body, £280. Rubber miniskirt, £470, Over-the-knee socks, £110. All Meadham Kirchhoff, at Celestine Eleven

THE MODEL PRINCESSES: NOTHING COMPLEMENTS ETHEREAL SUMMER DRESSES BETTER THAN VIRGIN HAIR, ADORNED WITH A SIMPLE BOW This page: Lucan wears cotton dress, from a selection, Just Cavalli, at Harrods. Jessica wears silk dress, £505, Vanessa Bruno. For stockists, all pages, see Go Shop

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the silico slope Living in the Instagram age, we all feel the pressure to project the perfect image. But for some girls, this has led them into the world of Botox and fillers... Lottie Winter investigates. Photograph by Jenny van Sommers

t’s Saturday night and 18-year-old Anna and her friends are getting ready to go to a party. Taylor Swift’s “Blank Space” is pumping in the background and the straighteners are heating up. “Has anyone seen my eyelash curlers?” she says, tipping the contents of her make-up bag onto the floor. The girls aren’t allowed to wear make-up at school, so they really go for it at weekends, but whereas Anna’s beauty routine begins and ends with mascara, bronzer and lipgloss, she is part of a dying breed. For an increasing number of young women, cosmetics are no longer enough and, worryingly, Botox, dermal fillers and laser treatments are fast becoming the norm. In the same way that celebrity endorsement will shift clothes (Sub Urban Riot instantly sold

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out of their Kale sweatshirt when Beyoncé wore it in her “7/11” video), so famous faces showcasing newly puffed-out cheeks and pillowy lips are prompting thousands to follow suit. And whether you’re one of Kim Kardashian’s 25 million Instagram followers or an avid reader of the Mail Online’s showbiz sidebar, we are relentlessly updated on every tweak and transformation that happens in celebrityland, whether the celebs themselves have admitted to anything or not. “I follow Kylie Jenner on Instagram, Twitter and Vine. I love everything about her – her blue, dip-dyed hair, edgy sense of style, everything!” says Frankie, 17, from Cambridge. Jenner has garnered attention in the past few months for her ever-expanding lips, sparking worldwide debate over whether she had a helping hand in the form of lip fillers. “All I know for sure is that >


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really took any notice until I started watching she looks amazing,” says Frankie. “I’d never really TOWIE. Seeing all those girls get full lips like it thought about enhancing my lips but Kylie looks was no big deal, I decided to book a consultation so much better now than she did a few years ago, for lip fillers.” Since getting her lips done four I’ve started toying with the idea myself.” years ago, Lucy, now 25, has had three top-ups But a celebrity-obsessed culture is only half the and considers regular appointments part of story. Our self-worth is increasingly influenced her beauty routine, like pedicures or bi-weekly by social media, to the extent that we are more eyebrow waxes. “If someone thinks they need it, concerned about how we look in photos than why not?” she says. “The key thing is safety and in real life. It’s not difficult to understand why trusting your practitioner.” – we encounter in person a handful of people per While the law says you must be a qualified day, whereas there are no limits to the number surgeon to perform invasive surgery (such as of online admirers (and critics) viewing our facelifts and nose jobs), selfies. Plus, once you’ve non-surgical procedures posted something, it stays (such as injections, laser there, so it can feel even more treatments, fillers and peels) essential to make a lasting, WITH NON-INVASIVE and flattering, impression. ALTERNATIVES, THERE’S NO NEED are a totally different story. The Department of Health’s Head to the App Store FOR NEEDLES and there’s a whole arsenal Aveda’s Botanical Skin Resurfacing Treatment Review of the Regulation of Cosmetic Interventions flags of Photoshop-like apps, is nature’s answer to microdermabrasion, allowing you to manipulate that is, all the radiance and smoothness with that there are no restrictions none of the irritation or redness. over who may perform these a selfie into a “before-and£56 FOR 30MINS, AVEDAINSTITUTE.CO.UK procedures, no accredited after” format. The apps are You can achieve miracles with make-up: training courses and no legal free, quick and painless, and it sculpted cheekbones, full lips and radiant skin becomes all too easy to forget in an instant. Let the pros at Mac teach you responsibility for suppliers to produce safe products (fillers that real-life procedures aren’t some tricks in a one-to-one lesson. MAKE-UP IN 60, £30 REDEEMABLE AGAINST PRODUCT, and implants are exempt from quite so straightforward. ONLY AT MAC PRO STORES the EU General Product Reality TV shows further Head over to the European Dermatology Safety Directive). “What desensitise us to the serious where dermatologists offer medical people have to understand is nature of these procedures, Centre treatments for every condition. Whether going so far as to reposition there’s a specific concern or you just want a that some of these substances, them as entertainment general skincare MOT, you’ll be in safe hands. including things like fillers, MEDICAL CONSULTATION, £299, EUROPEAN have not been through proper (remember TOWIE’s Botox DERMATOLOGY, LONDON W1 medical-regulation processes party, or the Real Housewives Get mapped at the Dermalogica Skin Bar and may consequently have of New Jersey/Orange County/ for targeted analysis of your skin’s health. had less rigorous assessments wherever who are always Therapists pinpoint problem areas and popping off for a little prescribe an effective, tailored treatment plan. than an electric toothbrush,” COMPLIMENTARY FACE MAPPING, DERMALOGICA says Sir Bruce Keogh, NHS “freshening up”?). Several CONCEPT SPACES, NATIONWIDE medical director. “That cast members on TOWIE, anybody with little or no training can inject which averages more than a million viewers chemicals into another person, which if not done per episode, have contracts with cosmetic properly can cause serious damage, is shocking.” clinics to endorse their services on Instagram We sent Abby, a fresh-faced 20-year-old, for and Twitter, effectively turning themselves into a consultation to see just how unscrupulous advertisements. In fact, so influential is TOWIE the industry can be. Her first port of call was that the show has been cited 16 times in the Harley Street, the cosmetic-procedure hub of Department of Health’s research as an example London and the location for many high-profile of how reality TV is swaying teenage attitudes transformations. To our relief, Abby was turned towards non-surgical cosmetic procedures. away from every door – maybe the industry isn’t Lucy Smith, a young entrepreneur, is an quite so shady after all? However, Abby’s next example: “I’ve always had thin lips but never

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stop, at a high-street beauty salon in east London, revealed what we had feared. Abby was shocked to find that they not only recommended Botox for her jawline (“to add definition”) and forehead (“to get rid of wrinkles”), but also dermal fillers in her cheeks and chin – a prescription that would set her back £1,200. “I know I’m not perfect, but sitting there while someone deconstructed my face and then quoted me a four-figure price tag for ‘fixing it’ made me feel awful. It was also humiliating.” Preying on our insecurities is one of the cosmetics industry’s favourite marketing ploys and often breeds worry where there was none beforehand. Psychologist Dr Michael Lewis agrees. “Teenage years can be particularly stressful and there has been a proliferation of cosmetictreatment messages aimed at young people. They think that if they change their appearance then they will be happy, but recent studies have shown this isn’t the case and it doesn’t tackle the underlying problem.” Two-for-one deals, last-minute discounts and free follow-up procedures are another way the industry targets younger consumers, encouraging an instant commitment from those who don’t have lots of cash. According to the General Medical Council’s Good Medical Practice Guide, patients should be given a two-stage consent process or a seven-day cooling-off period, to ensure they are giving fully informed consent. “Unfortunately, it’s often the unqualified practitioners who resort to cheap deals,” says Harley Street surgeon Dr Marko Lens. “This means it’s becoming a very dodgy industry indeed.”

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ver in LA, aesthetics capital of the world, many surgeons think of themselves as businessmen as much as aesthetic practitioners. When asked whether he agreed with a culture in which teenagers are getting Botox, Beverly Hills surgeon Dr Randal Haworth said, “I don’t agree with it, but it certainly helps my pocket book.” He went on to explain that he didn’t like the way the world was going, but giving Botox to a young person wasn’t bad and could make them look better and he wasn’t going to change society by refusing to administer the treatment to a 21-year-old, adding, “the world’s

happening and we all have to make a living”. But if all doctors take this defeatist view, where does it leave vulnerable young women? Ethical concerns aside, will Botox actually do anything for someone who doesn’t have wrinkles? “Theoretically speaking, if you avoid frowning, you will avoid wrinkles, which I think is where this idea of ‘preventative Botox’ has come from,” says Dr Lens. (Botox temporarily “freezes” your muscles, rendering you unable to move them until the treatment has worn off – usually a few months later). “Administering Botox to someone who doesn’t have wrinkles makes them look really quite weird. It’s the same with lip fillers. Underqualified administrators don’t have the experience to produce the results patients have asked for, often condemning them to months of frozen faces and supersized lips.” In addition, explains Dr Lens, we have no idea of the long-term effects of starting some of these procedures so young, describing how long-term use of Botox could cause muscular dystrophy, where the muscle becomes so lazy, it ends up becoming more prone to ageing. While the undesirable aesthetic outcomes are off-putting enough, there’s another distressing side. Mr Simon Withey, esteemed plastic and reconstructive surgeon, a week before this interview, had spent three hours in surgery painstakingly removing permanent fillers from a young, female patient’s face. Since having them put in five years ago, she had experienced constant and relentless infections. “Fillers are like grains of sugar – they integrate into the tissue. Once you’ve injected a couple of thousand grains the only way to remove them is to take the tissue out, too. We had to remove hers right down to the muscle.” The removal has left 10cm of scars across her cheeks. “I went for the procedure to improve the way I look and my confidence. When it all went wrong it was devastating,” says the patient of her ordeal. “I had so many lumps of scar tissue around my mouth that I looked deformed. I hated leaving the house and became paranoid that people were staring. The worst part is that I didn’t have to get it done at all. Looking back, I must have been mad.” We’ve all listened to Beyoncé’s “Pretty Hurts” and sung along in solidarity, but we didn’t know that it could hurt quite this much… Q 87


Describe your style. Very kawaii (cute), but with fashion twists. It’s important to be different from other kawaii girls and stand out with my own style. What are you wearing today? My top is from Alexander Wang, a skirt from Lil Lilly, a Mickey Mouse-style hat from Onespo, and my bag and choker are vintage Chanel. Five favourite brands in your wardrobe? Chanel, Nike, Bubbles (a Japanese label based in Harajuku), Joyrich, Fig & Viper.

What was your most extravagant buy? A Chanel bag, which was about ¥300,000 (£1,700). It was a present for myself when I graduated from school. Do Tokyo girls love fashion more than anyone else? Of course, yes! Young girls like to create their own original style through fun pop items. You can find fashion at reasonable prices in areas such as Shibuya and Harajuku, so it’s always fun just to walk around. I’m happy to live in Japan!

Hair and make-up: Yuya Nara at Shima. Production: Risa Yamaguchi. Styling: Junsuke Yamasaki Natsuumy reveals her Tokyo haunts in our exclusive film on Vogue.co.uk/miss-vogue

Έ NATSUUMY, 22 Singer and model

wild style Bubblegum-pink pants and brothel creepers; or a Chanel and Mickey Mouse fashion mash-up… Only in Tokyo, where street style is almost a religion. Miss Vogue meets the girls who use the precincts as their catwalk, while Susie Lau reports on the city’s rainbow tribes. Photographs by Daisuke Hamada

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দጤϞφ MONA MATSUOKA, 17 Model

Describe your style. I’m a skinnyjeans girl, with retro T-shirts, tight turtlenecks, oversized sweaters and crazy chokers. Style pin-ups? Rihanna and Drew Barrymore. What are you wearing today? A vintage coat and top with a Moschino bikini.

Five favourite brands in your wardrobe? Kenzo, Acne, Opening Ceremony, American Apparel, Alexander Wang. What was your most extravagant buy? My Louis Vuitton studded boots. I’m a big shopper, but my mum takes care of my money – she keeps control. Where do you go out? I love karaoke.

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㊆Ն IRUKA, 21 Model

Current fashion mood? A little bit mannish, with a vintage cowboy feel. What was your most extravagant buy? A fur-lined military coat, which cost about £3,000. How do you shop? By myself, so I can focus. I like random finds… What fashion items do you obsess over? Biker jackets – I have 15 – and shoes, too many to count. My favourites right now are my Alexander Wang for H&M spike-heeled boots.

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Favourite brands in your wardrobe? I buy a lot of vintage, from Tokyo stores Pink Cake, Long Beach and Birthdeath. They have really good vintage stores here in Harajuku. I also like Opening Ceremony, Monki and H&M. How would you describe Tokyo style? The majority of girls here still like the kawaii look – dollish with long eyelashes, socks and little heels. Favourite Tokyo night out? An evening at Club Origami, a bar and dancehall.


Describe your current look. Seventies Western-girl style. I buy a lot of vintage. What are you wearing today? A top by Julien David with a Charles Anastase skirt over Toga jeans, with Stella McCartney shoes. Five favourite brands in your wardrobe? Olympia Le-Tan, Toga, Pearl, Prada, Taro Horiuchi.

What was your most extravagant buy? Shoes from Prada, s/s ’14. Current favourite handbag? A roulettewheel-shaped clutch by Olympia Le-Tan. Which fashion girls do you follow on Instagram? Fashion icons of the Fifties and Sixties. Where do you go out? To shops and cafes in Harajuku and Omotesando.

‵ⅷ㝠㉖ MINA KAYAMA, 24

Assistant manager at fashion boutique Sister

DAISUKE HAMADA

⊐ㄴѮ

AOI SHIBATA 20 Assistant at fashion boutique Candy Describe your current look. London-girl style. What are you wearing today? A Y-3 coat, a dress from Antipodium, and shoes by Underground. What was your most extravagant buy? A biker jacket from Blackmeans – a very cool Tokyo leather design collective, stocked by Opening Ceremony. Five favourite brands in your wardrobe? Antipodium, Blackmeans, Alexander Wang, House of Holland, Sam MC London. Where do you go out socially? I visit Shibuya, the famous shopping district, almost every day. Which fashion girls do you follow on Instagram? My friends, who all work at fashion stores in Harajuku. 91


Describe your current style. I mix skinny, ripped black jeans with a white T-shirt and creepers. What are you wearing today? My Hysteric Glamour bomber jacket with American Apparel torn jeans. Five favourite brands? Toga, American Apparel, Facetasm, Sly, Prada. What was your most extravagant buy? A backpack from Prada. Current handbag? It’s Chanel. What’s on your playlist? Michael Jackson, the Four Seasons, the Rolling Stones and 2NE1. How would you describe Tokyo style? Tokyo fashion is fun and girls dress themselves in their own way, which is great to look at. However, it would be better if people wore newer brands, especially from Japan. Personally, I like this Japanese brand called Facetasm.

ΤϚ EMMA, 20 model

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DAISUKE HAMADA


Devoured by girls from the age of 10, popular hen I think of local style magazines such as Cutie, So-En and Japanese street style Ginza provide exhaustive how-to articles, DIY the seminal Nineties projects and shopping manuals. As a result, Tokyo magazine Fruits is the only city where a fashion lover will ID your comes to mind, outfit piece by piece, right there on the spot, no with its images matter how obscure the brand. In stores, you’ll of zany Tokyo find endless books on Charlotte Gainsbourg tribes, captured by photographer Shoichi Aoki. or Alexa Chung, snapped up by girls eager to These ranged from the Gothic Lolita (an emulate their style. And the myriad shopping OTT take on Victorian/Edwardian style) to choices make it impossible Fairy Kei (a group obsessed to be homogeneous. with all things pastel and Boutique culture is strong My Little Pony-esque). In in Japan, especially in Tokyo, although many of Tokyo, and every taste is these original style gangs catered for, no matter how still remain, they have obscure or underground. also evolved. Now, the Japanese designers also array of fashion cultures is love to latch on to Western further distinguished by subcultures. A good example the different districts in the of this is the Tokyo-based city – you have your kawaii leather label Blackmeans. Shibuya tribe, the zany It’s a collective that makes Harajuku girls, the posh extraordinary leather pieces Ginza girls and the indie inspired by English punk, Shimokitazawa kids. but its designers also mix Visit Japan and you in other cultures, making immediately see that Blackmeans a local icon for Japanese girls take their a very Japanese strand of fashion very seriously. They punk. It’s the fervour and also revel in amping up enthusiasm they bring that the commonplace to the makes it convincing. extreme. They possess a Tokyo’s vintage scene is sprawling, imaginative and a treasure trove of ideas for wonderfully idiosyncratic girls to raid. Vintage isn’t approach to style. Even one lumped-together genre. as the West encroaches, It has its own very specific with brands such as H&M BRITISH FASHION categories. Go to Grimoire, and Topshop expanding BLOGGER SUSIE LAU a themed vintage store in in Japan, and street-style – AKA SUSIE BUBBLE – should you wish fans increasingly looking to REPORTS FROM TOKYO Shibuya, to look like a Bavarian Rihanna and Rita Ora for milkmaid – or, as they call it in Japanese, mori girl inspiration, individuality still reigns supreme. (forest fairy). Try Jeanne Valet in Daikanyama if For Tokyo’s sartorialists, it’s definitely not you want to channel an Oliver Twist street urchin about blending in with the crowd. International in Victorian workwear. Spank!, a store in the trends may feed in to their ideas but they always trendy Koenji, has you covered if you want Care add their own spin. Tokyo is a style cauldron Bear sweaters and pastel tutus. brimming with imagination, where genres and Tokyo is a city where anything goes, where themes familiar to our Western eyes become rules are there to be broken, and where fashion is something else entirely when filtered through its adored. I can’t wait to return. Q obsessive love of fashion.

GETTY

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Haileyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Smash-hit model? Check. Besties with Kendall and Gigi? Check. Member of a Hollywood dynasty? Check. Hailey Baldwin is burning bright

Comet

Styled by Francesca Burns. Photographed by Letty Schmiterlow

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THE BODY-CON RETURNS: ONE SIMPLE RULE? SAVE GILDED DETAIL FOR THE REAR VIEW Black jersey minidress, from £458, Versus. Hair: Alex Brownsell. Make-up: Nami Yoshida. Nails: Ama Quashie

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PARE YOUR LOOK DOWN TO THE BARE MINIMUM – A SIMPLE DRESS SHINES BRIGHTEST WITHOUT ANY ADORNMENT Slip dress, £15, Asos.com

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THE HOLE STORY: GRAPHIC CUT-OUTS BRING BODY-CON BANG UP TO DATE Black jersey dress, £30, Topshop

LETTY SCHMITERLOW

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THE BOLD BLACK BANDEAU IS A WARDROBE STAPLE. WEAR WITH A HIGH WAISTBAND TO REVEAL AN ELEGANT SLICE OF FLESH Jersey bandeau top, £88, Neil Barrett. Zip-front skirt, £40, Zara

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THE LBD GETS A PUNK TWIST WHEN STAMPED WITH SHINY HARDWARE Cady minidress, from a selection, Mugler, at Matchesfashion.com

What does the heir to a Hollywood acting dynasty throw on when she’s running late for the plane to her next modelling gig (and she still hasn’t unpacked from the last one)? “I’m a Saint Laurent girl,” drawls the 18-year-old, “blurred with Nineties Calvin Klein.” Rather than hip-hop or pal Justin Bieber, it’s “anything by the Hillsong United band,” her local church’s gospel group, that soundtracks life in her native New York, with best friends Kendall Jenner and Gigi Hadid in tow. “I’m definitely the joker,” smiles Hailey. “They are more like the moms!”

LETTY SCHMITERLOW

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A HIGH NECK MAKES THAT SUPER-SHORT HEMLINE DAYTIME APPROPRIATE. WHAT WOULD HAILEY ADD? BOX-FRESH AIR FORCE ONES Black stretch minidress, £65, Cos

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LETTY SCHMITERLOW


SHOW OFF YOUR NATURAL GLOW WHILE MASTERING A PORCELAIN FINISH WITH MAYBELLINE DREAM FLAWLESS NUDE FOUNDATION, £9 Jersey tube dress, £40, All Saints. For stockists, all pages, see Go Shop

When it comes to food, Hailey doesn’t deny herself anything. Her speciality is quinoa pasta with spicy sausage, olive oil and Parmesan cheese. “I’m all about keeping fit,” she says, adjusting an All Saints body-con dress. “I love boxing. I do three sessions a week plus Pilates.” It shows – her slim build is athletic and she moves with the poise of a ballerina. (Hailey did 15 years of ballet training.) Her vibe is all-natural, right down to that plump pout: “Beauty is all about keeping it simple: I apply Eucerin Aquaphor lip repair all the time.” JH

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it

THE

BRIT

Fiery singer Charli XCX talks power women, pizza and pink rinses, and how to be taken seriously in a man’s world. By Nell Frizzell. Photographs by Rory Payne harli XCX is the kind of girl you want to go to a diner with and order a milkshake, compare eyebrows and talk about bad dates. While her soaring, addictive hooks have made her one of the most sought-after writers and performers in pop, face to face she’s still like a character from a cult Nineties teen movie. From her cool, downbeat way of talking to her love of “Candy Crush” fashion, she’s an amalgamation of Cher Horowitz from Clueless, Corey Mason from Empire Records and Nancy Downs from The Craft. And at just 22, she’s breaking through from cult darling to mainstream hit maker. We meet in east London. Charli has just come off a flight from Los Angeles, where hype for her new album is in overdrive. Born in 1992, she can barely remember the Nineties, and yet her red-lipped, Lycra-clad look, brilliant dance-pop hits and love of trash glamour have attracted comparisons with Gwen Stefani and Björk. Fans love her sassy live performances – with a powerful voice and wild hair, she’s sexy without playing dumb or acting the little girl. “I think that when you’re female you have this awesome power that men will never understand,” says Charli, her voice low and rich. “Depending

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on your age and what sort of person you are, you can harness it in different ways. Sometimes I feel like such a kid, although I’m on this power woman thing right now.” Growing up in Hertfordshire, Charli began posting her songs to MySpace, catching the eye of east London promoter Chaz Cool. And so she entered the music industry, playing warehouse raves before she’d even left school. “My mum and my dad would come,” laughs Charli. “They’d have a little parent bop at the back but they never really went for it. I quite like the idea of getting old; pottering around and having a pink rinse.” The pink rinse is still a long way off, but that rebellious attitude is clear in her stagecraft, lyrics and ambition. “I was always drawn to artists who had that raw, wild edge,” says Charli, who is now signed to Atlantic alongside Missy Elliott, Icona Pop and Santigold. “But as I got older and began making music myself I did start to get angry at the way I was being treated. I was 16 and the men at record labels never took me seriously. It’s never been much of a problem from producers and songwriters; it’s always been the suits. Of course, there have been instances in the studio when I felt like I wasn’t being taken seriously, because I’m young or because I’m a girl.” She may be a power woman but, admits Charli, she has the diet of a pizza-delivery boy. “I love >


“WHEN YOU’RE FEMALE, YOU HAVE THIS AWESOME POWER THAT MEN WILL NEVER UNDERSTAND” Gingham sweatshirt, £280, Marc by Marc Jacobs. Suede miniskirt, £65, Miss Selfridge. Sunglasses, £158, Miu Miu, at Sunglasses Shop. Hair: Nao Kawakami. Make-up: Jenny Coombs. Nails: Lyndsay McIntosh. Fashion editor: Verity Parker

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fried chicken,” she says. “In America I eat fried chicken once a week. I’m not a salads kind of girl. My comfort food is pizza in bed.” How does she stay in shape with that kind of diet? “I don’t go to the gym, I don’t run, I don’t work out – I fucking hate it. I’ve just always been this shape.” As well as eating what she wants and eschewing exercise, Charli is also chilled about her beauty regime. “I’ve never plucked my eyebrows. My mother never taught me anything. The first time I shaved my legs I pressed the razor in so hard that I started bleeding, and the first time I did a home wax on my bikini line, it was a nightmare. I had no idea what I was doing.” Instead, work is Charli’s main focus: writing pop hits and performing with vocalists like Iggy Azalea and Rita Ora. At the time of going to press, she’d been nominated for two Grammys and a Brit, was about to support Katy Perry

across Europe and had performed all over US television. Next up, her British tour. No wonder plucking her eyebrows isn’t top priority. Besides fried chicken, Charli loves the fastfood-inspired fashion of modern Moschino. “I’m super-obsessed with Moschino having Jeremy Scott designing,” she says. “He’s amazing in such a wild, almost punk, way.” But, she admits, fashion has always come second to personal style. “Nineties Mariah Carey is a fashion icon. Or Drew Barrymore when she had a short crop and daisies in her hair. She’s kind of my girl crush, although I hate that term.” And like most girls in the Nineties, Charli was obsessed with Britney Spears and the Spice Girls: “Baby Spice was my favourite. I wanted to dye my hair blonde and in my mind she was my best friend.” Charli has a new album, Sucker, to tour. But although life on the road can be a party, it’s important to keep people who really know you close by. “On my last tour I took my childhood best friend,” says Charli. “And I hired another of my best friends as my assistant. I enjoy touring. I’m the opposite of a diva.” What, she could sleep in a bin? “As long as I’ve had some champagne then probably, yeah.” The songs on Sucker, especially “Caught in the Middle”, seem more autobiographical. But don’t think this is a reveal-all album: “I talk about feelings, rather than specific narratives. ‘Boom Clap’ is more about the feeling of falling in love rather than any actual relationships. I’ve fallen in love maybe 10 times. I’m not a believer in one person; I believe in multiple people.” As Charli slips into a brilliant orange jumper, it’s clear that her relaxed attitude is genuine. “I think I’ve learned over the last year how to chill out,” she says. “Once you’ve achieved a few of your goals you feel like you deserve a break. Although I feel like I’m never going to be satisfied.” Let’s hope not. Q “Sucker” is out now. Charli’s British tour begins on March 24


“I’M NOT A SALADS KIND OF GIRL. MY COMFORT FOOD IS PIZZA IN BED” Opposite, inset: suede jacket, £455, American Retro. Cotton/silk top, £210, Carven. Denim jeans, £40, Topshop. Leather belt, £39, & Other Stories. This page: cashmere sweater, £395, ESK. Denim jeans, £150, Etre Cécile. For stockists, all pages, see Go Shop Check out the film of Charli taking on our challenges. Visit Vogue.co.uk/miss-vogue

“I’VE FALLEN IN LOVE MAYBE 10 TIMES. I’M NOT A BELIEVER IN ONE PERSON...” RORY PAYNE

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The Entrepreneur DANIELLE COPPERMAN

FAVOURITE DISH BAKED SALMON WITH HOMEMADE GUACAMOLE

FAVOURITE INGREDIENT TAHINI

fresh

faces

From feeding top models to rustling up snickerdoodles and s’mores – these young foodies are cooking up a storm. By Louisa McGillicuddy. Photographs by Piczo haring a flat with Sam Rollinson and Charlotte Wiggins – and whoever’s crashing for the night – Danielle Copperman is the model you’ll find up all night banging about in the kitchen. The girls’ Stoke Newington home is overtaken by Tupperware, sticky labels and chia seeds – all for the 22-year-old’s QNola range, a grain-free alternative to granola seen across fashion Instagrams everywhere. What started as a random post on her Tumblr, Model Mange Tout, spiralled into a fully

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fledged business that’s now stocked in Selfridges and St Pancras’s Sourced market. “The point of my blog is to prove that cooking from scratch isn’t complicated,” she says. “I’m inspired by the simple foods that have been part of our diet for centuries.” That means organic ingredients, well-sourced dairy and skipping baking ready-mixes. It all began with modelling gigs: “I started bringing in homemade raw chocolates and parsnip crisps for the girls – now I’m getting booked for the job and the catering.”


ot everyone can say their first job was spent cooking for Kate Moss. But for April Partridge, hopping on the night bus every weekend to peel onions at celebrity hotspot The Ivy was the norm. After proving her chops, quite literally, on work experience (“I think I got through about 100kg of veg…”), she stayed on to become its chef de partie, mixing sauces and plating up starters. “I never wear make-up in the kitchen,” she admits. “The atmosphere is very laddy, but girls help to balance out the testosterone. I’m quite emotional; I’m not ashamed to say there have been some tears!” She’s lost a few fingernails and burnt herself more times than she can count, but tells it with a chipper grin – last year the 21-year-old won the Observer Food Monthly’s coveted young chef award. “I love elevating humble ingredients to the best of their ability,” she explains, guiding the Vogue team through the aisles of her suppliers’ chilly warehouse. “Whether it’s homely comfort food or high-end restaurant-quality dishes, I just want a party on my palate.” Now she’s jumping between stints at restaurants like the Ledbury in Notting Hill and dreaming up plans for TV, learning from mentors and friends like Nigella (an “absolute darlin’”). “I want to encourage people my age to get more involved with cooking and show that it’s something everyone can do.” >

HAIR AND MAKE-UP: LICA FENSOME. SITTINGS EDITOR: NURA KHAN. DANIELLE WEARS TOP, AMERICAN RETRO. SKIRT, RIVER ISLAND. APRIL WEARS JACKET, KAREN MILLEN. TOP, JOIE. JEANS, TOPSHOP. SNEAKERS, CONVERSE. THANKS TO THE HABERDASHERY, NI6, AND MASH (MASHPURVEYORS.COM)

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FAVOURITE DISH ROAST LAMB WITH ALL THE TRIMMINGS

FAVOURITE INGREDIENT KAFFIR LIME

The Chef APRIL PARTRIDGE

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FAVOURITE DISH CHOCOLATE-CHIP COOKIES WITH BASIL-INFUSED BROWNED BUTTER

FAVOURITE INGREDIENT MAPLE SYRUP

The Baker IZY HOSSACK

ou won’t find mentions of antioxidants, detoxes or superfoods anywhere on Izy Hossack’s blog. Growing up in the kitchen of an ItalianAmerican mother, this girl is serious about pudding. The results of her adventures with her well-thumbed family cookbook include snickerdoodles, s’mores and “cakies” (half cookie, half cake). She’s been writing up her experiments in mouthwatering detail on Topwithcinnamon.com since she was 15, which now boasts 300,000 visitors a month. Friends and teachers are among her tasters – kept very happy during the testing for her cookbook, shot in her south London home last year. “Something I’ve learned is the need for balance,” the 19-year-old student says. “I tend to eat as healthily as possible for savoury food, then I’ll go to town on something I’ve baked.” Her most popular posts are at opposites ends of the spectrum, too: healthy dishes like courgette spaghetti for mains, but peanut-butter triple-chocolate caramel-popcorn cake for dessert. Now she’s creating recipes for Jamieoliver.com and will take her Sabatier knives to the University of Leeds in the autumn to start a food science degree. She’s already plotting her spin on the student cookbook: “something with easy, cheap and nutritious meals but a pleasing layout – too many look outdated.”

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FAVOURITE DISH THAI COCONUT CURRY

FAVOURITE INGREDIENT TURMERIC


The Guru ELLA WOODWARD

y earliest memory of cooking is with my sisters. We used to love melting chocolate, Rice Krispies and marshmallows into a goo in the microwave,” laughs 22-yearold Ella Woodward. It’s hard to imagine the girl behind Deliciouslyella.com, one of the most exemplary healthy-eating sites around, mucking in to such a riotous scene. But after being diagnosed with a heart condition during university, she embarked upon a drastic gluten-free, dairyfree, refined-sugar-free lifestyle, and has been sharing nutritious twists on her favourite recipes ever since. Focusing on whole, plant-based foods, her cleaneating app has had 70,000 downloads, and her debut book went straight to number one on Amazon’s pre-orders charts, too. “I’ve worked hard to create a brand and I try to stay true to that,” she explains from her Fulham apartment, where she runs the site with a full-time assistant (more than 1,000 people applied when she recently advertised for an intern). “There is a danger that the interest in healthy food can become faddy and obsessive,” she accepts, “Instagram can definitely make you feel guilty about not having a green juice. You’ve got to step away from the computer screen and be realistic about what you want to achieve.” Q

IZY WEARS SWEATER, TOPSHOP. ELLA WEARS TOP, PETIT BATEAU. SKIRT, KAREN MILLEN. SNEAKERS, NEW BALANCE

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GO SHOP

A & Other Stories Stories.com Adidas by Stella McCartney 0870 240 4204 Allsaints.com Americanapparel.net Americanretro.fr Aspinaloflondon.com B Boden 0844 873 0000 Brownsfashion.com Butler & Wilson 020 7409 2955 110

C Calvinklein.com Carven 020 7225 7110 Celestine Eleven 020 7729 2987 Céline 020 7491 8200 Chanel 020 7493 5040 Claire’s 0121 682 8000 Cosstores.com D Debenhams.com Dior (sunglasses) 00800 7234 5600 DKNY 020 7499 6238

Dover Street Market 020 7518 0680 E Emporio Armani 020 7823 8818 Eskcashmere.com Etrececile.com Eytys.com F Fendi 020 7838 6288 G Gillian Horsup 020 7499 8121 H H&M 0344 736 9000 Harrods 020 7730 1234 Harvey Nichols 020 7535 5000 Houseoffraser.co.uk Hsamuel.co.uk J Jessie Western 020 7229 2544 K KG Kurt Geiger 020 7781 7480 Korokimono.com L Loewe 020 7499 0266 M Marc by Marc Jacobs 020 7408 7050 Marquesalmeida.com Michael Michael Kors 020 7659 3550 Missselfridge.com Miu Miu 020 7409 0900 Mulberry 020 7491 3900

N Neilbarrett.com Newlook.com P Pandora.net Prada 020 7647 5000 Primark 0118 960 6300 R Redvalentino.com River Island 0844 576 6444 Rockins.co.uk Russell & Bromley 020 7629 6903 S Sandro 020 7486 9176 Selfridges 0800 123 400 Shrimps.co.uk Stormwatches.com Sunglasses-shop.co.uk Supreme 020 7437 0493 T Teva.co.uk Thomassabo.com Tommy Hilfiger 020 3144 0900 Topshop.com U Urbanoutfitters.co.uk V Vanessa Bruno 020 7499 7838 Versus 020 7259 5700 W Wildfoxcouture.co.uk Z Zara.com

OLIVER HADLEE PEARCH

Prices and availability were checked at the time of going to press, but we cannot guarantee that prices will not change or that specific items will be in stock when the magazine is published. We suggest that before visiting a shop you telephone to make sure they have your size. Where unspecified, stockists are in London; alternatively, websites or general enquiry numbers are given.


October 17, 2015 London For more information and to book your ticket now: wired.co.uk/nextgen wiredevents #wiredNG

A one-day event to inspire young minds. WIRED Next Generation is curated for 12-18 year olds and fuses music, performance, talks and workshops. H E A L T H

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MISS VOGUE flashback

JESSIE WESTERN TURQUOISE AND SILVER CUFF, £149

BOOHOO.COM FAUX-SUEDE WAISTCOAT, £25

Cool as folk: echo Stevie’s whimsical look in tasselled silk kimonos, earthy suede, boho jewellery and love-worn denim. NEW LOOK COIN BELT, £13

STEVIE (FAR LEFT) AND HER FLEETWOOD MAC BANDMATES

Gypsy queen RUSSELL & BROMLEY LEATHER SANDALS, £125

Dip into the dreamy, free-spirited style of Seventies songbird Stevie Nicks. By Naomi Smart Nothing beats the classic sound of old-school vinyl. Set the scene for summer, spinning Fleetwood Mac on your portable player.

CROSLEY TURNTABLE, £160, AT URBAN OUTFITTERS

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MISS SELFRIDGE KIMONO, £65

DL1961 JEANS, £180, AT HARRODS

ASOS.COM COTTON DRESS, £65

MATTHEW WILLIAMSON FOR DEBENHAMS LEATHER BAG, £85

SUDHIR PITHWA; GETTY

RAY-BAN SUNGLASSES, £188, AT HOUSE OF FRASER



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