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insideVOGUE MARCH 2016

“The only way to wear Alexander Wang’s souped-up track pants and bomber is with lashings of attitude” CAMPBELL’S COUP, PAGE 296

Regulars 78 EDITOR’S LETTER 92 VOGUE NOTICES Behind the scenes of the issue 107 VOGUE.CO.UK What’s online this month 287 CHECKLIST Spring colour comes into bud 397 STOCKISTS BACK PAGE MIND’S EYE JW Anderson’s inspirations

In Vogue 143 WHAT’S NEW The people, places, ideas and trends to watch now

WHAT TO BUY NOW Page 211

157 COVER STORY DRESS UP, DRESS DOWN Now that casual dressing has gone luxe, shouldn’t dress codes catch up? Fiona Golfar dissects a new dilemma 171 RICH MIX Spring’s elaborate aesthetic is creating a new generation of heirloom buys 181 COVER STORY TALES OF THE UNEXPECTED Magical combinations to win you street-style fashion points

COVER LOOK Edie Campbell wears sequined chiffon crepon dress, £3,020, Gucci. Get the look: make-up by Yves Saint Laurent Beauté. Skin: YSL Le Teint Touche Eclat Foundation, Blush Volupté in Parisienne. Eyes: YSL Luxurious Mascara for False Lash Effect, YSL Waterproof Eye Pencil. Lips: YSL Rouge Volupté in Lingerie Pink. Nails: YSL La Laque Couture in Rose Romantique. Hair by Label.M: Label.M Pliable Definer. Hair: Christiaan. Make-up: Val Garland. Nails: Lorraine Griffin. Production: 10-4 Inc. Set design: Jack Flanagan. Digital artwork: R&D. Fashion editor: Lucinda Chambers. Photographer: Mario Testino

191 VIEWPOINT GOLDEN STATE OF MIND Calgary Avansino on how her “kooky” Californian ways became the norm 201 VIEWPOINT BLASTS FROM THE PAST Novelist Laura Barnett describes living with a “curious” – and life-altering – inheritance

238 VENUS RISING On the eve of a new exhibition, David LaChapelle charts Botticelli’s genius 245 DARKNESS FALLS Novelist Gillian Flynn tells Marisa Meltzer what comes after Gone Girl

Spy

Vogue Shops

255 FLATS SEASON Put a (practical) spring in your step

211 WHAT TO BUY NOW Cropped or slouchy, this season’s denim makes everyday dressing easy breezy

265 COVER STORY HIGH FIVE: THE NEW SEASON TRENDS From sleek sports to Latina colour, introducing the looks you’ll invest in

View 231 BOY DONE GOOD Actor Jack O’Connell talks to Louisa McGillicuddy about taking tips from Jodie Foster and Angelina Jolie

278 BE INSPIRED Military orders from our fashion shoot 280 COMPETITION VOGUE TALENT CONTEST 2016 >64 Calling all young writers 49


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insideVOGUE “Marc Jacobs’s workaday raincoat gets a ceremonial update via a pearlstudded brooch” ABSOLUTE BEARING, PAGE 354

OUT OF THIS WORLD Page 366

Features 340 COVER STORY ROYAL VARIETY For consistent sartorial excellence, no one comes close to the Queen. Drusilla Beyfus charts 90 years of regal style 348 KING OF THE HILLS Fashion mogul Leon Max says there’s no place like home. Elizabeth Day visits him in Hollywood to find out why. Photographs by Peter Ash Lee 366 OUT OF THIS WORLD Four women tell Sarah Harris how they developed their enviable taste. Photographs by Philip Sinden 374 GIVE AND TAKE Is the sharing economy for everyone? Communal refusenik Christa D’Souza takes on her toughest assignment yet. Illustration by Natasha Law

Fashion 296 COVER STORY CAMPBELL’S COUP Edie Campbell comes from the best tradition of English roses – complete with a dash of eccentricity, says Fiona Golfar. Photographs by Mario Testino 312 GAME, SET, MATCH Graphics plus florals plus sportif is a combination made for the winner’s podium. Photographed by Craig McDean 326 COUNTRY LIFE Vogue’s rural romance takes sartorial advice from Thomas Hardy’s heroines. Photographs by Alasdair McLellan 354 ABSOLUTE BEARING Attention! Spring’s military style has a distinctly naval bent. Photographs by Josh Olins

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WOOD WORK Page 391

Beauty 379 RAINBOW EYES Multicoloured make-up made a splash on the catwalks. Nicola Moulton reports 384 ONE-SHEET WONDERS Sheet masks are the new beauty buzz. Lottie Winter finds seven of the best 386 BROW STUDY Fuller brows are back – but Lauren Murdoch-Smith is a long-time fan 391 WOOD WORK The new bunch of rose scents feature warm woody notes. By Lottie Winter 393 MARC’S MANIFESTO Marc Jacobs on the process of creating his new make-up line – as tried and tested by the designer himself 394 TAKE A SHINE Can you get a gel manicure at home? Vogue tests the kits that say you can

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78

ALEXANDER McQUEEN

Personal EFFECTS O

ur choice of cover star this month was informed by the spring/summer catwalk shows last year. More than ever, this season has a strong message – one of individuality, craftsmanship and idiosyncrasy. All those qualities are famously epitomised by British creativity, so who better to showcase the prevailing mood than homegrown beauty Edie Campbell (see page 296) – a model who, no matter which way she is styled, never becomes

a catwalk cookie-cutter figure, but retains her own look. Although many of the London designers are great exemplars of this move towards a precious, almost oneoff feel (take the prairie laces of Erdem, the rich embroideries of McQueen, the delicate fabrics of Simone Rocha), it was a trend that was by no means confined to Britain. From designers’ studios worldwide came an exotic blend, as Ellie Pithers outlines in her article “Rich Mix” (page 171). Gucci’s >

CRAIG McDEAN; MARIO TESTINO; ALASDAIR McLELLAN; JASON LLOYD-EVANS; MITCHELL SAMS

The rich mood of the new season on the catwalk, top, and, above, modelled by Edie Campbell (page 296). Above right: Craig McDean gets sporty on page 312. Right: Jean Campbell is photographed by Alasdair McLellan on page 326

ERDEM

VALENTINO

Editor’s letter


EDITOR’S letter

Clockwise from below: the Queen’s inimitable style (page 340), as seen in 1979, 1951 and 1948 (with Princess Margaret); Vogue navigates the new dress codes on page 157, from Alexa Chung’s carefree style to catwalk formality

80

JASON LLOYD-EVANS; MITCHELL SAMS; GETTY; BARON/ CAMERA PRESS; HULTON-DEUTSCH/CORBIS; FEATURE FLASH

GUCCI

to personal interpretation, good style manages to be both transcendent of fashion and absolutely of the moment. We talk about it often in the Vogue offices, and for this issue I asked Fiona Golfar to look at the question of what is considered smart dress now (see page 157). Of course, what she discovered is that the definition is more slithery than ever. Although we profess to not particularly care about dress codes, I for one have noticed a resurgence in dress-code guidelines on party invitations. In London – where expensive private members’ clubs are springing up weekly – there is certainly a tendency towards demanding dress decrees. When Dior launches a range of crystal-studded trainers, and Givenchy eveningwear resembles scraps of lingerie, where does that leave us as we navigate the sartorial maze? Although no longer a question of short or long, hats or gloves, chic dressing for special occasions will always be in demand, even if now satin jogging pants might be appropriate. But that’s what’s great about fashion – it keeps moving on, as do we along with it. DELPOZO

Alessandro Michele was certainly one of the most celebrated exponents of this haute-heirloom style, but so too were Maria Grazia Chiuri and Pierpaolo Piccioli at Valentino, Miuccia Prada, and Louis Vuitton’s Nicolas Ghesquière (albeit, in the latter case, with a harderedged spin). All created beautiful clothes that will be the influencers of how we dress this summer. One woman who has successfully remained immune to the sensibilities of the catwalk is Her Majesty the Queen. Instead she has forged an inimitable style of her own, which demonstrates as deliberate and clear a vision of how she wants to present herself as any fashion figure. As a woman who has spent the majority of her life in the public eye, she has developed a relationship with clothes that shows enjoyment in the act of dressing as well as an element of armour for the role of figurehead. Drusilla Beyfus, herself a close contemporary of the Queen, visited the curator of the forthcoming exhibition of her clothes that will be shown around the country and got a look into the treasures that will be displayed. In “Royal Variety” (page 340), she describes how HM’s style has evolved during her life and reign, and offers up some fascinating observations on how she has maintained her unique grandeur. Style is an evergreen subject. Often difficult to pin down and always open


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VOGUEnotices ALL ABOUT THIS MONTH’S ISSUE

CHICAGO BLUES Marisa Meltzer met novelist Gillian Flynn at Chicago’s Public Hotel for this issue (page 245), where the globe-light installation in the Pump Room restaurant, below, attracts a glittering crowd. But the Gone Girl author normally frequents a more low-key spot in the Windy City: “My favourite restaurant in all of Chicago is a small French place called Aquitaine.”

1989

Designer Leon Max gives Elizabeth Day a guided tour of Castillo del Lago, his nine-bedroom mansion in the Hollywood Hills, on page 348. Max isn’t the first stylish occupant of the Mediterranean-style villa – for a 1989 issue of American Vogue, photographer Patrick Demarchelier captured the house’s owner, Madonna, striking a pose in her living room, above – the Material Girl’s brother had just decorated the house for her in less than a fortnight.

2016

RENAISSANCE MAN Ahead of the V&A’s Botticelli Reimagined show (March 5 to July 3), David LaChapelle traces the Renaissance master’s influence on his own work, from portraits in New York’s East Village to his famous recreation of The Birth of Venus (page 238). For his latest project, the Aristocracy series, below right, the photographer’s inspiration returns to the 21st century, as he turns his gaze to aviation: “I’m fascinated by today’s private-jet class and the separate world they inhabit from the rest of us.”

A fine romance Laura Barnett considers the migraine gene in “Blasts from the Past” on page 201. The Versions of Us author has topped bestseller lists with her romantic debut novel – but which literary love stories have a place on her own bookshelves? “My favourites are those that turn the usual conventions upside-down – books like The Time Traveler’s Wife by Audrey Niffenegger, One Day by David Nicholls and, particularly, Breathing Lessons by Anne Tyler – probably my favourite novel ever.” 92

PETER ASH LEE; PATRICK DEMARCHELIER; DAVID LACHAPELLE

KING OF THE CASTLE


VOGUEnotices Hardy perennial Jean Campbell, right, took on the role of a Thomas Hardy heroine in Alasdair McLellan’s “Country Life” (page 326). “We were inspired by Far from the Madding Crowd and Tess of the d’Urbervilles,” says Vogue’s Kate Phelan. “Jean was the only girl who could capture the romance of those narratives.” Raised on the Cawdor estate in the Highlands of Scotland, the 18-year-old model has fashion pedigree; her mother, Isabella Cawdor, once worked as a stylist alongside fashion director Lucinda Chambers.

SHARING IS CARING Christa D’Souza dips her toe into the “sharing economy” for “Give and Take” (page 374). Tap into this burgeoning industry with Vogue’s guide to the best sites and apps

• Echoapplication.com: act the DJ while curating playlists for other music lovers • Borrow My Doggy: borrow a neighbour’s four-legged companion for a stroll • Lovehomeswap.com: trade your flat for an Irish cottage or Provençal villa • Vrumi.com: dubbed the daytime Airbnb of office space • Impossible.com: Lily Cole’s social network where users can gift acts of kindness

BIG YELLOW TAXI

Queen’s gambit Drusilla Beyfus, above, charts the Queen’s style evolution in “Royal Variety” on page 340. The etiquette writer and journalist first met HM while attending a garden party at Buckingham Palace in the late Nineties. What did the politesse expert wear to the royal gathering? “A silk print frock by Dries Van Noten and low heels – a must in view of protecting the green lawns.” 94

BRUCE WEBER; JASON BELL; DARREN GERRISH

As the Vogue editors prepare for the autumn/winter shows this month, we look back at the team’s distinguished shuttle from last season: a canary-yellow G-class Mercedes, which dropped its fashionable cargo (from left, Nura Khan, Julia Hobbs, Emily Sheffield and Sarah Harris) at 50 shows and 23 presentations over five days.


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GOOD SHOW! Visit Vogue. co.uk this month for your 360-degree guide to the autumn/winter 2016 catwalks. As Fashion Week begins in New York and travels through London, Milan and ultimately Paris, the Vogue team will report daily with galleries of every look from every show, as well as city guides, streetstyle updates and backstage beauty trends, plus the definitive Vogue verdicts on the season’s most talked about collections.

TRENDS

Step it up Make Vogue.co.uk your go-to destination for all the fashion inspiration you could possibly need: you’ll find instant shopping edits, celebrity style hits and weekly guides to the season’s must-know trends.

FOR THE WIN February plays host to the year’s most anticipated film and music award shows: the Baftas, the Grammys, the Brits and, lastly, the Oscars, on the 28th. As soon as 2016’s roll-call of nominees hit the red carpet, we’ll be reporting on the sartorial talking-points. Vogue.co.uk/spy

ARTS & LIFESTYLE

Hot shots

VOGUE VIDEO

CORINNE DAY; GETTY; JASON LLOYD-EVANS

Take two

Vogue 100: A Century of Style opens at the National Portrait Gallery on February 11, showcasing 100 years of remarkable photography. Follow us on Instagram – @BritishVogue – for daily glimpses inside the archives with our #Vogue100 posts.

Alexa Chung returns to Vogue Video screens this month with the latest installment of her Future of Fashion series. Play catch-up and revisit season one in full at Vogue.co.uk/voguevideo

Whatever your preferred social-media channel, be sure to get the latest news from Vogue first by following us on Instagram, Facebook, Twitter, Tumblr, Google+ and Youtube. Just search for BRITISH VOGUE and MISS VOGUE and join the club.

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ALEXANDRA SHULMAN EDITOR-IN-CHIEF CREATIVE DIRECTOR JAIME PERLMAN DEPUTY EDITOR EMILY SHEFFIELD MANAGING EDITOR FRANCES BENTLEY FASHION DIRECTOR LUCINDA CHAMBERS EXECUTIVE FASHION DIRECTOR SERENA HOOD SENIOR CONTRIBUTING FASHION EDITORS KATE PHELAN, JANE HOW FASHION BOOKINGS EDITOR ROSIE VOGEL-EADES STYLE EDITOR NURA KHAN FASHION ASSISTANTS FLORENCE ARNOLD, BEATRIZ DE COSSIO FASHION BOOKINGS ASSISTANT KATIE LOWE SENIOR FASHION COORDINATOR PHILIPPA DURELL JEWELLERY EDITOR CAROL WOOLTON MERCHANDISE EDITOR HELEN HIBBIRD CONTRIBUTING FASHION EDITORS FRANCESCA BURNS, BAY GARNETT, KATE MOSS, CLARE RICHARDSON FASHION FEATURES DIRECTOR SARAH HARRIS FASHION NEWS EDITOR JULIA HOBBS FASHION FEATURES EDITOR ELLIE PITHERS SHOPPING EDITOR NAOMI SMART BEAUTY & HEALTH DIRECTOR NICOLA MOULTON DEPUTY BEAUTY & HEALTH EDITOR LAUREN MURDOCH-SMITH BEAUTY ASSISTANT LOTTIE WINTER FEATURES EDITOR SUSIE RUSHTON EDITOR-AT-LARGE FIONA GOLFAR COMMISSIONING EDITOR VIOLET HENDERSON ACTING COMMISSIONING EDITOR HANNAH NATHANSON FEATURES ASSISTANT LOUISA M C GILLICUDDY ART DIRECTOR FELIX NEILL ASSOCIATE ART DIRECTOR RASHA KAHIL ART EDITOR JANE HASSANALI PICTURE EDITOR MICHAEL TROW

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inVOGUE

What’s

NEW

Flight MODE

THE PEOPLE, PLACES, IDEAS AND TRENDS TO WATCH NOW

PRADA

Edited by JULIA HOBBS

PIECE OF HER HEART Janis Joplin’s tragically short life story

makes for both cheering and heartbreaking viewing in Amy Berg’s documentary, Janis: Little Girl Blue, narrated by Cat Power. With access to Joplin’s most intimate letters, it’s the ultimate celebration of her storming voice, sexual magnetism and flamboyant style. From February 5

GUCCI

JASON LLOYD-EVANS; GETTY

w

hen Karl Lagerfeld transformed the Grand Palais into Terminal 2C of the Paris Cambon airport for Chanel’s spring/ summer ’16 show, he raised the bar on globetrotting style. Chanel Airways, departing from Gate No 5, demands paparazzi-proof sunglasses and a “Coco Case” (the new trolley bag). “We travel more and more. So why shouldn’t there be Chanel luggage?” says Lagerfeld. Functional, timezone-switching luxury fashion is now big business, with designers opting for a sharper, retro-tinged look. Prada showcases the appeal of the air-hostess skirt suit, while Gucci has revived the old-school monogram suitcase. Both could be straight off the pages of The Art of Flying (Assouline, £115). Perfect for today’s jet set, who hail their private jets using Fly Victor, the app that can have you in the air as little as four hours later. Choupette can come too, thanks to their “pets on jets” policy.

CHANEL RESIN AND METAL BROOCHES, £338 EACH

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inVOGUE

CLUB RULES

n

ever been much of a “club” person? You might be persuaded otherwise. London’s traditionalmembers’-club scene is undergoing a revival. The revamped Mark’s Club in Mayfair attracts a chic crowd who adore the upholstery as much as the punchy cocktail list. (Act like a regular – no one leaves without petting the club dog.) Wine-lovers have 67 Pall Mall, which is dedicated to oenophiles, while the Devonshire Club, a converted Regency warehouse in the City, has a blow-dry and nail bar and a Pilates studio. Should you want to make your club a home, the Arts Club in Dover Street has 16 hotel rooms, including a penthouse suite. Get on the waiting lists now. HN

s

LIKE A CHARM Start hinting now about that last-minute Valentine’s gift – a diamond-encrusted amulet by jeweller Diane Kordas. Fill it with your own scent or a lover’s (Kordas’s contains Omnia Améthyste by Bulgari) and keep it with you wherever you go. Gold and diamond perfume amulets, from £2,850 each, Dianekordasjewellery.com

ROLL with it

ALEXANDER WANG

GETTY; MIRRORPIX; REX FEATURES

Rewind to Glastonbury 1995, and button your denim jacket all the way – the Oasis dress code of tracksuit, parka and bucket hat is back for summer, thanks to director Mat Whitecross’s forthcoming, as yet untitled film.

WES GORDON

SAINT LAURENT

VERSACE

MARK’S CLUB

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inVOGUE

Above: twins Camilla and Giulia Venturini. Below: Ruth Bell at Lanvin s/s ’16. Below left: Kris Gottschalk Ruth Bell. Photograph: Matthew Eades. Sittings editor: Lucy Bower

CROP circle

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LANVIN

h

aircuts often invite comment, catwalk work, has by no means been but few have elicited such a left behind. “We have been casting for change of fortune as model Burberry for three years and finally got Ruth Bell’s buzzcut. Like her twin it,” says Ruth. sister May (who is also a model), the This time around, the shaven head is 19-year-old was formerly the owner softer than the spiky, punky versions of a waist-length, honey-coloured sported by Annie Lennox in her mane, until photographer David Sims Eurythmics days or Eve Salvail, suggested she shave her head for an Nineties muse of Jean Paul Gaultier. It Alexander McQueen campaign. isn’t meant to be an aggressive style When hairdresser Paul statement – temper the Hanlon chopped off her “My agent look with a flyaway floral plait, Ruth’s agent was in dress or a conservative panicked cashmere sweater and a tears. “She was panicking that this was about to ruin dewy complexion. that this my career,” says Ruth, The trend is gaining who went on to donate would ruin momentum: a swathe of her hair to the Prince’s my career” baby-faced pin-ups have Trust to make wigs for followed Bell’s lead. Kris children undergoing chemotherapy. Gottschalk buzzed her hair at the Fast-forward six months, and that request of Riccardo Tisci for the half a centimetre of hedgehog hair Givenchy show, as did Louis Vuitton has propelled Ruth into the modelling favourite Tamy Glauser, and twins spotlight. At the spring/summer ’16 Camilla and Giulia Venturini, who shows, she walked for Gucci, Lanvin, modelled for Tod’s. But does Bell’s and Versace; this season she stars in mother approve? “No. My mum was the Burberry campaign alongside her definitely shocked and still dislikes it!” twin, who, while having eschewed she laughs. EP

MAKE-UP: FLORRIE WHITE. RUTH WEARS JACKET, SAINT LAURENT BY HEDI SLIMANE. DRESS, ALEXANDER McQUEEN. JASON LLOYD-EVANS; MITCHELL SAMS

THE BUZZ ON THE FASHION CIRCUIT? MODEL RUTH BELL’S FEARLESS HAIRCUT


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inVOGUE

Concrete JUNGLE

Peace lilies in the studio of Isa Arfen designer Serafina Sama

“I’ve always wanted to live in a house like the Eameses did in the Sixties,” says Sophie Hulme of her indoor “jungle”. The handbag designer is not alone. Decorating with giant banana plants and palms is garnering a high-fashion following. Be inspired by Erdem’s and Céline’s Mayfair boutiques and go green with low maintenance, large-scale tropical flora. For designer Serafina Sama of Isa Arfen, it’s all about the Kentia palms, an essential part of the “decadent throwback” decoration of her Bayswater home. Start your collection now.

Banana plants in Céline’s Mount Street store

Vogue creative director Jaime Perlman favours fig trees and palms

The regeneration game

A lush alocasia at the Erdem boutique on South Audley Street

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THESE BOOTS ARE MADE FOR WALKING Cowboy boots are back, minus the boho tagline. The new, slick offerings look best with Céline’s lingerie evening dress. This isn’t a vintage moment – buy box-fresh and keep them in mint condition.

JAIME PERLMAN; JASON LLOYD-EVANS; AVENUE 3; ISTOCK

LOUIS VUITTON

PHILOSOPHY BY LORENZO SERAFINI

COACH

PAUL & JOE

CELINE

Clapton, Forest Gate… Piccadilly? The regeneration game is now being played in central London’s tourist corridor. “It’s going to be progressive,” says Anthea Harries, of the Crown Estate. Dover Street Market relocates to Burberry’s former HQ in Haymarket this March. Expect the top-floor Rose Bakery to become the centre of gossip-trading for London’s fashion scene. The jewel in the crown of the Estate’s 10-year renewal plan, however, is St James’s Market – a collection of independent dining spots launching this month.


inVOGUE The new nineto-five Miroslava Duma in Delpozo separates

Summer wedding

Cocktail now

Alexa Chung wearing Erdem

Leandra Medine in Rosie Assoulin

Dress UP, dress DOWN FROM RIPPED JEANS AT CLARIDGE’S TO JEWELLED TRAINERS IN THE BOARDROOM, IS IT TIME TO RETHINK THE RULES ABOUT WHAT “SMART” MEANS? FIONA GOLFAR INVESTIGATES

FEATURE FLASH; GETTY

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don’t know what to wear!” I hear it all the time. From weddings to weekends, boardrooms to black tie, it’s a sartorial minefield out there. The good news is that there are no rules any more; the bad news is that working out appropriate dress codes can now seem more complicated than cracking Fermat’s Last Theorem. Gone are the days of dark tailored suits in the boardroom, of black tie

meaning a long dress, and if you happen to be asked to something as quaintly old-fashioned sounding as “drinks”, what exactly – I ask in the name of fashion – is one supposed to wear between 6pm and 8pm, especially if coming from the office? We live in a brave new world, or so we are told. We can wear what we like. But is that true? Twice recently I’ve met friends after work for cocktails in

London’s chicest bar, the Fumoir in Claridge’s, a dimly lit jewel box with deep burgundy leather-lined walls. Both times, the women I met were wearing highly fashionable, blindingly expensive ripped jeans, and on both occasions the adorable albeit embarrassed staff told us that ripped jeans were not “encouraged”. They were far too polite to ask us to leave, but the message was clear. > 157


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You can wear short – as long as it’s a kneelength style with a couture sensibility

TIPS

Mine’s a Cosmopolitan: architectural lines in monochrome work for barhopping urbanites

Vogue’s guide to the new dress codes

A traditional gown speaks volumes; avoid black, a lighter colour is more youthful and ribbons are the flourish of the season

LANVIN

For the woman who wears the trousers, a skinny black style partnered with a trophy blouse resets the agenda

JASON LLOYD-EVANS; MITCHELL SAMS

Black tie

RODARTE STELLA McCARTNEY

ALTUZARRA

HERMES

GUCCI

Lurex trouser suits, plunging blouses and trailing scarves say Seventies glamour, ideal for decadent nights that go into the small hours

OSCAR DE LA RENTA

of my wardrobe. Someone out there needs to have a rethink. Once, the rules were clear. 1. A figure-flattering LBD took you almost anywhere (but how old-fashioned does that idea feel now?). 2. Wear gloves to town. 3. Take your watch off in the evening. 4. Matching bags and shoes are good. 5. Long – and often velvet – is appropriate when changing for dinner in smart country houses. And so on. Role models also helped us along the way. They helped us to visually make sense of the way we dressed for occasions. Grace Kelly epitomised the perfect princess bride; her wedding in 1956 was watched by 30 million people around the world and her style emulated by women everywhere. Years later, Carolyn Bessette Kennedy ushered in a new kind of chic at her 1996 wedding, changing the mode of dress for a generation; no lacy tiered-cake confection – instead, a simple strappy bias-cut silk-crêpe gown by Narcisco Rodriguez. She wore flat Manolo Blahnik sandals, her hair pulled back into a loose knot. Not what you would expect from America’s new princess. Kennedy had rewritten the rules and set the bar for the seemingly effortless style (nothing ever really is) of the Lauren Santo Domingos of today. >

A sundress brimming with personality – and with the power to go from day to night – is a winner for weddings in warmer climes

Cocktails

What’s SMART NOW DOLCE & GABBANA

Try getting a twinklingtrainered tootsie through Britain’s smartest doors

For formal weddings that require tailoring, opt for a retro-style skirt

Wedding

DELPOZO

Here’s another problem. Chanel, Miu Miu, Valentino, Céline and Dior have all told us we can wear their skate shoes and decorated trainers with our equally high-end fashion purchases – a real winner in terms of a style message, but try getting a twinkling-trainered tootsie through some of Britain’s smartest doors. The Dorchester and the Ritz both have strict dress codes: no jeans, trainers or sportswear. So too, the newly reopened Mark’s Club or 5 Hertford Street, London’s chicest members-only clubs; the women working at the latter are dressed in taffeta frocks. Taffeta! The crunching sound of which I haven’t heard since 1987. Meanwhile, upon organising “drinks” at Annabel’s, an email pinged in to remind me what won’t be acceptable. The roll-call includes leather or suede, T-shirts, leggings, officewear, trainers, deck shoes, casual or cowboy boots – all of which makes up roughly 80 per cent

The LBD is still a chic option. Rule of thumb: the simpler the silhouette, the better quality the fabric must be

Yes, you can wear black to a wedding: head to toe or partnered with a white skirt


S H O P O N L I N E AT E S C A D A . C O M


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FINISHING TOUCHES

b) you have a better invitation waiting around the corner. Regardless of age, shoulders are what to Layer up necklaces of reveal now. varying lengths and mix A crisp white shirt is gold and silver together. timeless. Now wear Combine with a neckerchief with sleeves pushed up and for extra points. pop one side of the collar. Wear a coat. Properly. A knotted front is also Propping over the having a revival. shoulders is now Wear a large and over. Furthermore, interesting cocktail wear your coat all ring on every finger à la night. It suggests Valentino’s Maria Grazia that a) it’s too Chiuri. Start collecting. precious to be SUSAN FOSTER A man’s gold or banished to the RING, £9,880, AT MATCHES stainless-steel watch cloakroom and

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is always in style, but appears more feminine when worn with a mix of shiny gold bangles. Pull hair back into a tight, simple ponytail when wearing long statement earrings. Midi-skirt-and-sweater combos work best in contrasting prints. Stand up straight; good posture has the power to make anything look infinitely better. Don’t default to red. Try the New French – a French manicure on shorter nails.

night-time.” Rothschild has to attend at least one event a week, either in the art or business world. “I might add some jewellery and heels to what I wear during the day if I go from the office.” For black-tie events she does wear long; Etro, Dries Van Noten or McQueen are her go-tos. These days, women wear the bright colours of Peter Pilotto, Roksanda, or Gucci in the boardroom if they wish. No longer do they have to adhere to the idea that a demure suit is officesmart. As Vogue contributing editor Lisa Armstrong says, “The point is, if you are at the top you can make your own rules. So if we are to be led by example, the workplace now is a much brighter place. Serious business doesn’t have to mean serious clothes.” It’s easy to be thrown when out of one’s sartorial comfort zone. What to wear if you are not in the habit of going to the country for a weekend, invited by people whose ancestors have been doing this for generations? You don’t have to try to emulate. Adding a jewelcolour cashmere jumper to a Dries Van Noten skirt should get you through an evening, or try a frothy silk blouse with Burberry’s smart naval trousers. Most importantly, never look back to history for guidelines; instead, look around you and see what works. I did just that recently at a fashion dinner, hosted by Lauren Santo Domingo. What was she wearing? An LBD by Emilia Wickstead. I’m not kidding. Furthermore, she looked spectacular, which brings me to the conclusion: there are no rules. Wear anything with authority and everyone – including yourself – will believe in it. Q

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JASON LLOYD-EVANS; PAUL BOWDEN; GETTY

Dior’s embellished trainers

Meanwhile, Mira Duma flits between boyfriend denim and Russian demicouture seemingly regardless of the event, while Dasha will wear prim Prada to a football match. These days, “If you are at the invitations often won’t state a dress code in the top, you can make way they once did. your own rules” “Black tie” is often replaced with “dress glamorous” or “dress colourful” – far more fun and much less restrictive. Emilia Wickstead, whose classic pieces have a simple modernity, says her clothes are just as wearable in the boardroom of a bank. “You can easily wear one of my dresses or skirts to work. Many of my clothes skim the leg just between the calf and the ankle; it’s a great length to get you from day to night. Partner it with a pair of brogues and look perfectly professional, then if you need to go out from work, simply add costume jewellery and heels and you are all set to go to a gallery opening or smart dinner.” Hannah Rothschild, non-executive director at Rothschild investment trust and chairman of the trustees at the National Gallery, has a work schedule that often keeps her busy from breakfast until bed. “I wear a lot of well-cut fit-and-flare dresses by Oscar de la Renta; they’re stylish and classic. It also helps that they never seem to crease – vital when you have to look smart all day.” De la Renta’s designs often have a stiff lining in the hem which offers structure and shape. “I love silk brocade pieces, or those that are shot through with silver thread. An Lauren Santo element of embellishment isn’t too Domingo in Emilia Wickstead much during the day and great come

OSCAR DE LA RENTA

This side of the pond, our own Diana, Princess of Wales, shrugged off her Sloane Ranger frilled collars and started to play with fashion for formal occasions, much to the delight of the designers of the day Catherine Walker, Caroline Charles, Bruce Oldfield, even Gianni Versace. The message was that one could be more relaxed and informal. Although we think of them as oldfashioned, rules were often helpful. We knew where we were. Now we are supposed to be thrilled that we can “dress as we like”, but we don’t always have the answers. When it comes to being smart, we often have to decipher exactly what that means. Designers and consumers look to street style on Instagram for inspiration. This is Britain, and we have always had a playful relationship with fashion. Alexa Chung, Miroslava Duma and Dasha Zhukova share the way they dress for work, parties and the red carpet on their posts. Would Alexa wear a long dress to a black-tie affair? Yes, of course; she’s often photographed in romantic full-length Erdem or Valentino gowns, but equally, she could show up in the shortest Chloé babydoll dress and look perfectly appropriate. The trick is that she always leaves her hair “undone”.


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Rich MIX

ORNATE DETAIL WITH A SUBVERSIVE TWIST HAS CREATED A VERY MODERN HEIRLOOM AESTHETIC FOR SPRING. BY ELLIE PITHERS

DRIES VAN NOTEN

JASON LLOYD-EVANS; MITCHELL SAMS

W

hen was the last time you wore an heirloom? A finely worked piece of jewellery handed down from generation to generation, or an exquisitely embroidered evening dress inherited from a grandmother? Perhaps the word heirloom has thrown you, conjuring up images of precious but dusty fabrics. Or perhaps, like me, you’re thinking along the lines of tomato varieties rather than tiaras. Heirlooms, though, are the very thing for now. Having shelved the polished codes of luxury – that clean, discreet aesthetic which reigned for so long – the spring collections were rich and opulent, boasting highly worked details. They signalled a return to craft but without the make-and-do connotations. Leather, silk and frothy tulle were all worked upon laboriously and lovingly, embellished and embroidered to offer a charmingly eccentric flavour. Take Gucci, where creative director Alessandro Michele’s heirloom impulse is stronger than most. A keen collector of antique textiles and upholstery, and a needlepoint fan (when in London, he picks up kits at Liberty), Michele has steeped his Gucci girl in heritage. His spring collection was a riot of traditional Italian craft. Jewel-tone satin came sprinkled with rhinestones that took a day to handembroider; lace gowns presented sequined parrots that necessitated 18 hours of sewing; tapestry flowers were > 171


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different moment in time and have a historical lineage,” says Olivia Thornton, director and senior specialist of contemporary art at Sotheby’s London. “They’re buying traditional works that fit with their contemporary aesthetic, but also collecting work by contemporary artists who use craft techniques. Artists such as Tracey Emin, who uses appliqué and stitching on her blankets, Alighiero Boetti, who employs artisans from Pakistan and Afghanistan to execute his conceptual work, and Rosemarie Trockel, who harnesses knitting and tapestry, are all really desirable.”

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he Future Laboratory sees the trend as part of a broader shift in the luxury market towards storytelling. “The big brands have a challenge to attract the attention of consumers who are seeking an emotional connection with what they buy,” says Szymanska. “Traditional craftsmanship can’t do that on its own, especially since terms such as ‘craft’ and ‘artisanal’ have become empty marketing buzzwords used to sell beer and chips. But when those craft techniques are used in a playful, cheeky way, you can build on a story, and that creates desire.” Erdem, who has built his brand on craftsmanship, understands it needs to come with a backstory. His cinematic spring collection (which saw girls

tramping through mud to a crackling soundtrack of Emily Dickinson poetry) was inspired by the Homestead Act of 1862, whereby American women gained the right to own a tract of land, but only if they lived alone on it for five years. “I’d been reading about prairie madness, a psychological condition that developed as a result of the act,” he says. “I was intrigued by the idea of isolation, how these women survived on the prairie.” His fabrics literally told the women’s story. “Everything was very worked on and developed, but often the base fabric was very poor: I loved the contrast of hand-embroidery on a basic cotton ticking stripe, or a fabric we developed to look like raffia that frayed beautifully.” That subtlety extended to the memento mori of women’s faces woven into broderie anglaise. “I wanted it to be naive, but presented in a dark way,” he says. The front row looked visibly moved at the finale; consider that emotional connection fully forged. Tabitha Simmons, a self-confessed needlepoint fanatic, welcomes the new craftwork. She has been working with a seventhgeneration English silk mill to produce delicate embroideries for her shoes. “With social media, everything is on such a quick turnaround and people have such short attention spans. I feel people now want items that they can’t find everywhere else and that are the highest quality possible.” Incidentally, the silk mill is the same one that produced the weaving for the Queen’s coronation coaches. That’s the kind of geeky twist that heirloom lovers dream of. If it all sounds a bit overwhelming, don’t panic. “Accessories are a gateway to those maximalist collections,” says Sarah Rutson, vice president of global buying at Net-a-Porter. “You can be in a minimal dress but with a beautiful embroidered shoe or tapestry handbag. It’s that softly, softly approach. How to wear it now is about tempering everything – a brocade skirt worn with a white shirt and a slip-on shoe. It’s about balancing out the ornateness.” Perhaps those richly worked details are best worn in unexpected form, as one Vogue editor discovered when she found a metallic embroidered bird the size of a baby’s fist sewn into the lining of her new black Gucci blazer. There was no mention of it at the time of purchase. What could be more chic than an heirloom detail that no one else can see? Q

JASON LLOYD-EVANS; MITCHELL SAMS

“This flamboyant woman wants to enjoy life. She dares to mix things”

ERDEM

OSCAR DE LA RENTA

hand-stitched on to a black leather biker jacket; and lush 18th-century brocades sported ruffled, sequined hems. Even the accessories had been painstakingly crafted: one silk rose, worn at the neck (right), took two days to make. Craft techniques were equally abundant at Valentino, Oscar de la Renta and Lanvin. At Dries Van Noten, the designer’s familiar jacquards came with showgirl paillettes arranged in wing-like configurations. “I was thinking about the flamboyant woman – she’s not just eccentric, because that can mean old and with 25 cats,” says Van Noten. “She wants to live, she wants to enjoy life. She knows how to mix things, and dares to.” That ability to mix is paramount, according to Aleks Szymanska, visual trends analyst at the Future Laboratory. “Designers are adopting these very traditional techniques, but giving them a new form of expression, one that is almost subversive. Gucci’s collection was full of gorgeous, precious detailing, but the references were a surreal combination of the animal kingdom, maps, atlases and a sugary Sixties element – and that mix felt very modern.” The impulse to frame idiosyncratic craft within a contemporary context has hit the art world, too. Sotheby’s reports that a growing number of its modern art collectors have begun buying Old Masters. “Collectors are looking to acquire works that speak to a

GUCCI

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inVOGUE Stylist Anya Ziourova at the Paris shows

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Fashion buyer Annabel Rosendahl at Milan Fashion Week a/w ’15

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Norwegian blogger Hedvig Opshaug in Gucci

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VOGUEviewpoint

Golden STATE of mind WHEN CALGARY AVANSINO MOVED TO LONDON IN 2000, HER HEALTHY CALIFORNIAN WAYS WERE SEEN AS “WEIRD”. HOW TIMES HAVE CHANGED

KRISTIN PERERS; INSTAGRAM/CALGARY AVANSINO

i

f you can believe it, there was a time when coconut water wasn’t available at Pret A Manger, when quinoa wasn’t stocked at Tesco, and when people were yet to regularly debate which cold-press company delivers the “greenest” juice. This was the London that welcomed me from California 15 years ago. Unlike many Americans, my husband and I weren’t moved here on assignment. We had made a conscious decision to pull up roots and make the big leap across the pond because we wanted to live the European life, make British friends and work for British companies. We were ready to immerse ourselves in London life. Give or take a few cultural idiosyncrasies, we figured, we shared a common language – how different could it be? Very, as it turned out. You might say I was a typical 25year-old California girl at that time: into yoga, smoothies and books about meditation, although I definitely was not a hippy. God, no! I got regular manicures, loved fashion, shaved my armpits and always wore a bra. In California, there was nothing extreme or “weird” about me. Awareness of healthy food, exercise and spirituality were commonplace. Even if you weren’t particularly passionate about the topics, they were part of the West Coast lifestyle and vernacular. All my friends worked out – mostly at 6am, before work – and no one batted an eyelash if you ordered a plate of

Top: Calgary, with a plate of (healthy) chocolate, cranberry and buckwheat cookies. Above: an early-morning hike on the Santa Barbara mountain trails

lifestyle that I had mistakenly assumed veggies for dinner. That was my norm. I would easily import into my life On the freezing morning of here. How can a girl live without December 28, 2000, we arrived in organic vegetables, almond milk and this great city with all the optimism a good trainer? Seriously. that only a fresh start can grant Within days of moving to London you. As I wandered around our it became clear that mayonnaise was, new neighbourhood with a copy of over here, practically a food group: Time Out in hand, I stopped in cafés tuna with mayo (or to warm up and write lists. I had It became clear that more correctly mayo a little tuna); to get a job, join mayonnaise was, with stacks of whitea gym, decide on a local grocery store over here, practically bread sandwiches slathered in it; that would have a food group sweetcorn and mayo everything I needed, on baked potatoes; chips dipped in it; find a hairdresser, a yoga studio and a and salads “dressed” with it. I quickly local farmers’ market; all the comforts realised that I was going to be cooking that would make me feel at home in at home, a lot. For this I needed the a foreign land. Don’t get me wrong, ingredients I was accustomed to back I wasn’t one of those annoying expats in California. But there wasn’t much who want it to be “just like home”, organic produce in the supermarkets, I embraced the cultural differences, no designated “health-food aisle”, no > but there were elements of my Cali 191


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exciting this was to me. Slowly but surely what was once kooky became part of the everyday vocabulary. First it was quinoa, then coconut water, chia seeds and sprouting. I would smile and nod when people said to me, “You should try green juice, it’s amazing!” I didn’t feel smug, just happy that an interest in healthy living was gaining momentum. Suddenly instead of exercise being deemed a form of torture, people were keen to try “the few months after new class” or join a swanky new gym. arriving in London, And if you didn’t already have, or I landed a job at desperately want, a Vitamix you were Vogue and quickly became judged hideously out of touch. Within acutely aware of two things: a few years my “weird” habits became my wardrobe; of particular interest and being the Slowly, what to those around me. only American What did I eat for was once in the office. I breakfast? What did would arrive kooky became I feed my kids? How at work still often did I work out? everyday flushed from What did I snack on? the gym, while my colleagues Jump ahead another five years, and were still nursing their I’ve written a book on those very coffees. Exercising, caring topics – wow, I’d never have guessed about your body and what that a decade ago. Keep It Real not you ate (and, God forbid, only offers simple recipes and practical talking about these things) advice on all things healthy but just wasn’t very English. It also chronicles my commitment to wasn’t long before I gained wellness as a lifestyle, never a diet. the status of office health nut Along the way, Britain has taught – helped by the actual me some lessons, too. In California nuts (raw almonds, brazils, the obsession with body image and walnuts) that I kept perfection is at the very least tiring and in my desk drawer. Since at worst destructive. It’s more balanced, I didn’t much like the typical less extreme here, more focused on lunchtime offerings in the having a good time. God forbid you nearby sandwich bars (see: should take yourself too seriously. I mayonnaise) I started bringing admit that I have felt pressure to be in leftovers for lunch (cue “perfect” a lot of my life (which is more eye-rolls), and a another article altogether), and it’s smoothie for my midcounter-productive. Not until the last morning snack, which one of few years have I truly (and I mean it, my more brazen colleagues honestly) learnt to love my body. Just referred to as “diarrhoea”. simply show it love! Not because it is I was officially weird for the fit, hard, thin or looks good in clothes; first time in my life! But just because it’s mine and I’m healthy Californian habits die hard. and happy. To be well, strong, able to I continued to do things my have three babies and get up every day way, hunting down the foods feeling good is a blessing. I feel more I wanted to eat and making balanced about food than I ever have, do without the ones I missed. and it’s freeing. I do eat bread and Regardless of the high-maintenance pasta, and I enjoy desserts – just not rep I was establishing for myself, I still all the time. Moderation is the mantra. asked for my dressing on the side, my Living in Britain has made me spinach steamed instead of sautéed, understand that health is about balance, and: “Is there cream in this soup?” not deprivation, and that being healthy Eventually, over the years, London has as much to do with your mind as caught up with me. Real farmers’ it does with your body. That said, markets started popping up all over I still don’t eat mayonnaise. Q the city, Daylesford opened a raw “Keep It Real” (Yellow Kite, £25), food café and Whole Foods debuted by Calgary Avansino, is published on in 2007. I can’t quite articulate how February 18

of a Californian exercise that doesn’t translate: on our first weekend in the country with friends I was told to wear wellies for our afternoon walks. I’m a hiker – we’re talking tall peaks, sweat, hiking boots on, lots of calories burnt – and now I was going to walk in the rain in flabby, gripless rubber boots? I found myself longing for cardio like others long for cream buns.

a

From top: Calgary, pregnant with her third child, at London Fashion Week; berry picking in California; showing her love of kale

INSTAGRAM/CALGARY AVANSINO

almond butter or good avocados, and definitely no quinoa or kamut. Heeding the advice of a neighbour, I headed to Borough Market. This would be the answer, I hoped – a mecca of fresh, organic produce from countryside farms with friendly purveyors and like-minded people. It was not. First of all, I’m sorry, but it’s underneath the railway line! With puddles of stagnant rainwater underfoot, it smelt like kebab meat and there were more stands selling pies than organic vegetables. I tried to like it, I really did, but that isn’t an open-air farmers’ market, people! Finally I found something resembling what I had at home in two stores: Fresh & Wild and Planet Organic, both in Notting Hill. They stocked products such as soya milk, wild rice, raw nuts, organic yoghurts, tofu, organic and grass-fed meats and wholegrain breads at a price. I made a weekly pilgrimage there after my yoga class at the Life Centre, only to realise yet another cultural difference: people in London most definitely didn’t wear their workout clothes outside the workout environment. I might as well have been walking around in a G-string for the number of disapproving looks I received. These days wearing the right brand of fitness wear in public is a bragging right, but back then it was verging on improper. So like any good émigrée I started changing in the dressing room with the rest of my class. In 2000 there were few gyms and exercise classes, so I shimmied around London in search of new ways to sweat. In the end, I decided running was the most universally accepted exercise. But I seemed destined to stick out. Before moving to Britain I had begun learning about the power of intervals from a trainer who had taught me all variety of hops, skips and jumps to do between running spurts. So I danced and pranced around Hyde Park as bemused dogwalkers looked on. Another example


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Blasts from THE PAST BESTSELLING NOVELIST LAURA BARNETT’S “CURIOUS INHERITANCE” IS A DISMAL BEAST. BUT HOW WOULD SHE FEEL IF IT DISAPPEARED FOREVER?

HAIR AND MAKE-UP: CAROLYN GALLYER. LAURA WEARS SHIRT, HAIDER ACKERMANN; TROUSERS, ALEXANDER McQUEEN. BOTH AT BROWNS. SHOES, MANOLO BLAHNIK

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July day in south London in 1989: clammy, golden, smelling of hot pavements and car exhaust. It is my birthday, and I am giddy on cake and presents and the fact that, tonight, all my sevenyear-old dreams are going to come true: my mum is finally taking me to see Andrew Lloyd Webber’s Cats. For months, I have been obsessed with the show. I could hardly be more excited if Webber himself knocked on the door of our flat and broke into a personal, idiosyncratically harmonised rendition of “Happy Birthday”. There’s one problem: my mum is in bed in her room, curtains closed against the light, pressing the left side of her face into her pillow. She is deathly pale and can hardly bear to open her eyes. “Just let me sleep,” she says, and I do, though it is my birthday, and surely she should be thinking about me. “I’m not sure I can go tonight,” my mum tells me softly some time during the afternoon, and I am inconsolable, raging at the injustice of it, until she rouses herself, dresses, and calls us a cab into town. At the theatre, I watch the stage, transfixed by the wild-haired dancers in brindled catsuits, while my poor mum holds her head in her hands, shielding her eyes from the pounding, strobing lights. Even now, I feel guilty about that day. My mother’s affliction, migraine (a savage, throbbing pain, usually on one side of the head, lasting up to three days and bringing with it a sensitivity to light, sound and certain foods), is my own. I now know what it is for my vision to disintegrate, moment by moment, into fragments – lurid, hallucinatory, like the endlessly shifting patterns in a kaleidoscope. I know how it is to feel that pain – which my mum has always described as being like an iron bar thrusting into her skull, but which, for me, feels more like being stabbed repeatedly

with a blunt knife. I am now the one who, at best, must lie down in darkness and silence once a fortnight; and, at worst, has a migraine almost every day, forced to withdraw from the world entirely until, finally and blissfully, the pain loosens its grip. My first migraine arrived when I was 17. I know this because it is noted in my medical records, but I remember nothing about it. I do, however, recall taking one of my final exams at university with a migraine, the lines on the paper blurring through a mist of pain; and, in my twenties, pressing my head against a toilet door for cool comfort during my long days in the office as a newspaper journalist. I had a migraine on my wedding night. I’ve missed countless meetings, parties, birthday dinners. I think of

“It is a link between me and all the women whose genes I carry.” Laura Barnett at Four Hundred Rabbits, SE19. Sittings editor: Nura Khan. Photograph: Rick Morris Pushinsky

migraines as a tax on fun, triggered by alcohol, excitement, travel, late nights: all the things that, as a 33-year-old woman, I feel I ought, by rights, to be enjoying to the full. As a novelist and freelance writer, I am very lucky to be able to work from home, shaping my timetable around the unpredictable periods of rest and withdrawal; I would simply, in the worst phases, not be able to hold down an office job. My husband and I worry about having children, and how I would cope with the sort of situation my own mother faced, all those years ago, on my seventh birthday. Migraine is a miserable, tricky condition, long misunderstood – only recently have medical researchers begun to unpick the physical processes believed to underpin it – and much > 201


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abused. I have lost count of the times Laura, aged four, I’ve heard migraine used as an excuse with her mother for just lolling around with a hangover, or descriptions of migraine as somehow synonymous with hysteria; suffered by highly strung women overcome by self-perpetuating attacks of nerves. It is also often dismissed as just a bad headache, but it is far more than that. Migraine is, as the National Migraine Centre (NMC) in London – an invaluable charity providing migraine sufferers, or “migraineurs”, including me, with specialist medical advice – points out, a disorder of the brain. Its precise cause is still not fully understood but is believed to involve the emission of neurotransmitters by an area of the brain with a brilliant tongue-twister of a name, the trigeminal ganglion. These neurotransmitters stimulate the dilation of blood vessels, which then cause the pain. About one in seven people in Britain suffers from migraines, with women up to three times more likely to get them than men; the World Health Organisation lists migraine among the 20 most disabling I think of migraine lifetime conditions. as a tax on fun, on Migraine seems to run in families. In all the things that, his classic 1971 book as a 33-year-old, Migraine, neurologist Oliver Sacks (though I feel I ought to be sceptical about this enjoying to the full himself ) cited several studies indicating that up to 65 per cent of migraine patients are likely to have migraineur relatives. In women, this heredity may be linked to the menstrual cycle; often a governing factor in attacks, and another reason women seem so much more susceptible to migraine than men. That certainly reflects my experience. Every woman on both sides of my 202

family has suffered from migraine: picture a family tree, shifting down through the generations, and there, at the bottom, am I, fusing two long lines of migraineurs into one. Migraine is a link between me and all the women whose genes I carry; it is my own curious inheritance. Throughout their adult lives, both my grandmothers often retired to their darkened bedrooms. My maternal great-grandmother, Eleanor (a formidable woman with six children, a laundry business and a husband who toured America as a trick rider in Buffalo Bill’s circus), called her migraines “sick headaches”, and worked on through them, stoical, a cold compress held to her temple under a tightly wound scarf. Her daughters suffered similar fates. As a child, my mum remembers dreading Mondays – washday, when Eleanor spent all day boiling and mangling piles of laundry – as her own mother would invariably have a migraine by the end of the day.

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earning to live with migraine is, at its root, about acceptance: struggle against the pain and it will only dig in its claws. Part of that, for me, has been about trying to see migraine as part of who I am; and also observing the fascinating links between migraine and creativity. Countless artists and writers have, over the centuries, been migraineurs. Van Gogh is believed to have suffered the unsettling visual disturbances known as the “aura” – that strange fragmentation of the vision that I’ve experienced many times and can, now I come to think of it, see in Van Gogh’s fractured, pulsing brushwork. Elvis, Elizabeth Taylor, Whoopi Goldberg, Joan Didion, Siri Hustvedt, Hugh Jackman: the list of creative migraineurs is long and diverse. So, I’ve long wondered, does having migraine make you more likely to be creative, or does being creative bring on a migraine? I’m increasingly aware of a connection between my most intense periods of work – those frenetic “flow states” in which the words seem to pour from me and I begin to lose track of space and time – and my migraines. These bursts of creativity are often, it seems, followed by a migraine attack. Dr Jud Pearson, a GP and headache specialist at the NMC, has an interesting theory about this. As most migraineurs gradually learn, each attack can usually be divided into clear

phases, including the “prodrome”, which precedes the onset of the pain and is, Dr Pearson points out, the phase in which an artist or writer may feel at their most productive. “The prodrome can produce feelings of euphoria and increased energy,” she says, “so it’s easy to see how that might connect with intense periods of creativity.” She isn’t convinced, however, that migraine and creativity necessarily go hand in hand. “Up to 20 per cent of the population as a whole have migraine,” she says. “So of that number, it’s logical that a good many will be artists and writers. But many different types of people suffer from migraine.” This is true even of the women in my own family. I am the only professional writer or artist among us, and though I may carry some of their character traits (my paternal grandmother’s melancholic streak, my mum’s tendency to worry), there is nothing to suggest that our migraines might have their source in some innate, unchanging aspect of our personalities. I am far luckier than them, too, in terms of the possibilities available for managing the condition. There is still, as yet, no cure, but we migraineurs are taught to keep diaries of our attacks, to help identify – and then avoid – the triggers that may be causing them. And recent advances in medical understanding have ushered in a group of painkillers called triptans that actually do blunt the pain, something my great-grandmother (scarf tied pirate-like across one eye) or my mother (forced to endure the torture of the strobe lighting and noise of a musical) could only have dreamt of. I have also, in the last few months, begun taking a new preventative medication that I hope will reduce the frequency and intensity of my attacks. Should this, or anything else, ever offer me the chance to rid myself of migraines for good, I would certainly not miss them. But I would be aware, too, that some connection – some genetic quirk, passed from woman to woman along the branches of my family tree – would have been severed. This curious inheritance would no longer be mine to bear; and perhaps some small part of me would mourn its disappearance, even as I celebrated my liberation from a lifetime of recurrent and debilitating pain. Q “The Versions of Us”, by Laura Barnett, is published by Weidenfeld & Nicolson at £7.99


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VOGUEview Boy done GOOD Having drawn on his own past for the bad-boy roles that got him noticed, Jack O’Connell now looks to Angelina and Jodie for guidance, he tells Louisa McGillicuddy

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a Jack O’Connell: “I used to want to fight the whole system…” Grooming: Mike Gorman. Sittings editor: Beatriz de Cossio. Photograph: John Spinks

fter driving down from his Derbyshire home, Jack O’Connell arrives at a studio in north London carrying his own bags, opening the door for others and navigating the room in a flurry of “bless you” and “cheers, boss”. The actor lives with his mother and sister in the home he bought them with the pay from Unbroken, Angelina Jolie’s Second World War epic. The Oscarwinning actress (with whom he’s now on “Angie” terms) cast him last year in the lead role as the formidable Olympic distance runner and prisoner of war Louis Zamperini. During filming she flew his family out for dinner on-set; he returned the favour, he says, by > 231


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VOGUEview de-mining fields for her charitable projects in Cambodia. O’Connell was a relative newcomer at the time, and Jolie’s patronage shot him to $150 million-grossing box-office success. Despite the fast-track to Hollywood, today he travels with only one assistant (rare) and arrives on time (rarer still). He chats to everyone – including a ginger tomcat belonging to Vogue’s photographer – and looks you dead in the eye as he speaks. He pays attention when you talk, too, asking about the Irishness of my surname – because his father, who died when Jack was 18, hailed from Kerry, and he goes there often. The scrupulous manners are worth noting because it wasn’t long ago that Jack O’Connell had a reputation for being… unpredictable. He’d meet journalists bleary-eyed from the night before. That Jack was juggling performances at the Royal Court (playing a student sleeping with his teacher in Scarborough) with appearances in an actual magistrates’ court (he remains vague on the details, but the misdemeanours almost cost him his American visa). But that’s all in the past. Now 25, he’s bright-eyed and clean-shaven, auburn hair worn in a half-crew cut – last season it was longer and slicked

JACK WEARS SWEATER, SUNSPEL. JOHN SPINKS; JACK BARNES; THE KOBAL COLLECTION; REX FEATURES

“Often Jodie wouldn’t even say anything, she’d just ‘do’ the emotion” back in a Prada menswear campaign. We meet in a nearby pub (initially vetoed by his publicist as not a very Jack 2.0 venue), but he orders water. “I used to want to fight the whole system, make a difference,” he says with a frown. “But I don’t think you can do that in one interview or one fuckin’ rant.” The only hint of a wayward past is a giant “Jack the lad” tattoo on his right bicep. It came from a frequent comment in his end-ofterm reports at his Catholic school. He left an atheist with two GCSEs – one of them in drama. In person, he is polite but cautious. Following a few ill-advised Twitter outbursts, and some increased tabloid attention thanks to a rumoured romance with Cara Delevingne, he deleted his social-media presence last year; now he has a private Instagram account under a fake name. He speaks with honesty, but prefaces it with

apologetic disclaimers such as “Not to get wanky and pretend I’m an artist, but…” or “Not to be clichéd, but…” He’s been in the business, involved in “all this malarkey”, as he puts it, for 10 years, and speaks as if it’s been a lifetime. “I want to be regarded seriously as an actor, and I feel a lot clearer about what I want to achieve,” he says in his slow, syrupy accent.

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y O’Connell’s own admission, if the acting hadn’t worked out “I could’ve just reared off the tracks”. But the chequered adolescence has enriched his rough-and-readytype roles: a National Front recruit (This Is England), a gang leader (Eden Lake), a juvenile offender (Starred Up) and a soldier (’71). He’s been chiselled “I feel a lot into fighting shape as an Athenian clearer about warrior for 300: Rise of an Empire, what I want to achieve,” says then lost a stone and a half to be O’Connell the withered Zamperini in Unbroken (today there’s not an inch of Role model fat to his sinewy 5ft 8in frame). The compelling “If I wasn’t as panicked or vulnerability in all his roles traumatised as she wanted, she’d has earned him comparisons often come over and wouldn’t to a young Brando – and, last even say anything, she’d just ‘do’ year, a Bafta newcomer award. the emotion for me,” he says Do the high-octane screen with a laugh, about Foster’s performances take their toll? SKINS (2009-13) technique. “We got to a stage “Of course,” he nods, fiddling where I could kind of understand with a pack of Marlboros. STARRED UP what she meant.” He’s considering But he’s quick to point out (2013) following that well-trodden path the alternative: “Being out of of actor-turned-director, like work. I don’t like to spend too Foster and Jolie, and setting up long not working.” During his own production company one one quiet spell, he worked on a day. “You can create jobs then and farm shovelling horse manure; find talents, offer opportunities “very grounding”, as he puts it. like the ones I had,” he says. O’Connell landed his latest ’71 (2014) But right now he’s most part – the lead in Jodie excited – and anxious – about Foster’s Money Monster – over returning to the stage in March a transatlantic Skype session. in The Nap, a new play about “We looked at many, many a troubled snooker professional, actors,” she emails from LA, for which he’ll be commuting “but within seconds of Jack to Sheffield’s Crucible Theatre launching into Kyle, we barely each night – and has been looked back.” The Wall Street studiously practising his lines drama sees him play a since before Christmas. “I’m deranged viewer who, after probably overdoing it, but it’s losing his life’s savings, takes my first dabble at theatre for a the host (George Clooney) of while, and I want to hit the a stock-market-tips television UNBROKEN (2014) ground running,” he says, brow show hostage. “There’s a furrowing. “When I came out of complicated guy in there,” the Royal Court in 2008, I felt like I’d continues Foster of O’Connell, “who learnt more in that theatre than I had clearly has dealt with the consequences in my entire career. I want to repeat of his own emotional demons. Maybe that’s what makes him so hard-working that scale of learning, you know?” If and grateful. I feel so blessed to have those teachers weren’t already eating been able to stand in the room with their words, Jack the lad’s now a him and cheer on his enormous talent.” thoroughly model pupil. Q 233


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FILM TREND:

On the same page From Boston Globe and Rolling Stone writers to two portrayals of the notorious American gossip columnist Hedda Hopper, journalists have become the scoop in a string of new film releases

Celebrity photographer David LaChapelle explains why the works of Sandro Botticelli are as fresh today as they ever were

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otticelli’s Venus standing in an open shell with her knee bent and head tilted in The Birth of Venus (1484-86), above, is one of the most celebrated female nudes in the history of art. I’ve always been influenced by Renaissance sculpture and painting. Right back in the early Eighties in New York, when I used to shoot my friends at my East Village squat, I remember a roommate trying to recreate Michelangelo’s Dying Slave pose. With my work The Rebirth of Venus (2009), top, I wanted to put a contemporary take on Botticelli’s masterpiece and celebrate the beauty of the female form in its unashamed nudity. The noblewoman Simonetta Vespucci posed as Venus for Botticelli. Considered a great beauty (legend has it Botticelli was in love with her), she also modelled for his Venus and Mars, which hangs in the National Gallery and was the inspiration for another of my works, The Rape of Africa (2009), for which Naomi Campbell sat as Venus. I chose Czech model Hana Soukupová to pose for The Rebirth of Venus. She was doing a series of photographs with me in Hawaii, where I live, and I just thought she was beautiful. Traditionally in paintings the

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seashell represented the female sex; instead of having Hana standing on a shell, one of the god-like young men is holding a conch in front of her, while the other blows into a shell, trumpeting her arrival and proclaiming her beauty. It was a very spontaneous shoot, which we set up on a bluff in the rainforest overlooking the South Pacific. I know the spot well and I’d always wanted to shoot there. We started at sunrise, and by the time we’d finished we were all totally sunburnt and looked like lobsters. It took a while to shoot because it was such a precarious location; everyone was balancing with sticks and ladders. The tropical setting was not exactly the Mediterranean that would have inspired Botticelli’s palette; the colours are punchier. The ribbons, which break up the frame, are a reference to another Botticelli painting, The Three Graces (circa 1482), in which it’s as if the painter’s three female figures are dancing round a maypole. I loved the ribbons’ energy – it’s almost like there’s a scribble across the photograph. During Botticelli’s time a lot of his socalled pagan art, depicting classical gods rather than one Christian God, was thought to be immoral and was burnt by the Florentine friar Savonarola – the Donald Trump of the time. But Botticelli’s work wasn’t pagan, it was about the human condition. His Birth of Venus is about pure beauty; give it time and it will transport you away from the darkness of the world. Which is why his work, with its themes of conflict and beauty, continues to be relevant to A Botticellithis day. Q inspired Dolce & Gabbana “Botticelli Reimagined” is s/s ’93 dress is at the V&A, SW7, from on display at March 5 to July 3 the V&A show

TRUMBO (out now) Set in Fifties America, Helen Mirren plays right-wing gossip columnist Hedda Hopper with callous grit and an array of exotic hats, which Hopper, above right, famously wore. Meanwhile, Tilda Swinton adopts a clipped English accent for her Hopper portrayal in Joel and Ethan Coen’s HAIL, CAESAR! (February 26), in which she tries to untangle the mysterious kidnapping of fictional Baird Whitlock, the biggest star in the world, played by Coen favourite George Clooney. SPOTLIGHT (out now) Rachel McAdams and Mark Ruffalo play real-life investigative reporters Sacha Pfeiffer and Mike Rezendes, members of the Boston Globe’s Pulitzer Prize-winning Spotlight Team, which helped to expose widespread sexual abuse within the Massachusetts Catholic Church.

THE END OF THE TOUR (out on DVD) The five-day interview between Rolling Stone writer David Lipsky and the brilliant novelist David Foster Wallace was never published. This film is about that intense 1996 encounter, when Lipsky (Jesse Eisenberg) followed Wallace (Jason Segel) on tour for a piece on “What it’s like to be the most talked about writer in the country right now”. MILES AHEAD (April 22)

“I could write some bullshit… but I’d rather hear it in your own words,” says Rolling Stone reporter Dave Brill (Ewan McGregor) to Miles Davis (Don Cheadle). McGregor’s role is based on journalists who strove to interview Davis in the Seventies. HN

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Darkness FALLS As the novel she describes as “more frightening than Gone Girl” comes to the screen, Gillian Flynn tells Marisa Meltzer why what’s closest to us is scariest of all

E JASON WAMBSGANS/CHICAGO TRIBUNE

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illian Flynn has been living in the dark confines of her book Gone Girl since it was first published in 2012. That’s what happens when your novel about marriage, lies and murder becomes a colossal success, putting you with the ranks of authors like Stephen King or JK Rowling who found global fame and huge fortunes. But before Amazing Amy, before the 10 million copies sold worldwide, and the 2014 film by David Fincher that took nearly $400 million at the

box office, there was Libby Day, the heroine of Flynn’s second book, Dark Places. This month, Gilles PaquetBrenner’s film adaptation of that book is released, starring Charlize Theron as the unlikeable yet gutsy Libby, a woman set on avenging a horrible crime. “My first book, Sharp Objects, is the most gothic, Gone Girl is the most modern, but Dark Places is the most frightening and unnerving.” Flynn is perched on a sofa in a café in Chicago, the city where she lives with her

“It’s a strange little book,” says Flynn of Gone Girl, the novel that brought her worldwide fame. “There’s no one really to root for”

husband Brett Nolan, a lawyer, and their two children: a son named Flynn, five, and Veronica, one. Dark Places, which was published back in 2009, tells the story of Libby Day, sole survivor of the murder of her family in Eighties Kansas. Twenty years later, Libby is still getting by as the girl who survived, living off the dwindling proceeds of a fund in her name. She’s so desperate for money – and also, perhaps, a human connection of some kind – that she agrees to make an > 245


appearance at an underground Kill Club, where true-crime aficionados gather. (In the film, look out for Lizzie Borden in the Kill Club scene, a Hitchcock-style blink-and-you’llmiss-it cameo from Flynn herself.) If the underlying menace of Gone Girl was the recession and tabloid culture, then in Dark Places it is blue-collar poverty, satanic worship, paedophilia.

Today Flynn is dressed in a black shirt and trousers, her long auburn hair spilling over her shoulders, but it’s a look that comes across as more basic than severe. In fact, she has a rather innocent and sweet appearance and is quick with a joke, which makes the whole business of how she writes such twisty thrillers so confounding. “Dark Places is set pretty close to that area of country that In Cold Blood is,” she says, referring to Truman Capote’s classic true-crime book. Growing up in Kansas City, that story haunted her. Dark Places explores an equally

and human beings in a way that you aren’t in a city.” Flynn is known for writing unlikeable, untrustworthy female anti-heroines, which drew Theron to the project. “I loved her lack of sentimentality and it was so refreshing for me to read something with an unabashed and fearless take on a female character,” Theron tells me later. She and Flynn have done their fair share of bonding during the project and while doing press together. (“I can’t say it’s the greatest thing for one’s ego to be constantly matched with Charlize all day long,” Flynn quips.) “The thing that struck me most about Gillian is how normal and funny and down to earth she is,” says Theron. “I mean, how do such dark things come out of someone so light?”

i

From top: Gillian Flynn at the Hollywood Film Awards in 2014; Flynn with Gone Girl stars Rosamund Pike and Carrie Coon; Nicholas Hoult and Charlize Theron in Dark Places

“Serial killers don’t scare me. The scary thing is that something very wrong is happening close to you” horrifying premise, in which a family is murdered one night in the middle of Kansas. Her story is set during the Eighties farm crisis in America, where many small farmers could no longer afford to run their business and their land was foreclosed. The midwestern United States has its own brand of menace, different from noir Los Angeles or gritty Manhattan. “It’s that big, open sky, and you get a sense of your vulnerability; you’re exposed to the weather and animals 246

t’s true that, when she was a girl, Flynn’s family life was achingly normal, with a film professor father and a mother who taught reading. Her parents still live in the house she grew up in and her older brother lives close by. “Kansas City is not the place of huge dreams. It was like: dream, moderately,” jokes Flynn. She attended university in Kansas and then the prestigious Medill School of Journalism at Northwestern University, near Chicago. She thought for a spell that she wanted to be “a hardboiled crime reporter” but instead, after graduating, took a job at Entertainment Weekly. As a young woman, she loved thrillers and horror. “The old-fashioned kind of Hitchcock thrillers as opposed to ‘the serial killer’s out there’ sort of thing. I don’t read as much of those, it doesn’t scare me as much. To me, the scarier thing is that something very wrong is happening very close to you.” She wrote her first two books while still on staff at Entertainment Weekly. They were critical successes – Sharp Objects won two Crime Writers’ Association Dagger awards, and was shortlisted for an Edgar Allan Poe award, the prestigious mystery prize – but much more modest in terms of sales. Before Dark Places even came out, she was laid off from her magazine job, which set up the premise for Gone Girl

– a New York media couple, both made redundant, move to the heartland to recreate themselves. “We were hoping it would build on my audience. I knew I had written a book that I would like to read but it wasn’t like we were all preparing for this thing to happen,” she insists now. “It’s a strange little book. There’s no hero, in that there’s no one really to root for. It’s like a whodunit where you find out who did it in the middle.” Advance word before publication from the sales force was that booksellers were liking this “strange little book”, and it debuted in June 2012 at number two on the New York Times hardcover-fiction bestseller list. When Flynn found out, “I was in Arizona getting ready to do a bookstore reading. I remember I was wading back and forth in the pool, I was like, great!” But she assumed sales would drop off the next week. Instead, Gone Girl went to the top of the list and stayed there for eight weeks. Breathless reviews and positive word of mouth turned it into a literary juggernaut. David Fincher, the director of The Social Network and The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo, snapped up the rights for a reported $1.5 million, with Flynn working on the script. Watching actors recite her dialogue was surreal, she says, but for an author also an exercise in ego management. “You have to let go of that ownership feeling when you hear an actor say a line in a certain way that’s been in your head for three years.” She and Fincher immediately embarked on a second project together, a series called Utopia, a conspiracy thriller set in the near future, starring Rooney Mara. But late last year, before it could be filmed, it was cancelled by HBO, the network that owns the rights. Its future is uncertain. “It sucked,” she sighs. “I mean, partly the pure opportunity it cost – I could have written the next novel in that moment – but I don’t regret it because working with Fincher is like a masterclass.” The 44-year-old author isn’t giving up on Hollywood quite yet, though she will remain living in Chicago. Her next screenplay is for 12 Years a Slave director Steve McQueen, a heist thriller based on the 1983 television series Widows, about four women who come together to pull off the crime left unfinished by their late husbands. “It’s not done wacky, like, ‘Can these crazy ladies do it? Like, you know, with their high heels and their periods?’ They’re badasses, so it’s four good roles for women of all different ages.” >

GETTY; CAROLYN COLE/LOS ANGELES TIMES/CONTOUR BY GETTY

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VOGUEview McQueen first encountered Flynn through his wife. “She was reading Gone Girl and was engrossed with it,” he says. “I read the book. I thought it’s great – popular fiction, but really good. And then I saw Gone Girl and thought, OK! It was fast-moving and it had something. It was a pop drama but engaging. It was surprising for myself to be so engaged.” McQueen didn’t know what to expect when they first met. “We had a dinner meeting and sat down and the first thing she asked for was whiskey. I thought, wonderful, she’s a broad in the real sense of the word.” Flynn takes this a step further. “I’m naturally a bit of a guy’s girl. A lot of my friends are men; I like to sit and play video games – but that doesn’t mean the Cool Girl.” Flynn is referring to Amy’s famous “Cool Girl” monologue in Gone Girl: “Men always say that as the defining compliment, don’t they? She’s a cool girl. Being the Cool Girl means I am a hot, brilliant, funny woman who adores football, poker, dirty jokes, and burping. Who plays video games,

“I knew I had written a book I would like to read, but it wasn’t like we were all preparing for this thing to happen” drinks cheap beer… Cool Girls never get angry; they only smile in a chagrined, loving manner and let their men do whatever they want.” Flynn was guilty of trying to maintain a similar façade in her twenties, but it’s safe to say she’s able to be her fully nuanced self with her husband.

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illian met Brett Nolan through mutual friends and they were friends for years before they started dating. He is an active reader of all her first drafts, she tells me. In an early version of Dark Places, Libby was perky and well-adjusted. It was her husband’s gentle suggestion that the character wasn’t believable which made Flynn start over and create the much darker, more tortured version of Libby who appears in the published novel. His philosophy on her success is, “You’re having a moment now, grab it.” “I would never have married a man who thought it was my duty because I have a vagina to do everything in the domestic sphere,” is how Flynn puts it. Her office is in her Frank Lloyd Wright-style home in the Lincoln Park neighbourhood of Chicago. She has a

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large desk befitting, she says, a robber baron and a treadmill desk where she can walk – albeit at a very slow pace – while working. She works a strict nineto-five schedule, with an occasional hour or two at night or at the weekend. “Some days when I’ve been up with a deadline, I don’t feel remotely guilty leaving my kids with a babysitter while I sleep and watch an old episode of The West Wing.” Her rule is not to be a guilty working mother. “It’s important for kids to see mothers with jobs they love and realise that they’re not entirely the centre of the universe.” At home, she wears sweatpants. “They’re not awesome yoga pants that are cute; they are a step above pyjama pants,” she says. “The greatest thing is washing my hair as little as possible, no make-up, and I wear a bra as little as humanly possible. I take it off as soon as I get home – my husband often finds it in the kitchen.” Not that Flynn is opposed to moments of glamour. At the 2015 Golden Globes, where she was nominated for a best screenplay award, she wore a burgundy Zac Posen gown. “I had a newborn and was like, whatever you can get me into. My greatest regret is not buying it – or saying I lost it,” she says with a flicker of wickedness. But by the end of the night she was in bare feet. She enjoys spending time with friends from university, her family, and other parents of young children, emphasising that she’s not particularly materialistic. With the success and, yes, money from Gone Girl, she has had just a few splurges. (Forbes recently put her earnings at $9 million.) Her husband got her a first edition of The Mysterious Affair at Styles, Agatha Christie’s first published novel. She bought a new car, albeit a sensible Prius, and carries a black leather bag by Tom Ford. “People try to ‘JK Rowling’ me a little bit,” she says. “Rags to riches isn’t accurate. I went from modest. It drives me insane – it’s insulting to people who were laid off during the recession who were in trouble. I was never in a danger zone. We had a home. I was nervous for a while, but that’s a luxurious place to be.” Flynn is even more opinionated on the subject of how women are portrayed both on the screen and the page – something over which she now has some power, after all. “Hollywood is still making movies for 13-year-old boys. That’s not going to star a lot of women. Women [writers] are very ambidextrous because we don’t sit there and think, ‘Oh, a movie about a man.

I’d better switch my whole thinking so I can understand this.’” It’s a bias that starts early, and one she’s trying to combat within her own family. “I have this super-insistent rule in my house that for every book Flynn reads starring a boy, we read a book starring a girl.” She admits she had a moment of pre-publication panic – would male readers want to pick up a book called Gone Girl? “Well-meaning men come up to me and say, ‘I don’t normally read books by women but I have to tell you I read your book’, and that’s not acceptable,” she says. “I’m a polite Midwesterner so I don’t take anyone to task, but you know I just usually say, ‘Well, let me give you a list of others.” If you like this book, you should try [books by] other people with vaginas – you might like them, too.” Although thrillers by women about women with “girl” in the title have become something of a marketing phenomenon (Luckiest Girl Alive, The Girl on the Train, The Good Girl), Flynn swears she hasn’t read any of them. “I have lived in Gone Girl world for so long, between writing it, doing the movie, and then talking about it all, I’ve had my fill. If someone says something is like Gone Girl, I’m all good – as long as it’s not done cynically.” But now Flynn must tackle the issue of her next act. Today she is getting her portrait painted for her edition of the Hogarth Shakespeare series, in which famous writers reimagine the plays. Flynn’s pick is Hamlet, but it isn’t set to be published until 2022. Sooner will be her next novel, “a big folkloric story of a murder that has big echoes over different generations and how it all ties together.” One of the inspirations is Norman Mailer’s exploration of capital punishment, The Executioner’s Song, which she rereads every year. Returning to fiction, and the daunting task of following up Gone Girl is, she admits, frankly intimidating. “I really wish I had started it immediately. I don’t regret working with David Fincher, but the more time goes by, there’s more build-up,” she says with a sigh and a smile. “I need to manage my own expectations: I’m never going to have another Gone Girl, there’s never going to be that sense of propulsion again. Is it too much or not enough like Gone Girl, that’s what will be in my head when I settle down and work. Now I need to get over myself and write the book I want to write.” Q “Dark Places” is in cinemas now, and out on DVD from February 22


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VOGUEcompetition

Vogue TALENT CONTEST 2016 Recognised as one of the most prestigious writing prizes around, Vogue’s Talent Contest for Young Writers has helped launch the careers of authors, playwrights, poets – and members of Vogue’s staff. We’re looking for journalists with an eye for a good story, who can tell it with originality, wit and structure. The winner will receive £1,000, and the runner-up, £500. If you are under 25 and want to enter, read on. Please note, you must complete all sections.

1. Write a descriptive interview with a person who is not a member of your family (800 words). 2. Write a social-observation piece. This can be a cultural review, a commentary on current affairs, or an article about a fashion or beauty trend (800 words). 3. Pitch three ideas for stories suitable for Vogue. These can be related to the arts, beauty, fashion, a personality, or lifestyle orientated. You should briefly outline the proposal and, if you like, you may include visual prompts (no longer than 200 words each). Entries must be submitted via email. Please include a photograph of yourself as an attachment, while the main body of the message should list your name, permanent address, telephone number, date of birth and occupation. The judging panel will include Vogue’s editor, Alexandra Shulman, senior members of the magazine’s staff and guest judges. Finalists will be invited to a lunch at Vogue, after which the winner will be decided.

CONDITIONS OF ENTRY 1. Entrants should not have reached their 25th birthday by January 1, 2016. 2. Entries must be submitted via email, to arrive no later than the closing date, to voguetalent2016@condenast.co.uk. 3. Copyright of entries belongs to the Condé Nast Publications Ltd. 4. The competition results will be announced in an autumn issue of Vogue and on Vogue.co.uk. 5. In the event of a tie, the prize money will be shared. 6. The editor’s decision is final. 280

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CLOSING DATE: FRIDAY APRIL 8, 2016


# S TA RT W I T H T H E S H O E S Spring / Summer 16 dunel o ndo n. c om


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Turn a fresh face towards the dazzling new season. Spring is looking bright Edited by VIRGINIA CHADWYCK-HEALEY

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Long LINES Showing a fluid elegance and, at the same time, a very easy wearability, The Krayys has made its debut, launching exclusively with Farfetch. Lengthening and altogether lovely. 1. Cotton shirtdress, £693. Cotton trousers, £283. 2. Lamé safari shirtdress, £850. 3. Linen jacket, £712. Linen layered skirt, £750. All The Krayys at Farfetch.com

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You have the loafers, the glittery skirt, the floral shirt – now all you need is the ultimate travelling companion. Alessandro Michele, you’ve won our hearts. 290

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MARINA RINALDI COTTON-MIX SHIRT, £324, GB.MARINA RINALDI.COM


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MARIO TESTINO. STYLED BY LUCINDA CHAMBERS. HAIR: CHRISTIAAN. MAKE-UP: VAL GARLAND. NAILS: LORRAINE GRIFFIN. MODEL: EDIE CAMPBELL

vogue

spring FEVER

With the frisson of excitement that comes with the new spring collections is a renewed enthusiasm to shop. Our advice? Cast your net wide, from updated classics – the biker jacket, the slip dress – to personality pieces bursting with energy. Do you dare to try the next-generation tracksuit? Or the new-breed prairie dress, revived in dazzling brights? Now is the time to indulge the impulse for the off-kilter. But among the thrills, there’s always a place for practicality. A utilitarian attitude is played out with military precision in user-friendly navy and khaki via zippy jumpsuits and multi-pocketed officer jackets. Now, doesn’t that all sound like it would slot right in to your wardrobe?

Leather jacket, £2,595. Silkcrêpe and lace dress, £2,995. Both Burberry Prorsum


Pyjamas are now an inviting daytime proposition. Up your style with a silken pair by Olivia von Halle Olympia wears emerald silk pyjamas, £350. Edie wears blue silk shorts, £310 as part of set. Both Olivia von Halle. Bespoke eye masks, £40 each, Yolke. Sunglasses, from a selection, Jeremy Scott. Hair: Christiaan. Make-up: Val Garland. Nails: Lorraine Griffin. Production: 10-4 Inc. Set design: Jack Flanagan. Digital artwork: R&D. Models: Edie and Olympia Campbell

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“At first I was a bit embarrassed about modelling. It was not something I dreamt of, like riding,” Edie admits Embroidered crêpe jacket, £2,130. Matching trousers, £1,290. Silk shirt, £525. Tie, £305. All Gucci

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She’s conquered the catwalk and rules the racecourse. West London girl Edie Campbell – photographed here with her sister Olympia – tells Fiona Golfar why she’s ready for a new challenge Photographed by Mario Testino. Styled by Lucinda Chambers 297


How good is your super-clash? Gucci makes snake print, sportswear and powder-pink chiffon the new power combination Emboidered silk bomber jacket, £2,130. Organdie blouse, £595. Leather skirt, £3,720. Leather shoes, £600. All Gucci. Socks, stylist’s own

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“It’s true,” Edie chortles of her relationship with her younger sister. “We did not get on as teenagers, although I don’t think there is anything unusual in that, really. Show me an easy teenager!” Olympia wears white cotton top, £390. Black patent-leather skirt, £2,190. Edie wears black patent-leather top, £1,375. Black wool skirt, £1,090. All Salvatore Ferragamo. White canvas shoes, £395, Margaret Howell. Headbands, made for shoot by hairstylist

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Fierce florals define spring’s rebellious new mood. Join the gang with Mary Katrantzou’s studded minidresses Edie wears yellow crêpe smock top, £1,890. Teal quilted lamé dress, £2,095. Leather boots, £1,255. Olympia wears multicoloured georgette dress, £4,575. All Mary Katrantzou, at Harrods and Marykatrantzou.com

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blustery morning in London, and the trees in Holland Park, not far from Edie Campbell’s new flat, are clinging to the last of their leaves. A skeleton crew has gathered to shoot the first picture of the day featuring Edie and her younger sister, Olympia. The idea is to photograph the girls in bed in pyjamas, and the atmosphere is relaxed – familial, in fact. Mario Testino, known for being sentimental, is reminiscing about how he and Vogue’s Lucinda Chambers – today’s stylist – first shot Edie for a story about teenagers for British Vogue when she was 13. “I was so excited,” Edie chips in. “I remember not only did I get the day off school, I got a free lunch, and there were boys!” Edie, now 25, is looking adorable having recently got out of bed: her famously pink cheeks are glowing, and the remnants of last night’s makeup is smudged to perfection around those enormous eyes, while she puffs away on an e-cigarette, rarely out of her hand. Her 5ft 10in frame is clad ready for the first shot in a pair of silk pyjama shorts and top, her legs sporting an impressive array of bruises – “Horse-induced,” she admits. An eye mask bearing her name is shoved into her now famous mullet, currently dyed a pretty sandy blonde by her colourist Josh Wood. There is an inscrutable quality to Edie, a sort of “do not disturb” air of self-containment. She’s definitely not cold or unfriendly, but neither is she about to bake you a batch of glutenfree cookies à la Karlie Kloss. She appears so controlled, so self-assured, so unperturbed by what impression she may or may not be giving, that you can’t help almost nervously wondering what she’s really thinking when she focuses those mesmerising blue eyes on you. The new flat is a light, bright onebedroom affair with a view of west London treetops from its three large sitting-room sash windows. Its decor is a work in progress; Edie is the first to admit she isn’t remotely interested in decorating (why waste valuable

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horse-riding time?), but the renowned interior designer Christopher Hodsoll, a great family friend in whose homes she spent a lot of her childhood, is helping her decorate. It is not ready yet but the bones are there and possibly the best way to describe it would be as a grand 18thcentury English house squeezed into a spacious but essentially onebedroom London flat. No fashionable mid-century modern for Edie. “I wanted somewhere warm and welcoming that I could come home to from work and flop,” she explains, launching herself on to one of the comfortable Soane sofas, living proof that Hodsoll is fulfilling the brief. Edie’s penchant for this traditional English decoration is all the more interesting given that her mother is the former Vogue fashion editor turned architect Sophie Hicks, whose minimalist style seems to have sent her eldest daughter ricocheting in the opposite direction. Edie’s father, Roddy Campbell, who separated from her mother when Edie was a teenager, is a hedge-fund manger

Edie’s horses, Dolly and Armani, are almost as famous as she is turned entrepreneur (his company, Vrumi, rents out space in people’s homes to use during the day as offices). Edie fondly describes him as having “little visual interest, although a keen eye for good quality. I grew up with so many conversations about the visual world,” she continues. “My mother had this very strong vision, and a distinctively pared-down style in both clothes and architecture. I don’t really want to go that route. I always liked Christopher’s houses; his daughter, the artist Alba Hodsoll, is one of my best friends, and I spent so much time in their home while growing up and always loved being in it. He has the same delusions of grandeur as I have!” she laughs. “Don’t you love going to the sales on Lots Road?” asks Testino, bemused by her apparent lack of interest in trawling markets and auction houses. “Fuck, no!” she exclaims. “I can’t think of anything worse!” The bookshelves are already crammed with well-thumbed books – Kurt Vonnegut, Jeanette Winterson and Laurie Lee, as well as art books

about Rothko, Gilbert & George and more, and Ginsberg’s collected poems. (Edie’s an ambassador for the Reading Agency, which encourages young people to read.) She has managed to combine a hugely successful modelling career working steadily with photographers such as Testino, Steven Meisel and Tim Walker, while simultaneously gaining a first in history of art from the Courtauld Institute. Her professional success has also allowed her to fund her passion for riding, which has resulted in a successful career as an eventer. (She won the inaugural allfemale race at Goodwood in 2011.) Her horses, Dolly and Armani (documented frequently on her Instagram account), are almost as famous as she is. Dolly even made it into the Lanvin autumn/winter 2014 campaign, shot by Tim Walker, which featured Edie and Olympia, their mother, grandparents, brother Arthur, father Roddy, Edie’s boyfriend at the time, Otis Ferry (son of Bryan), and Olympia’s then boyfriend, Matteo. The campaign summed up everything Edie represents – not so much the aristocratic world of Stella Tennant but a west London world of sophisticated, well-bred, welleducated bohemia (although she does admit to attending very un-boho hunt balls for the three years she was dating Ferry, who was master of his local hunt in Shropshire). The artistic, creative circles she hailed from meant that not only was she at ease with the titans of the fashion world (having known many of them as family friends) but also that they had first dibs on her. “It was a time when all my friends’ children were becoming teenagers,” says Testino, talking about why he first cast Edie at 16, in the 2006 Burberry campaign. “That year was the 150th anniversary of Burberry and they wanted to do a party-themed campaign. I said, ‘Why don’t we do “family”?’ I put Edie with Penelope Tree, which in a funny way was the same values from different eras.” Testino also shot Kate Moss, Stella Tennant, Lily Donaldson, and David Bailey’s son Fenton. “It was a whole British family,” finishes Mario. Speaking of family, I ask Olympia, who is five years younger, what it’s like working with her sister. “Better now she’s less of a bitch,” she replies > 306 in a flash. When I tell Edie 301


A flawless canvas is a prerequisite of any masterpiece. Prep with YSL Le Teint Touche Eclat foundation,£31.50, for lightweight perfection Straw hat, from £290, Eugenia Kim. Personalised especially for Vogue

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“My mother had this very strong vision, and a distinctively pared-down style. I don’t really want to go down that route,” says Edie Olympia wears sheer beaded organza dress, £2,615. Black gingham shirt, £385. Red polo shirt, £635. Leather boots, £1,395. Socks, £45. Headband, £240. Ribbon necklace, from £725. All Miu Miu. Edie wears sheer beaded organza dress, £2,435. Black gingham shirt, £385. Black polo shirt, £635. Bikini bottoms, £85. Leather boots, £1,395. Socks, £45. Headband, £240. Ribbon necklace, from £725. All Miu Miu

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Edie has the best kind of English observational wit, taking no hostages but cackling with laughter as she delivers a stinging one-liner at your expense Opposite: Edie wears studded linen blouse, £2,110. Silk trousers, £1,090. Olympia wears embroidered wool top, £5,020. Chiffon bra, £510. Linen/cotton skirt, £1,420. All Louis Vuitton. Leather and python boots, £595, Terry de Havilland

Take theatrical adornment to the next level. Between Christopher Kane’s electric party dress, Prada’s bauble earrings and smudges of clubby glitter, there is now no such thing as just one finishing touch Lace dress with fringe skirt, £4,995, Christopher Kane. Paillette earrings, £325, Prada

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what her sister had to say, she roars with laughter. “It’s true,” she chortles. “We did not get on as teenagers, although I don’t think there is anything unusual in that, really – show me an easy teenager!” For Edie to be thrown into an industry at the top came with its challenges. “At first I was a bit embarrassed by modelling. It just happened to me; it was not something I dreamt of, like riding, which I had been in love with since I was eight. I had to learn that it was so much more than just showing up and looking into a camera.” Edie credits Steven Meisel with teaching her how to pose. “He was so specific with what he wanted. He would always have a mirror in front of me so I could see what I was doing, and slowly I learnt it wasn’t all about me; it was about translating what was needed for the picture. I had to understand how to fill a page.” nlike many of the girls who open their lives up to Instagram and other forms of social media, this is something that one feels is not entirely natural to Edie. She does it, of course, because she is a pro, and now it’s part of the job. What one does get from her Instagram posts – apart from her riding prowess – is a sense of how funny and naughty she can be. Which, by the way, having spent a night out with her last summer in Paris, I can confirm is very. She has the best kind of English observational wit, taking no hostages but cackling with laughter as she delivers a stinging one-liner at your expense. “She makes me belly laugh,” says Tim Walker, who met Edie when she was 16 at a Jean Paul Gaultier show in Paris. “She has very funny observations about people, and she often verbalises what I am thinking. She’ll just come out with it.” He explains why he has enjoyed such a long and productive friendship and professional collaboration with her. “There is no vanity to her. She is right here and now, and that’s why the camera likes her. I have been looking at her for a long time and it’s a rare and amazing quality; Kate Moss has it, too. If you are vain, you bring a suitcase of worries to work, but if you don’t have vanity, you can do so much

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more.” Walker credits Edie’s ability to interpret a picture on an intellectual level to her history of art degree. “All that looking at Uccello, breaking pictures down to get to the essence of them, really comes into play when she is working.” The other quality that defines Edie is the no-nonsense attitude she has to everything. Her great friend, the artist and textile designer Christabel MacGreevy, with whom Edie is collaborating on a playful sideline of iron-on jeans patches named Itchy Scratchy Patchy, describes Edie as someone who “gets on with things in that very British way”. The pair met as teenagers and still hang out on their west London teenage beat, “spending too much time at Eat Tokyo and in pubs down Portobello Road”. Edie is not interested in spending any more time in the fashion world than she has to. (Nor do I get the impression that she has a big horsey social life at the stables, either.) “I often get lonely when I travel – I miss my friends from school and my real life,” she admits. “My oldest friends are who I want to hang out with when I’m not working.” So not for her the sisterhood of the model family, as many of the girls describe it? “No, I think too much is made of all that,” she says in her unguarded manner as we stride down the Goldhawk Road in Shepherd’s Bush, checking out the fabric shops for possible materials for the patches. She’s wearing a pair of jeans with a black nylon bomber jacket and a white hoodie underneath. “YSL?” I ask, given that she is the face of their beauty campaign (and the new face of Fendi and Cavalli). “Nah!” she laughs. “Army surplus.” Her style is boyish and easy, not minimal Comme des Garçons like her mother, but not girly either. “The patches aren’t quite right yet,” she admits. “It’s hard to get them to stay on, but we are changing the manufacturer.” Again, one senses that she will make sure that she gets them absolutely perfect; that’s her nature. As Christabel says, “She pushes herself hard; she’s so like her mum in that respect. She gets up early, she does a lot, she is tough on herself.” Tim Walker agrees: “We have been in very extreme places, we’ve been to Burma travelling around on the back of a coal lorry. She has a backpacking, adventuring quality.” Not that Edie doesn’t do girly and playful when she wants to. I watched

her give a talk about collaboration with Tim Walker the night of the Vogue shoot at a Times readers’ event – quite a serious affair. Her oldest friend, Jessica Draper, was sitting in the audience with Edie’s mother. After speaking articulately for an hour, Edie came over to say hello. She and Jess fell into each other’s arms screaming and bouncing up and down like 14-year-olds. Later I asked her what they were laughing about. “Oh, just boys,” she replied. Cool as a cucumber again. Last summer Edie and Otis broke up; she has nothing but nice things to say about him and the relationship, citing the pressures of work and geography as factors in the break-up. I mention a couple of people I’ve heard she might be seeing. Rather than shut me down for being too nosy, she laughs and says, “I’m enjoying flirting!” I wonder if her

“Slowly I learnt that modelling wasn’t all about me; it was about translating what was needed for the picture” perceived life with Ferry and horses and hunt balls made her seem remote to people. “Maybe,” she muses. But I sense that for the formative years that they were together he offered support and a like-mindedness that were crucial. It’s not easy to be both posh and clever in the fashion world. Edie has found a way: with the former, she doesn’t entertain the idea of pretending she isn’t; and the latter she uses to her best advantage. She has started writing for magazines – T, Love, Holiday and System, among others. “I don’t know if I’m necessarily a good writer yet,” she admits carefully. “But I think it’s a worthwhile thing to at least try. On a personal level, I spend nearly all my time working in collaboration with people, which is wonderful. But it does mean that you can rely on other people as a creative crutch if you can’t find the solution. With writing it’s all on you. So it’s a challenge and it reflects – good or bad – on me.” That’s Edie Campbell, face to face with another challenge and relishing every minute of it. Q


Sequined hotpants, to order, Gareth Pugh. Hat, as before

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A sprinkling of sequins, supersize fishnets and, of course, a few frills – the stage is set for a dramatic entrance Sequined silk top, £11,500, Giorgio Armani. Tutu skirt, ruffle and mask, courtesy of the National Theatre. Leather boots, from £620, Céline. Tights, from a selection, Maison Margiela

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Streetwear classics have come of age. The only way to wear Alexander Wang’s souped-up track pants and cropped bomber is with lashings of attitude Silk bomber jacket, £775. Cotton trousers with lacing detail, £700. Both Alexander Wang. Leather and glitter boots, £395, Terry de Havilland. Beauty note: who said switching your hairstyle had to be hard? Apply Label.M Pliable Definer, £13.25, from root to ends for reworkable texture and pliable hold

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“Edie has a backpacking, adventuring quality. We have been in very extreme places – we’ve been to Burma travelling around on the back of a coal lorry,” says photographer Tim Walker Olympia wears military jacket, £1,995. Tiered lace dress, £3,995. Embroidered wedge shoes, £1,595. Edie wears frock coat, £2,635. Tiered lace dress, £6,395. Fil-coupé trousers, £720. All Alexander McQueen. For stockists, all pages, see Vogue Information

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Sports illustrated: JW Anderson draws a new line in luxury casuals. The update? A graphic double take on the tracksuit trouser Gabardine top, £685. Twill trousers, £485. Both JW Anderson. Socks, £12, Palace. Hair: Anthony Turner. Make-up: Peter Phillips. Nails: Anatole Rainey. Set design: Andy Hillman. Production: North Six. Digital artwork: D Touch. Models: Isabel Alsina, Cayley King, Rita Saunders and Kiki Willems

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game, set,

MATCH Play off this season’s pretty florals and bold graphics with crisp, sporting style Photographs by Craig McDean. Styling by Jane How

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Wear the edgy eccentricity of Vetements’ thigh-high boots with a strictly British twist: the London look is all about teaming them with a Palace skater T-shirt Cotton T-shirt, £35, Palace. Tie-dye silk-taffeta and leather skirt, £4,060, Roberto Cavalli. PVC and leather boots, from £1,200, Vetements, at Dover Street Market

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Match point: Fendi’s smock top and Chloé’s collegiate tracksuit trousers make an easy power couple Cotton smock top, £1,030, Fendi. Jersey tracksuit bottoms, £870, Chloé. Embroidered leather boots, from £1,960, Vetements, at Browns. Vintage earrings, £75, Gillian Horsup

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Gucci’s feminine sportswear mash-up is on a winning streak. Naturally, Alessandro Michele serves up his cult side stripes with blooming botanicals This page: goalie shirt, £65, Adidas & Palace. Pink crepon shirt with neck-tie, £745. Flared jersey trousers, £1,140. Both Gucci. Shoes, stylist’s own

Prada’s gentlemanly golf jersey sets spring knitwear on a new, playful course. Subvert the look with country-club pearls Opposite: cashmere tank top, £690. Shantung top, £745. Both Prada. Vintage earrings, £88, Gillian Horsup

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The new champion wardrobe piece? A pale grey sweatshirt Hooded sweatshirt, £84, Champion, at Consortium. co.uk. Floral-print dress with ties, £2,710, Chloé. Embroidered leather boots and earrings, as before

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Make room: Céline’s scoop-neck blouse elevates spacious sports trousers with a fresh, billowing innocence Opposite: poplin top, from £805, Céline. Tracksuit trousers, £225, Lacoste. Vintage earrings, £75, Gillian Horsup

Leave the jacket at home. By day or evening, the cover-up of choice is the nextgeneration hoodie This page: silk slip dress, £3,560, Calvin Klein Collection. Jersey hoodie, from £650, Vetements, at Dover Street Market. Socks, £12, Palace

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The millennial logo has returned. This time around wear yours beneath feminine, gauzy chiffon This page: organza dress, £6,200, Dior. Training vest, £30, Umbro. Sock boots, from £1,020, Vetements, at Dover Street Market. Earrings, as before

Forget hard-edged androgyny: the exposed waistband is the detail to borrow from the boys now Opposite: chiffon blouse, £1,240, Louis Vuitton. Tracksuit bottoms, from £12, Kappa. Boxer shorts, from a selection, Paco Rabanne. Beauty note: cross the finishing line with graphic, over-sized sweeps of eyeliner. Try Dior Diorshow Pro Liner in Black, £20, for streamlined precision

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Pick your team: all eyes are now on Lacoste’s Seventiestinged team colours Opposite: cropped bomber jacket, £160, Lacoste. Denim dress, £2,543, Chanel. Beauty note: offset a boyish undercut with gently tousled waves. Use Bumble & Bumble Grooming Creme, £10, on lengths to retain feminine lustre

The new state of undress demands a novel approach to evening footwear. Sport Vetements’ sock booties and a football-pitchgreen get-up This page: Lurex dress, from £1,160. Sock boots, from £730. Both Vetements, at Dover Street Market and Joseph. Thanks to Big Sky Studios and Great Northern Hotel, N1. For stockists, all pages, see Vogue Information

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COUNTRY

life Pastoral prints, sweetened frills and smart gingham set spring’s nostalgic mood on a boldly romantic track

Photographs by Alasdair McLellan. Styling by Kate Phelan

Soft shirting is the new counterpoint for exquisite lacework. Note how graphic stripes enliven the sheerest peasant dress Silk-muslin and lace dress, £1,850, Alberta Ferretti. Striped cotton-mix dress, £820, Awake, at Harrods. Linen/cotton pocket square, tied at neck, £110, Brunello Cucinelli, at Mrporter.com. Ribbon, worn as belt, from £4 a metre, VV Rouleaux. Jewellery, throughout, model’s own. Hair: Duffy. Make-up: Lynsey Alexander. Production: Bellhouse Production. Local production: Mamma Team. Digital artwork: Output. Model: Jean Campbell

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Nothing spells springtime like garden-fresh cotton. Let purity rule with Philosophy’s delicate broderie anglaise and fluttering frills This page: broderieanglaise blouse, £330. Matching skirt, £380. Both Philosophy by Lorenzo Serafini

This season’s faded florals bring a mellow mood to daywear. Clashes can be understated, too; Etro’s pale bouquets strike a perfect mismatch with Suno’s countrified gingham Opposite: reversible cotton gilet, £1,745. Printed silk dress, £3,155. Both Etro. Checked cotton shirt, £194, Suno. Leather ankle boots, £375, Tricker’s. Ribbon, tied at neck and waist, from £3 a metre, VV Rouleaux

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Turn up the saturation. Vetements’ ice-cool take on the meadow dress is all about that intense hit of acid yellow Satin dress, from £1,060, Vetements, at Dover Street Market. Leather shoes, £580, Manolo Blahnik for Wes Gordon. Socks with floral trim, from £35, Maria La Rosa

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A plunging neckline is easy to handle with a little help from Versace’s preppy shirt. Be sure to button up all the way Printed silk dress, £710, Hilfiger Collection. Striped cotton shirt, from £390, Versace. Beauty note: a sweet, floral flush evokes the levity of springtime. Dust Estée Lauder Pure Color Blush in Plush Petal, £27, over the apples of the cheeks

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Do a double take on the classic white blouse. A flowerstrewn print is as pretty as a posy Opposite: checked cotton blouse, from £290, A Détacher. Floral cotton shirt, £99, Baum & Pferdgarten

Erdem pioneers the new prairie-girl look. The winning piece? A flyaway gown speckled with wild strawberries This page: silk-voile dress, £2,575. Embroidered raw-silk shoes, £580. Both Erdem. Socks, as before

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A novel take on modern layering: wear Miu Miu’s gauzy dress over sweetened (but starched) office attire Opposite: tulle wrap dress, £1,010. Cotton shirt, £385. Wool skirt, £725. All Miu Miu

Antique hues and pastoral motifs are entering a realm of their own. The modern heirloom? Alexander McQueen’s embroidered coatdress This page: washed-chenille dress, £7,195, Alexander McQueen. Cotton T-shirt, £10, Uniqlo. Fabric, made into neckerchief, £22.50 a metre, Liberty. Straw hat, to hire, Angels

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Linen is big news for spring. Play up the bucolic side of Céline’s sculpted silhouette with a frilled white blouse and cowgirl-style neckerchief Linen dress, from £1,190. Leather shoes, from £660. Both Céline. Broderie-anglaise shirt, £159, Cabbages & Roses. Silk/cotton pocket square, worn as neckerchief, £110, Brunello Cucinelli, at Mrporter.com. Socks, as before

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Pretty needn’t mean wholesome. Saint Laurent’s decadent take on the grunge slip speeds the Nineties staple into the 21st century Georgette dress, £3,135, Saint Laurent by Hedi Slimane. Ankle boots, as before. Beauty note: nothing is more romantic than a soft centre parting and fluttering flyaways. Mist hair with Toni & Guy Glamour Moisturising Shine Spray Lightweight Gloss, £6.39, to enhance natural movement

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Preen’s particular shade of fondant pink points to nostalgia but doesn’t come with an age limit Opposite: silk-jacquard dress, £1,632, Preen, at Matchesfashion.com. Socks and ankle boots, as before

Gucci’s moody gypsy florals invite a new attitude. Where will you take it? This page: georgette dress, £3,020, Gucci. Fabric, made into neckerchief, £24 a metre, Cloth House. Thanks to Casa Palacio de Carmona, Seville. For stockists, all pages, see Vogue Information

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From left: Princess Elizabeth announcing her engagement in 1947, wearing Norman Hartnell; in sweeping silks at the Festival of Britain in 1951; the Queen in hot pink by Norman Hartnell for a royal tour of India, 1961; a sea-green coat and hat for Easter in Windsor, 1988

Royal VARIETY Diplomatically, culturally and socially, the Queen’s considered wardrobe has played a central role in her reign, helping seal her image around the globe. Drusilla Beyfus looks back on 90 years of royal style – from the tiaras to the tweeds

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M the Queen and I are close contemporaries. Memories in her name reach back to babyhood. My nannie related with the greatest possible pride that one day, when pushing our Silver Cross pram in the park, I was taken for the young Princess Elizabeth. It must have been my bonnet – an early intimation that clothes were to become the very mark and signature of the Queen’s public image. That episode ended my headsup in sartorial royal history, as our tidy day wardrobes parted company – hers towards Norman Hartnell and Hardy Amies, mine towards Jean Muir and Jil Sander. Nor was there a link in the everyday. My understanding is that HM has not been seen about her business in a catalogue of items that are pretty well basic to my kit, and arguably belong to our generation: black tights, jeans, poloneck sweaters, shirt-andskirt combos, T-shirts with graphic images, pull-on woolly hats, trainers. On the other hand, it’s fair to say in this context that no living woman has appeared in a greater array of sartorial effects than has Queen Elizabeth II. And where fashion is concerned, it’s interesting that these include many pieces that are said to be royal no-nos, such as off-the-peg dresses, culottes, streetwise long boots, dark shaded sunglasses and black for evening. HM is now the longest-serving monarch in the nation’s chronicles, marking her 90th birthday on April 21 this year. One can speculate whether she will be our last female sovereign. Males are in line for the throne for the next three generations, and we don’t know what or who comes after that. In the meantime, the number-crunching of HM is impressive: 266 overseas visits to 119 countries. Last year her diary encompassed 341 official engagements, counting private audiences.Throughout she has communicated a sense of dedication that has shown no sign of waning. I metaphorically raise my hat to her – no matter that our generation is the first in modern times in which a woman could be considered well dressed without one. Much of the Queen’s public life has been bound up in sartorial >

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considerations. A factor that will be brought into focus in this year’s exhibition by the Royal Collection Trust, Fashioning a Reign: 90 Years of Style. Equating to a grand historical lookbook, the display covers the Queen’s life and reign and is the largest ever shown. It makes clear that decisions over the decades range from satisfying her often-aired belief that people who come to see the Queen ought to be able to do so easily, without being frustrated by her chosen form of outfit, to the more complex question of selecting forms of dress that communicate with the audience. Diplomatically, culturally and socially, the royal wardrobe has an obligation to be booboo-proof, well able to function in the light of a sartorial hotchpotch of tricky sensitivities and trip-up issues. Few would question that the clothing of the Queen has constituted a big help in enabling her to play the part of Her Royal Nimbleness. How has the style of dress that goes with the royal role come about? One answer is through intensive prepping,

Princess Elizabeth to Prince Philip. In the midst of postwar austerity and coupon-ridden frugality, it might be thought that the sheer lavishness of the nuptial gown would have struck an inappropriate note. Not a bit of it! The populace lapped up details of Norman Hartnell’s creation: the yardage of delectable ivory duchesse satin, the number of seed pearls and crystal beads in the embroideries, the deep folds in the full skirt. All the pageantry seemed to satisfy a hunger long denied. Once into her reign, an independence of spirit emerged in relation to her clothes that was spot on the generational mood. It applied to many of those of us who came to fashion post-World War II. Allowing for the fact that both mother and daughter were dressed by the London couturier Norman Hartnell, it’s clear that the successful formula of floaty chiffons and theatrical effects he had created for the Queen Mother was way off the mark for the young royal. Hartnell’s biographer Michael Pick confirms, “the sleek lines of the young Queen’s wardrobe differed from her mother’s established look.” One wonders whether the 2007 photographs of the Queen taken by Annie Leibovitz, which depict her in a stately long gown with shoulders widely enfolded in fur, fully caught on to the sitter’s more modern approach to dress. To my mind, they echo the parental generation, or an even earlier period. Diplomacy is stitched into the royal wardrobe – detail is key. Embroidery, for example, has highlighted relationships between nations and regions. Her coronation dress boasted British and Commonwealth emblems. When the Queen visited Ireland in 2011, her robe for the state banquet at Dublin Castle was embellished with more than 2,000 hand-sewn shamrocks. Colour is more than a shade. Its symbolism may govern options. Take the instance of the blush-pink gown worn by HM at her spectacular James Bond-inspired entrance to the 2012 Olympic Games. Care had to be taken to select a tone that was not associated strongly with any of the participating nations. Staying within the margins of conservative dress, HM began to find her own style in the Sixties and >

Diplomacy is stitched into the royal wardrobe – detail is key personal dedication and learning on the job. Underlying any review of the Queen’s attitude to dress is her apparent lack of vanity. Normally, a young woman as good-looking and well-placed as was Princess Elizabeth would have developed some fondness for vanity’s self-regard. But we never spot HM glancing at herself in a looking glass, or indicating that she is aware of people’s flattery. Even when she dons those magnificent royal jewels, it seems to be more out of a sense of duty than any wish to show them off stylishly. A contra observation relates to her jolly touch on the makeup box. From the beginning she was partial to lipstick, a bright red being a signature. She has been seen in public repairing the shine. An enduring photograph of HM by Cecil Beaton depicts her bearing sceptre, orb and Imperial state crown. She is shown in a luscious lip tone, a nod to the duality of her role as sovereign and woman. (Latterly, the Queen has upped the tone of the blusher on her cheek, and a blue shade enhances her eyes.) My first recollection of the power of royal dress was the wedding of 342

Clockwise from above: a poppy-red coat by Stewart Parvin, 1997; a tailored silhouette accessorised with corgis, 1974; characteristically Seventies tones of pink and orange by Ian Thomas, 1976; with the Queen Mother, in a graphic coat by Hardy Amies, 1972; summer cotton with the young Prince Charles, 1956; a princess in pretty florals, 1947; full-skirted Hartnell glam with Jackie Kennedy, 1961


ROYAL ANNALS OF STYLE

The three-string pearl necklace was given to her by her grandfather, George V, in 1935 on the day of his Silver Jubilee. Her father also followed the family tradition started by Queen Victoria of giving his daughters two pearls every birthday from birth

People travel from around the globe to catch a glimpse of the Queen, so she often opts for a hat “with a fair-sized crown” to give her height. Hatpins are custom-made for every new hat Queen Mary’s Devon pearl earrings were given to Elizabeth in 1947 as a wedding present A brooch is chosen by the Queen from her extensive collection, and she still eschews the help of her dressers to pin them on herself

The shorter gloves for day are made of pure cotton jersey and are usually matched in colour to her outfit and shoes

CORBIS; GETTY; PA IMAGES; REX FEATURES

Fabrics: many come from the Queen’s personal stock, some of which dates back to 1961. This Hartnell design is wool crêpe. She prefers unfussy designs in strong, bright colours so that well-wishers can easily spot her in the crowd

Originally the Queen’s shoes were made by Rayne, a British firm used by the Queen Mother – occasionally Eddie Rayne would be asked to repair a corgi-chewed heel. These days she prefers a 2in block heel for public appearances; new pairs are custom-made by David Hyatt at Anello & Davide of Kensington

Left: the Queen wears a mimosa-yellow dress and coat by Norman Hartnell during a six-week tour of Australia in 1970. Above: maxi-length royal blue and a turban for a state visit to Saudi Arabia, 1979. Above right: a classic Forties silhouette to accompany George VI on his royal tour of South Africa, 1947. Right: flowing metallic florals in London, 1995. Below: the newly crowned Queen reviews the fleet in crisp nauticalinspired tailoring, 1953

A boxy patent bag is usually adopted for daytime occasions – generally in white or black. The weight is vital given how long she may have to carry it. The Queen likes a longer handle so that it hangs on her forearm without catching on her cuffs (for evenings there is often a specially designed bag to match her gown)

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Regal glamour in New York for the Queen’s first state visit to America, 1957. Opposite: inspecting fruit in the British Virgin Islands, 1977. Ian Thomas was the Queen’s chief designer during the decade, and her clothes took on a more bohemian feel

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Seventies. For one thing, the Queen’s silhouette, with its full bosom, appeared to change. It was widely rumoured in my day that the Queen had undergone a bust reduction. But bodies do alter shape through natural causes, and that could have been the explanation for the reduced curves. Whatever the background story, the proportions of the Queen’s body appeared trimmer and sleeker. or royal attire, read jewellery. The massive collection of royal gems fulfils different, sometimes overlapping functions, representing regal status and personal adornment. Distinct from the Crown Jewels is the Queen’s personal assemblage – which includes, for instance, pieces given to her by Prince Philip. If ever there was a pearly girl, it is the Queen. Among many, many strings of pearls in her collection is a double row given as a wedding present by her parents, George VI and Queen Elizabeth. She also received a diamond tiara from her grandmother, Queen Mary, who had been presented with it on the occasion of her own nuptials in 1893. Known as the Girls of Great Britain, the piece is said to be a favourite, and is the lightest of the Queen’s tiaras. She who had had no training for the job became a true professional, and with experience came up with a working wardrobe that suited her singular responsibilities. Much of her clothing could be regarded as costume, custom-made for performance. For instance, necklines on coats and dresses are cut to avoid risking restricting the Queen’s freedom of movement. Hemlines may be weighted to guard against untimely gusts of wind and mishap. Hats are fashioned with a fair size crown to give extra height and brims are styled off the face to be friendly to viewers. Many trusted props are apparent. The proportions of an outfit from childhood days of a short jumper and kilted skirt have found a place in her adult wardrobe in myriad forms. Allowing for fine textiles and custom-made origins, the actual style of her typical daywear on parade is not so radically different from outfits in high-street windows. The easy to wear suits and coats with chiming dresses by and large conform to a look that many of her subjects would be happy

BURT GLINN/MAGUM PHOTO; GETTY

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to see themselves in. It’s transparently clear that the Queen’s clothes are not intended to intimidate or overwhelm. As Roger Scruton has written, “the emotion she inspires is unbelligerent tenderness” – and who can doubt that her wardrobe speaks of that? Worth saying on this point is that the fashionconscious among us had distinct reservations about certain aspects of the Queen’s dress. The expressed view was “they never cracked daywear”. In contrast, the Queen’s formal evening looks were greatly admired by one and all. Fashion editors and social diarists purred over her “fairytale” dresses. In

truth, the elements of small bodice and commanding long skirt, the beautiful silks and satins, the splendour of royal jewellery and the pomp of royal regalia did come together to form a theatrical tour de force. Norman Hartnell, who designed the evening gowns that spring to mind, channelled Winterhalter’s paintings of Queen Victoria. It was often observed that when the Queen dressed formally for an evening occasion and was entertaining visiting ladies who perhaps represented some competition in the apparel stakes, HM’s ensemble could be counted on to score for the home team. The picture of royal dress familiar to most of us was created by her principal

designers. Each contributed their own expertise. Norman Hartnell and Hardy Amies, both of whom were knighted for their services, worked in association with each other where royal patronage was concerned, or at least to some degree. Hartnell wins critical accolades for ceremonial robes and exquisite embroideries. Amies, known for absorbing Parisian couture trends without slavishly following them, introduced brighter colours, sophisticated prints and patterns, smaller hats. However, he stayed by the rules explaining in his biography that the changing length of dresses would be considered “so that no more than a minimum of knee would show”. In the miniskirted Sixties he wrote beneath a photograph of the Queen “as short as we dared”. Ian Thomas, who was assistant designer at Hartnell, took over in 1970 and under his own label dressed the Queen in the understated elegance that was his hallmark. Stewart Parvin, graduate of the Edinburgh College of Art, followed. Since her arrival in 2002 as the royal dresser, Angela Kelly – now appointed the personal adviser and senior dresser to the Queen – has been interpreting the royal dress code at the dressers’ floor at Buckingham Palace and has 11 people in her team. An exploration of the significance of what amounts to the Queen’s soft armour underpins the forthcoming exhibition, the flagship show of which opens at Buckingham Palace in July. Caroline de Guitaut, the curator, emphasises that “clothing has been influential in establishing a relationship between the Queen and the nation.” Looking at the sweep of the story of the Queen’s reign from my own standpoint, it’s the current phase that tells. Neither she nor I (yet) uses a stick. The Queen’s straight-backed unwobbly action of walking backwards down the steps of the Cenotaph last year evoked admiration among my age group and undue peering at her 2in-heeled court shoes. At the time of writing, it was said by some I talked to that the Queen was looking particularly bonny these days. Happening at a period when oldies are snuffed out of public gaze in so many different aspects, how good is it to have the Queen on side. Besides, we are seeing more of her smile. Q “Fashioning a Reign” is at the Palace of Holyroodhouse in Edinburgh from April 21, Buckingham Palace from July 23, and Windsor Castle from September 17 345


Tweed There are two royal tartans (the Royal Stewart and the Balmoral) and if anything were proof of her ageless style, it is this classic outfit – the Queen’s favourite tartan pleated skirt, with a matching tweed jacket, cashmere knit and brogues, finished with the soft glimmer of pearls.

THE JEWELS Like her predecessors, the Queen enhances the aura of sovereignty with glittering jewels. There are upwards of 10,000 diamonds in her personal collection alone, many of them invaluable. Her Williamson brooch contains the finest pink diamond ever discovered (just under 24ct), while her collection of Cullinan jewellery was cut from the largest diamond in history, more than 10cm in length and 3,106ct. Bling doesn’t even describe the level of decoration with which the Queen ornaments herself on formal occasions – even Elizabeth Taylor’s collection could not measure up when they met in 1968.

The Diamond Diadem was first worn by George IV for his coronation ceremony in 1821 (he had a lifelong passion for jewels which added to his prodigious debts)

Grand Duchess Vladimir’s Tiara is made up of 15 intertwined diamond-set ovals, hung with pendant pearls, which can be replaced with emeralds

THE TIARAS

The Queen wearing the Girls of Great Britain Tiara, originally given to her grandmother, Queen Mary, on her marriage in 1893. The lightest of her tiaras, it is shown on some British banknotes. The shadow it casts resembles a row of little girls holding hands

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The Kokoshnik Tiara, densely fringed with diamonds, was originally a gift to Queen Alexandra on her silver wedding anniversary in 1888

The Diamond and Sapphire Tiara was made to match the necklace and earrings given to Elizabeth by her father, George VI, for her wedding in 1947

Headscarf The Queen has a vast collection of silk scarves, many collected from Hermès, and has worn them since she was a teenager – always tied with a simple single bow.


Lipstick The Queen’s red lips and porcelain complexion were a glamorous signature look from her early twenties onwards. The eye-catching pillar-box red by Elizabeth Arden perfectly offset the glitter of her diamonds and added a shot of bright colour for the cameras.

Twinning Long before Instagram cottoned on to twin dressing, the royal family often dressed to emphasise the Queen’s style code, further sealing the royal image.

CAPTIONS: EMILY SHEFFIELD. CAMERA PRESS; CORBIS; GETTY; LICHFIELD; REX FEATURES

INTERNATIONAL TOURS Over the course of her reign, the Queen has undertaken more than 260 overseas visits to 119 countries, often travelling on the Royal Yacht Britannia. At least she doesn’t need a passport – after all, she is the one who issues them. Royal tours have sometimes proved groundbreaking in terms of dress, as well as helping to perpetuate the formal style of clothing for which she is recognised. On her first extensive tour of the Commonwealth in the Fifties, lasting six months, the Queen took more than 100 specially made new outfits and 12 tons of luggage. Because many trips included hot destinations, she had a huge variety of print dresses from the retailer Horrockses, augmented with more formal Hartnell designs and Hardy Amies gowns – some with over 100 yards of tulle. When the Queen turned up in flares and plimsolls during the royal tour of Canada in the Seventies, it prompted headlines back in Britain. Trouser suits and leggings have also appeared on royal visits.

Hats

1950 PEACOCK PLUMES ABOUNDED IN THE FIFTIES

The Queen’s headgear ensures she stands out in the crowd. Her principal milliner, Simone Mirman, worked with couturier Elsa Schiaparelli

1965 CLOSE-FITTING CORAL MADE A NEAT SUMMER STATEMENT

1965 A FEATHERED CLOCHE? PERFECT FOR EASTER

1968 SIGNATURE FLORAL SWIMMINGPOOL-STYLE CAPS

1969 A TUDORINSPIRED SHAPE BY SIMONE MIRMAN

1972 A LATTICEDETAILED BONNET OFFSET HER PEARLS

1982 A POLKA-DOT TURBAN WITH A FRISSON OF FEATHERS

1996 A HAIRNET TO COMBAT BLUSTERY WINDS

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King of the

HILLS Fashion designer and entrepreneur Leon Max’s brand of unshowy elegance is reflected in the relaxed refinement of his Mediterranean-style villa, high in the Hollywood Hills. By Elizabeth Day Photographed by Peter Ash Lee

’m not sure how it’s happened that, barely an hour after meeting the Russian fashion mogul Leon Max, we have ended up in his bedroom. A few moments earlier he led me up a narrow, winding staircase in his Spanish-style home in the Hollywood Hills and we had emerged into an octagonal-shaped room, framed on all sides by patterned linen curtains fluttering in the breeze. Now Max is lying on the bed, patting the duvet next to him. “Come,” he says. I am uncertain of the journalistic etiquette in this situation. But he’s insistent. In the name of research, I sit tentatively on the edge of the mattress. “Lie back,” Max says in his soft Russian accent. Well, I think, in for a rouble, in for a pound. I rest my head against a crisp cotton pillow. “Now look.” He gestures towards the one uncurtained window and suddenly I can see what he’s getting at. The view from the bed is staggering: a sweeping vista of rolling slopes, red earth and green trees set against the

YANA WEARS DRESS AND SANDALS, BOTH LEON MAX (MAXSTUDIO.COM)

I Yana and Leon Max in the grounds of Castillo del Lago, their California home. Hair: Will Carrillo. Make-up: Michelle Mungcal. Sittings editor: Nicolas Klam

bluest Californian sky. In the distance is the Hollywood Reservoir, its flat mirrored water twinkling in the sunlight. “So when all my friends are getting soggy and sad in England, I’m here,” Max says, smiling with the benign look of a satisfied cat. Eight years ago, Leon Max bought this seven-storey white-stucco Mediterraneanstyle villa – known as Castillo del Lago (“Castle of the Lake”) – because he was fed up with the damp British winters. Since 2005, his prime residence has been Easton Neston, a beautiful house and estate in Northamptonshire designed by Nicholas Hawksmoor in 1702, and bought by Max for £15 million from the former Tory treasurer Lord Hesketh. Most people wouldn’t particularly mind a spot of rain if they got to shelter in an exquisite mansion stuffed with Old Masters and French ormolu tables, but Max enjoys the languor of Los Angeles. He’s a workaholic, he says, and coming here enables him to relax. Although not a household name, Max, 60, is one of the most successful figures in the fashion business: the designer and > 349


retailer’s eponymous Max Studio has 42 stores across the world. Two million items of clothing are produced every month by his manufacturers in China, all of them pitched at a “Zara price range”. His higher-end line, Leon Max, launched in 2011. He has design studios in England and California, and is the sponsor of the Vogue 100 exhibition, on show at the National Portrait Gallery from February 11, but he comes to Los Angeles as often as he can for the sunshine: “I love the weather in southern California. That’s really the main reason for being here.” He and his Ukrainian-born model wife, Yana, enjoy the easier pace of life, too. If there is a Russian expat scene, Max says he hasn’t yet encountered it. He’d probably steer clear anyway. When he was single, he endured more than his fair share of

But truthfully, Max says, as we get up from the octagonal bed and make our way back downstairs, he’d rather stay at home. And with a house this nice, it’s not hard to see why. Designed in the early Twenties by the architect John DeLario, the building has retained many of its historical features. The two-storey living room, which faces south on to the garden, still has the original wooden beams with stencilled paintwork vaulting across the ceiling. Many of the floors are tiled, and the rooms are filled with light. Max did not make any structural changes when he moved in. He knew that Madonna had lived here from 1993 to 1996, but the only thing that survived from her tenancy was “this interesting contraption where she had her hair washed. It was a sort of hairdresser’s basin. You can do that kind of thing if you’re Madonna.” So no conical bras in unexpected places, then? He smiles. “No conical bras were found.” Max furnished the whole place in “two or three months”, ordering pieces of furniture online. The result is a successful intermeshing of Moorish and Renaissance designs. There are brightly embroidered sofa throws in deep reds and yellows from Turkmenistan beside 17th-century Dutch paintings in ornate gilt frames. As we walk along a corridor, Max casually points out a Van Dyck. He can’t recall where he got it: “I just buy paintings to decorate houses.” The cast-iron coffee tables in the living room are from Portugal, while upstairs, Yana and Max’s formal bedroom contains a 16th-century Italian, carved-wood four-poster bed. Along the corridor, there is a cinema room, bedecked with stained-glass lanterns and woven Moroccan cloth. Next door, a guest room is hung with a set of intricately rendered engravings of St Petersburg. This colourful fusion of styles and eras results in a laid-back, yet surprisingly coherent sense of taste. “We’re totally relaxed here,” agrees Max. “It’s a jeans-and-sandals place.” The atmosphere is reflected in Max’s design aesthetic. His clothes are unshowy but elegant; easy to wear but stylish. His ideal muse is, he says, “cultured” – but beyond that, he likes to produce garments that >

Leon knew Madonna had lived here, but nothing survived from her tenancy. “No conical bras were found”

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Top: a turret bedroom. The curtains and canopy are in a Renaissance-style motif by Leon Max. Above: the view from the master bedroom. Right: the house is full of Renaissance treasures. Below: a dressing table in the master bedroom

YANA WEARS JUMPSUIT, LEON MAX

posh dinner parties where the host would sit him next to “an oligarch’s wife who doesn’t speak English. I’ve had to suffer through a few of those.” These days, he describes himself as “ill-suited to a lifestyle where one has to be out every night”. He likes to walk around barefoot and not make too much of an effort. The contemporary art scene doesn’t much interest him – “a lot of it is just garbage” – and if he and Yana have a free evening, they like to spend it at home, throwing intimate dinner parties or making a quick and easy Italian meal à deux. The couple have been married for two years and “we get along very well. We never argue. I think having some kind of common cultural background helps.” On Sundays, they like to go to the West Hollywood Farmers’ Market and buy fresh produce for a leisurely lunch. He enjoys wandering through the grounds at the Getty Villa and admires the architecture there. Occasionally, the couple will venture out for dinner at the legendary Chateau Marmont on Sunset, or the LA outpost of Soho House, situated in a penthouse with panoramic views and its own olive grove.


Above and left: the main living room is filled with auction finds – Leon furnished the house in “two or three months”. Below: a 16th-century Italian wedding bed in the master bedroom

Yana in the living room

PETER ASH LEE

The “hanging gardens”, looking towards the city and the reservoir


The house is covered with bougainvillea, and the dining area overhung with orange trees


can be worn by all kinds of women at different stages in their life. His Croatian housekeeper is dressed head to toe in Leon Max, and Yana is wearing a navy jumpsuit from a previous collection, her frame making it look significantly more expensive than it is (even in his signature line, nothing costs more than $500). “My wife is my best model,” says Max. “I design everything for her. If she wears it, I get to see if it works – and I have to say, Yana looks very, very good everywhere we go in the company of people who are wearing very expensive clothes.” The couple were introduced by a mutual friend in 2012, and went on to get married at Easton Neston, followed by a lavish party complete with fireworks and footmen dressed in 18th-century livery. Despite the age difference – Yana is 28 – the couple have a sweet, gently humorous dynamic. When Max reaches for his Marlboros, Yana chides him gently. “Someone told me they were going to stop smoking,” she teases. “Hello?” He turns to look at her, shamefaced. “Yes, you!” As his wife gets ready to be photographed, sitting in a flowing green dress on the outside terrace overlooking the famous Hollywood sign, Max observes the scene with a critical eye for detail. He notices things others wouldn’t. There has been some light rainfall, and the moisture on the patio tiles is unevenly spread. Max asks his housekeeper to mop the floor so that it looks uniform. “Make it consistent,” he says, directing the mopping. “Here, under the chair.” Yana looks on, amused. When Max takes his seat next to her for the portrait, she strokes him lightly on the back. He smiles, head leaning back, arms resting on the chair like a medieval king presiding over his court. His face has a curiously ageless quality. In profile, it resembles a Piero della Francesca portrait of a 15th-century Venetian aristocrat. From the front, the planes seem to shift; his high cheekbones and eyes that curve down at the corners lending him an air of permanent amusement. The photographer clicks away. There is a stone cherub fountain in the centre of the patio that Max hates but hasn’t got around to doing PETER ASH LEE

anything about yet. When he turns his back to the cherub and looks out at the hills, fringed by palm trees, there is a modern, box-like house that snags his field of vision. “I should really buy that house and take it down,” he says, completely serious. “It’s an eyesore.” ax has always been drawn to beauty. He describes himself as “a professional aesthete”, and says that his childhood among the wide streets and baroque palaces of Saint Petersburg has left him with a love of symmetry and architectural grace.

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From the start, Leon had an eye for craftsmanship: he once bought a job lot of typewriter ribbon and made poplin separates “My eye is trained to spot harmony,” he says. Growing up in Soviet-era Russia, he nurtured a desire to escape. He found socialism “very grey, just grey”, and cannot understand why the Labour party elected the left-wing Jeremy Corbyn. “I don’t know why anyone these days sees anything glamorous in socialism,” he says. “I lived under it. It’s monstrous.” Born into the intelligentsia – the son of a playwright and a civil engineer – Max always dreamt of escaping to the West. In 1974, he found out that Jews were being given permission to leave, and got a visa allowing him to travel to Israel – but he never got there. When the plane stopped over in Vienna, he claimed political asylum. His mother had given him three Fabergé photograph frames: Max sold them and used the funds to start his new life. He ended up in New York, working as a personal trainer in a gym run by a rich Russian émigré who wore a T-shirt emblazoned with the slogan “Never Say Diet”. Jackie Onassis used to work out there, as did the restaurateur Joe Allen. “It was a very interesting clientele,” Max says. “Very much the cream of Manhattan in those days.” What’s

the secret to being a good personal trainer? “I have no idea.” He ended up enrolling at the Fashion Institute of Technology in pursuit of a girl he had a crush on. After a short time working for a fashion start-up, Max struck out on his own and moved to Los Angeles. From the start, he had an eye for quality and craftsmanship: he once bought a job lot of typewriter ribbon and used it to make poplin separates. He was a millionaire by the age of 25, and has never looked back. He takes me into his woodpanelled study, filled with leatherbound books, works of bronze sculpture and large Canaletto-style canvases. The study is situated in a secret nook of the house, just off the living room, and the light here is soothing. It is where Max comes to work, writing emails on a new Apple Macintosh that he has yet to master. It is the smallest, most intimate room in the house, and it is here that Max keeps his family photographs. There is one of Sophie, his 27-yearold daughter from his first marriage, to model Kim Adams. (His second wife was the American model and stylist Ame Austin.) There is also a photograph of his mother, who died last year in Saint Petersburg. Was she proud of him, I ask? “Well, she was disappointed I wasn’t going to win the Nobel Prize,” he says drily. “Or that I’d never run a country. That was no good.” He misses her, he admits, but Max does not like to dwell on the past. His focus has always been forwardlooking. He’s already planning to have more children with Yana – “however many we can manage”. Does he find it surreal, I wonder, sitting in his well-appointed home in the Hollywood Hills or the stately grandeur of Easton Neston, presiding over a multi-billion-pound fashion business and thinking about how far he has come? “Not any more, no. Because I’ve been in business since 1979 – 35 years – and it’s been really successful from the beginning.” Still, he concedes, there is one way in which his life has changed for the worse. These days, he considers his houses so beautiful that no hotel he stays in is ever as nice. It’s a good problem to have, I say. “It is,” he agrees, and we walk back outside, into the blaze of the Californian sunshine. Q 353


A laser-cut bob strikes the perfect balance between elegance and bravery. Finish with Redken Diamond Oil Airy Mist, £13.25, for an enduring shine Cashmere pea coat with metallic braiding, £2,295, Burberry Prorsum. Hair: Shon. Make-up: Sally Branka. Nails: Eri Handa. Set design: Kadu Lennox. Digital artwork: Gloss. Model: Iselin Steiro

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BEARING The spring collections take their cue from military tailoring; now the smartest combinations have a touch of officer’s swagger Photographs by Josh Olins. Styling by Clare Richardson 354


Whatever the day might throw at you, Yang Li’s tough tailoring proves the ideal armour with which to brave the elements Black cotton trench coat, from £790. Black leather brogues, from £250. Neck tie, from a selection. All Yang Li, at LN-CC and Selfridges. Black cotton-mix trousers, £340, Max Mara

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Spring’s sartorial lifebuoy is Wanda Nylon’s utilitarian boiler suit in the manner of a trench coat Gabardine jumpsuit, £680, Wanda Nylon, at Selfridges. Neck tie, from a selection, Yang Li.Wool cap, to order, Eugenia Kim. Drawstring cupro rucksack, £585, Kenzo

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JW Anderson was thinking about “survival” – these piped separates have an indestructible kind of elegance Black crêpe shirt with contrast seams, £465. Matching trousers, £435. Both JW Anderson. White leather boots, from £620, Céline

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Because two is better than one: double up in Versace’s urban warrior jackets, neatly cinched with a Medusahead stable belt Cotton-gabardine jacket, £1,202. Sleeveless silk-mix blazer, £1,275. Stretchcanvas belt, £356. Leather bag, £1,377. All Versace. Leather boots, from £650, Céline. Socks, £15, Falke

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When is a belt not a belt? When it’s fastened as a skinny scarf. Meanwhile, the workaday raincoat gets a ceremonial update via a pearl-studded brooch Gabardine trench coat, £2,500. Jewelled brooches, £200 each. All Marc Jacobs. Cotton shirt, £550, Ralph Lauren Collection. Striped denim trousers, from £340, Dolce & Gabbana

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When combined with deck-hand trousers, Joseph’s gently deconstructed jacket has an air of the corsair. Smarten up with spit-andshine lace-ups Black cotton-tweed jacket, £495, Joseph. White belted cotton tank top, £395, Michael Kors Collection. Linen trousers, £1,350, Ralph Lauren Collection. Patent-leather brogues with ankle cuff, from £250, Yang Li, at LN-CC. Black neck tie, £35, TM Lewin. Wool beanie, from £80, Lynn & Lawrence

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Make military green your new neutral: Céline’s zippy jumpsuit turns definitive when partnered with optic white boots Silk-mix trench coat, from £1,760. Satin jumpsuit, from £1,450. Leather boots, from £620. All Céline. Neck tie, as before

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Forget blending in – Tomas Maier’s abstract camouflage at Bottega Veneta is a standout print Cotton-twill parka, from £410, La Condesa. Quilted silk and fleece jacket, £1,405. Matching cropped trousers, £555. Both Bottega Veneta. Leather bracelet, from £330, Céline. Neck tie, as before. Beauty note: offset military tailoring with smouldering, muted tones on the eyes. Smudge Estée Lauder Powder Shadow Stick in Charred Plum, £18, on to eyelids and lower lash lines

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A clementinecoloured flight jacket now updates regulation black Reversible nylon bomber jacket, £105, Alpha Industries, at MA-1.com. Two-tone jumpsuit, from £1,530, Mugler, at Selfridges. Leather boots, as before

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Boy meets girl remixed: the way to wear Dior’s soft, androgynous jacket? Shrugged off to expose shoulders, and layered over cross-body braces Wool jacket, £1,900, Dior. Belted cotton tank top, £395, Michael Kors Collection. Cropped wool trousers, £240, Boss. Braces, from a selection, Paul Smith. Brogues, as before

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Classics that point to now; it’s the fingertiplength sleeves on Max Mara’s Breton and the anklegrazing swing on mannish trousers that say spring Black gabardine trench coat, £615, Wanda Nylon, at Selfridges. Black doublebreasted jacket, to order. Striped jersey T-shirt, £170. Black cotton-mix trousers, £340. All Max Mara. Brogues, as before. For stockists, all pages, see Vogue Information

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Out of this

WORLD Are you born with good taste or can it be acquired? And who actually has it? Sarah Harris meets four women with the answers Photographs by Philip Sinden

Nadège Vanhee-Cybulski, photographed at the Hermès ateliers in Pantin, north-east Paris. She wears an Hermès silk-twill shirt and trousers by Maison Margiela. Hair: Liv Holst. Make-up: Josephine Bouchereau. Sittings editor: Michael Trow

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Nadège Vanhee-Cybulski, artistic director orget everything you think you know about the Hermès woman. The house’s new artistic director, Nadège Vanhee-Cybulski, 37, is wearing white Nike Air Max of the nonboxfresh variety, roomy Margiela trousers and an Hermès silk-twill shirt in the Brides de Gala scarf print. Tall, flame-haired and with lightly freckled alabaster skin, she looks sensational. Oh, and her exercise of choice is boxing. And yet, it’s no surprise the Frenchborn designer ended up here. Her career trajectory, beginning at Martin Margiela before graduating to Céline and The Row, is a masterclass in stealth luxury. “I’ve been lucky to work with people who share my values of how clothes should be,” says Nadège, from the sprawling Hermès ateliers at Pantin, on the outskirts of Paris. Nadège talks about clothes a lot. Not fashion. Words such as “function” and “pragmatic” dot her conversation, and are indicative of the direction she’s steering Hermès in. “I’ve always related to this house, but I want to reformulate the classic idea of Hermès – bring even more practicality,” she says, referring to a pair of gabardine waterproof trousers of her design, ideal for the businesswoman caught in a downpour, “and surprises and playfulness, too.” Like a pair of silk poplin trousers, perhaps, with a faint red tuxedo stripe inspired by the kind of French tea towels you see in bundles at flea markets. “I love shifting simple, humble things into something beautiful.” Also on her spring runway: an opening series of sporty blueblack tailoring, leather pieces spliced with silk scarves, apron dresses, and a utilitarian mustard-coloured cotton jumpsuit. There was an ease to everything, coupled with an assurance that the wearer of these special pieces will have them for life – that’s the thing about exceptional craftsmanship. “It’s true, anything is possible here,” she agrees. “There are extraordinary resources and knowhow, nevertheless it’s the material – leather or fur, cotton or silk – that has the last word.”

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Nadège, the first female designer to take the helm at Hermès in more than two decades, has always loved clothes, favouring a minimalism honed during her three-year tenure in New York. Specifically, she has a thing for shirts (men’s shirts, too, often bought from Jermyn Street), and is slowly building a personal archive of Hermès silk-twill styles: “They make me feel properly dressed, no matter what else I have on.” She also works scarves into her vocabulary as neckerchiefs or knotted as belts. You’ll rarely see her in anything other than trouser-andshirt combinations – and trainers. For all her modernist tastes, Nadège is obsessed with eras. Books including Elegance in the Age of Crisis: Fashions of the 1930s and People of the 20th Century by German photographer August Sander ornament her sparse office, alongside volumes on vintage menswear. The designer – who grew up listening to Massive Attack and Portishead, and still keeps her tour T-shirts in boxes at the Pigalle apartment she shares with her English artist husband and two Jack Russells – says that “music tribes and styles” are what excite her most. Will she be luring a new tribe to Hermès? “As a designer, you’re drawn to moving boundaries. You want to flirt a little with what’s wrong, what’s a bit weird, it’s your curiosity,” she shrugs. For spring, that meant Neoprene and leather sneakers, and a series of shirtdresses in retina-burning neon orange – to spike the sacred house colour was a gutsy move by anyone’s standards. “I wanted to play with saturation. People said, ‘Wow! That’s not what we expected.’ It isn’t about bad versus good taste, it’s about pushing the boundaries of taste.” >

“As a designer, you want to flirt a little with what’s wrong, what’s a bit weird”

This Hermès skirt and top is one of Nadège’s favourite looks from the spring/ summer ’16 collection

HERMES SILK-TWILL TOP, £2,020

HERMES EMBROIDERED SILK-TWILL SKIRT, £3,020

White Nike Air Max trainers are her shoes of choice

NIKE AIR MAX TRAINERS, £90

Left: “I drink ginger with hot water every day. I am never without it,” says Nadège. Below: she takes her silver pen – a family gift – everywhere

Left: Nadège picked up her vintage trinket box – a replica sardine tin made of silver – in Venice. It is nestled in Star Wars tissue paper (Nadège is a fan)

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Rose Uniacke, interior designer ews just in: the at-home cocktail bar is over; the tea cupboard is The Thing. If anyone knows, it’s Rose Uniacke, interior designer/ furniture maker/tea-cupboard expert. “It was a huge pleasure building this, and working out the proportions of it all,” she says, opening it up to fix herself a cup of green tea. The humble wooden cupboard, based on a Japanese design, is made from ash, and inside are neat shelves crafted from chestnut, a copper boilingwater tap and a row of hinged-door cubbyholes. “Hinges are important. Notice how these don’t shock you – that’s so important. Details make all the difference,” she says, matter-offactly. “They have the power to make something good or bad.” She could just as easily be referring to the Céline dress she’s wearing, a sporty black sweatshirt style rendered in cashmere, elegantly cinched with white drawstring laces and with sleeves loosely rolled just so. Rose, whose oeuvre includes everything from refurbishing Jo Malone’s London HQ to the Beckhams’ Holland Park villa, occupies a world that’s big on detail. Her own home in Pimlico, which she describes as an “Italian palazzo meets a monastery”, is evidence of how she has become the go-to designer of houses that people want to live in – as in move right into, today. Walk through the front door and immediately to the right is a glassceilinged jungle, a tropical courtyard of palms and orchids. Study the exposed brick walls for long enough and you’ll discover a secret door that leads through to a screening room (essential, given that she is married to multi-Bafta-winning film producer David Heyman, of Harry Potter and Gravity fame). Upstairs, via a sweeping Portland stone staircase, is the office, housed in a former ballroom complete with chandeliers and a 17th-century Mughal rug that’s restored once a year. “It’s a lovely house to live in. It feels warm and homely – and with vast ceiling height

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that was the challenge, to try and create something inviting.” Built in 1859, it was being run as the Warwick Arts Trust when Rose and David bought it and embarked on a threeand-a-half-year renovation plan, working with the Belgian architect Vincent van Duysen. The common denominator of her interiors may be restraint and elegance, but there’s not a Rose Uniacke “look”; clients buy into her taste more than they do any signature. Take right now, for example, when she’s juggling projects as varied as a new-build house, a Georgian home in Richmond and a period property in Chelsea, where she has just installed purple iris wallpaper all the way up to the eaves. (Yes, she can do maximalism too when required.) Much of her design sensibility is inherited from her mother, antiques dealer Hilary Batstone, who runs a shop around the corner from Rose’s offices on Pimlico Road. “I grew up in Oxford, in a lovely house – not grand in any way, but my mother was stylish and knew how to make a room feel welcoming.” Rose’s eye was honed when she started out as a furniture restorer and gilder. Now with her Editions line of contemporary furniture and lighting, a rapidly growing arm of her business, it’s an itch that she’s able to scratch again. Standouts from the collection include a hand-blown glass lightshade, impressive because it’s the largest shade that it is physically possible to hand-blow. Meanwhile, she’s collaborating with weavers in France and Japan to develop fabrics, and she’s also just designed what’s possibly the chicest ever set of playing cards (she’s a mean card player; Bridge, Oh Hell and Rummy are her games). What you won’t find in her repertoire: furniture with no purpose. “I like furniture that functions. Furniture should be used. It’s very boring if you have to worry about where to put your glass,” she insists. “Who wants to live like that?” >

There’s not a Rose Uniacke “look”; clients buy into her taste, not a signature

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From above: the antique marble column was a gift from Rose’s husband; her grandmother’s gold ingot pendant on a Victorian chain; the ring is by Glenn Spiro; Rose favours Céline and Valentino: “I like wearing nice clothes. I like the theatre of it”

CELINE LEATHER BAG, £2,095

LEMAIRE CROPPED WOOL TROUSERS, £590

VALENTINO WOOL/SILK DRESS, £2,640

PHILIP SINDEN


Rose Uniacke, photographed in the courtyard of her London home – described by her as “an Italian palazzo meets a monastery”. She wears a silk blouse by Alex Eagle and cropped trousers by Stella McCartney. Hair: Jan Przemyk. Make-up: Tania Grier. Sittings editor: Nura Khan

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Martina Mondadori Sartogo’s eclectic style brims with colour and print. She wears a shirt and skirt by Gucci, and Manolo Blahnik heels. The belt and jewellery are vintage. Hair: Dora Roberti. Make-up: Sarah Mierau. Sittings editor: Nura Khan

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Martina Mondadori Sartogo, editor artina Mondadori Sartogo’s biannual lifestyle publication, Cabana, is the product of a life lived in colour. With its covers crafted in Pierre Frey palm-tree prints, Fornasetti designs or decorated in vintage Etro scarves, it’s less a magazine, more an artsy tome. “We have fun with it,” says the Milanese editor-in-chief, at the South Kensington home she shares with her husband and two children; its terracotta walls, bazaar finds and rich tapestries are the 3D version of Cabana. Print media runs in her family. Martina, 34, who also edits art-and-style title Anew, is part of the Mondadori publishing dynasty founded by her great-grandfather, Arnoldo, when he was just 18 – and although her father sold the business in the Eighties, she still serves on the board. Martina grew up surrounded by creativity; she remembers sitting on her father Leonardo’s lap at Versace fashion shows in the Nineties, and going with him to Paris to trawl antiques shops for gothic objects. Much of her eclectic taste can be traced back to her childhood and the homes she lived in. “My mother was always very interested in interiors. Her best friend was interior designer Renzo Mongiardino, he decorated our home and he would come over to our house every week for dinner – he didn’t have his own kitchen, so he would visit his friends on rotation to dine with them. I was always so visually stimulated, and I had a passion for it.” (She even wrote her graduation thesis on aesthetics.) How to decorate now? “I think we’re seeing a return to cosiness – warm colours, a mix of textures, the idea of emotional interiors,” she says. “We’re seeing it reflected in fashion, too. It’s coming back, that richness and opulence. There’s a new consideration for how fabrics are made, a renewed love for layering and exploring the art of collecting,” she continues, citing her

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new-found appreciation for Gucci since Alessandro Michele took the helm, along with other favourite Italians, Miuccia Prada and Giambattista Valli. Few can be better at collecting than Martina, who will open a pop-up boutique on 1stdibs.com in April, boasting curated curiosities picked up at flea markets from Istanbul to Kempton Park to Marrakesh, as well as Cabana’s collection – comprising wicker and velvet poufs, plus collaborations with Laguna B on glassware and Laboratorio Paravicini on dinnerware. So what is catching Martina’s eye now? “I’m obsessed with eastern European ceramics hand-painted between the Thirties and the Fifties; they’re to die for. You can find them everywhere from France and southern Italy to Austria, Romania, Hungary, Russia and down in the north of Africa. Actually, I’m organising a road trip towards these countries this summer. I hope to bring lots back,” she says. “After all, the happiest rooms are always the ones filled with an interesting collection of things.” >

“It’s coming back, that richness and opulence – a renewed love for the art of collecting”

A mix of market finds, fine art and collectibles make up Martina’s home

GUCCI SILK BLOUSE, £600, AT BROWNS

DOLCE & GABBANA BROCADE SKIRT, £615

Left: “Never has an accessory been so popular on me as this Afghan necklace!” Martina picked it up in Istanbul

MANOLO BLAHNIK CANVAS SANDALS, £525

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Gabriela Hearst, fashion designer f Gabriela Hearst was looking for affirmation that her newly designed handbag, the Nina, will be a hit, she received it this morning in the lift at Claridge’s on the way up to her sixth-floor suite. A man complimented her on the prototype she was carrying and asked her who made it. “Thank you,” she blushed. “It’s actually my own design. I made it.” The gentleman said he would like to order one for his wife and then handed her his card. It read: Sir Jonathan Ive, chief design officer of Apple Inc. Had she not been so taken aback, she would have told him that she, in fact, makes all her jacket pockets roomy enough to house an iPhone 6 Plus. Hearst, a former model who launched her eponymous collection 18 months ago, is a woman as keen on the practicalities of a piece as she is on its beauty. Her line, which comprises ready-to-wear, shoes – and now bags – is best described as urban luxury. In short, they’re clothes that you might already have in your wardrobe – a knife-pleated skirt, say, a denim jumpsuit, or gossamer ribbed knits – just better versions of them. “I look at men’s clothing a lot, I like the utilitarian aspect of it, I like it when things work,” says the 38-year-old New Yorker, who is married to Austin Hearst, the grandson of William Randolph Hearst. Beneath the uberchicness of it all (look out for the polished hardware on her trousers, it’s the stuff that sets hearts racing), she favours a rustic element; she may use Loro Piana wool for a skirt, but she will leave the hem raw to fray. “I don’t believe in perfection, I get uncomfortable when things are too perfect.”

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“The rare times I don’t wear boots, I love our label’s white Augustin spectator shoes”

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Born in Montevideo, to one of Uruguay’s oldest ranching families, Hearst was raised in the countryside, where days were spent herding cattle with gauchos; she learned how to ride a horse years before she ever sat on a bike. “I got sent to work, I thought it was very normal, I didn’t know any different. There was so much space and not a lot of distractions. Of course, as a teen I rebelled; I wanted to party in Punta del Este…” Her days on the estancia are far from over. In 2001, she inherited a 9,000-hectre ranch from her father, along with 150 horses, 6,000 organic-grass-fed cattle, and 10,000 merino sheep. She visits several times a year. But her interest in fashion is inherited from her mother who, frustrated by Uruguay’s fashion scene, bought fabrics from Europe and hired a seamstress. “Everything was made bespoke, and they were classic designs and so lasted for years.” This idea of longevity resonates with her. “I only want to have clothes that last; buy one, don’t buy 10 or 20 of them, buy one but a very good one that will endure,” she says. “When I launched my label, I realised there wasn’t a need for another fashion brand, but I did feel the need for something that’s very well made, a counter to having new things all the time, and I hope that’s what my clothes are.” Hearst will buy a Valentino gown but only one with long sleeves, because she imagines herself wearing it when she’s 60. Likewise, a trouser suit that she is being fitted for this afternoon at Timothy Everest. “Longevity has always been my philosophy – I come from a ranch where we didn’t throw anything out; even a can of paint doesn’t get thrown away because it will be used for something one day.” Was she born with taste? “My friend Lauren Hutton, the chicest woman ever, says you’re not born with taste, it’s something that you learn and discover, and I agree with that. But I also think authenticity is important; being true to who you are. I like things that make me feel comfortable, that’s my taste.” Q

Above: the Nina bag, by Gabriela Hearst. Right: the designer is a fan of Chitose Abe’s designs for Sacai

“I get uncomfortable when things are too perfect”

Gabriela commissioned her emerald ring from German jeweller Hemmerle. Above: the graphic designer Peter Miles designed her bangle

SACAI POPLIN AND CHIFFON SKIRT, £905, AT NET-A-PORTER.COM


Gabriela Hearst, photographed in Claridge’s, wearing her own label. “I wear knee-high boots all the time, even in the summer. I even got married in a pair.” Hair: Diana Moar. Make-up: Sarah Mierau. Sittings editor: Sarah Harris

PHILIP SINDEN

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Give &

TAKE Gigs in your living room, a Kazakh sleeping on your sofa, giving lifts to strangers… In the Sharing Economy, everything is communal. But how much connecting can we really take? An apprehensive Christa D’Souza joins the movement Illustration by Natasha Law

s sharing a natural human trait? Was it competition or co-operation which propelled evolution forward? Meaning, was it all about the struggle to survive – or the snuggle to survive, as someone once said? These and other questions drifted in and out of my mind when I found myself in the car with a total stranger on a drive down to the country. For last week I registered with Liftshare, Britain’s biggest online carsharing service, which pairs up drivers with those needing rides in the same direction. It’s a little like Uber Pool or car-share platform Blablacar but more caring and sharing because other than petrol costs there’s no money involved. Say you have a cottage somewhere off the A303 and someone else

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how do you nicely tell a stranger that there can be no talking in your car during Any Questions? How to subtly convey that for the blissful three hours it takes my other half and me to get to our part of Wiltshire (the longest time we get to be alone, pretty much, without being asleep), we actually prefer no talking at all? The Sharing Economy, The Weconomy, Collaborative Consumption, The Mesh. Call it what you want, for the next 10 days or so I am going to fully participate in it. And this I’ll share with you for free: it’s not going to be easy. You know how there’s a certain sort of person who prefers sharing plates at restaurants? You know, the person who sometimes can’t help keening for those good old backpacking days, for that 10-to-a-room hostel experience; who would far prefer to stay as a guest in someone’s house and maybe share a glass of wine with the host than sit on one’s bed in a cold, impersonal hotel room watching Al Jazeera and ordering room service? Well, I am not that person. Never have been, never will be. I share like mad on Instagram – too much, in fact – and as a journalist I’ll go even further: nothing of mine is not yours when it comes to the nice, distancing medium of print. When it comes to sharing my physical personal space though, making conversation when I don’t want to (don’t even look at me, let alone talk to me, before I’ve had my

How do you tell a stranger that there’s no talking in your car during Any Questions? takes that route regularly, too? Bingo, you share a ride. Fewer cars on the road, less money to the train companies and, in the bargain, I get a hit of serotonin, the brain chemical which is supposed to be released when you do something nice. What’s not to like? At the same time, being a novice to the so-called Sharing Economy, I have a few concerns on the etiquette front. For example, 374

coffee in the morning) – that’s something else. It could be that God made me that way, but it’s probably more to do with the fact that when my sister and I were growing up, our house was always full of my mother’s liggerish friends and boyfriends, helping themselves from the fridge, clogging up the bathroom, cutting off the nose of a brie at table – treating the place, in fact, as if it were their own. Perhaps that is why, even though we’ve got a few spare bedrooms in our family home, there are no beds in any of them. Wish me luck, then, on this particular journey. It may the toughest assignment Vogue has given me yet. Which brings me back to our very sweet Liftshare companion, Rob, a 25-year-old brand consultant from Hoxton who is visiting his parents in Wincanton for the weekend. As a passenger, he is polite, does not smell and – big brownie points here – is much more helpful on the car-loading front than either of my teenage sons. But in the back of my mind I’m thinking, Liftshare is all about building “cycles of sharing”, and I don’t know if I can make this more than a one-off thing. As it happens, we find out over the weekend that we’ve been burgled back in London, and when poor Rob texts me on Sunday morning for a ride back, my reserve of goodwill for the human race has all but evaporated. My husband and I end up driving back to London slightly early. Alone. This sharing of goods and services with each other, peer to peer rather than through a business or brand name, is hardly new. >


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People have been carpooling, nanny sharing, B&B-ing, lending each other money and so on for yonks. (Arguably the model was invented by a company set up in the Fifties called Intervac, which still allows teachers around the world to swap homes during the holidays to gen up on foreign culture.) What’s changed the game lately, and allowed sharing brands such as Airbnb and Uber to take over the world, is the online community, to which we now ineluctably belong. We’re sharing on an unprecedented scale. An empty car seat, a driveway, a wedding dress, a dog – hey, even a nice clean loo (look up Looie, an app that will direct you via GPS to the most recently cleaned one in your area, though it’s still only available in New York), nothing has to be a “dead” asset any more. The possibilities are endless as to the goods and services that can be shared – and curiously we’re keener than ever to share them with complete strangers. One enterprising millennial I met is thinking of developing an app called Lapn, whereby you can rent out your lap to strangers during rush hour on the Tube. If that sounds nuts, just give it a few years. “Technology has enabled new kinds of accountability and trust,” says Rachel Botsman, co-author of What’s Mine Is Yours and lecturer on the collaborative economy at Oxford University’s Saïd Business School. “This hasn’t just changed how we buy goods on marketplaces like Etsy or Ebay. It has changed how we travel, bank, work and even fall in love. Ideas that might have seemed weird, risky or dangerous are now

in Paddington; the way we are all as good as chipped via our smartphones; the way you just wouldn’t steal a bathrobe from a person’s home… These are just some of the reasons the Sharing Economy works. Then there is the all important peer-to-peer review system. When I log on to Liftshare, I see that Rob has rated me five stars. Five stars! I’m only a 4.7 star passenger on Uber. Darn it. Did I remember to rate Rob back? “When ‘sharing economy’ projects are at their best, they’re about more than saving money. They’re about a sense of connection,” says Ivo Gormley, son of artist Antony Gormley, who founded Goodgym, a nonprofit platform which allows runners to use their workouts to benefit the community (shifting earth for community gardens, helping old people with basic tasks). “As a provider, if you don’t get amazing feedback, you have to improve. To make the system work you have to recognise the importance of the individual. That’s the fundamental change from the ‘old’ industrial model.” o now I’ve been a provider of an asset (our car), it’s time to be on the other side of the sharing marketplace, ie be a user, a sharee. Here I am, then, on my way to a gig held in a stranger’s living room somewhere in Belsize Park. Sofar (Songs from a Room) is a global music collective started in 2009 which throws intimate gigs in people’s living rooms all round the world. Robert Pattinson and Scarlett Johansson are loyal attendees. Wolf Alice, Bastille, James Bay and the National have all “secretly” performed. But you’ll never know; as in the manner of Secret Cinema, no act is ever promoted in advance. The address of our “venue” is emailed to me on the morning of the gig. Along with instructions to bring our own alcohol and blankets as, joy, we will be sitting on the floor. Shoot. Forgot the blanket. But my date for the evening, Josh, a 26-year-old filmmaker who has already been to a Sofar gig in Brighton, thought to put a bottle of Aperol in his backpack this morning. As we arrive, plaidshirted “early adopters” are smoking on the doorstep. Lining the hallway are pretty girls in parkas with short fringes. Inside, the elegant, double-fronted living room is set up with an impromptu stage and the distinctly non-loserish crowd is building fast, especially around the kitchen table, laden with bowls of Haribo and smoked-salmon canapés. Our host tonight turns out to be Sofar’s founder

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“When sharing economy projects are at their best, they’re about more than saving money – they’re about a sense of connection” normal, and this is largely because of new mechanisms for building trust. By the time we get into someone else’s car or house, by the time we lend them money or enlist them to accomplish a task, we have a real-time sense of who they are, which enables us to try something we otherwise wouldn’t have considered.” Indeed. Like Thrinder which, in case you didn’t already know, is like Tinder but for threesomes. But the permutations are endless, aren’t they? What about Tuber, for example (Thruber, even?), for people who haven’t got time for drinks and want to, er, connect while being driven to work? Having the Uber driver’s phone number; knowing that if you leave something in the back of the car it won’t end up in some depot 376

Rafe Offer, 45, an American expat who used to consult for Coca-Cola and Disney. He explains how the idea was born out of his frustration with live gigs. “I thought there had to be a better way of watching music than in a packed concert hall where you can hear beer bottles clinking and everyone talks through the acts and there’s zero intimacy or any real connection with the artist.” When Sofar started up six years ago, a hat was passed around to cover costs. Now people have to buy tickets online and there’s often a waiting list. Offer stresses he is not doing it for the money but to “bring the magic back to the gig and tap into a subculture of people who value music above their smartphones and alcohol. Every time we’ve done a gig here everyone is out by 10.30pm and because they tend to leave quietly we’ve never had any complaints from the neighbours.” When I ask if he worries about security, he looks at me a little blankly. No, he says, never. In fact, of the 3,000 gigs that have been thrown in 150 private spaces in 100 cities around the world, he is aware of nothing, not even a scarf, that has ever been reported stolen. By the time I get home, though a little cross from having to sit on a hard wooden floor for two hours, I feel a subtle yet significant shift in my attitude to this Sharing Economy business. The first act up, a band called the Bohicas, were goosepimply good (how come I’d never heard of them?) and I feel privileged to have been introduced to them in such an intimate setting. On the other hand, is this going to change my behaviour around how I listen to music the way Uber changed my travel habits? Probably not. But it is enough to make me feel at least slightly less murderous at the idea of having supper with a group of strangers, probably in a flat right at the other end of London, eating food that I am likely going to hate. That’s the premise of supper clubs such as Grub Club: you buy your ticket (around £40) but you don’t know who the other guests will be, you don’t know what the food is and you don’t know where the venue is until the day of. I guess I lucked out. My hosts for the evening are Jordan Bourke, the Dublin-born chef, television presenter and former model who was discovered by Skye Gyngell and has already published two successful cookbooks, and his wife, Korean designer Rejina Pyo. The other guests (because they are, at time of print, still testing the concept out) are six of the hosts’ friends, all of whom are well versed in the whole notion of supper clubs. Several bottles of wine are being passed around as Bourke darts between the living room and the kitchen of their beautiful west London flat, but there’s no question of getting arseholed before we eat. This is all about the food, and by 8.30pm


sharp we are all respectfully sitting down, ready to sample a Korean feast prepared by Bourke: delicately seasoned dry squid, tofu with fried kimchi and pork belly, marinated beef and lettuce wraps with pickled onion, charred garlic samjang sauce and sticky rice. With cinnamon- and pecan-stuffed pancakes topped with non-dairy ice cream for afters. It’s delicious but not at all what I’d have ever ordered off my own bat – which, says Bourke happily, is exactly the point. “Rejina wanted to share with people what real, true Korean food was all about, because it doesn’t have the greatest reputation, and it was also a nice way of doing it in London which, let’s face it, can be a bit of an impersonal place when it comes to going out to dinner.” Isn’t he worried about people abusing their hospitality? “I have a number of friends who’ve done this, Sabrina Ghayour [author of the cookbook Persiana] among them, and they’ve said it’s been totally fine,” shrugs Bourke, “and by keeping it small, you get to have more control over both the cooking and the setting.” y now my phone is literally dancing with sharing apps, all designed to tap into a world of collaboration: Airbnb, Grub Club, Blablacar, Couchsurfing and Olio (got a half-eaten pack of Quorn sausages? Guaranteed there’ll be someone in your GPS radius on Olio who’ll take them). Then there is Borrow My Doggy. How genius is that? And what a smorgasbord of adorable canines there are to choose from. Spoilt for choice, I eventually pick Roland, an 11-month-old retriever, who “snorts like a little piglet when he is delighted about something”, according to his owner, Grace. Though I’ve paid my verification fee, and uploaded a “pawticularly pawsome” profile picture of myself with our office dog, Lottie, I’m a first-timer on the app and therefore have no reviews, no rep. But hooray, Grace replies and suggests we meet the following weekend with a view to me becoming Roland’s temporary friend. Already I’m fantasising about where he will sleep, which part of the sofa he’ll get to sit on, how he’s going to love our family so much he’ll never want to leave. The one thing I couldn’t be more mi casa es su casa about is dogs. The one thing I couldn’t be less share-y about is clothes, but I may have to rethink that block. That notion of access rather ownership is already extending to our wardrobes. Well, in New York, anyway. Take Heidi Julavits and Leanne Shapton, coauthors of Women in Clothes: Why We Wear What We Wear, who regularly hold public clothing swaps in the city for friends and strangers. They talk of a kind of natural, healthily competitive algorithm which

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evolves: “women flicking through racks but also eyeballing what others were trying on, watching value fluctuate the moment an item was pulled from the hanger and held against the body.” Hmm. It’s all very well borrowing for a fancy-dress party. But just to go out of an evening? Am I the only person who feels slightly fraudulent at the idea? Time for the biggie; the granddaddy, as it were, of the Sharing Economy which is Airbnb, already so “normal”, so preferable to hotelling it, a lot of my friends can hardly

home in Martha’s Vineyard. He welcomes me into his spankingly clean, exposed-brick loft space. My heart sinks slightly when it’s clear there is only one bathroom, with no lock on the door, but in for a penny, in for a pound. This will be the twelfth time Brian’s hosted via Airbnb. He does it, he says, a) for the extra income, and b) because, bless, he likes meeting new and interesting people. I push him for bad experiences, horror stories, like the one about the woman whose Airbnb guest had been making a porn film in her home or the guest who found out on Facebook, only days into his stay, that his host had overdosed and died. The worst that’s happened, says Brian, is a couple who got a bit pissy when they found out breakfast wasn’t offered. “But they were older, they didn’t understand it wasn’t a bedand-breakfast situation.” I have to hand it to Brian. I know he’s making money out of it, it’s not just out of the goodness of his heart, but the idea of a stranger staying in my house, of not so metaphorically sleeping in my bed and eating my porridge, will always fill me with dread. And so it is with anxiety that I check my Couchsurfing profile. This free platform connects members to a global community of travellers (in the literal rather than “bum” sense). Apparently there are a whole bunch who want to stay on our slightly grubby sofa, next to the tortoise’s vivarium. Tien from Dublin, Bashir from Clermont-Ferrand, Ali from Kazakhstan… And Sabine from Cologne, whose profile reads, “I am talkative, I can be Helping Hand in household… I love to chat about Travel Experiences.” I plump for Ali who’s got that reassuring green tick by his profile picture, a 94 per cent response rating, doesn’t mind sleeping on floors under tin roofs and is into Buddhism. We arrange for him to stay for two nights. A close friend, Pernille, who has been renting out her Copenhagen apartment on Airbnb for years, has some advice. When you become part of this arm of the Sharing Economy, lay down the ground rules from the start. “There was one lady who stayed and it was clear she wanted to hang out with me, have dinner, have me show her around which was not what I wanted at all,” she says. “So now I say in my description that I’ll leave them a list of places I like in the area, but I’m neither a travel agency nor a friend.” She’s very Scandi and straightforward that way; however, when Ali and I speak on the phone, somehow I can’t bring myself to say any of that. Oh well, our lovely cleaning lady, Bahyta, is Kazakh. > 396 Maybe they will bond. Our live-in

Apparently a whole bunch of travellers want to stay on our slightly grubby sofa, next to the tortoise’s vivarium believe I have never done it before. In the eight years it has been in existence, 3.1 million British residents have used Airbnb for their travels and 2.2 million guests have used it to visit Britain. Just this past year, 52,500 hosts have opened up their homes, be it a yurt, castle or even principality (yes, in 2011 Prince Hans-Adam II of Liechtenstein rented his out for £70,000, complete with street signs and temporary Swiss francs) to strangers, each host typically earning £2,000 for sharing their personal space for an average of 46 nights a year. “The Sharing Economy is creating a new category, people as businesses,” as Nathan Blecharczyk, cofounder and CTO of Airbnb, recently put it. “Our hosts are the next generation of micro-entrepreneurs.” And that’s the thing. Is making money out of your driveway or your Chanel bag or your spare room really so “sharey”? Isn’t what we’ve got here a variety of hypercapitalism rather than a nicer, kinder way of doing business? Twenty years from now, will nothing be free? As a Guardian journalist – who else – pointed out recently, look what bottled water did for the communal water fountain… But back to Airbnb, and my night with a complete stranger in his loft in Spitalfields. Christ. Should I take my own pillows? (I’m a freak about pillows in other people’s houses.) Do I order a takeaway and, if so, should I order for him, too? I hate sharing my food. Does he drink? Should I bring a bottle? I might not be able to get through the awkwardness without it. Up I pitch then at Brian’s. I chose Brian for his super-positive reviews and also because he’s from Rhode Island, where I went to college. That at least is something we have in common. Brian, it turns out, is extremely sweet, polite and non-serial-killerish with a proper banking job in Pall Mall and a summer family

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VOGUEbeauty NAILS INC GEL EFFECT NAIL POLISH IN SEVEN DIALS, £15

& OTHER STORIES CHEEK & LIP TINT IN KICK PLEAT RED, £12

VIVIENNE WESTWOOD

BOBBI BROWN LIP GLOSS IN PINK LILY, £19

MAC RETRO MATTE LIQUID LIP COLOUR IN RECOLLECTION, £21

FROM TOP: MAC LIP PENCIL IN RUBY WOO, £12.50, AT HOUSE OF FRASER. RIMMEL LONDON EXAGGERATE LIP LINER IN CALL ME CRAZY, £3.99. STARGAZER EYE AND LIP PENCIL IN 26, £3, STARGAZER-PRODUCTS.COM. MAC CHROMAGRAPHIC PENCIL IN LANDSCAPE GREEN, £14. URBAN DECAY 24/7 GLIDE-ON EYE PENCIL IN EMPIRE, £15.50. CHANEL STYLO YEUX WATERPROOF EYELINER IN FERVENT BLUE, £19, AT BOOTS. URBAN DECAY 24/7 GLIDE-ON EYE PENCIL IN DIOR ASPHYXIA, £15.50 ROUGE DIOR LIPSTICK IN ROUGE PIMPANT, £26.50

STILA AQUA GLOW WATERCOLOR BLUSH IN WATER POPPY, £20

Rainbow EYES…

JASON LLOYD-EVANS; PAUL BOWDEN

… AND LIPS AND NAILS. SPRING’S MULTICOLOURED MAKE-UP IS BRIGHT, BEAUTIFUL AND JUST A LITTLE BIT BRAZEN, SAYS NICOLA MOULTON

t

here was a lot of talk about underground clubs at fashion week this season. Vivienne Westwood even set her show in a basement, with a signpost outside that read “Alien Sex Club”. The show itself was

entitled “Unisex”, and the clothes certainly didn’t discriminate: male models wore miniskirts and girls mannish suits. What did mark the difference was the make-up: in a world where clothes are becoming

ever more gender-free, the show’s make-up artist, Val Garland, made the point that make-up is still a job for the girls, with multiple looks that were bright, brilliant and paintbox-punk. > 379


Miuccia Prada was also thinking about a “sexy salon” when she envisaged her Miu Miu show, although her inspiration was rooted in a characteristically political belief: “There’s conservatism on both the right and the left in politics,” she said. “And then people look for escapes from it, attracted to strange religious beliefs, or underground clubs and music.” In this context, this season’s paintbox-bright makeup achieves a dual feat: it feels at once joyful and yet subversive.

GIVENCHY OMBRE COUTURE CREAM EYESHADOW IN JAUNE AURORA, £18 ILLAMASQUA POWDER EYE SHADOW IN VICTIM, £16.50

STILA MAGNIFICENT METALS FOIL FINISH EYE SHADOW IN METALLIC EMERALD, £33.50

JASON LLOYD-EVANS; PAUL BOWDEN

“Bright colour is only half a statement. The randomness brings both innocence and boldness to the look” ISSEY MIYAKE

As seen at Issey Miyake: for a take on abstract eyes, apply Stila Smudge Stick waterproof eyeliner in Turquoise then use a wet brush to apply Illamasqua powder eyeshadow in Victim, Stila Magnificent Metals eyeshadow in Metallic Emerald and Givenchy Ombre Couture cream eyeshadow in Jaune Aurora. Try & Other Stories lip pencil in Pouf Orange on the lips STILA SMUDGE STICK WATERPROOF EYE LINER IN TURQUOISE, £14.50

& OTHER STORIES LIP PENCIL IN POUF ORANGE, £7

HIGH BROW As seen at Vivienne Westwood: experiment with colour on the brows using YSL False Lash Effect mascara in green and pink VIVIENNE WESTWOOD

The rebelliousness comes partly in the application. The colours are friendly enough; but where bright colours were used, they were rarely confined to a tasteful application on lips or nails. Coloured-in eyebrows – pink and orange at Westwood, orange at Max Mara, sky blue at Chanel (possibly acknowledging the Chanel Airlines theme) – were the new alternative to a statement lipstick. On a clean face, with dewy skin and a touch of clear gloss, they didn’t look grungy or studenty or jokey, but interesting, unusual, creative. At Giamba, Val Garland talked of “really cool girls having fun, going in the clubs wearing coloured brows in pink, yellow and peachy tones”. You could use coloured mascara to do this – there are some beautiful new ones in the spring make-up collections (most noticeably in YSL’s False Lash Effect range). Or, for a slightly subtler effect, you could use any coloured eyeshadow, applied with a wet brush and fixed with a little clear brow gel. Nail and make-up technicians were also dreaming up new ways to apply old products. At Issey Miyake, make-up artist Alex Box, who is known for her painterly approach, blew face paint down straws to make serendipitous >

FACE PAINTING

YSL VOLUME FALSE LASH EFFECT MASCARA IN GREEN AND PINK, £25 EACH

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patterns around the eyes. It looked pretty, but in an enigmatic and natural way – rather as if the girls had become butterflies – and the looseness brought both an innocence and boldness to the look. Back to Giamba, where manicurist Keri Blair mixed nail polishes together or used randomly applied coloured nail foils “to create a custom polish of colour and texture”, which was

JEREMY SCOTT

VOGUEbeauty TEN TO ONE As seen at Jeremy Scott: why restrict yourself to one nail colour? Work up a painterly mix using Guerlain nail varnish in Red Heels and Sally Hansen Miracle Gel in Tidal Wave

At Manish Arora, models became “galactic manga gypsy girls at the disco”

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SALLY HANSEN MIRACLE GEL IN TIDAL WAVE, £9.99 GUERLAIN NAIL ENAMEL IN RED HEELS, £17.50

CHANEL STYLO YEUX WATERPROOF EYELINER IN FERVENT BLUE, £19

WATER COLOURS

CHANEL

As seen at Chanel: get the wash of blue to eyes using Chanel Stylo Yeux Waterproof in Fervent Blue and Illusion d’Ombre in Griffith Green

CHANEL ILLUSION D’OMBRE IN GRIFFITH GREEN, £25

JASON LLOYD-EVANS; JAMES COCHRANE; PAUL BOWDEN

an exquisite and very wearable take on the trend. Rainbows, by their nature, are also about enjoying multiple colours at once, so “palette eyes” – so called because they seem to incorporate every shade in a palette – were in evidence, too, from the daubed-on hues at Westwood to the painstaking colour blends created by make-up artist Kabuki at Manish Arora, transforming models into “galactic manga gypsy girls at the disco”. Kabuki was also behind the make-up at Jeremy Scott, where cartoonish eyes and lips were offset by OPI nail polishes in every colour under the sun. “The feeling is strong individuality, and a fascination with counterculture,” he said. And there’s no denying it, bright make-up looks great on the runway. Fashion editors have been whispering for some seasons now of a marked conservatism in the clothes, so what better way to enhance the theatrics of a collection than with some dazzling make-up? In what was to be his final show for Lanvin, Alber Elbaz was preoccupied with the idea of putting on a performance, presenting his collection in a specially created “theatre”. “What is relevant today? Is it need or provocation? Can fashion and theatre coexist?” he asked. In make-up terms, they emphatically can. Q


VOGUEbeauty

ESTEE LAUDER MICRO ESSENCE INFUSION MASK, £50 FOR SIX

111 SKIN BIO CELLULOSE FACIAL TREATMENT MASK, £20, AT HARRODS

BEST FOR: DULL

GIVENCHY HYDRA SPARKLING FRESH & FAST MASK, £39.50 FOR 14

SKIN

Estée Lauder’s Micro Essence Infusion Mask provides a double dose of Micro-Nutrient Bio-Ferment – an intensive blend of clinically proven restorative micronutrients – compared with its liquid counterpart, Estée Lauder Essence in Lotion, making it a faster route to glowing skin.

BEST FOR:

BEST FOR: ANTI-AGEING

YOUNGER SKIN

111 Skin’s Bio Cellulose Facial Treatment Mask is saturated with three key ingredients: arbutin to brighten, silk amino acids to strengthen, and asiatica to stimulate collagen. The ultra-fine bio-cellulose fibres mould to fit the contours of your face, allowing ingredients to penetrate most effectively.

Givenchy’s Hydra Sparkling Fresh & Fast Masks come in a multi-pack, just like face wipes. The science isn’t too shabby either: each fabric mask contains Givenchy’s Sparkling Water Complex – a unique formula that attracts and stores water inside skin cells, supporting skin’s natural functions and allowing the cells to work at their optimum level. In return, skin exudes luminosity.

BEST FOR:

STRESSED SKIN

A brand entirely dedicated to sheet masks, Timeless Truth offers a masked solution for every skincare qualm. Its Multipeptide Calming Revitalising Mask, for example, uses negatively charged, freezedried powder embedded in a serumsoaked cloth. Upon application, the skin’s warmth dissolves the powder allowing the negative ions to boost circulation and fully absorb the nourishment from the serum for intense anti-wrinkle benefits.

One-sheet WONDERS THE REJUVENATING POWER OF SHEET MASKS IS THE SKINCARE WORLD’S LATEST OBSESSION, SAYS LOTTIE WINTER

BEST FOR:

LACKLUSTRE SKIN

The first “hydrogel” mask on the market, Decléor Aurabsolu Intense Glow Mask comes infused with jasmine absolute – the brand’s hero ingredient, used to combat stressed skin. It is harvested in the morning when the chemical composition of jasmine’s essential oils is at its most powerful. The mask is packed with amino acids and vitamins to restore radiance to lifeless skin.

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BEST FOR:

PIGMENTATION

Eve Lom’s White Brightening Mask homes in on pigmentation, revealing a bright and even complexion. A blend of ingredients – such as DermaPep to help prevent the formation of dark spots and pigmentation; allantoin to reduce inflammation; and niacinamide to boost collagen production – the mask acts as an all-in-one, multi-action treatment.

DECLEOR AURABSOLU INTENSE GLOW MASK, £12

BEST FOR: DRY

DR WU HYDRATING SYSTEM EXTREME HYDRATE BIO-CELLULOSE MASK, £28

SKIN

Because of the water-loving properties of bio cellulose, Dr Wu’s Hydrating System Extreme Hydrate Bio-Cellulose Mask is able to hold up to 100 times its dry weight in liquid – or, in this case, HyaluComplex (an advanced formula containing active yeast extract to prompt cell rejuvenation, and edelweiss extract for its powerful antioxidant properties).

BEN HASSETT; PAUL BOWDEN

TIMELESS TRUTH MULTIPEPTIDE CALMING REVITALISING MASK, £4.90

EVE LOM WHITE BRIGHTENING MASK, £125 FOR EIGHT, AT SPACE NK


VOGUEbeauty

CARA DELEVINGNE, WHO SPARKED THE LATEST TREND FOR BOLD BROWS, AND, INSET, LAUREN MURDOCH-SMITH

SHAVATA BROW STRENGTHENER ORGANIC CASTOR OIL, £15. THE ROLLERBALL APPLICATOR WILL NOURISH BROWS AND HELP STIMULATE HAIR GROWTH

BILLION DOLLAR BROWS BROW POWDER, £18. USE TO DEFINE AND FILL BROWS

BROWTICIAN THE STYLIST KIT, £7.99, AT SUPERDRUG. A GOOD TRAVEL-SIZE GROOMING KIT

EYLURE BROW COMB TWEEZERS, £12.50. DOUBLE-ENDED TWEEZERS FOR PRECISION GROOMING

Brow STUDY

DO YOU HAVE FULL EYEBROWS? LEARN TO LOVE THEM, SAYS LAUREN MURDOCH-SMITH, AND THEY’LL BECOME YOUR MOST ENVIABLE ASSET (AS WELL AS BEING BANG ON TREND)

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strangers to “cheer up”, and I’m convinced it’s to do with my brows. They make me look moody – angry, even – and make my expression seem hard rather than soft. At the Blink chain of brow bars, they’ve named the biggest and boldest of their looks the Proud Brow, and the model in the picture looks confident to the point of arrogance. Blink’s founder, Vanita Parti, says she often finds that women with strong eyebrows seem almost apologetic about them, which

“Strong brows express an inner confidence” is why she chose the name. “The name Proud Brows reflects how women should feel about their eyebrows,” she says. “Strong brows are as important as a strong smile. They express an inner confidence.” Maybe that’s the problem. People wrongly assume I’m overly confident to maintain such oversized brows. But the truth is I’ve tried the alternative: at university I had them thinned out and re-shaped, and I just didn’t look like me. I could change my hair colour, I could wear glasses, I could wear a bright red lipstick and still feel like the old me, but

BLINK BROW-CONDITIONING DUO, £26. USE THE DAY CREAM TO CONDITION AND THE NIGHT BALM AS A MASK FOR YOUR BROWS

MII CONCEAL & CONTOUR DUO, £11.50. USE TO HIDE STRAY HAIRS

CIATE INSTABROW TINTED BROW GEL, £15, AT ASOS.COM. LIKE A MASCARA, BUT FOR YOUR BROWS

& OTHER STORIES TRIPTYCH COAL EYEBROW CREME, £10. GREAT FOR A NATURAL FULLER EYEBROW

changing my brows felt different. It felt as if I were changing a part of my personality. I notice that Cara Delevingne – the model who single-handedly brought big eyebrows back – went through the same phase. She certainly didn’t launch her career with the eyebrows you associate with her today. There was a moment where she wavered and had them narrowed down, but it didn’t last long because her brows are her “thing” and were never meant to be tamed. These days, despite occasional negative associations, I like having naturally bushy brows. That’s not to say they don’t take maintenance – in fact, they require daily attention, as new growth is an overnight affair. I comb them into place and tweeze out stragglers as part of my morning routine. But for every person who might think me standoffish, there’s another who remarks how jealous they are. So my Tom Ford brows are here to stay. Q

SIMON EMMETT; ALASDAIR MCLELLAN; PAUL BOWDEN

a

t a recent dinner for a Tom Ford fragrance launch, a woman whom I’d never met caught my eye and shouted across the table: “Your eyebrows are very handsome – they’re the perfect Tom Ford brow.” When you have big eyebrows they can define you. Quite often I’m referred to as “Lauren, the one with the amazing brows.” The “amazing”, though, refers to their size (like the “Incredible” Hulk). And I suppose they are quite arresting. They’re darker than my natural hair colour, and – I’ve just measured them – an impressive 1cm across, even at their thinnest. My face is quite narrow and my eyes almond-shaped, both of which enhance my brows even more. These days I often wonder whether people think I wear them full because that’s the current trend, but mine have been a talking point ever since I can remember. When I was growing up, the cool girls at school had thin brows, and those pencil-thin arches spawned a generation of scarce (and now Scouse) brows. At the time, though, something in me resisted plucking my own – hence my alreadygenerous eyebrows seem to stand out even more today. But strong eyebrows define me in subtler ways, too. I’m often told by


CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: BYREDO SUPER CEDAR EAU DE PARFUM, £88. ANNICK GOUTAL ROSE POMPON EAU DE TOILETTE, £67. DOLCE & GABBANA DOLCE ROSA EXCELSA EAU DE PARFUM, £65. CALVIN KLEIN CK2 EAU DE TOILETTE £53. VALENTINO VALENTINA POUDRE, £61

VOGUEbeauty

Wood WORK

PAUL BOWDEN

THIS SPRING, ROSE COMBINES WITH WOODY NOTES IN A REINTERPRETATION OF A CLASSIC. BY LOTTIE WINTER

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COLOURING BOOK by Iain R Webb

ON SALE NOW £10 ISBN: 978-1840917215


VOGUEbeauty MARC JACOBS

ON WHY MORE IS MORE

STYLE EYE-CON NO 7 PLUSH EYESHADOW PALETTE IN THE LOVER, £45

“Texture is really important to me. In our meetings I often try something on – mascara or nail polish or whatever – and say I wish it were thicker, or shinier, or softer. And then we work on how to make that happen.”

MARC’S manifesto

AS MARC JACOBS LAUNCHES HIS FIRST COSMETICS LINE, THE DESIGNER TELLS VOGUE HOW HE’S REWRITTEN THE MAKE-UP RULE BOOK

MAGIC MARC’ER PRECISION EYELINER PEN IN BLACQUER, £22

ON BLACK “Our shade Blacquer has been a great part of this collection from the beginning. It’s the blackest black, and I think that makes it great for eye make-up or nails. Almost everyone likes and looks good in black of some sort. It works with all complexions. It’s like a black pen on a blank piece of paper – there’s just something about it that looks really good.”

Left: Marc’s production notes

AS TOLD TO NICOLA MOULTON. JASON LLOYD-EVANS; INSTAGRAM/THEMARCJACOBS; PAUL BOWDEN

ON THE LINE-UP “I’m not really straight in any way… so I can’t imagine our beauty line ever being that. The names are inspired by movies and characters I love, mixed with my love of alliteration and exclamation marks and other punctuation – like O!Mega Lash mascara, Magic Marc’er eyeliner and Re(marc)able Foundation.”

ENAMORED HI-SHINE NAIL LACQUER IN SHOCKING, £15

KISS POP LIP COLOR STICK IN SMACK, £20

ON APPLYING MAKE-UP “I don’t know who made up the rule that you can’t apply lipstick at the table. If you feel comfortable doing something, you should do it. I was never very interested in what Miss Manners had to say.”

ENAMORED HI-SHINE LIP LACQUER IN FRENCH TICKLER, £22

ON THE NEED FOR SHINE

THE FACE III BUFFING FOUNDATION BRUSH, £37

The designer wearing his Blacquer nail polish

“If anyone wants shine, we have plenty of it. I happen to love shine. Shine to me is decadent, but I don’t know if it’s for everyone.” Marc Jacobs Beauty is available at Harrods 393


VOGUEbeauty The wonder remover Peeling off your gel manicure doesn’t sound right, but Untied Beauty’s latest kit means just that. KIT: Gelousy Peel Off Gel Starter Kit, £59.99, at Unitedbeauty.co.uk. BEST FOR: Those who don’t like the idea of a two-week shade or gel commitment, or anyone concerned about damage. EASE OF USE: Quick and easy – just make sure you take a thin coat of polish up to the nail edges as it can shrink. Peeling off a gel manicure goes against the grain, but it is very satisfying, and after several tests nails appeared healthy. We also like the portable USB LED lamp (below, £59.99). Fun, practical – and it works! RANGE OF COLOURS: There are only 15 Gelousy Peel Off shades, but its new Gel Touch kit (£49.99) turns any polish into a peelable gel.

The innovator Known for his natural nail products, manicurist Leighton Denny has branched out into the gel market – with a difference. His Top That kit means that any polish can be transformed into a gel manicure by using the kit’s gel top coat. KIT: Leighton Denny Top That Gel System, £79.99, Leighton dennyexpertnails.com. BEST FOR: Value, and for those who don’t want to be restricted by one brand’s colour choices. EASE OF USE: A little more difficult to “cure” (it took longer than the instructions stated). However, this minor negative is outweighed by the fact that you don’t have to use a special polish. PROS: You don’t need to buy a whole new nail wardrobe. The kit is compact and professional-looking. RANGE OF COLOURS: Infinite.

NAILING THE GLOSSARY CURING STAGE: This refers to the

Take a SHINE The all-rounder THE GEL MANICURE REVOLUTIONISED OUR GROOMING REGIMES, BUT IS IT ACHIEVABLE AT HOME, ASKS LAUREN MURDOCH-SMITH

i

t’s been about five years since gel nails became the salon manicure of choice for busy yet well-groomed women. The instantly dry, hard-to-chip two-week finish has elevated the treatment to a new level. But could you achieve the same effect at home? DIY gel-manicure kits are now becoming more widely available, including professional polishes, gel top coats and your own LED lamp. There are even innovations that are overtaking what you might get in a salon, such as peel-off nail colours (so no damage to nails when you get the urge to pick off a chipped gel) and nextgeneration top coats that turn your favourite polishes into a Shellac’s new Xpress 5 Top Coat is the latest from CND, professional gel treatment. So along with a new high-speed LED lamp (previously Shellac was cured with a UV lamp). This new top coat which are the best? Vogue roadmeans a five-minute removal, still in the traditional tested three of the major players foil-wrap way, but that’s much less than the usual to see if that elusive two-week 10 or 15 minutes. Last but not least, the shine is manicure really does no longer unbeatable. Sweetsquared.com need a salon appointment…

THE PRO UPDATE

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With one of the biggest colour ranges, Sensationail is a market leader. There are 10 manicures’ worth of product in the kit, any of which can be easily replaced, but the lamp will last for ever. KIT: Sensationail Starter Kit, £70, at Boots. BEST FOR: Beginners. EASE OF USE: Includes everything from a lamp to lint-free wipes. The shine on the finish could have been better compared with pro brands, but on the whole it is a very good kit. RANGE OF COLOURS: More than 85 shades make it one of the widest selections. The nudes aren’t as good as the darker shades, but this is common with gels.

PATRICK DEMARCHELIER; PAUL BOWDEN

activation, when heat from a lamp turns the gel into plastic to set the polish. CLEANSING STAGE: After the top coat has been cured, nails must be wiped with a cleanser (normally provided in a kit) to remove the sticky residue left from the final top-coat stage. LINT-FREE WIPES: The square, almost medical-like swabs are important, as fibres from cotton-wool pads can catch on your nails, leaving a bumpy finish. Restock at Sallyexpress.com. LED LAMP: These are now the choice for both professional and at-home gel kits, mainly because they cure gel polish faster than UV lamps, and the bulbs don’t need to be replaced. The higher the lamp’s wattage, the faster the polish will cure.


<377 GIVE & TAKE

nanny/housekeeper – she’s very friendly, too. Maybe if he’s too much the glommer, I could abscond with Roland the retriever to our country cottage? I send Grace a message via Borrow My Doggy. Is Roland good with sheep? Because that could work… It’s not as if I’m not used to sharing my personal space with others. I do it at work. In fact, that’s the only place I prefer having others around. Right now I work in a fabulous shared space atop Dover Street, an arrangement that I and my co-workers managed to achieve through the friend of a friend, the way people have been sharing for decades. Instinctively, I prefer to do things through a friend of a friend. But now I’m actually on the lookout for a new shared workspace – unbearably, our landlord is kicking us all out – and I will likely end up at Soho Works, the shared-office concept created by Nick Jones – if and when the newest one opens in White City. But an alternative could be a berth at Wework, the global $10 billion office-sharing conglomerate, co-founded in New York by Adam Neumann and Miguel McKelvey in 2010. I’m met at the Wework Moorgate building by Hillary Deppeler, head of “brand experience”, a cool platinum blonde wearing a pompom hat and leather jeans who formerly worked for MTV and TED. Digital brands like Soundcloud, Skyscanner, Farfetch, they all operate out of Wework’s office. But you can go there, like me, as a freelancer (desks cost from £325 a month). As with any super-cool shared office space, there are “dedicated” desks, “commons” areas, booths, conference rooms, and little shut-to phone cubicles to do that difficult interview. The difference, maybe, to most offices is the luxe feel of the facilities – immaculate kitchen stations on every floor with free Volcano coffee, almond milk, soya milk, dairy milk with “all different gradients of fat” and on-tap beer. Keg parties, chocolate fondue parties, Square Mile coffee martini parties… They’re all very “Wework”, too. But what do you expect from a company whose core values, as the latest newsletter reads, are “Grateful and Together: two key pillars of our identity.” Neumann, 36, who is related to Gwyneth Paltrow by marriage, was brought up on a kibbutz and may be a billionaire real-estate developer on paper but is also passionate about collaboration. As I leave, I realise that the place reminds me of the fictional, all-powerful internet company in Dave Eggers’s dystopian novel The Circle. Meanwhile I get a message from Grace, Roland’s owner, who says I can’t borrow her doggy. I guess I came on a bit too strong, asking if he was good with sheep. But then, I have no doggy-borrowing experience and therefore none of those precious, positive reviews on my profile. In Sharing Economy terms I’m what Rachel Botsam calls “a ghost in the system”. But when my couchsurfer, Ali from Kazakhstan, blows me out, too, saying in not so many words that he has had a better offer, I begin to wonder. Should I have worked on my profile pic a bit harder? Should I have mentioned that I was writing this piece for Vogue? I wonder if you can buy reviews, like you can buy Instagram or Twitter followers? That was a joke – I would never do that, but in this new world where the currency is reputation, it crosses my mind. So has participating in the Sharing Economy shifted my everyday behaviour? Have I been missing out, up until now, by not being more involved? Maybe. I’d never have heard of the Bohicas. I’d never have realised I love Korean food. And if I’d taken a Hailo rather than Uberpool, I’d never have met Caz Coronel, a DJ/lucid-dreaming instructor, whose mother comes from Medellín (a place I’m utterly fascinated by after watching Narcos). Whether it’s made my life easier, though, whether I’ve made or saved any money – that’s another thing. Meanwhile the constant hectoring to “rate my performance”, to rate the conversation about my performance; the constant, pressing need for feedback, the ensuing guilt for not providing it right there and then… I’m not sure I like being this much in demand. I’m not sure I have the stamina. At the same time, I’ve got an empty car going to the country this weekend and it seems both unfair and wasteful, not to mention lazy, not to give Rob a ride. I’ll text him now. Q 396

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A A Détacher, New York 001 212 625 3380 Adidas 0870 240 4204 Alberta Ferretti 020 7235 2349 Alex Eagle 020 7589 0588 Alexander McQueen 020 7355 0088 Alexander Wang 020 3727 5568 APC 020 7287 9659 Aquazzura 020 3828 0433 Ariesarise.com Aspinaloflondon.com Ateaoceanie.com B Baumundpferdgarten.com Bellafreud.com Boss 020 7499 5605 Bottega Veneta 020 7838 9394 Brownsfashion.com Burberry.com By Malene Birger 020 7486 4000 C Cabbagesandroses.com Calvinklein.com Carven 020 7225 7110 Céline 020 7491 8200 Chanel 020 7493 5040 Chloé 020 7823 5348 Christian Louboutin 0843 227 4322 Christopher Kane 020 7493 3111 Church-footwear.com Clothhouse.com D Daks 020 7409 4040 Dior 020 7172 0172 DKNY 020 7499 6238 Dolce & Gabbana 020 7659 9000 Dover Street Market 020 7518 0680 Driesvannoten.be E Each-other.com Emilia Wickstead 020 7235 1104 Erdem 020 3653 0360 Etro.com Eugeniakim.com F Falke.com Fendi 020 7927 4172 G Gabrielahearst.com Ganni.com Gareth Pugh Studio@garethpughstudio.com Gillian Horsup 020 7499 8121 Giorgio Armani 020 7235 6232 Givenchy.com Gucci 020 7235 6707 H Harrods 020 7730 1234

Harvey Nichols 020 7235 5000 Hermès 020 7499 8856 Hilfiger Collection 020 3144 0900 Hugo Boss 020 7499 5605 Hunterboot.com I Iandavidbaker.com Isabel Marant Etoile 020 7499 7887 J Jeremyscott.com Jigsaw-online.com Jimmychoo.com Joseph-fashion.com J-w-anderson.com K Kappa.com/uk Kenzo 020 7491 8469 Thekooples.co.uk L La Perla 020 7399 0620 Lacondesa.es Lacoste.com Lemaire.fr Leon Max 020 7221 1204 Liberty 020 7734 1234 Lkbennett.com Ln-cc.com Longchamp.com Louis Vuitton 020 7399 4050 Lynnandlawrence.com M Maisonmargiela.com Maje 020 7486 0306 Manolo Blahnik 020 7352 3863 Mansurgavriel.com Marc Jacobs 020 7399 1690 Margaret Howell 020 7009 9009 Marialarosa.it Marks & Spencer 0333 014 8555 Marni 020 7245 9520 Marykatrantzou.com Max Mara 020 7499 7902 Mcmworldwide.com Michael Kors Collection 020 7811 5940 Michael Michael Kors 020 7659 3550 Mih-jeans.com Milly.com Missoni.com Misssixty.com Miu Miu 020 7409 0900 Moschino.com N National Theatre Costume Hire 020 7452 3970 Neilsonforestrow.co.uk New & Lingwood for Alex Eagle 020 7589 0588 Nike.com

O Oliviavonhalle.com P Pacorabanne.com Palaceskateboards.com Paul Smith 0800 023 4006 Pepejeans.com Philipp Plein Plein.com Philosophy by Lorenzo Serafini 020 7235 2349 Polo Ralph Lauren 020 7535 4600 Prada 020 7647 5000 R Rada.it Ralph Lauren Collection 020 7535 4600 Roberto Cavalli 020 7823 1879 Roger Vivier 020 7245 8270 Rupert Sanderson 020 7491 2220 Russellandbromley.co.uk S Saint Laurent by Hedi Slimane 020 7235 6706 Salvatore Ferragamo 020 7838 7730 Sandro 020 7486 9176 Selfridges.com Sportmax 020 7499 7902 Stella McCartney 020 7518 3100 Stuartweitzman.com Sunglass Hut 0844 262 0860 Sunony.com Sunspel.com T Tabithasimmons.com Terrydehavilland.com Theory 020 7985 1188 Thomassabo.com Threegraceslondon.com Tibi.com Tmlewin.co.uk Tod’s 020 7493 2237 Tommy Hilfiger 020 3144 0900 Tricker’s 020 7930 6395 U Umbro.co.uk Uniqlo.com V Valentino.com Valentino Garavani 020 7235 5855 Versace 020 7259 5700 Victoria Beckham 020 7042 0700 Vivienne Westwood 020 7439 1109 Vvrouleaux.com W Whistles.com Y Yangli.eu Yolke.co.uk Z Zimmermannwear.com

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The Penthouse Collection – only 4 remaining For those looking for the ultimate city lifestyle, The Penthouse Collection in the Carrara Tower meets every expectation. 2 and 3 bedroom penthouses available from £2,525,000 Call 020 3393 3649 to register your interest or email 250cityroad@berkeleygroup.co.uk 250 City Road Sales & Marketing Suite – 250 City Road, London EC1V 2QQ. Open 7 days a week 10am – 6pm (Until 8pm on Wednesdays and 4pm on Sundays). Details correct at time of going to press and subject to availability. Computer generated images of 250 City Road and a penthouse terrace and view at 250 City Road pending on planning, indicative only.

www.250cityroad.co.uk Proud to be a member of the Berkeley Group of companies


ONE BLACKFRIARS LONDON’S NEW MASTERPIECE

The majestic 170m tower rises 50 storeys high and is only moments from the River Thames, occupying a privileged position at the heart of fashionable South Bank. A choice of Studios, 1, 2, 3 & 4 bedroom apartments are available each boasting luxurious, spacious interiors and exceptional views over the inspiring capital. Dedicated Harrods Estates Concierge • Valet Parking • Health Club with Spa, Swimming Pool & Gym Private Screening Room • Wine Cellar • 32nd Floor Executive Lounge

Prices from £1,150,000* 020 3411 2692 | www.oneblackfriars.co.uk

Proud to be a member of the Berkeley Group of companies

*Price and details correct at time of going to print. Computer enhanced image depicts One Blackfriars and is indicative only.


Cresswell House Chelsea SW10 Cresswell House embraces classical grace and splendour and is undoubtedly one of the ďŹ nest luxury family homes to come on to the Chelsea market for many years. Situated at the heart of The Boltons conservation area, this beautifully designed and exceptionally spacious house offers an abundance of light, impressive proportions and unrivalled family accommodation. Master bedroom suite with 2 dressing rooms, en suite bathroom and shower room 4 further bedroom suites | Sitting area/bedroom 6 Entrance hall | Drawing room with bar Dining room | Kitchen/dining room | Sitting room | Study Cinema room | 2 guest cloakrooms | Gym Swimming pool, Jacuzzi and relaxation area | Sauna Shower rooms | Self-contained staff area | Garage with lift for 2 large cars | Courtyard garden 48ft south west facing garden Approximately 1,027 sq m (11,062 sq ft) | EPC: B

FREEHOLD GUIDE PRICE ÂŁ37,500,000


Chelsea

020 7349 4300

Paul Finch

James Pace

KnightFrank.co.uk


Step away from the ordinary...

Images include optional upgrades at additional cost.

... and into a stunning new Crest Nicholson home at Bishop’s Brook in Wells. Whether you’re looking to buy your first home or you’d like to downsize, you’ll find what you’re looking for at Bishop’s Brook. Take in the character and charm of Wells with historic buildings, quaint cobbled streets and a host of restaurants and shops. These traditionally designed homes are located within a 10 minute* walk of Wells town centre. Embrace all that Wells and Bishop’s Brook has to offer.

4 & 5 bedroom homes priced from £475,000 Sales & Marketing Suite open daily, 10am – 5pm Glastonbury Road | Wells BA5 1TU

B I S HOP’S B ROOK WELL S

www.crestnicholson.com/bishopsbrook *Times & distances are approximate and taken from Google Maps. Pricing correct at time of going to press. Show Home & local area photography.

01749 600 864


Established and picturesque wine estate KINGSCOTE, WEST SUSSEX East Grinstead: 3.6 miles, Haywards Heath: 10 miles, Central London: 32.4 miles Grade II listed 5 bedroom farmhouse, established vineyard, visitor’s barn, winery, shop and office, holiday let and equestrian facilities.

Chris Spofforth Savills Haywards Heath

01444 616131 cspofforth@savills.com Alex Lawson Savills London Country Department

020 3092 0992 About 152 acres I Excess £4.5 million

alawson@savills.com

savills.co.uk


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condenastjohansens.com Ariana Sustainable Luxury Lodge, Turkey


MARINE LIFE For the ultimate getaway, explore the world of luxury yachting â&#x20AC;&#x201C; a nautical adventure that leaves traditional villa vacations in its wake. Cecil Wright arranges bespoke yacht charters that will take you deep into your comfort zone.

SIREN for sale exclusively through Cecil Wright. Contact Chris Cecil-Wright: chris@cecilwright.com

www.cecilwright.com


PROPERTY

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SE1

SHOW APARTMENT NOW OPEN A unique blend of new build apartments & mews houses; some sympathetically crafted around the retained façade of a former bakery. › Located in a conservation area › Nestled around a secluded courtyard garden › Easy commute to the legal quarter, The City of London, Canary Wharf & the West End › Conveniently located for elite universities, LSE & Kings College › Concierge Service › 250 year leasehold › Completions from summer 2016 Southwark Stn.

The Cut

OldVic Theatre

Waterloo Stn.

4 minutes

4 minutes

4 minutes

5 minutes

Blackfriars Bridge 11 minutes

Borough Market

St. Paul’s

17 minutes

22 minutes

Book your appointment to visit 0800 883 0193 | valentineplace@crestnicholson.com | www.crestnicholson.com/valentineplace 1 beds from £735,000 | 2 beds from £965,000 | 3 beds from £1,175,000 | 3 bed mews houses from £2,195,000 Development Address 1-19 Valentine Place, London, SE1 8QH Digital illustration is indicative only. Pricing correct at time of going to press. Times and distances taken from Google Maps.


PROPERTY

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No other magazine combines fashion, style, beauty and culture in such an inspiring way print + FREE iPad & iPhone access VOGUE features the top photographers, the most glamorous models and the most talented writers to create a very lively and entertaining read. Names like Mario Testino, Kate Moss and Nick Knight give us the most arresting fashion pages to be found in a UK glossy magazine.

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CALL 0844 848 5202 REF KVO15141 OR VISIT WWW.VOGUE.CO.UK/SUBSCRIBE/KVO15141 (BT landline calls to 0844 numbers will cost no more than 5p per minute; calls made from mobiles usually cost more) *Offer limited to new subscribers at UK addresses and to direct debit payments only until 31/03/2016. For privacy policy and permission details, log on to www.magazineboutique.co.uk/youraccount.


The Goodman Penthouse Launch at Goodman’s Fields Thursday 4th February, 6pm – 9pm

Enjoy the pinnacle of London living at The Goodman Penthouse. Just over 3,800 square feet set over the top three floors of Satin House with exquisite interiors and breathtaking views towards the City and Canary Wharf. The Goodman Penthouse priced at £5,000,000 - ready to move in by March 2016. Call 020 3051 3760 or email goodmans@berkeleygroup.co.uk Sales & Marketing Suite open 7 days a week 10am – 6pm (Open until 8pm on Wednesdays and 4pm on Sundays) 39 Leman Street, London, E1 8EY. Price and details correct at time of going to press and subject to availability. Computer generated image depicts Goodman’s Fields and is indicative only.

www.goodmansfields.co.uk Proud to be a member of the Berkeley Group of companies


THE SMARTEST TRAVEL MAGAZINE IN THE WORLD

THE WORLD AT YOUR FINGERTIPS FROM CORNWALL TO THE CARIBBEAN Inside every issue the world’s best travel writers and specialists share their secrets and offer new and authentic experiences. Features on new destinations, or well-loved classics and ideas for achieving holidays in places you’ve only dreamed of – Condé Nast Traveller will take you there.

EXCLUSIVE TRIAL OFFER 3 I S S U E S O N LY £ 3 * Try Condé Nast Traveller for only £3 and enjoy 3 copies of the magazine. After your exclusive trial offer, contact us to stop receiving the magazine or let your subscription start automatically. When your subscription starts, you will receive a FREE WELCOME GIFT and 1 year of print and digital editions for only £24 – that’s 73% free. Also as a subscriber you will automatically qualify for FREE membership to the Members Club.

TO SUBSCRIBE: www.cntraveller.com/subscribe/KCT15139

call 0844 848 5202 (REF KCT15139)

or

*Offer is limited to new subscribers at UK addresses and to direct debit payments only until 10/04/2016. BT landline calls to 0844 numbers will cost no more than 5p per minute – calls made from mobiles usually cost more.


B R A C K E N B U RY G R O V E B R ACKE NBURY V ILLAGE W6

A unique selection of highly desirable West London residences

Computer generated images

Brackenbury Grove offers a unique collection of 2 bedroom mews houses, 3 bedroom townhouses and a selection of 1, 2, 3 & 4 bedroom apartments. These exclusive homes combine refined living with contemporary flair and luxury. Featuring a premium specification throughout with private courtyards, balconies or terraces, secure underground parking*and a concierge service.

Coming early 2016 To register your interest and be one of the first to view this exceptional development please contact our sales team

0344 809 2016 www.brackenburygrove.co.uk www.site-sales.co.uk

* Selected 1 bedroom apartments do not benefit from parking


mind’sEYE

If I lived in an imaginary house, it would be like Kettle’s Yard in Cambridge, the setting for my resort 2016 show

BYREDO PARFUMS MOJAVE GHOST, £88, AT LIBERTY.CO.UK

SUNSPEL WOOL SWEATER, £135

JW ANDERSON LEATHER BAG, £715

I met A$AP Rocky in Paris a year ago – we’re now friends. My favourite track is “Jukebox Joints”

JW ANDERSON TIGER’S-EYE EARRINGS, £325

NIKE MESH TRAINERS, £85

LEAVES (2015), BY MAGALI REUS

THE DESIGNER – AND CREATIVE DIRECTOR OF LOEWE – REVEALS WHAT’S INSPIRING HIM NOW

CONFIGURATION (1955), BY BARBARA HEPWORTH

IAN DAVID BAKER COTTON T-SHIRT, £150

I own work by both Giles and Magali. Pieces by these artists will be stocked in the JW Anderson Workshops, inspired by the Omega Workshops, just open in Shoreditch

HELP (2015), BY GILES ROUND

Ab Fab is one of my favourite comedies

COMPILED BY ELLIE PITHERS. SCOTT TRINDLE; ALLSTAR; COURTESY MAGALI REUS/THE APPROACH, LONDON; COURTESY LEEDS MUSEUMS AND ART GALLERIES/BRIDGEMAN IMAGES

JW Anderson

I first saw Ian’s work in a magazine booklet years ago, and now we’ve collaborated on some products for the Workshops


yslbeauty.com

Live the night experience at yslblackopium.com

Edie Campbell

THE NEW EAU DE PARFUM


PLEASE TURN THE PAGE TO VIEW SUPPLEMENT


SHOP THE SEASON What to buy & how to wear it

TREND MASTERCLASS

STYLING FASHIONâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S FRESH IDEAS

SPRING/SUMMER 2016


VOGUE PROMOTION Take the tropical on tour with a chain-link clutch that sings of fiery sunsets and the exotic Top, £185, Claudie Pierlot. Bag, £1,195, Jimmy Choo. Available at The Village, Westfield London

ANDREAS OHLUND & MARIA THERESE


SPRING/SUMMER 2016

Shop the season Be yourself! Across all four fashion capitals, the message for spring/summer ’16 was unanimous: celebrate individuality in all its forms. Whether you embrace romance and drama, or the pared-down simplicity of tomboy stripes, put your persona firmly in the spotlight. Designers offered up a rich cache of detail, colour, texture and ideas – all ways to update and enhance your wardrobe. But there’s more to style than head-to-toe catwalk dressing. In this guide, Vogue breaks down the trends and highlights the standout pieces to invest in. And we’ve conjured a wealth of styling tips to help you incorporate spring’s new treasures into your favourite looks. So wear your personality with pride – this season, fashion is here to help you shine! Editors Serena Hood and Nura Khan Art director Phillip Savill Writer/Chief sub-editor Lucy Olivier Merchandise editor Helen Hibbird Supplement co-ordinator Tasha Arguile Contributors Florence Arnold, Lucy Bower, Beatriz de Cossio, Philippa Durell, Naomi Smart, Lottie Winter Editor-in-chief Alexandra Shulman Photographers James Cochrane, Jason Lloyd-Evans, Mitchell Sams, Getty, Pixelate Cover photographer Lacey Set designer Daniel Sean Murphy On the cover leather bag, £2,000, Louis Vuitton, at The Village, Westfield London. Suede and python shoes, £1,495, Miu Miu. Illustrations: embroidered crêpe jacket, £1,710, Gucci. Sunglasses, £164.50, Jimmy Choo © 2016 The Condé Nast Publications Ltd, Vogue House, Hanover Square, London W1S 1JU. Printed by the proprietors, the Condé Nast Publications Ltd. Vogue is distributed by Condé Nast and National Magazines Distributors Ltd (Comag), Tavistock Road, West Drayton, Middlesex UB7 7QE. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part, without written permission, is strictly prohibited. Not for resale 1


VOGUE trend PETER PILOTTO LACE AND COTTON JACKET, £1,250, AT SELFRIDGES

“There was a romantic side to this season’s rebel. The clothes became very personal and unaggressive” BALENCIAGA

Lucinda Chambers, fashion director

M CQ ALEXANDER M CQUEEN LEATHER AND METAL CHAIN BELT, £135 PHILOSOPHY BY LORENZO SERAFINI COTTON TOP, £255

Soft ROCK

MIU MIU SATIN AND LEATHER BALLET PUMPS, £460

Fierce leather meets gossamer lace, and creamy ruffles join heavy-metal hardware as punk and pretty collide in a new-season style clash

STYLE NOTE

D AYLIG HT R E B EL

Look to Haider Ackermann, who paired the sweetest of blouses with biker leathers. Details come with a hint of menace – see Louboutin’s girlish flats, spiked with studs

CHRISTIAN LOUBOUTIN STUDDED LEATHER FLATS, £565

SANDRO LEATHER JACKET, £739, AT THE VILLAGE, WESTFIELD LONDON

J BRAND LEATHER TROUSERS, £1,050

HAIDER ACKERMANN

JW ANDERSON COTTON-MIX SHIRT, £265

2

MARQUES ALMEIDA

EMILIO PUCCI LEATHER SANDALS, FROM £530

ALESSANDRA RICH SILK-MOIRE BRA TOP, £900, AT SELFRIDGES


AF TER-D ARK R E B EL

DE BEERS CERAMIC AND DIAMOND RING, £3,225, AT THE VILLAGE, WESTFIELD LONDON

ALEXANDER M CQUEEN LACE BLOUSE, £1,595

CHANEL METAL AND CRYSTAL NECKLACES, FROM £1,598 EACH

RUFFS GOLD AND AGATE RING, £650. GOLD AND ONYX RING, £650

VERSUS VERSACE LEATHER MINISKIRT, £480, AT THE VILLAGE, WESTFIELD LONDON

BLUEBELLA LACE BRA, £28

STYLE NOTE The new blend of elegance and attitude is tailormade for night. Balance is key: a filigree lace blouse softens the hard glamour of a leather miniskirt

ERDEM LACE SKIRT, £1,625

PREEN

FENDI LEATHER BELT, £470

DIOR PATENT-LEATHER HEELS, £700

GIVENCHY BY RICCARDO TISCI FLOWER NECKLACE, FROM £840

BURBERRY PRORSUM SUEDE HEELS, £495

LOUIS VUITTON

MARY KATRANTZOU LACE TOP, £2,000

SAINT LAURENT BY HEDI SLIMANE LEATHER BAG, £1,175

3


TH E GEEK M AK EOVER HERMES SILK SCARF, £280

PRADA CASHMERE TANK TOP, £690

BELLA FREUD SILK BLOUSE, £325 OMEGA ROSE-GOLD WATCH, £8,730, AT THE VILLAGE, WESTFIELD LONDON

STYLE NOTE It’s the kooky catwalk details that elevate this look: Prada’s eye-popping patterned tank and Gucci’s embellished granny shoes both say “new-school nerd”

NERD Mentality

LE KILT CREPE KILT, £465, AT HARVEY NICHOLS

MIU MIU

ASPINAL OF LONDON LEATHER BAG, £595

With her sensible shoes, prim skirts and nerdy knitwear, the stylish swot steps into the spotlight, heralding a geek-chic rebellion ELLIOT RHODES LEATHER BELT, £94.50

GUCCI LEATHER MARY-JANES, £605

BARRIE CASHMERE CARDIGAN, £707

GUCCI

TOPSHOP UNIQUE COTTON-MIX TANK TOP, £85

4

BUTLER & WILSON CRYSTAL BROOCH, £38


VOGUE trend “Spring’s library loiterer is a nostalgic creature: retro prints and granny accessories offer fresh invitations to personality” Ellie Pithers, fashion features editor MIU MIU POLO SHIRT, £635

VIEW FROM THE CATWALK Slipping on a pair of geeky glasses is your quick route to to Nerdsville. We love Miu Miu’s glittery pink pair – the perfect mix of sweet and swotty

MARGARET HOWELL COTTON SKIRT, £375

MIU MIU £241, AT DAVID CLULOW

RADA JEWELLED HAIRBAND, FROM £120 LOTHO £280, AT MALLON & TAUB

OSCAR DE LA RENTA RESIN EARRINGS, £162

COSMOPOLITAN £89, AT CONCEPTEYEWEAR.CO.UK

AQUASCUTUM TRENCH COAT, £650

BURBERRY £268, AT DAVID CLULOW

CELINE £220, AT EYEWEARBRANDS.COM

PRADA

MANOLO BLAHNIK LEATHER LOAFERS, £535

LOUIS VUITTON LEATHER BAG, £2,000, AT THE VILLAGE, WESTFIELD LONDON

5


LISA MARIE FERNANDEZ BIKINI TOP, £310, AS PART OF SET, AT MATCHESFASHION.COM

MARY KATRANTZOU SATIN DRESS, £4,590

ETRO GOLD-PLATED CUFF, £455, AT NET-A-PORTER.COM

OSCAR DE LA RENTA

ALEXANDER M CQUEEN EMBROIDERED LEATHER JACKET, £3,595

OSCAR DE LA RENTA VELVET CLUTCH, £1,373

“Embrace the return of flamenco and wear your ruffles in bright colours and bold patterns. Why not dance in them, too?” Serena Hood, executive fashion director

H O W TO D O: D R ESSE D-D O W N FRILLS MILLY COTTON TOP, £235 FENDI COTTON BLOUSE, £770

AG DENIM DUNGAREES, £280, AT HARRODS

STYLE NOTE GUCCI CHIFFON BLOUSE, £745

6

A ruffled blouse is the neat way to update autumn’s dungarees, bringing together utility and frivolity. Decorative necklines and rippled sleeves ensure your frills are on show


VOGUE trend D AY-TO-NIG HT R UFFLES JIGSAW SILK BLOUSE, £98, AT THE VILLAGE, WESTFIELD LONDON

TOPSHOP UNIQUE LEATHER SKIRT, £295

ARME DE L’AMOUR GOLD-PLATED RING, £220

STYLE NOTE Rewind to the Eighties to recalibrate your work-and-play wardrobe. A simple silk blouse makes a clean counterpoint to a showy ruffled skirt or frilled trousers

ISA ARFEN SHANTUNG TROUSERS, £567, AT MATCHES FASHION.COM

Ripple EFFECT

JW ANDERSON

JOHANNA ORTIZ COTTONSATEEN TOP, FROM £580, AT ON MOTCOMB

Power up your nine-to-five in a fierce flamenco blouse or party hard in a frilled Eighties frock. Whatever you do, give it some fashion flounce...

TEMPERLEY LONDON CROPPED COTTON SHIRT, £350

CHANEL MESH DRESS, £25,570

LANVIN

BANANA REPUBLIC SUEDE HEELS, £75

7


Learn your LINES

CIT Y STRIPES

MICHAEL MICHAEL KORS CHAMBRAY TROUSERS, £140

ALEXANDER WANG

Powering through the collections, stripes run the gamut from regatta blues and sporty bands to multi-line mash-ups

VETEMENTS

LONGCHAMP COTTON AND LEATHER TOTE, £200, AT THE VILLAGE, WESTFIELD LONDON

R EG AT TA STRIPES

MDS STRIPES COTTON DRESS, FROM £330

A supersized cut reboots the city shirt

DOROTHEE SCHUMACHER COTTON-MIX DRESS, £491

STYLE NOTE Combining multiple blue-and-white boating stripes adds a subversive spin to classic regatta chic. The result? Old-school charm meets new-season showmanship

POLO RALPH LAUREN COTTON SHIRT, £110

MIH JEANS DENIM SKIRT, £245 DOLCE & GABBANA LEATHER BAG, FROM £1,425

THEORY LINEN TROUSERS, £250

MANOLO BLAHNIK CANVAS FLATS, £545

8


VOGUE trend LOUIS VUITTON BEAD NECKLACE, £415

MIX-A N D-M ATC H STRIPES

Street-style stripes worn head to toe in Milan

JONATHAN SAUNDERS SILK DRESS, £1,290, AT NET-A-PORTER.COM

GUCCI STRAW BERET, £170

DIOR WOOL COAT, £2,800

MISSONI

MARIA LA ROSA COTTONMIX SOCKS, FROM £30

ANDY WOLF SUNGLASSES, £225

SP ORTIN G STRIPES

BELLA FREUD WOOL TUBE SKIRT, £270

Victoria Heilbrunner runs with sporty stripes =

LACOSTE COTTON POLO SHIRT, £120

STYLE NOTE ADIDAS ORIGINALS LEATHER SNEAKERS, £67

CHLOE

PRADA LEATHER BAG, £1,985, AT THE VILLAGE, WESTFIELD LONDON

Go-faster lines offer a quick route into spring/ summer’s athletic trend. Don a sporty striped design and nod to fitness style without looking like a personal trainer

9


VOGUE trend SYDNEY EVAN SAPPHIRE, EMERALD AND RUBY EARRINGS, £995, AT HARRODS

CHROMATIC GEMS

MISSOMA SAPPHIRE PENDANT, £179

Spanning the colour spectrum in a sweep of brilliant hues, rainbow gems capture all the breathtaking beauty of the real thing. Pair with a plain white tee for hi-lo nonchalance

MARIE-HELENE DE TAILLAC SAPPHIRE, SPINEL AND TOURMALINE NECKLACE, £14,000 TO ORDER

“Spring’s rainbow palette requires a bold approach; temper the spectrum with black or denim” DRIES VAN NOTEN

Sarah Harris, fashion features director

ASHISH SEQUINED SILK BOMBER JACKET, £1,210, AT BROWNS HERMES SILK SCARF, £225

ANYA HINDMARCH LEATHER TOTE, £1,395, AT THE VILLAGE, WESTFIELD LONDON

DIANE VON FURSTENBERG SILK JUMPSUIT, £581

GUCCI

PIERRE HARDY SUEDE AND LEATHER SANDALS, £680

10


SARA BATTAGLIA LEATHER BAG, £2,028, AT MODAOPERANDI.COM AURELIE BIDERMANN BEAD BRACELET, £150, AT NET-A-PORTER.COM

CHANEL MUSLIN DRESS, £6,685

AQUAZZURA CANVAS AND LEATHER SANDALS, £505

H O W TO W E AR: R AIN B O W

Rainbow NATION

Fizzing with joie de vivre, colour-burst designs send a shot of instant pleasure blazing through your wardobe

CHLOE

CHRISTOPHER KANE

CHRISTOPHER KANE LACE TOP, £765

STYLE NOTE Colour-rich pieces have huge presence; let them shine. Understated black pants and chic pointed flats allow Christopher Kane’s vibrant top to claim the style spotlight

SAINT LAURENT BY HEDI SLIMANE WOOL TUXEDO TROUSERS, £585

STELLA M CCARTNEY PLEXIGLASS CLUTCH, £1,265

BIONDA CASTANA GROSGRAIN AND CRYSTAL FLATS, £425

11


JESSIE WESTERN SILVER CHARM NECKLACE, £162

H O W TO W E AR: CL ASSIC PR AIRIE

STYLE NOTE Days of Heaven dresses have a period charm that can easily tip into parody. Add cowgirl-kitsch details to steer the look out of dressing-up-box territory

VILSHENKO SILK DRESS, £1,450, AT AVENUE32.COM

SAINT LAURENT BY HEDI SLIMANE EMBROIDERED BAG, £1,250

12

ERDEM

VERONIQUE BRANQUINHO

MIU MIU LEATHER BOOTS, £1,395

GIAMBATTISTA VALLI

MARQUES ALMEIDA BROCADE MULES, £365

ZIMMERMANN

HERMES WICKER EARRINGS, £700

PHILOSOPHY DI ALBERTA FERRETTI

ZIMMERMANN LACE BLOUSE, £627, AT MATCHESFASHION.COM


VOGUE trend LAURENCE DACADE EMBROIDERED CANVAS BOOTS, £470, AT NET-A-PORTER.COM

COACH

GUCCI

Pioneer SPIRIT

Meadow prints, fluttering frills, and Wild West accessories make homespun prairie style fashion’s new frontier

WILDE ONES BEADED LEATHER BELT, £90

H O W TO W E AR: M OD ER N PR AIRIE

STYLE NOTE Clashing patterns and splashy sequins lend a touch of showgirl sass to prairie style, while extravagantly embellished accessories put the wild into Wild West dressing

RODARTE

MARY KATRANTZOU EMBELLISHED GEORGETTE DRESS, £9,450

GIAMBATTISTA VALLI

ETRO

VERONIQUE BRANQUINHO SILK TOP, £655, AT JOSEPH

CHLOE LEATHER SADDLE BAG, £1,395

CELINE LEATHER BOOTS, FROM £890

13


HEAVY METALS Spring/summer’s jewellery comes on strong. Steer clear of delicate pieces and look to chunky rope necklaces, bold brooches and dramatic drop earrings

LOEWE BRASS NECKLACE, £1,195

AURELIE BIDERMANN GOLD NECKLACE, £950, AT MATCHESFASHION.COM ELIE TOP GOLD AND DIAMOND EARRINGS, £8,000, AT MODAOPERANDI.COM

LOUIS VUITTON

SAINT LAURENT BY HEDI SLIMANE SEQUINED SILK MINIDRESS, £15,710

ALEXANDER M CQUEEN PEARL AND SWAROVSKI CRYSTAL BROOCH, £325

SERGIO ROSSI WOVEN LEATHER SANDALS, £950 CHURCH’S LEATHER BROGUES, £320, AT THE VILLAGE, WESTFIELD LONDON

LOEWE FRINGED SKIRT, £1,275 LANVIN CLOQUE SWEATER, £1,605

LOEWE

ALEXANDER M CQUEEN EMBELLISHED TULLE TUNIC, £6,795

RODARTE LEATHER HEELS, FROM £840, AT SELFRIDGES

14


VOGUE trend TAKIN G M E TALLICS TO W ORK

THE ROW EMBROIDERED SILK BAG, £4,730, AT BARNEYS.COM

DRIES VAN NOTEN EMBROIDERED COTTON-MIX SHIRT, FROM £505, AT SELFRIDGES

STYLE NOTE A pared-down monochrome setting creates a clean canvas for metallic details. Here, luxe gold embroidery dazzles against the white backdrop of Dries Van Noten’s blouse

JOSEPH BROCADE DRESS, £645

TOM FORD EYELET SKIRT, £2,230

Modern ALCHEMY

MANOLO BLAHNIK SUEDE AND LEATHER SLINGBACKS, £615

Invoke the power of precious metals. From polished platinum to burnished gold, rich details are right on the money TIFFANY STEEL WATCH, £3,450, AT THE VILLAGE, WESTFIELD LONDON COURREGES LEATHER JACKET, FROM £1,960, AT AVENUE32.COM

SACAI

CHANEL LEATHER BAG, £22,984

JIMMY CHOO SNAKESKIN HEELS, £895

15


THE GOLDEN HOUR This season’s mood is effortless. Think clean lines and touches of interest – a rustle of lace here, a zip of suede there. The Village at Westfield London’s exclusive collection exudes the spirit of a modern traveller, cool and comfortable wherever she goes Photographs by Andreas Ohlünd & Maria Therese Styled by Nura Khan


VOGUE PROMOTION As the day fades, this slip of chiffon is the perfect piece to switch to night-time nonchalance Dress, £550, Aquascutum. Shoes, £389, Sandro. Available at The Village, Westfield London. With special thanks to the Amangalla. Hair: Mette Thorsgaard. Make-up: Karin Westerlund. Model: Laura Julie Holm


No need to make too much effort – a striking one-piece offers poolside glamour without the usual fuss Swimsuit, £200. Versus Versace. Available at The Village, Westfield London


VOGUE PROMOTION Embrace the modern explorer with military accents and Amazonian drama. Belted khaki and lace-up sandals strike the perfect note Dress, £395. Burberry Brit. Shoes, £130, Kurt Geiger. Available at The Village, Westfield London

ANDREAS OHLUND & MARIA THERESE


It’s all in the detail – whites take on an edge of their own with pops of colour and pretty lace Top, £155. Skirt, £199, both Sandro. Available at The Village, Westfield London


VOGUE PROMOTION

Upgrade sightseeing accessories to the bold and boisterous with this showstopper from Anya Hindmarch Swimsuit, £55, Kurt Geiger. Backpack, £1,395, Anya Hindmarch. Available at The Village, Westfield London

ANDREAS OHLUND & MARIA THERESE


Floral arm candy from Gucci changes the mood from sweet to sophisticated. Pair with leg-lengthening flares and Colgate-white basics Sweater, £125. Jeans, £130, Michael Michael Kors. Bag, £1,670. Pumps, £455, both Gucci. Available at The Village, Westfield London


VOGUE PROMOTION Head off the path on a childish flight of fancy – unbuttoned and unrestrained, you float through the day lost in daydreams Shirt, £130, The Kooples. Bikini top, £75, Bikini bottoms, £70, both Vilebrequin. Available at The Village, Westfield London

ANDREAS OHLUND & MARIA THERESE


The spirit of Bardot hangs in the air – head-to-toe stripes are a given; the mood playful and graceful Shirt, £220, Boss. Jeans, £215, Hudson from House of Fraser. Available at The Village, Westfield London

ANDREAS OHLUND & MARIA THERESE


VOGUE PROMOTION Offset this romantic showstopper from Mulberry with bare feet and a bittersweet attitude. The result is unforgettable Dress, £1,250, Mulberry. Available at The Village, Westfield London


Sweltering nights call for a relaxed approach – throw on a vest and billowy bottoms to slouch off on a pre-dinner stroll Bikini top, £75, Vilebrequin. Vest, £75, Aquascutum. Trousers, £155, Weekend by Max Mara. Sandals, £175. Zadig & Voltaire. Available at The Village, Westfield London

ANDREAS OHLUND & MARIA THERESE


VOGUE PROMOTION As the colour seeps from the sky, embrace the change. Cool white on warm skin perfects this witching hour Top, £295, Belstaff. Available at The Village, Westfield London


VOGUE PROMOTION This season’s suede is structured and serene, a style statement to be made over and over again Dress, £379, Jigsaw. Shoes, £495, Belstaff. Available at The Village, Westfeld London

ANDREAS OHLUND & MARIA THERESE


VOGUE looks STYLE NOTE The old-school pyjama top makes a dapper workwear staple. Nonchalant glamour is the requisite look, with jeans and decorative slides completing the picture

ALEXANDER M CQUEEN SILK SHIRT, £615

Def JAMS VICTORIA VICTORIA BECKHAM DENIM JEANS, £210

Sleepwear continues to be an all-day affair, but if top-to-toe pyjamas feel a little louche, then a silky piped shirt will work like a dream

Danish style-blogger Pernille Teisbaek offers a monochrome take on pyjama dressing

BIONDA CASTANA LEATHER SLIDES, £395

H OLID AY H O W-TO

HERMES STRAW HAT, £340

POPLIN SILK NIGHT SHIRT, £180

CHLOE LEATHER AND MESH MULES, £370

Taking you from bedroom to beach and back again, the classic white nightshirt works double duty as a kaftan. Just add a sunhat and sandals...

DOLCE & GABBANA

STYLE NOTE

29


1

DRIES VAN NOTEN

PRINCESS FOR A DAY

A candy-coloured vision in featherlight chiffon and millefeuille tulle, Dries Van Noten’s gown conjures childhood dreams of princess dressing. Fashion fantasy made real...

18 Style START-UPS Fresh ideas came thick and fast at the runway shows. We’ve gathered our pick of the best to help launch your look into the new season. Spring/summer starts here...

30


VOGUE updates

2

THE BOY BOOT

JW ANDERSON

There’ll be plenty of time for sandals when the sun comes out. Right now, JW Anderson’s square-toed boots are the perfect transitional piece, their rough-and-ready glamour kicking girlish shoes into touch

CHLOE SILK AND LACE DRESS, £2,245

LINGERIE ON SHOW

3

From Dolce & Gabbana’s pyjamas to Saint Laurent’s slip dresses, the collections came brimming with boudoir chic. Our favourite lingerie-inspired design? Chloé’s cute-as-a-button babydoll dress

WORLD OF INTERIORS GUCCI

4

5

PROENZA SCHOULER

ERDEM SILK-VOILE DRESS, £4,200

COLD-SHOULDER CUTS Identified as the one part of a woman’s body that barely ages, shoulders return as fashion’s favourite erogenous zone

FENDI PYTHON AND VELVET HEELS, £1,700

An ode to exquisite interior design, Gucci’s chinoiserie prints have all the breathtaking glamour of silken De Gournay wall coverings. If his clothes are this decorative, can you imagine how beautiful Alessando Michele’s home must be?

6 STRAP YOURSELF IN

Falling somewhere between cute and kinky on the style spectrum, tie-up shoes appeared everywhere from Prada to Proenza Schouler. We’ll be risking our ankles in Fendi’s velvet-tied snakeskin pair. After all, excitement ought to come with a little danger attached... 31


DOLCE & GABBANA EMBELLISHED VELVET BAG, £3,975

8

SAILOR STYLE The nautical look may be a spring/summer perennial, but that doesn’t stop Max Mara’s take on the trend feeling as refreshing as salty sea air

DRIES VAN NOTEN

MAX MARA COTTON T-SHIRT, £145

DELUXE DETAIL

9

10

It’s excess all areas where accessories are concerned. With embellishments ranging from jewels, pom-poms and appliqué blooms to stick-on fruit and golden cherubs, the design mantra at Dolce & Gabbana was “more, more, more!”

TRIBAL BEAT Exotic detail has endless fashion mileage, but beware of tourist traps. Take your lead from Valentino, where tribal was mined with the deftest of touches: think feathers, fringing and beadwork scattered across delicate chiffon dresses

PURPLE POWER

Violet boasts all the delicacy of its candycoloured sibling shade pink, yet without the saccharine sweetness. Chanel, Miu Miu, Lanvin, Loewe (and many, many more) made the argument for pale purple as the colour of the season

MARC JACOBS LEATHER BOOTS, £1,300

11

INSIDE OUT Spring/summer’s abundance of sheer fabrics presents the ideal opportunity to upgrade your underpinnings. Invest in beautifully crafted pieces in glossy black silk

RAPHAELLA RIBOUD & ALEX EAGLE SILK BRA, £140

12

13

MISS AMERICA

From cheerleader to college girl, the new Marc Jacobs muse is an all-American beauty, giving us free rein to indulge in kitschy, star-spangled styling

32

VETEMENTS

VALENTINO

URBAN UPDATE

Vetements gave sportswear an undercurrent of urban menace this season. Dig out your grey sweatshirt and wear it hood up, garnished with a snarl


14 TALES OF THE CITY

DUCHAMP COTTON SHIRT, £130, AT THE VILLAGE, WESTFIELD LONDON

15

CHLOE ANKLE BRACELET, £225

FEET FIRST We’re giving you the heads-up now: bare legs will be very much on display this summer. Plan ahead with a block booking at Boomcycle, then invest in Chloé’s boho ankle chain to show off your shapely pins

Worn deconstructed at Vivienne Westwood, supersized at Vetements, and preppy-fashion at Ralph Lauren, the mannish city shirt is having a moment

16

ARMY DREAMERS

Head to your nearest army surplus store to find the perfect party cover-up. Slung over this season’s chiffon ruffles, a vintage military jacket lends instant McQueen-esque drama

DO OR DYE

Stoner style enjoys an elegant catwalk outing this season, with tie-dye techniques decorating the loveliest of summer dresses at Valentino, Thakoon and Altuzarra. Do try this at home...

18 THE PRECISION RED LIP Colour your lips just outside the natural lip line and fill in with a striking scarlet shade for spring’s ultimate statement pout

ALEXANDER M CQUEEN

17

CELINE

ALTUZARRA TIE-DYE DRESS, £870, AT MATCHESFASHION.COM

CHARLOTTE TILBURY MATTE REVOLUTION RED CARPET RED, £23

33


VOGUE shops

VALENTINO HAND-PAINTED LEATHER, £8,800

BALLY SUEDE, £2,795

CHANEL TWEED, £4,346

CHRISTOPHER KANE CREPE AND LEATHER, £1,495

MAX MARA WOOL, £1,110

PRADA TWEED, £1,530

SAINT LAURENT BY HEDI SLIMANE CANVAS, £1,825

MARC JACOBS EMBELLISHED DENIM, £3,500

MIU MIU LEATHER, £3,215

35


VOGUE staples CHLOE CORD NECKLACE WITH WOOD AND BRASS CHARMS, £435

INVEST IN: THE FESTIVAL DRESS

DURO OLOWU SILK-GEORGETTE DRESS, £1,098

A billowing summer dress is your new go-anywhere piece, taking you effortlessly from garden party to Glastonbury. Add buckled boots and a splash of sequins to play up its breezy boho charm

SAINT LAURENT BY HEDI SLIMANE SEQUINED WOOL CARDIGAN, £2,585

JIMMY CHOO SUEDE AND LEATHER BOOTS, £650

Kate Foley lends New York polish to the easy summer dress

36


HERMES SILVER EARRINGS, £560

INVEST IN: THE TRENCH

BURBERRY GABARDINE TRENCH COAT, £1,295

Eighties redux is this season’s wittiest revival, as Sloane Ranger separates enjoy a sleek catwalk makeover. Adding a classic trench coat lends streamlined polish to your King’s Road homage

JW ANDERSON WOOL-MIX SWEATER, £315

Natasha Goldenberg takes the trench to London Fashion Week TED BAKER VISCOSE SKIRT, £139, AT THE VILLAGE, WESTFIELD LONDON

SPRING’S NEW STAPLES The strongest wardrobe needs solid sartorial foundations. Invest in fashion’s stylish new building blocks to craft a look that lasts

GIANVITO ROSSI CANVAS HEELS, £520

37


VOGUE staples

INVEST IN: DAYTIME METALLICS

TATEOSSIAN GOLD AND SAPPHIRE NECKLACE, £3,500, AT THE VILLAGE, WESTFIELD LONDON J CREW CASHMERE SWEATER, £230

VICTORIA BECKHAM SUNGLASSES, £320

A wealth of shimmering metallics cast their gleam across the spring/summer shows. Dress down rich dazzle by day; a cashmere boyfriend knit makes a chic counterbalance to silver’s intense sheen

PRADA TWEED SKIRT, £745

GEORG JENSEN SILVER BANGLE, £435, AT THE VILLAGE, WESTFIELD LONDON

TOD’S LEATHER TROUSERS, £2,650

Helena Bordon models the new take on tweed

INVEST IN: THE NEW TWEED SKIRT

Endowing heritage fabrics with brand-new fashion smarts, this season’s checked skirt comes short and sweet. Complete the look with a striped knit and sneakers to emphasise tweed’s newfound spirit

FENDI LEATHER BAG, £940

BELLA FREUD CASHMERE SWEATER, £350

NICHOLAS KIRKWOOD LEATHER AND MESH HEELS, £775

MARC JACOBS LEATHER SNEAKERS, £245

Giovanna Battaglia shines at Paris Fashion Week

38


VOGUE shops

ONE-STOP STYLE

A decorative dress is the centrepiece of this season’s intelligent wardrobe, taking you seamlessly from morning to midnight. Switch up your accessories at sundown to refuel your look for the evening ahead...

NIGHT

DAY

PERCOSSI PAPI PERIDOT AND TOPAZ EARRINGS, £765, AT NET-APORTER.COM

+ sunglasses Keep the new season in your sights with Givenchy’s oversized cat’s-eye frames

GIVENCHY SUNGLASSES, £195, AT HARVEY NICHOLS

+ earrings Dramatic, shoulderskimming earrings signal your new-season savvy

DIANE VON FURSTENBERG SILK-CHIFFON DRESS, £501 FENDI LEATHER BAG, £1,530

+ watch Trade up to a trophy timepiece: Chanel’s dress watch scores serious style points CHANEL FINE JEWELLERY GOLD AND DIAMOND WATCH, £17,750

+ handbag Blush pink (autumn/winter’s hot hue) has lost none of its allure, and Fendi’s candy-coloured tote lends pretty a practical edge

NATHALIE TRAD RESIN AND SHELL CLUTCH, £860, AT AVENUE32.COM

CELINE HAWK’S-EYE BANGLE, FROM £290

+ handbag Swap your roomy day bag for a streamlined Perspex clutch to announce your party intentions

+ bangle Summer-length sleeves present an opportunity to show off this season’s statement arm-candy

+ shoes Silvery, space-age flats dip a toe into this season’s metallic trend RUPERT SANDERSON LEATHER FLATS, £425

+ shoes Showstopping heels complete your night-time transformation. Aquazzura’s party pair are garnished with decorative cutouts and gold-tipped laces.

AQUAZZURA SUEDE HEELS, £555

39


VOGUE shops GUCCI EMBROIDERED SILK, £3,780

JONATHAN SAUNDERS SATIN AND CREPE, £990, AT AVENUE32.COM

PETER PILOTTO INTARSIA, £1,525, AT HARVEY NICHOLS

ERDEM JACQUARD, £1,960

Dress circle

VICTORIA BECKHAM COTTON-MIX, £2,250

All florals, flounces and fetching shades, the new dresses are a masterclass in romance. Effortless glamour made easy...

TOPSHOP UNIQUE SILK, £225

CREATURES OF THE WIND CREPE AND SATIN, £815, AT FARFETCH. COM

ROKSANDA JACQUARD, £1,495 ROSIE ASSOULIN CREPE, £3,190, AT BROWNS

40


WHITE NOISE CELINE LEATHER, FROM £1,600

Spring’s virgin bags show pure brilliance, each striking white piece coming boldly designed, rich in detail and crafted with surgical precision

TOD’S LEATHER, £1,050

AKRIS LEATHER, £1,370

DIOR

LANVIN PATENTLEATHER, £1,285

ACCESSORIES Taking your look from nought to 60 in seconds, these new pieces are pure fashion rocket fuel, set to fire you straight into spring

CHOKE HOLD JW ANDERSON GOLD-PLATED, £375

CHRISTOPHER KANE

DIOR GLASS AND METAL, £600

Time to toughen up your stance on jewellery. Put away last autumn’s dainty gems and invest in some serious fashion hardware in the shape of this season’s chokers

VERSACE LEATHER, £320 BALMAIN GOLD-PLATED, £1,050

41


LOEWE

VOGUE accessories LOEWE PVC, £1,195 SAINT LAURENT

GOING CLEAR Beat Cinderella at her own game with a brand new pair of “glass slippers”. Step into one of these Perspex designs and await your Prince Charming...

ROSANTICA JEWELLED HAIR CLIP, £162, AT ROSANTICA.COM

CROWNING GLORY Revisit the glory days of grunge: tiaras, headbands and shimmering barrettes decorated countless catwalk heads this season. Complete the picture with a loveworn silk slip dress (copyright Courtney Love, 1991) and achieve style Nirvana

SIMONE ROCHA PVC, £675

ERICKSON BEAMON SWAROVSKI CRYSTAL TIARA, FROM £990, AT SELFRIDGES

CHANEL PVC AND LEATHER, £682

MIU MIU METAL AND CRYSTAL TIARA, £375

DOLCE & GABBANA EMBELLISHED PVC, FROM £1,465

CALVIN KLEIN COLLECTION

CHANEL METAL HAIR SLIDE, £589

BALENCIAGA CHAINMAIL, £1,465

THE CHAIN GANG

CALVIN KLEIN COLLECTION LEATHER, £4,800

BURBERRY PRORSUM ALLIGATOR, £7,000

42

Taking the trend for handbag hardware up a gear, the new batch of clutches, purses and totes comes jangling with gilt links and shackles

MARNI LEATHER, £2,230


BEHIND YOU With the utilitarian carry-all enjoying renewed catwalk kudos, follow the lead set by Christopher Bailey at Burberry and rediscover the practical pleasures of a rucksack

MELI MELO LEATHER, £415

SOPHIE HULME LEATHER AND SWAROVSKI CRYSTAL, £1,295

MONT BLANC SILVER AND PEARL, £225, AT THE VILLAGE, WESTFIELD LONDON

GIORGIO ARMANI CRYSTAL AND RESIN, £610

BURBERRY PRORSUM

ANYA HINDMARCH LEATHER, £1,295

HOUSE OF HOLLAND PONYSKIN, £275

“These shoes are jewelled treasures that will bring joy for years to come. Invest now, cherish forever” Nura Khan, style editor

A WALKING WORK OF ART

MARC JACOBS EMBELLISHED LEATHER SANDALS, £2,200

Rich with sculptural detail, the simple shoe has been elevated to the realm of sartorial masterpiece. Feel free to make an exhibiton of yourself...

ALEXANDER M CQUEEN PEARL AND SWAROVSKI CRYSTAL, £945

THE LONG VIEW MARC JACOBS

Hold your head high. With the catwalk’s fresh clutch of earrings stretching from lobe to shoulder, a swan-like neck is a spring/summer must-have BALMAIN CORAL, £1,150

OSCAR DE LA RENTA EMBELLISHED SATIN, £1,007

PRADA SEQUIN, £405

MARNI

PROENZA SCHOULER METAL, £395

DOLCE & GABBANA EMBELLISHED PATENT LEATHER, FROM £1,300

GUCCI JACQUARD, £600

43


VOGUE travel TAPISSERIE BEADED NEEDLEPOINT CLUTCH, £1,100

OSCAR DE LA RENTA BEADED TASSEL EARRINGS, £337

lake como MIU MIU SUNGLASSES, £207, AT DAVID CLULOW

DOLCE & GABBANA

Where to stay: Villa d’Este This lakeside hotel is the epitome of Italian splendour. Private balconies lead off the silk- and velvet-swathed suites to a view of the water, ideal for breakfast in pyjamas. Villadeste.com

“Supercharge your holiday wardrobe with colourful postcard prints”

AQUAZZURA JEWELLED LEATHER SANDALS, £725

Emily Sheffield, deputy editor

TORY BURCH BIKINI, £210

Where to stay: the Chequit Its white clapboards might indicate a stereotypical Hamptons hideaway, and yet the Chequit is anything but. No stuffiness here, just simple, understated quality. Thechequit.com

HERMES CANVAS TOTE, £1,175

44

LISA MARIE FERNANDEZ POPLIN DRESS, £380, AT NET-A-PORTER.COM

CARTIER GOLD TANK WATCH, £10,300, AT THE WATCH GALLERY, AT THE VILLAGE, WESTFIELD LONDON

RALPH LAUREN COLLECTION

shelter island


ERICKSON BEAMON RESIN AND SWAROVSKI CRYSTAL NECKLACE, FROM £500, AT NET-A-PORTER.COM

MARA HOFFMAN SWIMSUIT, £216, AT HARRODS

st lucia Where to stay: Sugar Beach Impossibly white beaches, four-poster beds draped in Egyptian-cotton linens, your own private pool and a tree-top spa. Sheer bliss. Viceroyhotelsandresorts. com/en/sugarbeach

TOMMY HILFIGER

JIMMY CHOO CORK WEDGES, £425, AT THE VILLAGE, WESTFIELD LONDON

RAY-BAN SUNGLASSES, £143, AT SUNGLASS HUT

TOUR de force Inspire wanderlust with your wardrobe; this season’s pan-global looks span a whole world of well-dressed destinations

DUVELLEROY FAN, FROM £32

brazil

YOSUZI STRAW HAT, £260

BONPOINT STRAW TOTE, £82 SERGIO ROSSI EMBROIDERED CANVAS SHOES, £775

TEMPERLEY LONDON

Where to stay: Casa Turquesa Nestled among the cobbled streets of Paratay, this turquoise and brilliant-white boutique hotel offers a tranquil taste of South America. Casaturquesa.com/br

45


BY TERRY TERRYBLY MASCARA IN TERRYBLEU, £35

SHU UEMURA MINI EYELASH EXTENTIONS, £16

TALES OF THE SEASON

Vogue presents spring’s leading ladies: six new make-up muses, each with a story all her own

TOPSHOP GLOWPOT IN GLEAM, £9

STILA SMUDGE STICK WATERPROOF EYELINER, £13

THE TRAILBLAZER

THE EXHIBITIONIST Never afraid to stand out, she sports baby-doll lashes and loads up on blue pigments for a showstopping stare. MAC HY-DEF CYAN PIGMENT, £16

ORIGINS DRINK-UP HYDRATING LIP BALM, £16.50

Edgy and creative, she pushes boundaries with a smudged, disrupted take on the blue eyeliner trend.

MARY KATRANTZOU

W

GIVENCHY TEINT COUTURE BALM, £29

VERSACE

hen you’re shopping for beauty this spring, don’t just think about the single, scene-stealing accent – bright red lips or standout lashes. Instead, go for a total new look, incorporating matt, dewy or glowing skin, defined eyes and even a captivating new fragrance, too. Choose from our six favourite catwalk faces and take a fresh look at the new season.

THE DREAMER Blessed with glowing skin and a gleam in her eye – her earthy presence perfectly encapsulated by an intoxicating amber and wood scent.

MISSONI MISSONI EAU DE PARFUM, £42

ILLAMASQUA CORRUPTOR SMUDGING GEL, £20

46

JONATHAN SAUNDERS

BENEFIT HOOLA, £22.15

EX NIHILO AMBER SKY EAU DE PARFUM, £150


YSL FUSION INK BLUSH IN EDGE BERRY, £7.99

H&M FOUNDATION COMPACT IN ALABASTER, £7.99

RIMMEL THE ONLY ONE LIPSTICK IN BEST OF THE BEST, £6.99

DOLCE & GABBANA ESSENCE, THE ONE EAU DE PARFUM, £65

DOLCE & GABBANA

L’OREAL PARIS MASTER SCULPT, £6.99

Nothing says sweet and sensual like her rose-pink lips and delicately feline eyeliner. She finishes with a spritz of timeless floral fragrance.

MAX FACTOR MASTERPIECE EYELINER, £7.99

“Doll-like lashes loaded up with cyan blue really open up the eyes” Lucia Pieroni, make-up artist at Mary Katrantzou CLARINS EYESHADOW PALETTE 5 COULEURS IN NATURAL GLOW, £33

ANYA HINDMARCH

THE BELLA DONNA

CREED ROYAL PRINCESS OUD EAU DE PARFUM, £75

THE MINIMALIST Her ultra-precise lip and a severe side parting require flawless skin and a monochrome wardrobe.

TOPSHOP KOHL EYELINER, £4

“For post-party eyes, smudge eyeliner haphazardly with fingers” Hannah Murray, make-up artist at Topshop Unique

THE SEDUCTRESS

ESTEE LAUDER PURE COLOUR ENVY LIPSTICK IN CARNAL, £25

TOPSHOP UNIQUE

Smoky eyes and rich, red lips make a smouldering combination, heightened by a sensual orris and sandalwood scent.

BOBBI BROWN EYE OPENING MASCARA, £23

JO MALONE ORRIS & SANDALWOOD COLOGNE, £105, AT THE VILLAGE, WESTFIELD LONDON

47


STOCKISTS

The merchandise featured editorially has been ordered from the following stores. Some shops may carry a selection only. Prices and availability were checked at the time of going to press, but we cannot guarantee that prices will not change or that specific items will be in stock when the magazine is published. We suggest that before visiting a shop you phone to make sure they have your size.

Adidas.co.uk Akris 020 7758 8060 Alexander McQueen 020 7355 0088 Andy-wolf.com Anyahindmarch.com Aquascutum.com Aquazzura 020 3828 0433 Armedelamour.com Aspinaloflondon.com Balenciaga.com Bally.co.uk Balmain 020 7491 8585 Bananarepublic.co.uk Barrie 020 7493 0749 Bellafreud.com Biondacastana.com Bluebella.com Bonpoint 020 7235 1441 Brownsfashion.com Burberry.com Butler & Wilson 020 7409 2955 Calvinklein.com Céline 020 7491 8200 Chanel 020 7493 5040 Chanel Fine Jewellery 020 7499 0005 Chloé 020 7823 5348 Christian Louboutin 0843 227 4322 Christopher Kane 020 7493 3111 Church-footwear.com David Clulow 0844 264 0870 De Beers 020 8746 7001 Diane von Furstenberg 020 7499 0886 Dior 020 7172 0172

Dolce & Gabbana 020 7659 9000 Dorothee-schumacher.com Duchamp 020 8743 7202 Duro Olowu 020 7839 2387 Duvelleroy.fr Emilio Pucci 020 7201 8171 Erdem 020 3653 0360 Fendi 020 7927 4172 Georgjensen.com Gianvito Rossi 020 7499 9133 Giorgio Armani 020 7235 6232 Givenchy.com Gucci 020 7235 6707 Harrods 020 7730 1234 Harvey Nichols 020 7235 5000 Hermès 020 7499 8856 Houseofholland.co.uk Jbrandjeans.com Jcrew.com Jessiewestern.com Jigsaw-online.com Jimmychoo.com Joseph-fashion.com J-w-anderson.com Lacoste 020 7439 2213 Lanvin 020 7491 1839 Loewe 020 7499 0266 Longchamp 020 8749 5758 Louisvuitton.co.uk Mallon & Taub 020 7935 8200 Manolo Blahnik 020 7352 3863 Marc Jacobs 020 7399 1690 Margaret Howell 020 7009 9009 Marialarosa.it Mariehelenedetaillac.com Marni 020 7245 9520 Marquesalmeida.com Marykatrantzou.com Max Mara 020 7499 7902 McQ Alexander McQueen Mcq.com Mdsstripes.com Meli Melo 020 7835 1363

Michael Michael Kors 020 7659 3550 Mih-jeans.com Milly.com Missoma.com Miu Miu 020 7409 0900 Montblanc.com Nicholaskirkwood.com Omega 0845 272 3100 On Motcomb 020 7235 4146 Oscar de la Renta 020 7493 0422 Philosophy by Lorenzo Serafini 020 7235 2349 Pierrehardy.com Polo Ralph Lauren 020 7535 4600 Poplin.co.uk Prada 020 7647 5000 Proenzaschouler.com Rada.it Raphaëlla Riboud & Alex Eagle 020 7589 0588 Roksanda 020 7613 6499 Ruffs 01489 578 867 Rupertsanderson.com Saint Laurent by Hedi Slimane 020 7235 6706 Sandro 020 3371 2300

Selfridges 0800 123 400 Sergio Rossi 020 7811 5950 Simone Rocha 020 7629 6317 Sophiehulme.com Stella McCartney 020 7518 3100 Sunglass Hut 0844 264 0860 Sydneyevan.com Tapisserie 020 7581 2715 Tateossian 020 8746 7460 Tedbaker.com Temperley London 020 7313 4756 Theory 020 7985 1188 Tiffany 0800 160 1837 Tods.com Tom Ford 020 3141 7800 Topshop.com/unique Toryburch.co.uk Valentino 020 7235 5855 Versus Versace 020 8743 3678 Victoriabeckham.com Victoria Victoria Beckham 020 7042 0700 Thewatchgallery.com Wildeones.com Yosuzi.com

FOR DETAILS OF ALL WESTFIELD STORES, VISIT UK.WESTFIELD.COM OR HEAD TO THE VILLAGE, WESTFIELD LONDON, TO ENJOY THESE SHOPS AND SERVICES Anya Hindmarch, Aquascutum, Belstaff, Burberry, Caffé Concerto, Church’s, Claudie Pierlot, De Beers, Duchamp, Georg Jensen, Gucci, Hotel Chocolat, House of Fraser, Hugo Boss, Jigsaw, Jimmy Choo, Jo Malone London, The Kooples, Kurt Geiger, Longchamp, L’Orchidee, Louis Vuitton, Maje, Michael Michael Kors, Miu Miu, Montblanc, Montegrappa, Mulberry, Omega, Prada, Salvatore Ferragamo, Sandro, Searcy’s, Tateossian, Ted Baker, Tiffany, Versus Versace, Vilebrequin, The Watch Gallery, Weekend Max Mara, Whistles, Zadig & Voltaire

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VOGUE PROMOTION Going green – blend into lush surroundings with rich tones of emerald and moss. A simple silhouette makes for more forest nymph than wallflower Dress, £370. Bag, £209. Both Maje. Available at The Village, Westfield London

ANDREAS OHLUND & MARIA THERESE


VOGUE PROMOTION

Find magic in monochrome with belted details and masculine cuts. Finish off with a statement shoe Jumpsuit, £350, Whistles. Platforms, £780, Salvatore Ferragamo. Available at The Village, Westfield London

ANDREAS OHLUND & MARIA THERESE


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