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VOTERS GUIDE 2

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In this guide you’ll find questionnaires completed by candidates from all city, school, county and state races within the Farmington/Lakeville Thisweek coverage area.

Don’t forget to vote on Nov. 2

Thisweek Newspapers October 22, 2010 Farmington/Lakeville


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October 22, 2010 THISWEEK NEWSPAPERS


THISWEEK NEWSPAPERS

Fa Farmington armin ngt gton n Cit City ty Co Council oun ncil (tw (two wo open op pen se seats) eats)

Jason Bartholomay Age: 36 Address: 19630 Estes Path Farmington, MN 55024 Family: Married to wife Jennifer in 2001, two children, Madelynn and Ethan. Qualifications: A Marine Corps veteran, St. Cloud State University alumnus, doctoral student, Target’s Business College graduate, and an experi-

Christy Jo Fogarty (incumbent) Age: 40 Occupation: Dental hygienist Address: 18946 Excalibur Trail, Farmington, MN 55024 Family: Husband Steve, and children, Ashley, 15, Jack, 13, and Thomas, 11. Qualifications: Dental Hygienist; A.S., Normandale Community College, B.S., Metropolitan State University, Advanced Dental Therapy master’s degree expected May 2011;

Lenny Hall Age: 52 Occupation: Bartender Address: 714 8th St. Family: Two sons, 19 and 16 Qualifications: This is my first attempt in the political ring, but I have fresh ideas. I was the past commander with

Don Hayes Age: 60 Occupation: City parks specialist Address: 18890 English Ave, Farmington, MN Family: Married 35 years to Judy; daughters Gretchen, married to Ryan Place who live Farmington, and daughter April is in college Qualifications: I have worked for the city of Farmington for

October 22, 2010

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enced business executive with many multi-national corporations. P ro f e s s i o n ally, I have led teams on projects to reduce waste and improve organizational efficiencies. Jason volunteers with many organizations like Burnsville Youth Hockey Program, Minnetonka Police Department, and Civil Air Patrol.

Why are you running for a seat on the Farmington City Council? I am running for Farmington City Council in order to restore fiscal responsibility to the city’s budget and to align our community’s planning to encourage business investment. Direct goals I have for my term in office is reduce our cost of servicing debt by increasing our credit rating and deleveraging from high interest bonds. I am also seeking to increase commercial development of vacant land owned by

the city. This will increase our tax base and reduce the burden on our current residents. I will be a champion for the residents of Farmington and an ally of the taxpayer. What are the most important issues facing Farmington and how would you address them? The most important strategic goal our city leadership will need to pursue is to position the city to be a desirable location for external investment. As our economy begins to improve, companies will seek to

expand. It is the job of our city leaders to ensure Farmington is in the best position to attract this investment. If we are successful in creating an ideal environment for businesses to expand operations to our city, property values, job opportunities, and quality of life for our residents will improve at a greater rate than a normal rebound from a bad recession. How can the city of Farmington better reach out to attract more business and industry to the city? I want to improve

commercial zoning and our tax structure to be more ideal than alternative communities in our area. We can create a program for businesses to develop cityowned land at minimal acquisition cost and give preferential property tax treatment for companies that increase additional business development by their presence. City leaders need to seek out companies that are looking to expand and work with their leaders to align Farmington with their needs.

member of Fa r m i n g t o n City Council; board member of Board of Water and Soil Resources (Metro Cities); and chair for Farmington Economic Development Authority; member of All Saints Church. Why are you running for a seat on the Farmington City Council? In the last eight years I have seen several changes in the city of Farmington and have been fortunate enough to play a role in some of those changes. I would like to remain on the council for many rea-

sons, but highest on the list is a desire to serve the community and continue to improve the place we all call home. I also would like to see more longterm planning. In the last several years long-term plans have been implemented but a few areas still need these plans, most notably permanent funding for the park improvement fund. What are the most important issues facing Farmington and how would you address them? Economic development is still the most important issue facing Farmington. As the chair of the Economic Development Authority (EDA), I have worked to make Farmington a business-friendly community.

The EDA has utilized federal monies to create a grant program for local businesses, helping them to enter or expand within the city. A new streamlined process has been created to expedite businesses coming to city, continuing to spur economic development. Efforts like this will ensure we can continue to welcome new business such as CVS, Blondie’s, and R&L Trucking, and the expansion of businesses such as Anna’s Bananas, Vinge Tile, and Trinity Care Center. Communication with residents is another issue. The city’s website has been redesigned to make it more user-friendly. In addition, we now stream all council

meetings online. Live and past meetings can be watched anytime online. While these are great strides, more can be done. How can the city of Farmington better reach out to attract more business and industry to the city? Many things can and are being done to attract new businesses to Farmington, and it’s working. Just slower than most would like. We are not alone in seeing slow economic growth, but in some ways we’re doing better than other communities because residential development continues to grow that affects business growth. It’s important to know in the last eight years Farmington has acquired

more than 50 new businesses. This will surprise many people. Just because large “big boxes” haven’t come yet doesn’t mean we aren’t growing. This has been in part because of good planning and zoning. In addition, we have had many existing business owners expand their businesses. The best “advertising” the city can do to attract new businesses is make an environment where our current businesses can thrive and succeed. Working with these businesses and listening to them is how we continue to attract new businesses.

the Sons of the American Legions, served as a treasurer with Farmington VFW Men’s Auxiliary, and was a former steward and vice president of contract bargaining committee member with a local union. Why are you running for a seat on the Farmington City Council? As a tax-paying resi-

dent of the city of Farmington, I am concerned for lowincome people, such as myself, and the high foreclosure rates that are occurring. We need to be more careful with spending and make better decisions on properties we own. What are the most important issues facing Farmington and how would you address

them? I think properties like the liquor stores and the ice arena need to be seriously considered. These properties may be better financed and managed by private business. We must get creative with trying to generate new business in the Vermillion River Crossing business district. This is costing taxpayers a considerable

amount. I hear of no future plans. The council needs to communicate with the public better. Possibly, the city could hold “off city premise” meetings once a year at a more informal setting for people to communicate their concerns. How can the city of Farmington better reach out to attract more business and indus-

try to the city? The city needs to look for new ways to attract new business. We need to find ways to make Farmington a good business community. Furthermore, we need to make sure existing businesses stay local. We need to make this a business-friendly community.

29-plus years. I worked with and on the Dew Days committee for 20 years plus. I’m a disabled Vietnam veteran. It is time to retire and use my years of experience to help the city work through these tough economic times. Why are you running for a seat on the Farmington City

Council? If elected, I feel I can use my 37 years of experience to work for the state and federal government to help council members and the public. I have insight into to how decisions impact the city and really play out at city staff levels. I think there needs to be more longterm thinking and sticking to decisions to solve long-term financial shortfalls, while doing this with more input from the public. What are the most important

issues facing Farmington and how would you address them? Our budget has been cut by the state LGA (Local Government Aid) a few years ago, and that has hurt our building permits that relied too heavily on construction. We need to find a way to fund our needed services and prioritize our needs, instead of waiting until June to start budget talks. I think we should have public input like an open forum, cottage meetings, or a phone or letter sur-

vey in January or February to ask for public input on the city budget. Then, we could prioritize how much money to spend, and take that information to a group of citizens to mold it into a lose budget package. That information would go before city council to turn into a city budget package. That way, the public is constructing what they want tax dollars to go for, and then staff and the council can construct a working budget.

How can the city of Farmington better reach out to attract more business and industry to the city? I think our EDA (Economic Development Authority) has been proactive. But new business is hard to start up at this time. We can keep talking to any interested companies or entrepreneurs to assist them in coming to Farmington and offer some incentives. I need to learn more about attracting business.


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October 22, 2010 THISWEEK NEWSPAPERS

Farmington Fa armin ngt gton n Cit City ty Co Council oun ncil

David Pritzlaff Age: 47 Occupation: Self-employed in the window business and residential construction Address: 20255 Akin Road Family: Unmarried Qualifications: Farmington City Council Member from 2004-2008, volunteer with Mountain Dew Days, and served as a volunteer with the Rambling River Center reno-

Jerry ‘Digger’ Ristow Occupation: Business owner Address: Farmington Qualifications: I am a lifelong Farmington resident. I served as Farmington’s mayor from 1996 to 2004, and on the City Council from 1992 to 1996. I elected not to run for a fourth term at that time.

Steven Wilson (incumbent) Age: 41 Occupation: Account manager at HealthPartners in Bloomington. Address: 5342 203rd St. W., Farmington Family: Married to Andrea for 12 years; 3 children, Josh, 10, Ben, 8, and Elizabeth, 4. Qualifications: Earned a bachelor of science degree from the University of Minnesota Twin Cities. Cub Scout Leader for Pack 120 in Farmington, coach for FYAA baseball, basketball and soc-

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vation. Why are you running for a seat on the Farmington City Council? I am running to represent our citizen taxpayers. The excessive spending decisions made by current council reflect how out of touch they are with the citizens who elected them.When I moved here 17 years ago it was an affordable place to live. Now

with our taxes increasing while property values decrease, a street light utility fee and plans for a gas and electric franchise fee is more than many people can afford. When citizens try to express their frustrations to council they do not respond, but direct unelected city staff members to follow up instead. This has to change. What are the most important issues facing Farmington and how would you address them? 1. Lack of fiscal responsibility. I want to curb

wasteful spending that has occurred the past two years, such as a $129,000 for a trail extension. We cannot afford to maintain the trails that we already have. We spent $14,000 for a park and recreation survey which revealed taxpayers’ first priority was to maintain our parks and trails. We spent $7,000 for a soil boring test to explore a second sheet of ice, an expense which failed to rank as a priority in the survey. 2. Increased taxes and fees. Reduce the levy amount so taxes

can at least stay the same as previous year. Remove street light utility fee and reject any franchise fees on gas and electric bills. 3. Facilities and park and recreation. Maintain aging equipment, facilities, parks and trails. Create accounts to save money for repairs rather than asking voters for more money. How can the city of Farmington better reach out to attract more business and industry to the city? Join websites that list business opportunities and partner with groups

that promote the city of Farmington and get our information into their hands. Ensure Farmington is on the map and make all of our opportunities we have for both commercial and industrial business. Sell all unused cityowned buildings to expand business opportunities and get the properties back on the tax roll. Address the issue of development and utility fees to make sure we are more competitive with surrounding cities.

The city had a balanced budget in those years and a great credit score. Why are you running for a seat on the Farmington City Council? I have the experience, the integrity and the ability to move Farmington forward. In my opinion, after look-

ing at the preliminary budget and attending meetings and workshops the city finances and the budget are out of control. I also feel that we are lacking leadership. I have proven that I can provide that leadership. Questions asked of some board members at meetings cannot be answered. I also feel it is time to have new members on the council. We cannot continue to raise taxes and add new fees.

The city needs to live within its means like a business and a homeowner. The council should not continue to tax or impose new fees to current residents and businesses in Farmington. Per Dakota County, Farmington has the highest percent of city dollars levied against the homes for the city’s portion of our property taxes. What are the most important issues facing Farmington

and how would you address them? The most important issues that I see facing Farmington are the taxes and assessments, and an overspent budget. We need to eliminate unnecessary spending. Council members and mayor need to understand their job and be professional at it. They should work to represent and be a voice for the residents. How can the city of Farmington better reach out to at-

tract more business and industry to the city? I will work to bring more commercial businesses to Farmington as I had done in the past. I will continue to work on the Spruce Street Extension for commercial businesses. I will also work to keep the businesses that we have. This can be done by advertising and being proactive in attracting new business to come to Farmington.

cer. Hosanna Church member. Avid runner and I have completed 12 marathons. I am involved in many Fa r m i n g t o n civic activities throughout the year. Why are you running for a seat on the Farmington City Council? I truly enjoy serving Farmington as your council member and believe I am an advocate for your tax dollars. As an example, I voted against the council pay increase two years ago. I bring a hard-working, common sense approach to the challenges that Farmington is facing.

The City has faced significant revenue reductions over the past few years. I have advocated for spending reductions and prioritizing of essential services during every budget cycle. I bring a fair-minded perspective and welcome resident suggestions. I bring a positive attitude of service to Farmington, and most importantly, I advocate for effective use of your tax dollars. What are the most important issues facing Farmington and how would you address them? The most significant issues Farmington faces is our tax burden along with retail, commercial and industrial development. On the issue of taxes, the city has seen significant revenue reductions from

state funding and construction decreases. While these cuts have put Farmington in a tough position, I have repeatedly advocated for reduced city spending and long-range planning to manage our budget. When your family income declines, your budget is reprioritized to meet these challenges and the city should be no different. With economic development, Farmington has seen a number of success stories over the past few years that I am very proud of. The city has provided business incentive grants to bring a variety of new businesses throughout the community, particularly new small business. In addition, I will continue to advocate for a Farm-

ington Veterans Memorial, and I also believe we need a volunteer-operated teen center to fulfill an unmet need in Farmington. How can the city of Farmington better reach out to attract more business and industry to the city? I am proud of the fact that Farmington has developed a solid comprehensive plan which is zoned and ready for new retail, commercial and industrial businesses to come here, while at the same time protecting our farming way of life and heritage. Farmington is proactively working with the Downtown Business Association, chamber of commerce and business owners directly to communicate the

value proposition Farmington offers. High taxes are a burden to new business development. I have voted against higher development fees and advocated for a simplified and streamlined development process. A downtown business owner recently commented to me the relationship between the city and the business community has improved significantly. This has not come about overnight. It takes a positive attitude and a willingness to partner with current and new businesses to help them succeed. I will continue to advocate for a positive, team approach as we refine our long-range planning for continued success.


THISWEEK NEWSPAPERS

Lakeville Cityy Council (two open seats) H

Dan Athmann Name: Dan Athmann (Ottmun) Age: 43 Occupation: Police sergeant, Burnsville Police Department Family: Wife, Jackie, and three school-aged children Qualifications: Police sergeant with 21-years of diversified law enforcement experience. Bachelor’s degree in criminal justice, St. Cloud State University. Master’s degree in public safety education and administration, University of St. Thomas. Northwestern University (Illinois) and FBI leadership trained. FOP member. Ex-vice president of SOTA. Youth coach

Marc Bourdeaux Name: Marc Bourdeaux Age: 42 Occupation: Entrepreneur Address: 20116 Home Fire Way, Lakeville Family: Wife Julie, children, Luke, Lance, Chris, Kate Qualifications: Broad Minnesota state legislative contacts as a lobbyist for a non-partisan, non-profit organization. Persuasive and convincing; highest sales in a large organization; started, built and managed a successful small business. Leadership in selling and managing people, relationships and projects with

Joe Crawford Name: Joseph Crawford Age: Not given Family: Wife, Monica, two children Address: Not given

October 22, 2010

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for LBA, YMCA and more. Why are you the best candidate for this office? Based on the 2010 Lakeville citizen survey, maintaining public safety services is overwhelmingly the single most important  priority for the citizens of Lakeville. As such, my 21 years of law enforcement experience will enable me to provide great wisdom, insight, and guidance to the council and city staff on future policy issues. Having an elected official at the policymaking level with my unique experiences and qualifica-

tions is an opportunity  not many cities are afforded, and doing so will greatly benefit the citizens of Lakeville. I will ensure the city’s priorities remain focused on those core services identified by the citizens as being most important to them. This is why I am the best candidate for the job. Lakeville has faced budget woes like many communities in the state and nation. Are you happy with how the budget has been handled? What would you have changed? I am very satisfied how Lakeville leadership has handled the budget over the past several years. Scaling back budgets, identifying the services that were eliminated was not easy. Lakeville leadership has

taken great steps to include citizen input into this process and they have prioritized service delivery to those areas identified as most important to the citizens. In fact, of the 50 largest cities in Minnesota, Lakeville ranks last in the number of employees per capita and last in per capita spending; all while maintaining great service delivery to the community. Are taxes too high in Lakeville? If so, would you cut them, and what services would be priorities for scaling back? Lakeville’s tax rate is very low when compared to other communities. In no way do I hold a pro-tax position and I firmly believe less is more when it comes to government.

That said, I do take a realistic approach to taxation. Government entities exist to provide basic, yet essential core services. Unfortunately doing so costs money; money gained through taxes. As a gatekeeper of the community’s money, I will ensure that taxes remain as low as possible, and that tax payer money is not frivolously spent. I will ensure tax payers get value for what they pay for. What are other key issues facing Lakeville, and what actions do you propose? Maintaining safe, well-planned and well-designed neighborhoods. Ensuring transportation needs are taken care of. Improving roadways to increase safety. Develop a

funding strategy for roadway infrastructure replacement. Continue to make youth/ school district partnerships a priority. Lakeville schools help define the great quality of life we all enjoy and maintaining these relationships is critical. Environmentally, we need to develop a comprehensive water management policy and subsequent funding sources. Take steps to improve the storm  water infrastructure so future home flooding can be avoided. Support the current businesses that call Lakeville home and promote business expansion and development.

prime talent in accessing decision makers and authorities. Why are you the best candidate for this office? I built my first business with no assistance, resources, and have been an entrepreneur since 1992; further, providing jobs for others as well as products and services that people can use. My real-world knowledge has given me critical thinking skills, management acumen, and practical tools that will help me address the current issues facing our city while planning. I have substantial knowledge of the internal mechanisms

of a business model including marketing, management strategy, and the implementation of human capital. It is time for us to elect someone who understands what it takes to run an organization. We need city leaders who know how to balance a budget, and can grasp the short and long-term ramifications of public policy decisions. I believe in my ability to serve Lakeville as a strong leader. I am ready to apply my background in business, entrepreneurship, markets, and management for the benefit of the community as a whole. Lakeville has faced budget woes like many communities in the state and nation. Are you happy with how the budget has been handled? What

would you have changed? I am not happy with how the budget has been handled. The city is purposing to increase spending by $8 million, yet no one is addressing spending; only that we either have to cut services or raise taxes. We need to look at needs versus wants. We need to start with what we have, not with what we don’t have. Government spending continues to increase at a time when business and homeowners are losing their homes and business. We need to be proactive with business development, and ask business what we can do for them to help them prosper. Are taxes too high in Lakeville? If so, would you cut them, and what services would

be priorities for scaling back? Some taxes are being held in check while water and sewer rates are being increased to make up revenue. In order for the city government to be more successful, it needs to create a strategic plan that will position the community for growth and competitiveness in the current environment. With new housing and taxes being the main source of revenue, and that revenue source on the decline, other sources of revenue need to be generated, that does not put an undue burden on the taxpayers. Some assets may need to be sold while others purchased to be more efficient for our current situation. What are other key issues facing Lakeville, and what ac-

tions do you propose? Keeping taxes low, while preserving our city’s solvency and maintaining the necessary services the city provides. Attracting new business to our community, this will encourage community growth, and make commodities more competitive, driving down the price of food, clothing, fuel, and making commuter time shorter for its residents. The city must keep a realistic budget that address the needs and not necessarily wants of city management. Encouraging ideas of our residents, and knowledgeable business leaders, while creating open communication.

Occupation: C o m mu n i t y A s s o c i at i o n Manager Qualifications: Community/civic organizations

involvement: Community Association Institute, vice chair, Legislative Action Committee; education: B.S., Human Resource Development Why are you the best candidate for this office? As a longtime resident of Lakev-

ille, I care about preserving Lakeville’s long history and future. Lakeville has faced budget woes like many communities in the state and nation. Are you happy with how the budget has been handled? What would

tions do you propose? No reyou have changed? No reply. Are taxes too high in Lakev- ply. ille? If so, would you cut them, and what services would be priorities for scaling back? No reply. What are other key issues facing Lakeville, and what ac-


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October 22, 2010 THISWEEK NEWSPAPERS

Lakeville Cityy Council

Karl Drotning Name: Karl Drotning Age: Not given Occupation: Not given Address: 17265 Jasper Trail, Lakeville Family: Wife, Vickie; children, Scot and Charla; six grandchildren Qualifications: Founder, president and CEO of Crystal Lake Automotive Inc. Accredited Automotive Manager (AAM). Senior member, Lakeville Planning Commission, over 12 years of service. District 16 representative, Metropolitan Council Land Use Advisory

Jack Evans Name: Jack Evans Age: 39 Occupation: Landscaper/investor Address: 8459 173rd St. W., Lakeville Family: Wife, Rhonda; two children, Jake and Cole Qualifications: Jack holds an MBA from the University of St. Thomas. Jack Evans has founded and runs three businesses in Lakeville, including a landscape company. A resident since 1996, Jack would like to be part of conservative change to help Lakeville to become the premier business and govern-

Matt Little Name: Matt Little Age: 25 Occupation: Tutor, English as a Second Language Address: 16162 Fairgreen Ave., Lakeville Family: Two nieces Qualifications: University of Minnesota-Morris, B.A. in political science. Member of the Lakeville Lions; Big Brothers Big Sisters mentor; Lakeville and Eagan Resource Center’s Development Committeemember; high school policy debate coach. Why are you the best candidate for this office? This is where I’m from and where I

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Committee (LUAC).Participant, 1992 and 1998 Lakeville Strategic Growth Task Force Study Group. Pa r t i c i p a n t , 2000 and 2010 Comprehensive Plan update. Why are you the best candidate for this office? Our community will continue to grow. We can expect another 40,000 residents to join us when Lakeville is fully developed. We need leaders that are engaged and will make reasoned decisions to both control and

manage that growth. Every development decision we make today will have long term consequences. Lakeville has faced budget woes like many communities in the state and nation. Are you happy with how the budget has been handled? What would you have changed? Lakeville has adhered to the “Do more with less” mantra for many years. Compared to many cities we are in fairly good shape, in spite of state funding policies that are unreasonable. These policies penalize growing communities to the benefit of many others. Call it the “Robin Hood” syndrome. Our leaders

have listened to the local taxpayers and put forth a 2011 budget that reflects the input of many. As 2011 unfolds, we will continue to search for cost savings and find more efficiency. I would prefer to bring a final 2012 budget that has no levy increase. Are taxes too high in Lakeville? If so, would you cut them, and what services would be priorities for scaling back? Let’s keep city taxes in perspective. Look at your tax statement for the breakdown of jurisdictions. The amount shown for Lakeville allows us to provide the following services: police, fire, parks, streets, water, sanitary

sewer, and storm water systems. Other services include managing development, permits, records management, senior center and the arts center. There are many others not listed. In order to maintain one of the lowest tax levies in the state, we will prioritize services from top to bottom. Those least important to public safety and quality of life will be the first to be eliminated or reduced. What are other key issues facing Lakeville, and what actions do you propose? The concept of small government is not new to Lakeville. We have the lowest number of employees per capita in the metro

area. To continue this, we will embrace technology, pursue cost sharing with neighboring governmental units, and search for opportunities to privatize services where possible. In the near term we are reducing some fund balances. As the economic environment improves, we must have a plan in place to restore those balances. Our municipal liquor operation delivers over $1 million annually to Lakeville. Its continued growth and health is an important revenue stream to our community.

ment model. Why are you the best candidate for this office? I am running for Lakeville residents who are being asked, time and again, for more and more, but who consistently get less and less from our city. I am running to allow everyday citizens to keep more of what they earn, so they can spend more time with those who are truly important, their families. I am running because our city has a great plan to keep extending and expanding our long term debt, but who has no action

plan for business promotion and relocation to Lakeville to help to settle that tab.I am running because Lakeville needs to launch its own economic improvement plan – waiting for another housing boom is not a solution to meet our debt obligations. I am running because if I don’t stand up for my children’s opportunities to dream and start their own businesses, who will? Lakeville has faced budget woes like many communities in the state and nation. Are you happy with how the budget has been handled? What would you have changed? The budget needs to better empower department heads to find ef-

ficiencies and make cuts that they know they can sustain. By allowing those heads to work with the council, we’ll find new opportunities and ways to cut waste, instead of insulating budgets for departmental self-preservation. Allowing our future debt to pile up, as we plan to do, we need a plan to pay if down, which we do not have. Lakeville needs to launch its own economic improvement plan, grounded in growing our business base now – ahead of the upcoming economic recovery. Waiting for another housing boom is not a solution. Are taxes too high in Lakeville? If so, would you cut them, and what services would be pri-

orities for scaling back? As with any family or business budget, it needs to balance out. Naturally, spending needs to occur, which it does, but sometimes we need to sacrifice in the short run for success long term. First, efficiency is paramount, even if it means freezing top city staff salaries and possible temporary cuts to those top wage-earning staffers. Also, options like outsourcing some services must be considered, where most frugal. Lastly, a logical sales plan to entice business to remain and move to Lakeville must be implemented. What are other key issues facing Lakeville, and what actions do you propose? First, as

I said, a logical sales plan to entice business to remain and move to Lakeville must be implemented. As we fail to plan and act, we offset the tax burden everyday more and more on homeowners. Our lack of a business attraction plan is part of the reason why our home taxes are rising. Second, it’s time that our top city officials, some more than others, are more in tune with the citizen’s needs. The City Council, by largely leaning to the liberal and moderate side of economics, allows the city’s managers to dictate to them their agendas and priorities a bit too frequently.

plan to stay. Through volunteerism and service I’ve been working to better our community. I view this campaign as an extension of my service. Moreover, I have the energy and drive to deliver on the policy proposals I support. I support keeping property taxes low. Am the only candidate who offered additional cuts to the 2011 budget during the Sept. 20 council meeting. I am committed to ensuring our public safety departments have the resources they need to operate effectively in a continually

growing city. I will not tolerate more cuts to our public safety departments. Also, I will seek to create programs to get more youth involved in our community. If elected, I will work hard every day to ensure these goals are achieved. Lakeville has faced budget woes like many communities in the state and nation. Are you happy with how the budget has been handled? What would you have changed? The primary reason I entered this race was the mishandling of the budget in the past few years. Police department personnel have been laid off and street maintenance was pushed back. This was short-term planning. Residential burglaries rose 41

percent and commercial burglaries rose approximately 30 percent over this same period. The streets are now in worse condition than they were a few years ago with nearly a third of our roads in need of repair. Spreading theses expenses over the past few years would have helped to limit the impact of tax volatility and special assessments on taxpayers. Are taxes too high in Lakeville? If so, would you cut them, and what services would be priorities for scaling back? Taxes in Lakeville are not high in comparison to other metro area cities but we must be vigilant about spending in future years so we can maintain and possibly lower our tax rates in

the long term. Small increases such as the projected 2.7 percent hike in 2012 will have only a light impact on most taxpayers in the short term. It is the effect of consistent and yearly increases that will have a cumulative and negative effect on homeowners and businesses. As a Councilman, I will act as a watchdog for taxpayers on municipal spending to guarantee it prioritizes our core services of public safety and infrastructure maintenance. What are other key issues facing Lakeville, and what actions do you propose? My top three goals are to maintain low property taxes, prioritize public safety, and engage the youth of the community.

Outside of these priorities, building trust in government is our next challenge. People feel their government isn’t accessible and doesn’t listen to them. I will continue to ask advice from citizens even after the election. Additionally, we need to post meetings live online, extend the time constraints on citizens’ comments, and allow questions to be asked via e-mail during meetings. This will permit citizens to participate who do not have cable or can’t physically attend the meeting.


THISWEEK NEWSPAPERS

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Lakeville Cityy Council

Kevin Miller (incumbent) Name: Kevin Miller Age: 54 Occupation: Senior vice president, U.S. Bank, operations executive Address: 18673 Irenic Ave, Lakeville Family: Wife, Rhonda; daughter, Heather; grandchildren Zachery, Ashley; son, Ryan, wife Andrea, daughter Lauren, son, Nathan, wife, Jessica Qualifications: Resident for 19 years and have been active serving the community in various leadership posi-

tions including; scouting organization, Lakeville Veterans Memorial committee, and the Lakeville Boys Basketball Association, Lakeville Parks and Recreation, Natural Resources committee and chaired for four years. In 2009 was appointed to the City Council. Why are you the best candidate for this office? I am running for office because I am proud of this community and I want it to continue to prosper and be a great place for families to live and grow.

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I believe that strong neighborhoods are built on quality services that meet the expectations of the community. My volunteer activity in the community and work with city staff have allowed me to develop partnerships that I think are critical as a candidate. I have leadership experience running large organizations, establishing strategic direction and developing teams that are responsive to customer service. I have a proven ability to establish and manage financial and business long-range objectives for growth and profitability which are all critical skills as a member of council. Lakeville has faced budget

October 22, 2010

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H H H H HH H H H H H H H H H HH H H H H H H H H H H H HH HHH H H H H woes like many communities in the state and nation. Are you happy with how the budget has been handled? What would you have changed? The current economic conditions have required that the city re-look at every service and program we have. The recent citizen and business survey stated that residents don’t want to lose the services the city provides but they also are resistant to tax increases. As a member of council we set the preliminary tax increase for 2011 and were able to hold taxes at no increase. Finding efficiencies has been a way of business for the council and staff as we have had to respond to the current market conditions.

Are taxes too high in Lakeville? If so, would you cut them, and what services would be priorities for scaling back? Lakeville boasts the lowest spending and number of personnel per capita among the 50 largest cities in the metro area and is 43rd out of 50 cities when compared on a per household basis. The City Council has, over the past three years, reduced services and lowered the number of employees to the level they were in 2001. When we set the preliminary tax increase for 2011 and 2012 we were able to hold taxes at no increase for 2011 and a preliminary operating levy of less than 1 percent for 2012.

What are other key issues facing Lakeville, and what actions do you propose? We must maintain a long-term vision for the needs of this growing community and find ways to maintain the city’s streets, utilities, trails and parks so that we do not have to spend exorbitant amounts in the future. We need to become more aggressive in our economic development efforts to attract more companies like Malt-O-Meal, Image Trend, Con Agra, and Ryt Way who have continued to grow in Lakeville despite the economy. Finally we need to prioritize spending decisions in critical areas such as police, fire, EMS, streets and parks.

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October 22, 2010 THISWEEK NEWSPAPERS

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THISWEEK NEWSPAPERS

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Lakeville Cityy Council

Colleen Ratzlaff LaBeau Name: Colleen J. Ratzlaff LaBeau Age: 48 Occupation: President/ owner of Ratzlaff Homes Inc., licensed realtor with ReMax Advantage Plus of Lakeville Address: 8356 190th St., Lakeville Family: Husband, Tom LaBeau; step-son Jeremy LaBeau and wife Melissa LaBeau; granddaughter, Isabelle Rose Qualifications: Licensed realtor since March 1985 sell-

ing homes in Lakeville and surrounding communities, plus residential home builder since 1986. Very knowledgeable in homeownership and the importance of it for making a better community. Very active in state and local public policy. Past president of the Realtors Association Board of Directors many years. Why are you the best candidate for this office? I would bring an important component currently not represented on the council. I have 25 years of cutting a payroll, plus nearly 30 years of man-

aging employees. Very knowledgeable on budgets, making do on what you have to work with and keeping high service levels. Honesty, integrity and servicing others how I expect to be treated. Listening to the client (our citizens and businesses) and working toward meeting their needs within reason. I stand behind my beliefs and vote what is best for the masses not my own self interest. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve served many years on executive committees, and as a director on local and state boards, as well as various committees at my church. Not afraid to dig in and put in the extra work the commitment at hand is calling for. Lakeville has faced budget woes like many communities

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in the state and nation. Are you happy with how the budget has been handled? What would you have changed? Last year a group of business people gathered to help study and guide the city in a way that we have had to operate our businesses. It was even suggested by a council member that the city is not a business, it is government. That in itself needs to be corrected. Although Lakeville sits better off then some other communities, there is always room for improvement and itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s never to late to look at putting a lid on costs and balancing the budget to zero. I would disclose all facts and lay it out as a business lays out their budgets. Are taxes too high in

Lakeville? If so, would you cut them, and what services would be priorities for scaling back? Realtors know that Lakeville has maintained a good tax level compared to some neighboring communities. However, with uncollected funds due to the stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s shortfall to us, home values down approximately 30 percent, the future could hold heavy increases if we donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t live with our means. We have prepare for the future to be grim as all facets of government are looking for the same piece of pie, yet the taxpayer gets hit with it. I believe it is the duty of the council to make sure we have open educated dialogue on a continuous bases so we donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t lose sight. What are other key issues

facing Lakeville, and what actions do you propose? One key issue is many businesses are suffering, and loss of employees doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t help the situation. The city needs to take a better look at how to attract and retain the ones that are here, even if that means reviewing some of the current policies in place. Lakeville needs an overall review to confirm we have the right employees in the right jobs the meet the needs the citizens expect for services. Additionally, attainable housing needs to grow the city is due to be reviewed and what we can offer other cities donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t.

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October 22, 2010 THISWEEK NEWSPAPERS

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Lakeville Mayor y

Mark Bellows Name: Mark Bellows Age: 56 Occupation: Pastor, marriage and family therapist, director of Lakeville Police Chaplaincy Services Address: 16349 Greenbriar Court, Lakeville Family: Married with 6 children Qualifications: Education: Bachelorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s degree in Communication, master of Divinity degree. Occupation: Pastor at Hope Community, licensed marriage and family therapist at Hope Counseling LLC, director of Lakeville Police Chaplaincy Services. Community involvement: former police reserve officer, police

Holly Dahl (incumbent) Name: Holly Dahl Age: 54 Occupation: General manager for Frontier Communications Address: 18698 Kanabec Ct., Lakeville Family: Husband Kevin, three grown children, all of whom graduated from Lakeville High School, and one grandson Qualifications: General manager, Fortune 500 Telecom. B.A., University of Minnesota-Duluth; extensive background in business, management, strategic planning and implementation, quality and process improvement; past

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chaplain. Offices held: City C o u n c i l member since 2000 with numerous related committee assignments. Why are you the best candidate for this office? I have 10 years of experience on the City Council, 20-plus years of involvement with the public safety sector of Lakeville, and the interpersonal skills and leadership abilities needed to be mayor. I have chosen the following summary words for my campaign: Values â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Personal character values of integrity and honesty, and politically conservative fiscal values that reflect the

values held by the majority of Lakeville residents. I am the most fiscally conservative member of the council and the only council member who voted against last yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s tax increase. Vision â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Leaner, more efficient and less intrusive government that enhances opportunities for a safe and prosperous life in Lakeville. Valor - Courage to take a stand, to lead, and to make the decisions needed for these challenging economic times. Lakeville has faced budget woes like many communities. Are you happy with how the budget has been handled? What would you change? The city claims to have a 0 percent tax levy increase for 2011, however, $665,000 of debt for expenditures has been pushed

into the future (the equivalent of a 2.7 percent levy increase). I believe this is a disingenuous shell game. I believe the council has failed to render due diligence in their fiduciary responsibility in scrutinizing the budget. We need greater input in reviewing the budget from the Economic Development Commission and the brightest business and financial minds in Lakeville in order to achieve greater fiscal efficiency, prudent expenditures, and a lower tax burden for our tax payers. What are your budget priorities? In the event of cuts, which programs and services would you protect first? Which would you cut first? The budget priority is to give the tax payer the greatest possible re-

turn in services for the taxes they pay. Therefore, the goal is to provide those services in the most efficient manner possible. This does not necessitate service reductions but it mandates efficiency improvements. The business community has learned to operate more efficiently while increasing their customer service. Government must follow suit. In establishing budget priorities the council must first define and come to agreement on what core, essential services are. I believe local government can become leaner and more efficient without reducing services. What are other key issues facing Lakeville, and what actions do you propose? Local government is not perceived

as being â&#x20AC;&#x153;business friendly.â&#x20AC;? I will create avenues for, and a culture within city government that not only receives concerns from residents and business owners in a respectful and inviting manner, but one that also seeks their input. I will develop businessfriendly policies that foster business retention and expansion. We need to proactively address declining residential construction and commercial development by holding a housing summit with builders and developers to listen to their concerns, by creating a more â&#x20AC;&#x153;customer friendlyâ&#x20AC;? and expedient service environment in planning, inspections, and engineering, and by re-evaluating our fees.

chair of ISD 194 School Board/board m e m b e r eight-plus years; wide array of leadership roles in county, regional and state-wide organizations; national speaker; volunteer for the arts/community. Why are you the best candidate for this office? Lakeville has navigated the economic downturn by prioritizing services and keeping a sharp eye on spending. We have reduced city staff, frozen salaries, required furloughs and next year we will not be increasing our tax levy. The majority of the City Council and our entire staff are committed to main-

taining both core services such as police, fire and public works along with quality of life amenities that Lakeville residents expect. The mayor plays an important role in shaping community identity both within the city and throughout the region and state. This election will determine if Lakeville continues to be the progressive, attractive desirable community it is today, or if we become fixated on low taxes and service cuts at the expense of community expectations. There will be a clear choice for voters between maintaining a professional, progressive, balanced approach for Lakeville or something less than that in this election. Lakeville has faced budget woes like many communi-

ties. Are you happy with how the budget has been handled? What would you change? Our budget reflects what residents and businesses expressed in the recent survey. It clearly stated that quality of life is highly valued by, but people donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t want higher taxes. Pairing that information with a prioritization of services, we are able to bring long-term tax stability. The budget anticipates reinvesting into our community infrastructure instead of delaying that investment which is exponentially more expensive. Continuous quality improvement is essential to any organization and we embrace it as well. If I could have changed something, I would have liked utilizing a focus group as a third component to our bud-

geting strategic planning. What are your budget priorities? In the event of cuts, which programs and services would you protect first? Which would you cut first? City government should prioritize those services that are necessary for daily life, specifically public safety and public works. However, it is important to note all of our efforts are aimed to make the city the best place to live or do business at a reasonable price. Looking to the long-term for service reductions, I would propose that our city complete a comprehensive review of either all services as â&#x20AC;&#x153;basicâ&#x20AC;? or â&#x20AC;&#x153;enhancedâ&#x20AC;? using data from our recent community survey and service prioritization to set a new baseline for city ser-

vice delivery built on a common vision. What are other key issues facing Lakeville, and what actions do you propose? It is vital to maintain a long-range vision that positions our community for the future. First, we need to maintain our infrastructure (streets, utilities, buildings) as these are the communityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s assets. Second, we need a strategic plan for economic development that will keep our tax base strong. We need to insure that any incentives used to garner business expansion or moving to our community will not burden our current taxpayers. Third, prioritized spending to strike a balance between taxes and the services they provide.

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THISWEEK NEWSPAPERS

Fa Farmington armin ngt gton n Dis District stricct 19 192 92 Sc School choo ol Bo Board oard d (t(three thre ee ope open en seat seats) ts)

Ron Groves

Rebecca Keeler

Did not respond

Did not respond

Carol Kappes Name: Carol Kappes Age: 50 Occupation: Minnesota Licensed Dental Assistant for pediatric dentist, ongoing continuing education, seminars and training Address: 18412 Everest Circle, Farmington, MN 55024 Family: Married to Gary, two children in high school Qualifications: Rochester Area Vo-Tech Institute, a member in Farmington ISD 192 councils. I have implemented ideas that were later taken into action by

Tera Lee Name: Tera (Schmitz) Lee Age: 35 Occupation: Associate pastor Address: 409 Willow St., Farmington, MN Family: Married to husband, Mike for 13 years with four sons, Michael in fourth grade, Josh in second grade, Alex in kindergarten, and Ethan in preschool. Qualifications: B.A. in pastoral and cross cultural studies. I worked in administration at North Central University and as a youth mentor for Minneapolis Park and Recreation Department, where I developed and

Melissa Sauser Name: Melissa Sauser Age: 30 Occupation: stay at home mom. I have a bachelor’s degree in international politics with a Spanish minor from Brigham Young University in 2001. Address: 18618 Euclid Path, Farmington, MN 55024 Family: Married for nine years to my husband, Aaron Sauser with a son, Andrew, 3, who is enrolled in Farmington Community Education’s Early Childhood Family Education (ECFE) Time for Kids program.

October 22, 2010

11B

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the school board. I attended Vermillion River Corridor w o r k s h o p s. Each one gives me the experience and understanding of the district and helps me with my decision-making skills. Why are you running for a Farmington School Board seat and why should people vote for you? I am running for the school board seat because I have a strong interest in education and

student achievement. I would describe myself as a team member who sets high standards, has the ability to plan and envision and is committed toward excellence. My experience on school councils and working on the budget process has taught me how to set goals, direct policy, and know how the school district works.People should vote for me because this is what I have been doing, and I want to be even more involved. I enjoy working for students, watching them succeed, and care about their future to be happy and successful. My task would be to support the stu-

dents, seek the input of parents and residents and to set a greater vision for Farmington Schools. If elected, what are your top three priorities for bringing change to the Farmington School District? One current issue would be the science curriculum because the test scores need improvement. We need to work on science classes being more interesting to hold a student’s attention so that they remember what is being taught. Science instruction provides higher problem-solving and thinking skills. Teacher management in classrooms should maintain posi-

tive energy for learning. Class sizes should be looked at to ensure students are retaining their skills. Fiscal responsibility in the classroom should be addressed for a student’s needs, especially elementary and middle school years. Buildings may need certain improvements for learning. What is the best way for the school district to increase achievement in kindergarten through 12th-grade among Farmington students? I would begin with early elementary classes having 20 to 23 students. As students get into third through fifth grades, they could be in classes with

25 to 30 students. They could also be ranked into classes with similar academic performance students. This will ensure their learning is developed and maintained within their ability. In middle school, students’ social development plays an important part along with their academic strength and higher-thinking skills. Friendships usually develop with similarities of abilities in academic strength and performance. I think this will place all students into challenging areas to move them forward to gain a better understanding of subjects.

implemented programs for youth and teens. Youth Pastor – developed youth programs, formed outreach teams, raised funds, and led programs in schools. Why are you running for a Farmington School Board seat and why should people vote for you? I believe children in the classroom should be our top priority. I have volunteered in the classroom every week for the past six years, and this has given me an important perspective on

the issues that we face as a school district. Because I have four young children in this district, I am very involved with students, parents, and teachers of ISD 192. I have worked beside teachers, parents, and administration (both building and district) and have listened to all their perspectives on how to improve our children’s education. Due to the downturn in our economy and less state funding, our school district is facing a great financial challenge. With this great challenge comes great opportunity. We will be forced to rethink and reorganize our priorities. I believe that rather than raising taxes and asking the public for more

money, we need to refocus on putting our precious resources back into the classroom. If elected, what are your top three priorities for bringing change to the Farmington School District? First, we need to keep class sizes small. Students learn better when they have a connection with the teacher and are in a less stressful environment. When classes are kept small, teachers have more time to focus on each individual and ensure that no one falls through the cracks. The teachers are more than teachers to their students, and we cannot put more on their plates. We have a district policy to ensure smaller classes, but it needs to

be strengthened and enforced. It is the board’s job to ensure the policies set forth are being carried out. The second priority is fiscal responsibility. If we reduce excessive administration and re-prioritize how we spend our money by putting it back in the classroom, we should be able to carry out my first priority without raising taxes. My third priority is communication. Trust has eroded between the public and district administration due to poor communication. What is the best way for the school district to increase achievement in kindergarten through 12th-grade among Farmington students? I believe that follow-up

is key. When the board is presented with test scores that don’t measure up, or any area of concern, questions are asked about what is being done about it. It seems the answers are lacking in specific plans. I would like to see very specific plans of action, and then periodic reports about how things are going. Also, smaller class sizes with quality teachers continuing in their staff development are highly important. We need a strong curriculum director and department chairs that work side-by-side with teachers and have communication going two ways, not just from the top down.

Qualifications: I have been a p a r a p ro f e s sional at all levels of education, most recently as an ESL (English as a Second Language) paraprofessional at Edina High School. I have served on the ECFE Parent Advisory Council, district Strategic Planning Committee and the Citizen’s Finance Committee, and am a member of MOMS Club of Farmington. Why are you running for a Farmington School Board seat and why should people vote for you? I am passionate about the

future of education in Farmington for my family and the community. I believe communication needs to be improved to allow the community better opportunities to be involved. Given the current economic situation, there will be difficult decisions that will have to be made concerning the budget. Open communication between the public and the school district will be necessary to make these decisions. I have worked in the schools as an English as a Second Language (ESL) paraprofessional, so I understand the needs of teachers and the difficulties facing students today. As a school board member I would be able to contribute from an educational background and

understand the needs of the district. As a parent and community member I believe the school board needs to be more involved in the community, provide more accessibility to the public and have greater transparency in decisions. If elected, what are your top three priorities for bringing change to the Farmington School District? My top three priorities are communication, community involvement and responsibly managing district resources by allocating the majority of the budget to classroom needs. It is the school district’s responsibility to communicate the current issues and allow the public proper time to voice their

concerns. I believe this could be accomplished by utilizing technology to create a forum where school board matters are posted. This would allow the public to be aware of the decision-making process and the ability to voice their concerns. I’d like to see a school board presence at the school open houses and events, PTP meetings and community functions. Face-to-face contact with parents and the community is crucial to access how they stand on current issues and be able to truly understand the needs of the district. What is the best way for the school district to increase achievement in kindergarten through 12th-grade among Farm-

ington students? The best way to provide increased achievement is to collaborate within our district and with other districts to find out what is working and model their success in our schools. It is important to be open to new education practices to facilitate increased student achievement. Specifically regarding the MCA Science results, I would like to see the science curriculum integrated into the entire school day. I would like to see individualized education plans for all students to improve results, as well as foster dynamic parent, teacher and student collaboration.


12B

October 22, 2010 THISWEEK NEWSPAPERS

Farmington Fa armin ngt gton n Dis District stricct 19 192 92 Sc School choo ol Bo Board oard d

Brian Treakle Name: Brian Treakle Age: 39 Occupation: Senior buyer/ planner Address: 5269 186th St W., Farmington. Family: Wife Mary, son Alex, 6, and daughter Anna, 3. Qualifications: I am a parent and a citizen concerned with the district test scores and the decisions being made regarding spending. My business experience is in accounting,

Veronica Walter (appointed incumbent)

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purchasing, creative problem solving, management and negotiations. These skills will be very helpful in working to improve the financial performance of the school district. Why are you running for a Farmington School Board seat and why should people vote for you? Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m running for school board because I have two children in Farmington school

district. I want to make sure we focus the funds we have on improving the academic performance of our children. We will see a very tight budget next year, and will have many tough decisions to make with that budget. It will be more important than ever to make sure we channel sufficient funding into the classroom so our children can continue to learn and excel in school. The first priorities are keeping class sizes down and providing teachers with resources they need to teach our children. Open, two-way com-

munication with parents and all district residents will be extremely important in reaching our goals. I will be a voice on the board for fiscal responsibility, improving student achievement, and open, honest communication. If elected, what are your top three priorities for bringing change to the Farmington School District? My top three priorities focus on areas that I believe, together, will lead to improved student performance, greater fiscal responsibility and greater trust with the

community. 1. I will work to ensure we receive the greatest possible return on our education spending. By â&#x20AC;&#x153;returnâ&#x20AC;? I mean improved performance and opportunity for our students. To do this, we need to focus financial resources on the classroom. 2. I will provide leadership in focusing the districtâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s attention on its primary responsibility â&#x20AC;&#x201C; providing means and support for teaching and learning. 3. Open, honest, two-way communication with the community is critical to building and maintaining

public trust. I will seek and encourage public comment and involvement in the decisions we make. What is the best way for the school district to increase achievement in kindergarten through 12th-grade among Farmington students? If there were a simple solution to improving academic achievement, every district would have 99 percent success rates. We need to have a sufficient number of teachers, with the technology and resources needed to deliver the best education possible.

Name: Veronica Walter Age: 39 Occupation: Guidance counselor Address: 5131 193rd Street,

Farmington, MN 55024 Qualifications: Presently serving on Farmington School Board (21 months); presently the Farmington representative on the Intermediate District 917 School Board (3 months); volunteer on the district Strategic Planning

Committee; volunteer/member of Dakota County Safe & Drug Free Schools; B.S. Communications, M.S. Secondary School Counseling Why are you running for a Farmington School Board seat, and why should people vote for

you? To be honest, two years just isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t long enough for me to complete the tasks before me. I see Farmington schools at a crossroads, and I believe we can become a leader in education with hard work and continual improvement. I see areas where

we still need to make changes to turn this corner, and I can continue to be a helpful leader to attain the transitions needed. I love this community, and I want to give my skills and strengths to make it even better. People

See Walter, 17B

   

10/22â&#x20AC;˘2386228Râ&#x20AC;˘10/22



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Vote Roz Peterson November 2nd www.rozpeterson.com Paid and prepared for by â&#x20AC;&#x153;Elect Roz Petersonâ&#x20AC;? Committee 12295 162nd St. W., Lakeville, MN 55044 952-892-1782


THISWEEK NEWSPAPERS

October 22, 2010

13B

H HHH H H H Lakeville Area District 194 School Board (three open seats) H H HHHH H H H H H H HH HHH Roz Peterson (incumbent) Name: Roz Peterson Age: 45 Occupation: Real estate agent for Cerron Commercial Properties and owner of three retail strip centers. Formerly owned Lakeville Snyder drug for 20 years Address: 12295 162nd St. W., Lakeville Family: Husband, Tim, for 24 years, two children Kayla and Hunter, both attend Lakeville South High School Qualifications: Gustavus Adolphus College, B.A. Business Management and Psychology 1987, cum laude, real estate license Kaplan Schools 2006. ISD 194 Director, Lakeville Chamber past president, Min-

nesota School Boards Association Board Director, Big Three Director (Cities, Counties, Schools), Lakeville Chamber Foundation chair, Dakota County Regional Chamber Board Director, Community Education Advisory Council, Downtown Lakeville Business Association, Hope For Tomorrow mentor, MNCAR, MSCA, ICSC, CCIM Dakotas-Minnesota. Why are you the best candidate for this office? I have a passion for public education and service. I believe in quality education and learning opportunities for a lifetime. I instigated and promoted transparency through the Citizenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s

Financial Advisory Council. I supported cost neutral structural change with our new Gifted and Talented programming and enhanced communications through community conversations and technology enhancements. I encourage collaboration between the public and private sector to form partnerships to enhance our educational system. I also believe in advocacy at the federal and state level. As director of Minnesota School Boards Association I have stayed on top of proposed legislation, looked for ways to cut bureaucratic red tape and traveled to Washington, D.C., and our state Capitol to meet with legislators to discuss how we can make our schools better. I am a creative, innovative, big picture thinker who is open to new ideas for better education for

our students with the available resources. Do you support the three levy questions that will appear on the ballot in November? Why or why not? Quality schools are the number one reason people move to Lakeville. I believe the community should have the opportunity to vote on the levies before we cut $21 million from the budget. I support all three questions because it balances cuts with additional revenues to help maintain the quality educational system we currently have in place. ISD 194 has cut $17.7 million over the past four years. Local levy dollars provide some stability to the budget with dollars that stay in our community so we can plan for the future and maintain the excellent education our community expects. Lakevilleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s schools face a

potential budget deficit of more than $21 million for the next biennium if all this yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s levy questions arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t passed. How do you propose to balance the budget in that scenario? The community will be involved in the budget deficit conversation from the beginning of the process. Resources will be aligned with the strategic plan where student achievement is prioritized Decisions will be made by evaluating all options and the systemic impact. Programs can shift to Community Education, like Youth in Government was shifted this year. Items that were on the list last year will be revisited such as additional student fees, program eliminations, staff reductions and increased class size. The board will have to develop creative ideas, structural change and streamlined efficiencies regard-

less of the outcome of the levies. What are other key issues facing Lakeville schools, and what actions do you propose? Although Lakeville holds the highest average ACT scores for a school our size in the nation, we can do better. Global economy competitiveness requires the 21st century student to have enhanced skills. They need a jump start on their post secondary education while in the pre-K-12 system and a heighted focus on areas where there is job growth like math and science. Our changing demographics are another challenge. Aging population coupled with more English language learners and flat enrollment will strain our present system. Decisions need to be made now to address these changes moving forward.

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October 22, 2010 THISWEEK NEWSPAPERS

Lakeville Area District 194 School Board parent, and youth athletics coach. I earned a B.S., business administration, and served 12 years in the

Randy Pronschinske Name: Randy Pronschinske Age: 50 Occupation: Corporate sales manager Address: 9885 Upper 173rd Court, Lakeville Family: Wife, Linda; son, Randel, 18, and a Lakeville North graduate; daughter, Marissa, 14, at Lakeville North Qualifications: I have both corporate and small business management experience, with responsibilities for sales, financial budgeting, and personnel management. My community involvement includes LNHS Parent Action Committee, event volunteer, booster clubs, Eagle Scout

Navy. Why are you the best candidate for this office? The majority of the current School Board has developed a pattern of questionable spending. When funds are sufficient, the board spends freely, without ensuring long-term sustainability. At the next budget cycle, we are surprised by huge cuts, due to shortsighted planning. We need to stop this pattern, and chart a steady course that is sustainable. I will use my experience in managing corporate bud-

VOTE 2 BER NOVEM

gets to create financial stability in the district. I also intend to change the culture on the board by advocating more open and honest communication. I will listen to our talented district employees, and the community that we serve, and be an advocate on the board for innovative ideas. If the board operates with transparency and communicates clearly, the community will understand the issues, and trust us to make effective decisions that are best for our students. I will work to build that trust with our community. Do you support the three levy questions that will appear on the ballot in November? Why or why not? Q1: Yes, I support this renewal of funding at the current level. Q2: Yes, I support this ques-

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tion, but with reservations. I would not have supported the poor planning and spending that led to this shortfall, but I cannot support the cuts that would be required if this levy does not pass. I would have preferred a shorter-term (3-5 versus 10 year) levy without annual inflationary increases. I will work for safeguards to prevent spending these additional dollars on unsustainable programs. Q3: Yes, I support the technology levy. Technology is an essential factor in improving student performance and teacher productivity. Lakeville’s schools face a potential budget deficit of more than $21 million for the next biennium if all this year’s levy questions aren’t passed. How do you propose to balance the budget in that scenario? In

that case, we must carefully scrutinize all options including all expenses, fees, and other sources of revenue. $21 million represents 10 percent of our biennial budget. Since 80 percent of the budget is for employee salary/benefits, it would be difficult to avoid staff reductions without some concessions. I would prioritize all spending items and evaluate each program for its costs and benefits. I would ask our teachers and staff for innovative ideas and new approaches to accomplish this objective with minimal impact to our students. I would solicit community participation and support in guiding the District in making these difficult decisions. What are other key issues facing Lakeville schools, and what actions do you propose?

We need to restore trust in the board through honesty, transparency, and communication. I have a business-like approach to planning and budgeting, in both good and bad economic times. All programs must be prioritized based on a cost/student benefit analysis, and approved programs must be sustainable over the long-term.Spending control cannot interfere with our goal of continuous improvement in student achievement. Our School Board needs to have a vision, to find ways to improve current programs, and learn from what has succeeded elsewhere. Today’s economy requires innovation to provide an excellent education for our students. They deserve nothing less.

RE-ELECT

HOLLY DAHL MAYOR

Proven Leadership as Lakeville’s Mayor

• Executive Committee Regional Council of Mayors • Policy Committee Member League of Minnesota Cities • Second Vice President Minnesota Mayors Association • Member Dakota County Mayor Managers Group • Board Member Dakota Future • Member Lakeville, Apple Valley, Burnsville, and Dakota Regional Chambers of Commerce

PAST INVOLVEMENT (Partial List) • Co-Chair Dakota County High Performance Partnership Project for Coordinated Pandemic Influenza Response • Co-Chair Dakota County High Performance Partnership Project for Sustainability • Demographic Taskforce League of Minnesota Cities • Member League of Minnesota Cities 2009 Conference Planning Committee • Chair Lakeville School Board (2 years) • Member Lakeville School Board (8+ years)

Even during these demanding economic times, Lakeville remains among the best places to live, work, and raise a family. I am seeking re-election to continue being your advocate and a champion of our city for new business development, conservative fiscal budgeting, positioning our city as a regional partner and working to ensure city services are a value for the taxes paid. I am proud to be a resident of Lakeville for the past sixteen years. This is the community that my husband and I chose to raise our children in. I am happy to share my talents and ideas. I want to help Lakeville be the best it can be.

YOUR LAKEVILLE YOUR FAMILY

YOUR VOTE

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CURRENT COMMUNITY INVOLVEMENT (Partial List)

PREPARED AND PAID FOR BY THE VOTE DAHL FOR MAYOR COMMITTEE

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THISWEEK NEWSPAPERS

Lakeville Area District 194 School Board

Jim Skelly (incumbent) Name: Jim Skelly Age: 47 Occupation: Communications coordinator, city of Burnsville Address: 18830 Iroquois Way, Lakeville Family: Wife, Rita, and a sophomore daughter at Lakeville North and sons who graduated in 2008 and 2010 from Lakeville schools Qualifications: I have served on the Lakeville School Board since 2003 including terms as vice-chair and treasurer. I also serve as vice chair on the Lakeville Arenas Board of Directors and on

Michelle Volk (incumbent) Name: Michelle Volk Age: 49 Occupation: Small-business owner Address: 16452 Kenosha Ave. W., Lakeville Family: Husband, Tom, and three daughters Qualifications: District Curriculum Advisory Council; District Teaching and Learning Council. First vice chair, Republican Senate District 36A. Past PTO President, Orchard Lake Elementary and Kenwood Trail.

the MSHSL Region 1AA Committee. I hold a bachelor of arts in speech/communications from the University of

Facing a $21.2 million budget deficit over the next biennium, the Lakeville Area Public School District will have three levy questions on the Nov. 2 ballot. The three levies â&#x20AC;&#x201C; one a tax neutral reauthorization of an existing referendum, and two questions seeking new funding

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Minnesota. Why are you the best candidate for this office? My top priorities include a continuing focus on improving academic achievement for students, maintaining a strong financial position and keeping our community informed and engaged with our schools. Consider that many families move to Lakeville because of the schools. Voters are attracted to a district that provides a high qual-

ity education at a reasonable price. Last year, Lakeville students averaged 23.7 on the college entrance ACT test, one of the top scores in the state. Meanwhile, Lakeville ranked 43 out of 48 metro area school districts in per pupil funding. As a board member since 2003, I have been at the table to assist in the transition to a new grade configuration and have been a key player in making decisions to move the district forward in a strategic way. Now, more than ever, that type of experience is needed on the School Board. Do you support the three levy questions that will appear on the ballot in November? Why or why not? The outcome of the November

election will make a significant difference in the lives of 11,000 students and their families. Since a levy election loss by 12 votes in 2007, the district navigated rough waters cutting millions in programs and increasing fees to families. Today, the State of Minnesota is not in a financial position to provide resources to maintain our programs. Our district needs to move toward stability and sustainability in program offerings. Local funding is essential to reach that goal. A yes vote on all three questions is necessary to keep our schools and community strong. Lakevilleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s schools face a potential budget deficit of more than $21 million for

the next biennium if all this yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s levy questions arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t passed. How do you propose to balance the budget in that scenario? The School Board has a public input and decision making process to collect and review information prior to making any cuts or increasing fees that has served us well in the past. That said, a $21 million reduction over two years would require quick action and significant cuts in programs and opportunities for students. The schools we see next year could be significantly different than they are today - at all levels. To address this large deficit, I would endorse a â&#x20AC;&#x153;all items are on the table format,â&#x20AC;? but would favor cuts in programs and would resist

large fee increases. What are other key issues facing Lakeville schools, and what actions do you propose? Lakeville is a community with significant untapped potential and we should work to get all elements of our community â&#x20AC;&#x201C; residents, schools, city, and businesses â&#x20AC;&#x201C; unified behind a common purpose and plan for our future. Our community will always demand quality services while keeping a sharp eye on taxes. We should explore every available opportunity for efficiencies including shared services and partnerships with the City of Lakeville to provide efficient and effective services and maintain a quality community for us all.

For mer Meals on Wheels coordinator. Why are you the best candidate for this office? It is crucial we have directors on the School Board who are â&#x20AC;&#x153;big pictureâ&#x20AC;? thinkers, hard working and most importantly, dedicated to making decisions that best serve students and residents of our district. Week after week, I have been asking the tough questions on your behalf. I believe my role, as a Director on the School

Board, is to represent you. Do you support the three levy questions that will appear on the ballot in November? Why or why not? I believe in local control and having voters decide what is essential for their schools. For the past eight years, the district has reduced expenditures by 14.6 million and increased revenue through fees by 1.7 million. Over 80 percent of our revenue comes from the State of Minnesota. The state is facing a huge deficit and we are not expecting any increases in revenue. School districts could even see a reduction in funding. The

challenges facing our district are so large that I feel it is important for our community to have their voices heard on the districtâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s financial future. Lakevilleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s schools face a potential budget deficit of more than $21 million for the next biennium if all this yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s levy questions arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t passed. How do you propose to balance the budget in that scenario? Budget adjustments are nothing new to the district. It is important that the community is a part of the process in balancing our budget. Many ideas have been on the table in recent years and will be considered

again. All programs should be evaluated for their impact on our studentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s academic success. I will work with our state and federal legislators to eliminate ineffective and expensive mandates that limit our ability to structure our programming to meet our communityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s needs. My priority will continue to be on supporting a budget focused on student achievement and academic excellence. What are other key issues facing Lakeville schools, and what actions do you propose? By 2014, we are required by Federal mandate to have 100 percent of our students test

at grade level in reading and math. Our English as a Second Language (ESL) student population continues to grow by 20 percent a year. The challenge for our ESL teachers is to collaborate with classroom teachers to accelerate the learning of ESL students to meet the Adequate Yearly Progress targets. A Professional Learning Community is a team of teachers who focus on student learning, analyze data and implement strategies to improve achievement of all students. I support PLCs as they are vital to student success.

Lakeville Area School District 194 Levy

Levy questions

October 22, 2010

â&#x20AC;&#x201C; would cost a $250,000 home, average for the community, $348 a year, or $29 a month, in new property taxes. The first question voters will see is a tax neutral reauthorization of a 2003 referendum. The $250 per pupil levy was originally passed to cover the operational costs of Lakeville South High School, district Superintendent Gary Amoroso said. The 10-year renewal will generate more than $5.8 million over the biennium and cut

the deficit to $15.4 million. The second question is for authorization of a new $524 per pupil levy. The 10-year measure will cost the average home $299 annually and will generate $12.4 million over the biennium, cutting the districtâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s deficit to $3 million. The final question is a onetime technology infusion of $940,000 to purchase 875 new computers. The one-time tax impact is $39 on a $250,000 home.

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October 22, 2010 THISWEEK NEWSPAPERS

Dakota Countyy Sheriff

Dave Bellows (appointed incumbent) Name: Dave Bellows (appointed incumbent) Age: 55 Occupation: Dakota County sheriff Address: 17841 Jaguar Path, Lakeville Family: Wife, Michaeleen; adult children, Bryan, Andy and Erin; grandchildren, Ava and Aidan Qualifications: The 10 years I managed the sheriff’s $18 million budget and 200-employee operations as chief deputy I developed crucial executive leadership skills. Innovation

Mitch Scott Name: Mitch Scott Age: 44 Occupation: Sergeant/police officer Address:19397 Elkridge Trail, Farmington Family: Wife, Angie; son, Hunter, 11; daughter, Hailey, 5 Qualifications: I have 24 years of extensive law enforcement experience working with federal, county and city government. I have worked Customs, Immigration and Narcotics, provided security for the president of the United States and

(incumbent) Name: Tim Blakely Age: 47 Occupation: First Judicial District judge, state of Minnesota Address: Dakota County, P.O. Box 211468, Eagan Family: Married, children Qualifications: Dakota County resident for over 20 years. Retired from 21 years combined active and reserve Navy service as an enlisted man, cryptology

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is second nature in law enforcement. We redesign operations constantly to redeploy resources ahead of innovative criminals. Eliminating redundancies resulted in successful collaborations with 11 police departments; 9-1-1 dispatch; Multi-Agency Assistance Unit (SWAT); countywide Drug Task Force; traffic safety programs. Dakota County is well served by this strong foundation of working relationships, informal and formal. This is a crucial time when experience matters. The Sheriff’s Department alone faces $500,000 in mandatory 2011 cuts. We will

roll up sleeves and explore time-tested options that enable us to maintain or improve services without impacting public safety (see my values and endorsements at www.bellowsforsheriff.com). Over 30 years of law enforcement experience, education, and community involvements are listed in my official resume at www. co.dakota.mn.us/sheriff (19 years, Lakeville Police Department; 15 years, executive-level leadership). Why are you running for office and why should people vote for you? My law enforcement career evolved as Dakota County evolved, and today I seek election as the most qualified candidate for sheriff. Over the past 30 years, Dakota County became the fastest-

growing county in Minnesota. Remarkably, this remains one of the safest places to live, work or visit. The sheriff is responsible to “keep and preserve the peace of the county.” Therefore, it’s necessary to keep a steady hand on what’s working well. But change is inevitable, and I am also running to quickly confront crime trends and create sheriff’s services to accomplish our mandate in an ever-changing environment. Operating the Dakota County Jail is the primary responsibility of the Dakota County Sheriff’s Office, and housing the increasing number of inmates can be challenging. Considering the financial constraints the department operates within, how can the county more affordably and safely manage

its populations? I confront escalating county jail costs with a reputation for results. Common-sense decisions cut inmate meal costs to $1.30 per serving; in 2006, I worked on legislation to cap medical costs. Taxpayers have saved $1.2 million without compromising inmate health. This year we project savings of $60,000 obtaining inmate medications via mail order. I believe we must hold inmates accountable, relieving the burden on taxpayers. Booking fees, medical co-pays and “pay to stay” fees for convicted inmates generated revenues of over $600,000 since 2006. There’s no daytime TV; instead, inmates are encouraged to attend programs to face their personal problems. What issues unique to the

Sheriff’s Office most concern you, and how would you address them if elected? My greatest concern is public safety. That’s my No. 1 job. I never take our low crime rates for granted. One no-cost strategy for keeping everyone safe involves citizens looking out for one another. The best law enforcement agency in the country is not as powerful as a neighbor paying attention when “something isn’t right” and calling police. The best free strategy for voters to accomplish public safety goals is continuity in the Sheriff’s Office. We need to keep working without disruption; rely on years of executive experience, and tested, professional collaborations for results. The citizenry deserves nothing less.

other dignitaries, and been a jailer, patrol officer, detective and sergeant. I have worked in the largest jail in Minnesota, and understand the day-to-day operations of how both a sheriff ’s office and police department operate. I have a good working relationship with the current labor unions and have been recognized for my leadership ability — something the Sheriff ’s Office is currently missing.

Why are you running for office and why should people vote for you? I am running for the office of sheriff because I believe the current administration has failed to lead the department properly. It has had several employees either embezzle money from inmates, have affairs with inmates or steal automobiles. And most recently, the sheriff himself has violated the Federal Labor Standard Act. It is time for the sheriff to get back to the grass roots of what a sheriff once was, be more involved in the communities and assist the local police departments

when possible. The sheriff also needs to work more closely with other agencies within the county. Operating the Dakota County Jail is the primary responsibility of the Dakota County Sheriff ’s Office and housing the increasing number of inmates can be challenging. Considering the financial constraints the department operates within, how can the county more affordably and safely manage it populations? The jail is a very important part of the Sheriff ’s Office. I have received a copy of the current budget, and when I inquired

why it was just a general budget, the county stated it does not have a line item budget for the Sheriff ’s Office. To truly see what you are spending and where it is going, you must break it down completely to ensure you are not wasting the taxpayer’s money. You need to maintain the required staffing levels of your employees in the jail. This is currently not being done and has placed the employees at risk. What issues unique to the Sheriff ’s Office most concern you, and how would you address them if elected? I believe the Sheriff ’s Office is currently

lacking leadership. The morale is extremely low and they are facing several issues with regard to payroll. The current administration has failed to pay its jail booking clerks overtime for three years. It has also failed to pay the deputies who have worked at the Republican National Convention, which is now over two years ago. It is apparent the current administration does not know how to properly manage personnel, and this will be my top priority. I must fix the damaged relationships between administration and employees.

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officer and intelligence officer. For 21 years I honored the oath to support and defend our Constitution; I routinely exercised impartial authority. Now I deal daily with sworn testimony, trial evidence and constant demands for impartial, effective justice. To uphold this necessary level of impartiality, I have made my official position public since the year 2000 that I decline

H to seek or accept endorsements. In 2005, awarded the Navy & Marine Corps Commendation Medal for work on Minnesota Homeland Defense. I have served as adjunct professor of law at William Mitchell, Hamline, and University of Minnesota law schools. Why are you running for office and why should people vote for you? I have always felt honored to serve as judge. I am responsible for a weighted average of more than 5,300 cases annually. Our chief judges have assigned me to frequently handle serious

H H H H HH H H H H H H H H H HH H H H H H H H H H H H HH HHH H H H H felony cases, sexually dangerous person commitments, traffic, family and civil cases in Dakota County over the past 11 years. I believe that I have developed real skills to help people resolve conflict and I move high-volume calendars very effectively. The best way I can continue to serve our community is to serve as a judge. Do you favor changing Minnesota’s law to have judges appointed instead of elected? Why or why not? The preference of voters must be paramount in deciding how judges are selected.

Judicial accountability after selection is equally important to our community. Because judges necessarily have an interest in this issue, I believe it is best that we judges listen to the voice of our constituents and not dictate which selection process is best. Describe one quality that you possess which makes you a good judge and explain why. People tell me frequently that I am a fair and understanding judge, and this comes from having the proper patience for this position. I am a good listener, and I have real skills to help people solve

their most difficult problems. I have appreciated this positive feedback for over 11 years as your judge. Recent efforts to politicize the judiciary present a danger to our impartial courts. For 21 years as an enlisted man and officer in the U.S. Navy and reserve, I was called upon to exercise impartial authority as a part of my regular duties. Have trust and confidence that I will continue to listen, remain fair, and reject all partisan influence as your judge.


THISWEEK NEWSPAPERS

District Judge g

Larry Clark Name: Larry Clark Age: 58 Occupation: Criminal prosecutor, Dakota County Attorneyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Office Address: Red Wing, Minn. Family: Wife, Colleen. Married 37 years. Three adult daughters. Qualifications: I have been an attorney for 30 years. For the first eight and one-half years, I was in private practice in a small law firm. My practice ran the gamut from general civil litigation and family law, to probate, real estate

Walter/from 12B should vote for me because I have proven to be a dedicated, hard-working, honest, innovative, and a balanced leader. I do my â&#x20AC;&#x153;homework.â&#x20AC;? I listen to all ideas. I strive to see an issue from all sides, knowing that as a board member I am charged with the task of doing what is right for students, and also what is re-

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and criminal defense. For the past 21 years, I have served as a criminal prosecutor, handling major felony offenses such as homicide and child sexual assault. I have briefed and argued many cases before the Minnesota Court of Appeals and the Minnesota Supreme Court. I have lived in Red Wing for 25 years and have been very active in my community. I recently completed two terms on the Red Wing Human Rights Commission, and

served as president of the statewide League of Minnesota Human Rights Commissions. In 2009, I organized and served as moderator for a community forum and workshop on how local courts are responding to civil rights issues. Why are you running for office and why should people vote for you? Because of the serious misconduct of the incumbent, resulting in suspension by the Supreme Court, I feel compelled to run. As a felony prosecutor, I have become accustomed to making decisions that literally change peopleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s lives. This judgeship is seated in Goodhue County. It is

my home, and I have a history of public service in that community. I have known the two other Goodhue County judges for over 25 years. I have visited with them about the needs of the judicial system in Goodhue County, and I will work with them to keep that system running efficiently and fairly. Do you favor changing Minnesotaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s law to have judges appointed instead of elected? Why or why not? As a result of recent U.S. Supreme Court rulings, I am concerned about the future of our judicial elections. Other states have experienced highly partisan and corporate-funded judicial

elections. Because we have been able to avoid that fate in Minnesota, however, I am not ready to say that the voters should be disenfranchised from voting for judges. We must be able to balance a candidateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s First Amendment rights against the need of the electorate to receive unbiased information about the candidates. Furthermore, there are inherent risks that the appointment process could become just as political as a partisan election. Describe one quality that you possess which makes you a good judge and explain why. I have a strong reputation for being able to get along with just about any-

one, whether they are a colleague or an adversary. I take pride in the fact that prosecutors and defense attorneys, as well as civil attorneys, are working toward my election. I work hard to treat everyone with dignity and respect, including the defendants whom I am prosecuting. I want everyone who appears in my courtroom to walk out feeling that they were treated with respect and received a fair hearing. Likewise, every person appearing before me will be held to the same standard of conduct and accountability.

sponsible for our district. If re-elected, what are your top three priorities for bringing change to the Farmington School District? Continue to improve on how information is delivered to the public. I want to see this become more userfriendly and accessible, but in a way that is also district-friendly. Academics â&#x20AC;&#x201C; examine areas that we are seeing high success rates

and apply these strategies to areas that are struggling. I would like to see new initiatives started at the elementary levels, middle, and high school to educate our students for the world that they will be working and living in. I think there are academic areas we can build that can be unique, effective and good for students. I believe with the economic situation our state is in, that districts

will need to take a serious look at their priorities and programs that are included in â&#x20AC;&#x153;public educationâ&#x20AC;? and that Farmington will need to utilize the talent and strengths of our district and community members to problem solve in this area. What is the best way for the school district to increase achievement in K-12 among Farmington students? Funda-

mentals and foundation will be the key to continued improvement. Reading, math, writing, and science are the areas that need to be solidified through ongoing overview of what our curriculum is teaching. Also, we need to look at what grade levels students are being introduced to the material, and the opportunities for advancement in these areas. I believe that more inten-

sive, focused strategies in these areas will yield better results year after year. As a board member, my job is not to create this, but provide our superintendent with our expectations and goals, then resources and opportunities for our professionals to get the job done.

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October 22, 2010 THISWEEK NEWSPAPERS

Senate District 36

Steve Quist (DFL) Name: Steve Quist Age: 39 Occupation: Accounting manager for a local nonprofit Address: 18208 Empire Trail, Farmington Family: Wife, Andrea; children, Ethan, 13, Mackinley, 11, and Camden, 5 Qualifications: I am an accounting manger. Frankly, I think the Legislature could use an accountant who is committed to fiscal responsibility and accountability. I work for a nonprofit, which, like all nonprofits in this economy, faces revenue

Dave Thompson (Republican) Name: Dave Thompson Age: 49 Occupation: Self-employed attorney and consultant Address: 9175 211th St. W., Lakeville Family: Wife, Rhonda, children, Amanda, 17, Phil, 15 Qualifications: I have been a student of public policy and politics my entire adult life. In addition to practicing law, I spent over 10 years as a radio and televi-

(Republican, Incumbent) Name: Mary Liz Holberg, incumbent Age: 50 Occupation: Small-business owner Address: 12195 Upper 167th St. W., Lakeville Family: Husband, Tom, two children Qualifications: Lakeville resident for 37 years and small business owner since 1987. Lakeville Planning Commission 1989-1995, Lakeville City

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shortfalls and budget cuts. I bring practical, commonsense skills to the table. Why are you the best candidate for this office? My political inspiration centers on the future of my three boys. They motivate me to work toward a better community – a community of integrity, strength, safety and respect for all our citizens. I’m a family man with a strong faith and a desire to contribute to our exceptional state. I will help the state work toward balance. We must have good public education; safe highways, roads and bridges;

and proper state services. But we cannot leave our children and grandchildren with crippling debt. I am committed to decreasing the partisanship that has damaged our state government. Party politics won’t move us forward. As Democrats, Independents and Republicans, we work together, play together and worship together. We must come together as legislators, using our common sense to solve the weighty financial problems we are now encountering. Minnesota faces a budget deficit in 2012-13 estimated at $5.8 billion. How do you propose to balance the budget? What increases in taxes or other revenue, if any, do you support? With a $5-7 billion shortfall, we must

increase revenues and cut expenses. I think a lot of people feel like they have done the right thing, but are being punished because our governor and legislature have dug our state into a hole that will be difficult to get out of. There will be painful cuts, but along with cuts we can also expand our revenue while making it fairer. We can expand the sales tax while decreasing the rate, and ask those who have benefited in this state – the richest – to pay a little more until we stabilize our economy. What are your budget priorities? In the event of cuts, which programs and services would you protect first? Which would you cut first? The programs I would protect first are the programs

we need for a strong Minnesota: superior public education, small and large business development to bring jobs to the state, safe roads and highways, effective police and fire departments, public health safety, veterans benefits, and a social services safety net for the most vulnerable Minnesotans. Before cutting entire programs and services, I believe we have to be a lot smarter in how we administer them. As an accounting professional, I believe I can help fellow lawmakers analyze departmental financial data and develop recommendations for cost savings. What are other key issues facing Minnesota, and what actions do you propose? Bolster

small businesses: The recession dried up funding to develop/ improve small business. We should develop a loan program to help small businesses weather the economic crisis. Strengthen public education: We need a well-educated workforce to keep our economy strong. Among our needs are smaller K-12 class size and affordable tuition at public colleges. Reform property taxes: An elderly couple on a small fixed income should not pay the same tax as their neighbor who is a wellpaid professional. We can’t decrease the revenue, but we can have a system that is more just, based on income or spending.

sion political analyst and commentator. These varied experiences have given me exposure to many different kinds of people, businesses and civic organizations. Why are you the best candidate for this office? The best candidate for office is one who is qualified for the job, and whose views are most consistent with the views of the constituents.After months of campaigning, it has become clear that people in this Senate district are primarily concerned about two issues: job growth and

excessive government spending. I am a student of economics and have been a small business owner for over 16 years. Like the folks I talk to every day, I am committed to policies that will help businesses provide good jobs. It has always been my position that the only way to grow the economy, thereby creating jobs, is to create an economic environment in which businesses thrive. That is why my top priorities as a legislator will be regulatory reform, keeping the lid on taxes, and cutting government spending. Our economic future is dependent upon the health of private sector businesses. Minnesota faces a budget deficit in 2012-13 estimated at $5.8

billion. How do you propose to balance the budget? What increases in taxes or other revenue, if any, do you support? How do we solve Minnesota’s projected $5.8 billion budget deficit? Stop spending money. Minnesota has one of America’s most generous social services systems. Most Minnesotans believe there should be more stringent residency and other requirements for collecting public benefits. In addition, we need to reform our agencies to make them more efficient and avoid duplication. Many functions could be outsourced to the private sector, thereby saving money and creating private sector jobs. We do not need more revenue, and I will oppose any

budget proposal that includes a tax increase. What are your budget priorities? In the event of cuts, which programs and services would you protect first? Which would you cut first? If you take time to look at the state budget, you will see that Health and Human Services, Education and Transportation consume about 80 percent of the budget. Therefore, we must be willing to look at these budget items. The state has a constitutional duty to provide a base level of education. However, savings could be realized by cutting down on state mandates while cutting the funds that go with those mandates. What are other key issues fac-

ing Minnesota, and what actions do you propose? Integrity of the electoral process will also be a priority for me if I am elected to the state Senate. It is time for photo ID in Minnesota. Secretary of State candidate Dan Severson has made this important issue front and center in his campaign. I am fully supportive of this important fraud preventing measure. Healthcare is another issue that is important to all Minnesotans. I will support an attorney general who will join the lawsuit challenging the constitutionality of “Obamacare.” In addition, we need to decrease regulation, and create a more competitive economic environment in healthcare.

House District 36A

Mary Liz Holberg

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Council 19961998, Lakeville Chamber of Commerce member since 1994 serving on the Government Affairs committee, and founding member of the Friends of the Lakeville Area Arts Board. Former Den Mother and PTO volunteer. Why are you the best candidate for this office? In 1992, I co-chaired the Lakeville Park Task Force which resulted in the foundation for our topnotch park and trail system. As Planning Commissioner, I worked hard to implement the ground breaking tree preservation policy. In 1993, I received the national VH-1 Good News

H Person Award for the Land of Amazement in North Park. As a freshman legislator, I received the League of Minnesota Cities Legislator of the Year award and was voted as one of the Top Five Legislators by the St. Paul Legal Ledger. Other awards I have received are the Outstanding Woman in Government from the State Women of Today, and the Friend of the Family, from the Minnesota Family Council. I’ve chaired the Transportation Finance and Civil Law House committees and served eight years on the Caucus Executive Board. It has been an honor to devote my time and talents to serving my hometown. Minnesota faces a budget deficit in 2012-13 estimated at $5.8 billion. How do you pro-

H H H H HH H H H H H H H H H HH H H H H H H H H H H H HH HHH H H H H pose to balance the budget? What increases in taxes or other revenue, if any, do you support? The budget deficit is not a result of declining revenues. In fact, Minnesota tax collections are projected to increase 7 percent in the next budget cycle. I do not support raising additional taxes. With little to no inflation in this economy, the state should be able to meet the needs of the residents with a 7 percent increase in spending. Minnesota household income is going down and many are unemployed. Spending should be limited to core government services. We must limit our spending to the basics and fund core government responsibilities. Growth in government spending should not be on autopilot.

What are your budget priorities? In the event of cuts, which programs and services would you protect first? Which would you cut first? There will need to be cuts to some areas of the budget. I would protect public safety, education, transportation and health and welfare services for those unable to provide for themselves. Spending reductions should be focused on the niceties that are unaffordable in this economy. Nearly every family and business in Minnesota has been forced to make budget reductions and the state can do the same. Programs that are not producing results must be eliminated and government should act more like a business when it comes to providing the best product or service for the cost.

What are other key issues facing Minnesota, and what actions do you propose? Fostering job creation is the most important issue facing the state. We need a strong job climate to reduce unemployment and position Minnesota to be competitive in the global market of the 21st century. Minnesota has a strong education tradition and we must protect it to provide a superior workforce. We must also structure a reasonable regulatory environment that fosters business growth. Most importantly, we must live within our means and avoid job killing tax increases that will burden our families and our businesses. The projected 7 percent increase in state revenues should be enough to fund the state’s priorities.


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House District 36A

Colin Lee (DFL) Name: Colin Lee Age: 31 Occupation: Software engineer Address: 17372 Jalisco Lane, Lakeville Family: Engaged Qualifications: I have been involved in my community through Lakeville Lions, Lakeville Friends of the Environment, Toastmasters, and charities like Feed My Starving Children and Habitat for Humanity. Why are you the best candidate for this office? Ronald

Reagan once said, “Politics is the second oldest p ro f e s s i o n . … It bears a striking resemblance to the first.” As one of the few candidates who reject all PAC, lobbyist, and corporate donations, I am the only candidate who honestly represents Lakeville voters. My vote is not for sale. I am not a career legislator, but an engineer. As an engineer, solving problems is my day job. I know how to gather requirements, seek and evaluate the most successful solutions,

House District 36B

Pat Garofalo (Republican, incumbent) Name: Pat Garofalo Age: 39 Occupation: Network engineer Address: 5997 193rd St. W., Farmington Family: Married (Julie), two children Qualifications: Three-term legislator in the Minnesota House of Representatives; ranking minority lead on the K-12 Finance Committee; named to the American Council of Young Political Leaders

Sigrid Iversen (DFL) Name: Sigrid Iversen Age: 42 Occupation: Educator Address: 20676 Jaguar Ave., Lakeville Family: Allen, four children Qualifications: Luther College, history, political science, education. Master’s of science in library media, Mankato State University. Teacher, Eagan High School, 14 years.

produce a design, review it, solve the problem, and then gather feedback to improve the finished product. These skills would be a rare commodity in our Legislature. I have vowed to work towards making Minnesota a model of efficiency. I will work with legislators on both sides to make this happen. In 200203, Minnesota Republicans made 15 year record spending increases that are unbroken today. No party has a magic spending wand. Minnesota faces a budget deficit in 2012-13 estimated at $5.8 billion. How do you propose to balance the budget? What increases in taxes or other revenue, if any, do

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you support? The only honest solution to a deficit larger than state payroll requires cuts and fairly raised revenue. We must reduce government health insurance costs, which are 40 percent of the budget. According to reports, 31 percent of American health costs are overhead and 15 percent are billing fraud. I will make it my mission to improve this. Also, my opponent voted against SF915, a bill which saves one billion dollars in 10 years by pooling K-12 teacher health policies statewide. We should seek revenue from Sunday liquor sales, which a 2010 study shows would raise $16-20 million per budget.

What are your budget priorities? In the event of cuts, which programs and services would you protect first? Which would you cut first? Education, public safety, and transportation are my highest budget priorities. These represent key responsibilities of government. We will need to cut the fastest growing areas: health and human services and corrections. We must solve out-of-control health overhead and fraud costs or else both businesses and government are at risk. What are other key issues facing Minnesota, and what actions do you propose? Property taxes and tuition are exploding due to state aid cuts

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and cost growth. From 20022008, homestead property taxes grew 70 percent statewide while school, city, and county revenues fell. While state and federal taxes were only reduced, these growing costs are the primary reason we’re “taxed enough, already.”High property taxes and tuition are not a budget solution. When income dives, these remain high. They have harmed our recovery by tipping Minnesotans over the edge. Together, let’s get finances in order and increase state aid to our schools, cities, and county, to maintain necessary infrastructure for a strong economy.

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Why are you the best candidate for this office? Like the citizens of our district, I believe the best way to create jobs is for our government to reduce debt and spend less money. With all the excessive spending and debt being added by our government, now is the time to have elected officials who understand prudent fiscal policies. In the last session, I was named the minority lead on the K-12 Finance Committee. In this role, I’ve worked with both Republicans and Democrats to re-

form our education system and fight the 1950s mindset that the leadership of the teachers union possesses. I have been an aggressive advocate for reforming our education system to be a childfocused system as opposed to the current model, which serves the needs of the adults first. I believe these positions and values are exactly what the citizens of our area expect from their representative. Minnesota faces a budget deficit in 2012-13 estimated at $5.8 billion. How do you propose to balance the budget? What increases in taxes or other revenue, if any, do you support? Transition new (not existing) state

employees to a 401k retirement model instead of the current pension model. Reform the Local Government Aid formula so that property tax assistance is given to the individual instead of to another unit of government. Redesign the wasteful and ineffective integration funding formula. Pass the Early Graduation Achievement Act, which would give scholarships to students to graduate early. Motivates kids, saves the state money, makes college more affordable. I am opposed to increasing those taxes which would create barriers to job creation. Taxes on savings and investment need to be reduced, not

increased. What are your budget priorities? In the event of cuts, which programs and services would you protect first? Which would you cut first? Protecting programs for the disabled and elderly. Protecting funding that is spent in the classroom. I would support a redesign of Local Government Aid and reductions in health care entitlement programs. My focus is on the outputs of service the program provides, not the input of dollars put into it. What are other key issues facing Minnesota, and what actions do you propose? Minnesota needs term limits. I’m proud of the fact that I have a private-sector job away from the

Legislature. Unfortunately, legislators like me are becoming less and less common. Increasingly, citizens see career politicians who don’t have other employment and view politics as their “job.” This leads to politicians focusing on what is in their own shortterm political interests as opposed to what is in the public’s best interest. The way to correct this is for the Legislature to pass term limits. I am a strong supporter of term limits and will continue to advocate for their passage.

Involvement in organizations: St. John’s Lutheran C h u r c h , Lakeville Education Foundation, ECFE Advisory Board, and Curriculum Advisory Council. Why are you the best candidate for this office? I will provide balanced leadership with a fresh perspective. I am interested in working corrobora-

tively with all of the citizens of District 36B to ensure the future of their communities. Minnesota faces a budget deficit in 2012-13 estimated at $5.8 billion. How do you propose to balance the budget? What increases in taxes or other revenue, if any, do you support? It is about balance and working together. We will not solve this budget from the fringes. Common ground is very important to meeting this challenge. We need to look for places that can be more efficient. If additional revenue is

needed then we will have to be creative. We need to make sure that one segment of our community is not responsible for any sort of revenue increase. What are your budget priorities? In the event of cuts, which programs and services would you protect first? Which would you cut first? Education and transportation. We need both to build strong communities and develop our economy. Education provides the “human infrastructure” that is needed for our future. We need to

make sure that funding for our kids is predictable and consistent. Roads and infrastructure literally provides businesses with the movement of people that is crucial to sustaining business and supporting our schools and communities. These have shared benefits to so many of the members of our towns and cities. What are other key issues facing Minnesota, and what actions do you propose? Jobs. We have a wonderful opportunity to help many of those out of

work. Sustainable projects such as transportation and infrastructure-related jobs are an option that will provide communities with the services that they need and put people back to work. Small businesses need help in employing people as well. Tax incentives for hiring new workers and making health care more affordable are just a few ways that we can make the climate for jobs better for everyone.


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Farmington Lakeville Voters Guide 2010