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The holiday magic of ‘Nutcracker’ at the Burnsville PAC. See Thisweekend Page 12A.

A NEWS OPINION SPORTS

Thisweek Farmington-Lakeville DECEMBER 2, 2011

VOLUME 32, NO. 40

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Messages/2A

Opinion/4A

Announcements/7A

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Cuts could come to Farmington City Council decision could mean comprehensive reorganization, layoffs by Laura Adelmann THISWEEK NEWSPAPERS

A last-minute Farmington City Council decision to buy down the 2012 levy may result in a total reorganization of city services, operations and staff. At a Nov. 28 budget workshop, Farmington City Council members directed staff to use $367,258 in one-time fiscal dis-

parities funding to reduce property taxes in 2012. As a result, taxpayers will be relieved of tax increases primarily driven by the state ending the market value homestead credit, which has shifted more taxes to businesses. Property tax increases would have been driven higher if the council had recommended approval of

the original plan to raise taxes to pay for city projects instead of using bonds. The decision to use fiscal disparities money to reduce the levy will create a $337,258 hole in the 2013 budget that can only be filled by cutting costs, explained City Administrator Dave McKnight in a Tuesday interview. “We either have to

eliminate the bill or find a different revenue source,” McKnight said. “The approach we are taking is to eliminate the bill.” McKnight said he doesn’t know what the restructure will look like, but all jobs and city services are on the table for potential cuts “because that ($337,258) number is so See Cuts, 6A

St. Nick returns to Lakeville Bob Jensen, former mayor of Lakeville, Dakota County commissioner and state legislator, died on Sunday, Nov. 27. He was 83.

Lakeville civic leader dies Bob Jensen helped shape city’s parks, industrial base by Aaron Vehling THISWEEK NEWSPAPERS

He was in hospice, suffering from colon cancer, but nothing would stop Bob Jensen from attending his grandson’s football games. “It’s one of those things we’ll always remember,” said Sarah Matasosky, one of Jensen’s daughters. The determination and drive to see things through were omnipresent themes throughout the life of Jensen, a farmer who served Lakeville in a number of public capacities, including mayor, Dakota County commissioner, state legislator and town board supervisor.

Jensen died Nov. 27 at The Lodge hospice facility in Burnsville, surrounded by his family. He was mayor during a time of great expansion. The village and township of Lakeville had merged, creating the 38-square-mile city that exists today. The population in 1960 topped out at under 1,000, but would balloon more than 700 percent to 7,500 people a decade later. He championed the Airlake Industrial Park and was heavily involved in Pan-O-Prog, which was designed to promote Airlake Industrial Park, Matasosky said. Jensen also sought See Jensen, 6A

Photo by Rick Orndorf

Lakeville’s immensely popular Holiday on Main returns to the city’s downtown from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 3. People can enjoy historic downtown Lakeville at this holiday event with Santa, Mrs. Claus, face painting, live reindeer, trolley rides, music, dance recitals, Early Childhood Family Education book sale and boutique, Santa’s Secret Store and the Senior Center’s bazaar and bake sale. The event is sponsored by the Downtown Lakeville Business Association.

Adjustments mean lower taxes for some in Lakeville by Aaron Vehling THISWEEK NEWSPAPERS

As the city’s Dec. 5 Truth in Taxation meeting approaches, adjustments made to the city’s 2012 levy might offer a mild calming effect. Since the preliminary budget was approved on Sept. 6, things have changed enough that Lakeville’s finance department now predicts a levy of $23,126,960, which is about $250,000 less than in September. Finance Director Dennis Feller said that various “financial events” have occurred since then, including (among other things):

Fire Department to see improvements to its operations • Increases in state aid for fire and police services because of the 2010 Census, • Opting out of membership in the Greater MSP, a regional economic development partnership designed to market the Twin Cities metro area as a whole to companies nationally and internationally. The membership would have cost the city $25,000. The Economic Development Commission recommended against it. • Electrical inspector change: The City Council has decided to get rid of its

in-house electrical inspector and contract with an outside party, a savings of more than $30,000. The decision to hire Steven Kletschka on such a basis is on the Council’s Dec. 5 agenda. • Lower health insurance bids means the Council can reduce its contingency fund by $82,000. This contributes the largest chunk of savings of the $250,000.

The average homeowner will see an $11 reduction when compared to the preliminary statements sent out in September, Feller said. C o m mercial and industrial p ro p e r t i e s could see about $57 less than the September preliminary levy. The city’s share of taxes on businesses is 13 percent, the school’s 16 percent and the bulk consists of state

tax levies and fiscal disparities. For those Lakeville residents in the Lakeville public school district (ISD 194), their school tax levy should be reduced by about 3.4 percent, according to discussions at a recent school board meeting. Figuring out the levy at the local level has been complicated for officials because of a change in the Market Value Homestead Credit (MVHC), which was eliminated. The Legislature, in a bid to cut spending, replaced the MVHC with a credit that reduces

the value of a property directly. In the case of Lakeville, city residents received a credit on their taxes but the city did not receive the reimbursement it was due from the state, Feller said. This meant that the city levied for that amount to make up the difference. The loss of the MVHC is tax neutral to city residents because the city no longer levies for difference, Feller said.

Other city news The Fire Relief Board requested a 3 percent increase in fire pensions for See Taxes, 6A

State again denies Farmington application for license center by Laura Adelmann THISWEEK NEWSPAPERS

Farmington’s second application for a deputy registrar’s office at City Hall has again been denied by the state. A Nov. 9 letter from the Minnesota Department of Public Safety states that the city’s proposed operation of the license center violates

General 952-894-1111 Distribution 952-846-2070 Display Advertising 952-846-2011 Classified Advertising 952-846-2000

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State Rep. Pat Garofalo vows to help on city’s behalf Minnesota Rules because an outside company would work in the center. “The responsible entity is a separate corporate entity having employees that are neither city employees nor subject to city oversight or discipline,” wrote Patricia McCormack, director of the Minnesota Department of Driver and Vehicle Services, in the letter. Farmington City Administrator Dave McKnight said he will seek direction from the council to determine if the city will take further action in pursuing the license center. Supporters of the proposal said a license center would increase downtown traffic, bring in businesses and stimulate economic development.

The city’s original agreement was to allow QuickServ, a private company, to operate the license center rent-free in City Hall for 2011. Beginning in 2012, Quick-Serv would not pay rent until it collected $100,000 in fees. Then, the city would earn 25 percent of filing fees. That same agreement would start over the next year. Without state approval, that agreement is void. McKnight said he won’t raise the issue until the coun-

cil has completed its work with the budget, which will be voted on Dec. 5. Mayor Todd Larson said in an interview Monday that he hasn’t given the deputy registrar issue much thought, but was not pleased with the state’s denial. “I’m disappointed they chose to go down this road again,” Larson said. Gay Smith, director of operations with Quick-Serv, the for-profit company that is proposed to employ service workers at Farmington’s license center, said it will stand behind the city with whatever

direction it decides to take. “I think the city of Farmington and the surrounding areas deserve to have the service,” Smith said. Farmington briefly opened a license center Feb. 28 this year with limited services, and the QuickServ employees distributed a few hunting and fishing licenses. It closed March 8 after receiving a letter from McCormack denying the city state approval. Farmington restructured its application and reapplied this fall. The new application was changed to name McKnight the deputy registrar and Farmington Parks Director Randy Distad as the license center manager.

The changes didn’t sway McCormack, who said state rules prohibit subcontracting the service. To approve the city’s application, Farmington would have to operate the office instead of delegating another business to operate it, according to McCormack. State Rep. Pat Garofalo, R-Farmington, said he would continue to address the issue with the department on Farmington’s behalf. “I think that the city of Farmington is in the best position to determine what services should be provided in their City Hall,” Garofalo said. “If the department refuses to work with us, I’d have no choice and will propose legislation.” Laura Adelmann is at laura. adelmann@ecm-inc.com.


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December 2, 2011 THISWEEK

    

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Lawsuit seeks to stop child care union vote Lakeville child care provider among group of 10 by T.W. Budig ECM CAPITOL REPORTER

A Lakeville child care provider has joined with a group of about 10 others in a legal effort to block the child care unionization vote recently put in motion by Democratic Gov. Mark Dayton. Becky Swanson, who has 10 children enrolled in her at-home child care service in Lakeville, spoke at a State Capitol press conference on Monday, Nov. 28, announcing the filing of the lawsuit. “I really think we have a very good case,� said Swanson, who has appeared at recent Capitol hearings in opposition to the vote. Her interest in the vote, which is planned for December and could result in the unionization of some child care providers, was originally aroused, she said, by bothersome union activists who contacted her at her business. Swanson, who does not have state-subsidized children enrolled in her child care and is not eligible to vote, objects to the unionization effort because it could result in a union bargaining with the state on issues affecting nonunion child care providers. There are already child

wrong,� he said of the pending vote. McGrath in an email said that Senate Republicans, who have recently indicated that they intended to file suit against the vote, were aware that Monday’s suit filing was coming. Dayton spokeswoman Katharine Tinucci in a statement responded to the filing of the lawsuit. “The debate around unionization of family child care providers started years before Governor Dayton was elected to office,� she said. “By refusing to call for an election, his predecessors denied licensed, registered family child care providers the chance to decide for themselves whether or not they want to form a union. Photo by T.W. Budig Governor Dayton believes Child care provider Becky Swanson of Lakeville and attorney Tom Revnew appeared at they should have the right a State Capitol press conference on Nov. 28 to announce the filing of a lawsuit against a to make that decision.� pending unionization vote involving Minnesota child care providers. Eric Lehto, organizing care provider associations with a voice at the state Capitol, she argued. The idea of having a vote is backward, opponents argue, because a minority could have power over the majority of the 11,000 child care providers in the state choosing not to join the union. Beyond the question of unionization, opponents argue that Dayton has no legal authority to call for the vote.

Tom Revnew, one of the attorneys representing the opponents, also argues the state Bureau of Mediation Services has no legal authority to design or conduct the election. The Service Employees International Union and the Association of Federal, State, County and Municipal Employees have been working toward the vote. Their supporters argue that unionization could mean better benefits, higher

pay, and less onerous regulations. The vote simply provides an option for providers to unionize or not. Some of the groups backing the opponents include Education Liberty Watch, Minnesota Family Council, Minnesota Majority and Minnesota Free Market Institute. Dan McGrath, of the Minnesota Majority, said his group is financially backing the lawsuit. “It’s fundamentally

director for AFSCME Minnesota Council 5, called the lawsuit “frivolous.� “Governor Dayton has legal authority to direct the Bureau of Mediation Services to conduct a union election and to determine appropriate bargaining units of child care providers. Voters in this election include only licensed, subsidized providers who have a direct financial relationship with the state of Minnesota,� Lehto said in a statement. “If a majority of providers come together in a democratic process, Gov. Dayton will recognize their professional voice. Union membership will be voluntary and all providers will retain their constitutional right to participate in the policy-making process.� T.W. Budig is at tim.budig@ ecm-inc.com.

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Farmington man charged with fleeing police on snowmobile by Laura Adelmann THISWEEK NEWSPAPERS

search of the area, concerned the driver may have suffered hypothermia, but did not find anyone. At 10:20 p.m., Farmington police learned that Astgen was at another residence, and went to talk to him. Astgen claimed to know nothing about the incident, and didn’t appear to be in any medical distress, but when he pulled out his wallet to show his identification, the wallet was soaking wet. Officers also located a black and green snowmobile jacket witnesses said belonged to Astgen. It also was soaking wet. Police noticed Astgen smelled like alcohol, had bloodshot eyes and slurred

his words. Astgen, who has a 2009 conviction for driving under the influence, said he had consumed “a couple beers.� A breath test measured Astgen’s alcohol level at .14, almost twice the legal limit of .08. The felony charge carries a maximum penalty of three years in prison and a fine of $3,000. Each gross misdemeanor charge carries penalties of 30 days to one year in jail and fines of between $900 and $3,000. Laura Adelmann is at laura. adelmann@ecm-inc.com.

 

  

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A wet wallet was one of the clues that led to multiple charges against a Farmington man who allegedly fled police while drunk on a snowmobile. Robert Allan Astgen, 35, was jailed on charges of felony fleeing an officer and two gross misdemeanor charges of third-degree driving while impaired for a Nov. 19 incident described in a Dakota County criminal complaint. According to the complaint: Farmington police and a Dakota County Sheriff’s deputy joined in a search for the driver of a snowmobile who was reportedly speeding up and down Pilot Knob Road and 180th Street at around 8 p.m. that night. After the call came over dispatch, the deputy turned onto 180th Street to see a Farmington squad turning on its lights, and a single headlight aimed at the deputy, who clocked the singleheadlight vehicle’s speed at 63 mph. As it approached, the deputy determined the vehicle was a green and black snowmobile ridden by a driver wearing a coat of matching

colors. Without slowing for traffic, the snowmobile crossed Pilot Knob Road and traveled east into a field, where officers could hear the snowmobile engine revving faster as it sped away, its Robert tail light growing Astgen smaller. Officers followed the snowmobile tracks to a residence, where people identified the driver as Astgen. As the officer was leaving, he learned the snowmobile was located sunk up to its handlebars in a retention pond in a field. Footprints were found nearby the sunken machine, but it wasn’t clear if they were that of the driver. Officers conducted a

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December 2, 2011 THISWEEK

Opinion ECM Editorial State has lesson for feds in medical cost control Minnesota’s two U.S. senators, Amy Klobuchar and Al Franken, both Democrats, have made it clear that they will not hesitate in carrying the state’s best-practice measures to the halls of Congress. We hope they were listening and watching this fall as the state of Minnesota released what has to be considered good news. The news is in relation to a bold move by the Dayton administration to embark on a competitive bidding process for insurers who want a share of the $4 billion annual business to pay for medical assistance costs for state residents. It is now estimated that the state program will save upwards of $180 million in state taxpayer dollars over the next two years but without any cut in benefits or forcing most enrollees to change

their medical providers. It is also likely that the federal government will see corresponding savings due to the fact that medical assistance for the most part is funded by both the state and the federal government. Gov. Mark Dayton has held true to his promise to seek reform with such health care initiatives, and we applaud the work of his administration. It makes sense at the state level and it makes minds wonder why it wasn’t tried much sooner. It’s such plans and principles that can and should work at the national level, too, if only leaders there could be so driven. In one specific case, the federal government is now projecting that the Medicare Part D prescription drug program will run an unfund-

ed deficit of $700 billion in its first 10 years, according to estimates. Medicare Part D was passed by a Republican-controlled Congress in 2003 and signed into law by President George W. Bush. Under the 2003 legislation, Medicare is not allowed to negotiate drug prices with manufacturers. We understand the partisan deadlock that is blocking most efforts at meaningful change or reform in Washington. It’s an uphill battle to be sure. But we believe Sens. Klobuchar and Franken have just the moxie to help push this heavy ball up that steep hill. They are getting some help, too. The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, signed into law in March of 2010 by President Barack Obama, is taking small

Letters A fairer system of taxation To the editor: My recent letter with the harsh suggestion of stripping certain people of their right to vote got some attention. The letters in the paper and online at ThisweekLive.com show a conversation sparked among a few people with some excellent points and counterpoints. It even compelled a letter writer in last week’s paper that asks just who these people are who pay $0 in taxes, and in the very same letter, goes on to say he pays $0 in taxes. Even when making the drastic suggestion, I realized that simply putting a one-size-fits-all rule into place is a very slippery slope. There are good, hardworking people with emotional investments in their community. But what about those of us who have an accompanying financial investment in the community? I’d suggest our emotional investment is even greater than that of the person without the direct financial investment. What about the gamers of the system? It’s these people who make it tougher on the legitimate entitlement earners. Or the young folks who still haven’t realized that there’s no such thing as a free lunch and are duped into voting for a candidate who may promise free health care, for instance? Should their votes have as much power as anybody’s?

but progressive steps to shrink the doughnut hole that many Part D participants face when their benefit limits are reached and the next $4,500 in prescription expense is cash from pocket. More shrinking needs to be done, and that can come through competitive bidding and/or outright negotiations with the large pharmaceutical companies, or by looking at reform that would allow the importation and re-importation of prescription drugs. Both could be considered competition to the current system. According to one estimate from the National Retiree Legislative Network, as much as $730 million, or 18 percent, of the nation’s Medicare Part D projected $4 billion costs for prescription drugs over the next 10 years could

be saved. Those are meaningful savings and rise to the level of totally wiping away the doughnut hole. It could also make a small but important reduction in the federal budget deficit. One of the ways to make changes and improve Medicare Part D is with competitive bidding, much like the state of Minnesota has done with its medical assistance costs. We know Sen. Klobuchar and Sen. Franken have voices that are being heard in Washington. It’s time they speak louder. An editorial from the ECM Editorial Board. Thisweek Newspapers and the Dakota County Tribune are part of ECM Publishers Inc.

Thisweek Columnist Accountability and responsibility have been lost on many people. Should we just forgive folks of consequences anymore? If stripping voting “rights� is too big a pill to swallow, perhaps we could start with calling it the benefit to vote. Something that must be earned. Or as a new friend of mine brilliantly suggests, certain votes could have more power than others. Yes, implementing some type of system like this would be complicated and difficult. But this country, this state, this local community, is worth that challenge. And with that, I’ll let the many experts out there respond. MARK BELLILE Lakeville

Fee can help pay for new stadium

tween Winnipeg and Thunder Bay. If each Vikings gameviewing household is charged a set amount each week (say $2) to watch the game on a dedicated cable/ satellite TV channel, then a stadium could be funded in 12 years max. The NFL can charge this amount to every household in the viewing region, the Minnesota Legislature (or county governments) cannot do so. This method also provides an economic voting referendum each week for each Viking fan household (“yes� - we want to pay to watch the game this week or “no� we don’t). In addition, even if the state does find funding for a stadium, they cannot guarantee a sellout for each home game over a 30-year lease, which means that most the Minnesota fan base (in the MinneapolisSt. Paul metro area) that would actually pay the “Viking taxes� may not ever see a home game on TV in the very stadium which they funded. A home game is blackedout within a 75-mile radius of the stadium, if a sellout is not reached within 72 hours of kick-off. Businesses have bought out remaining tickets to avoid a blackout in recent years, but a new stadium with higher ticket prices and personal seat license costs will likely increase the probability that a number of games will not be shown on local TV.

To the editor: In reaction to the Nov. 11 issue that contained T. W. Budig’s story on the Vikings’ visit to the Burnsville/Lakeville Chamber of Commerce luncheon on Nov. 8, I offer the following solution to the Vikings’ stadium debate. The NFL can totally fund the newly proposed Vikings football stadium (regardless of its final location in Minnesota) without public financing. The Vikings TV market includes areas outside of Minnesota and its taxing jurisdiction. These include the eastern Dakotas, northern Iowa, western Wisconsin DENNIS CUMMINGS and southern Canada be- Eagan

                               



High school graduates offer money-saving advice by Joe Nathan THISWEEK NEWSPAPERS

Here’s an early holiday present to young people that can save you and your family thousands of dollars. Really. Please take 10 minutes to read “One Year Outâ€? at http://press. collegeboard.org/releases/2011/content/ new-college-board-research-86-youngamericans-believe-college-essential. This is a survey of 1,507 young people who graduated from high school in 2010. Students were interviewed either by phone, or by an online survey. They were carefully picked to represent 2010 high school graduates from around the country. Hart Research Associates did the study for a national group, the “College Board.â€? Among other things, the College Board produces national college entrance tests and Advanced Placement courses. To begin with, 76 percent said the year after they graduated from high school was either good (42 percent) or great (34 percent). The vast majority (74 percent) enrolled in some form of education after high school. Forty-three percent enrolled in a four-year program, 25 percent entered a two-year program, and 6 percent entered a training program. Here’s where the potential moneysaving advice starts. • More than half of students who went to a two-year college (53 percent) and 56 percent of those who did not enter a program wished “they had worked harder in high school.â€? • Thirty-five percent of those entering a four-year college/university agreed. • More than half (55 percent) said the biggest challenge moving from high school to college was financial. • Thirty-nine percent of the 1,507 young people had taken an Advanced Placement or International Baccalaureate course. Of those, who had taken either kind of course, 83 percent said the courses were more difficult, and 82 percent reported that they were more worthwhile compared to other courses

they took in high school. • Eighty-six percent agreed that earning some form of degree after high school is “worth it.â€? How can this advice save you money? It’s no surprise that college costs are a challenge for many families. But throughout Minnesota, there are a variety of ways to earn free college credit while you are still in high school. There are many options – from taking such courses in your high school, to taking them online, to taking them on college campuses. Taking these challenging “Dual Creditâ€? courses, as recent college graduates suggest, gives you two advantages: • You can earn free college credit. • You make it less likely that you will have to take a “remedial courseâ€? in reading, writing or math. More than onethird of Minnesota’s recent high school graduates who entered a public college or university here had to take such a course, which costs money but does not count toward a college degree. More than half of recent Minnesota high school students who entered a public two-year program had to take a remedial class. If you’d like to see brief YouTube videos with Minnesota students who have taken Dual High School/College Courses, please check out our website: www. centerforschoolchange.org/dual-credit. The website also has other information about these courses. We’ve been able to do these videos with help from the Minnesota Department of Education. Most Minnesota families and teenagers work hard for their money. Listening to the recent high school graduates in “One Year Outâ€? will allow you to make much better use of your time and money. Joe Nathan, a former public school teacher and administrator, directs the Center for School Change, Humphrey Institute, University of Minnesota. He can be reached at jnathan@umn.edu. Columns reflect the opinion of the author.

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BURNSVILLE OFFICE 12190 County Road 11 Burnsville, MN 55337 952-894-1111 fax: 952-846-2010 Office Hours: 9:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. M-Th, 9:00 a.m. - 3:00 p.m. Friday


THISWEEK December 2, 2011

Season of giving lasts yearround for Farmington business Valmont Industries focuses on giving to local community by Laura Adelmann

the Rambling River Park. “I think it’s the right thing to do,� Morris said of the company’s plans and its dedication to helping the community. “The community needs your help more when times are hard,� Morris said. “Times are a little tight for us too, but we’re trying to do what we can.�

THISWEEK NEWSPAPERS

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Laura Adelmann is at laura. adelmann@ecm-inc.com. Photo submitted

Valmont Industries employees Jim Blomgren, left, and Jacob Moravec rolled up their sleeves to donate during one of Valmont Industries’ recent blood drives. The company regularly holds blood drives at its site and has embraced a corporate culture that celebrates serving others in the community. blood drives annually. This year, the events have yielded 75 pints of blood. Steve Berg, a Valmont technical customer service representative and the blood drive coordinator, said holding the events at work is convenient for employees and reinforces the corporate culture of giving. “It’s a good opportunity to help others within their community in a relatively easy way,� Berg said. Valmont Industries employees also can be found

ringing bells at Econo Foods in Farmington and lining up at Eagan’s Feed My Starving Children to help hand-pack meals specifically formulated for malnourished children. Morris said Valmont leadership encourages employees to offer ideas for ways the company can help the community. Thanks to one employee’s efforts, the company has already committed to donating flag and light poles to Farmington’s veterans memorial project, anticipated to be located in

Local area blood drives scheduled in December The American Red Cross will sponsor the following blood drives. For more information, call 1 (800) 448-3543 or 1 (800) GIVE-LIFE or visit www. redcrossblood.org. • Dec. 7, 1 to 7 p.m., Community Center, 13885 S. Robert Trail, Rosemount.

     

• Dec. 7, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., Ames Construction, Inc., 2000 Ames Drive, Burnsville. • Dec. 8, 1 to 6 p.m., Mt. Olivet Assembly of God, 14201 Cedar Ave. S., Apple Valley. • Dec. 9, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., Sister Rosalind Massage and Chiroprac-



tic Center, 14623 County Road 11, Burnsville. • Dec. 10, 9 a.m. to 2 p.m., Nelson Chiropractic, 14321 Nicollet Court, Burnsville. • Dec. 15, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m., Family of Christ Church, 10970 185th St. W., Lakeville.

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At one Farmington business, the season of giving lasts year-round. Valmont Industries, manufacturer of street, light and flag poles, has embraced a culture of giving that is primarily directed to serving others in Farmington, the community where one of its branches operates. “Our people take pride in giving back to the local community,� said Jim Morris, general manager of the national company’s Farmington plant. This year, the branch’s 116 employees participated in Farmington’s pond and park clean-up day, directed traffic during the military family picnic, and with 99 percent employee participation, raised 1,559 pounds of food for the local food shelves. Thanksgiving week, the company distributed vouchers for free turkeys to its employees, and 26 of them donated their voucher to 360 Communities, a local service organization. The company kicked in an additional $1,000 to help feed those in need over the holidays. At the Farmington site, the company holds three

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6A

December 2, 2011 THISWEEK

Jensen/from 1A to ensure Lakeville had a proper parks system. “Dad always felt strongly about the parks in Lakeville,� Matasosky said. Jensen’s son-in-law, Jack Matasosky, CEO of Appro Development, said Jensen’s dedication to Lakeville during those crucial early years was inspirational. “A lot of those early benefits have paid off for the community over the years,� Jack Matasosky said. “Bob’s commitment to the community always had an incredible impact on me, even before I met and married his daughter.� Jensen served in the Minnesota House for four terms (1975-78, 1983-84 and 1987-88). When he was in the Legislature he emphasized the importance of transportation and the environment, in addition to serving on the veterans affairs committee. Jim White Sr., owner of White Funeral Homes, represented the Lakeville area with Jensen as DFLers during the mid-1970s. The two would carpool together. “Bob was respected by all of his colleagues,� White said. “He was honest. When Bob gave his word, you knew that it was good.� Jensen has also been lauded for his devotion to his constituents. Jack Matasosky remembers visiting Jensen’s office as his fatherin-law was explaining to a lobbyist why he was voting against a bill. “It was not because he disagreed with the lobbyist,� Jack Matasosky said. “It was because that was the voice of the people he

represented. He had a great degree of integrity.� Jensen’s passion for proper transportation infrastructure was notable. Sarah Matasosky remembers when Jensen was trying to get his colleagues to understand the need for a Cedar Avenue bridge to the south metro that could handle large-scale traffic. The other legislators were not sold on the need for a new bridge. “He scheduled a meeting south of the river so the legislators would have to drive out there during rush hour,� she said. “He had no trouble getting a bridge after they had to make that trip.� Jensen was born Oct. 29, 1928, to Axel and Alma Jensen in Minneapolis. They raised him and his siblings on a farm south of Buck Hill. He married Bernice Pahl on Sept. 21, 1948. In 1949 they started their family and began farming in New Market. In 1957 the Jensens moved to Lakeville and started a large dairy farm near Flagstaff Avenue and 179th Street. They raised 10 children on that farm. In 2001, they sold it and moved to Rosemount into a townhome. They would spend winters in Mesa, Ariz. Although Jensen was actively involved in politics and local organizations such as the Knights of Columbus and the Lions, and was a full-time dairy farmer, family came first. Jack Matasosky said Jensen spent a great deal of time with his children and grandchildren. Sarah Matasosky said her father expected the best out of everybody, but also expected the best out of himself.

“He wouldn’t take ‘no’ for an answer,� she said. “If something was broken, he wanted to fix it, whether it was the farm or communications with people.� This carried through until the end of his life, not only with his attendance of his grandson’s football games but also with his own funeral. “He had a pre-planned funeral,� Sarah Matasosky said. “He always liked to take care of things. He was a doer.� Jensen was preceded in death by his parents, Axel and Alma, and his son, Bernard. He is survived by his wife of 63 years, Bernice, and his children, Jane (Kirby) Smith, Ken (Patti) Jensen, Doris (Steve) Wilson, Beverly (Bruce) Rydeen, Jerry Jensen, Sarah (Jack) Matasosky, Mary (Gary) Morgan, Willy Jensen (special friend Ina Newton), Tom (Lori) Jensen, Kate (Eric) Herness, along with 19 grandchildren and 10 great-grandchildren. He is also survived by his brothers Jim (Arlene) Jensen, Vernon (Tonete) Jensen, and sister, Camilla (Stanton) Lilly. Memorials will be shared among Jensen’s favorite civic favorites, including Lakeville Parks. Memorial Mass will be at 11 a.m., Monday, Dec. 5, at Church of St. Joseph, 13900 Biscayne Ave., Rosemount with visitation Sunday, Dec. 4, from 2 to 6 p.m., at White Funeral Home, 20134 Kenwood Trail, Lakeville, and one hour prior to Mass at church.

Cuts/from 1A large.� He plans to research restructuring options next week after the City Council’s Dec. 5 meeting when the council is expected to vote on the final budget. Mayor Todd Larson said in an interview Tuesday that McKnight will look at the organization “from top to bottom� for restructuring options. “How dramatic this gets depends on what we get for fiscal disparities next year,� Larson said. Typically, the city receives $1.2 million in fiscal disparities, but this year it received about $700,000 more than it has in the past. Using the unexpected cash to fund ongoing expenses is a “dangerous practice,� McKnight said in his memo to the council. Concern has been brewing for months about the confusing formula and uncertainty surrounding fiscal disparities. City officials don’t know why they received more fiscal disparity funds this year or what to expect in the future, making it difficult to budget. Council members requested staff to arrange for an expert to explain the complicated formula to them for better budget planning. Larson said if the city receives the same amount of fiscal disparities in 2013, the reorganization changes may be phased in and “make the bite not so

Aaron Vehling is at aaron.vehling@ecm-inc.com and www. facebook.com/thisweeklive. Taxes/from 1A

Agendas ISD 194 School Board

the District Office Board Room, 8670 210th St. W., Lakeville.

Following is the agenda for the 7 p.m. Tuesday, Dec. 6, special meeting of the ISD 194 School Board in

1. Preliminary Actions a. Call to Order b. Roll Call c. Public Comment

d. Agenda Additions 2. Discussion a. Conduct Public Hearing on Proposed 2011 Payable 2012 Tax Levy 3. Additions to the Agenda 4. Adjournment

2012 and 2013, as it did in 2011. The current pension benefit level is $6,230, according to city documents. The City Council consensus at a recent work session was in favor of the increase. The Council wants to support the city’s firefighters, said Mayor Mark Bellows. The City is also looking into moving the Fire Department’s administrative offices to Fire Station Number 4, which would necessitate remodeling it. Currently, Fire Station Number 1, located across from City Hall on Holyoke

hard.â€? “What we voted on ‌ was a worse-case scenario,â€? Larson said. “And, that would be total reorganization.â€? Under the new budget plan, taxes on the average market-value home of $176,100, would increase by 1.83 percent in 2012, according to Finance Director Teresa Walters. She said taxes for a home with a market value of $193,000 would rise by 2.58 percent. Taxes on a commercial property valued at $570,200 would rise 11.23 percent instead of nearly 30 percent increases that were projected under Farmington’s previous plan. Included in Farmington’s new 2012 budget is money for sealcoating, trail maintenance, fire equipment and building maintenance. City firefighters may lease a much-needed new fire truck instead of purchasing one; options regarding that decision will be made at a future council meeting.

Budget changes

age-valued home would rise by $81, but when tax statements came out, it was discovered an inaccurate number was used in the city’s calculation. The increase would have been closer to $200 in 2012. At a Nov. 22 City Council meeting, the plan was scrapped, and the council also asked McKnight to deliver $175,000 in budget cuts. McKnight spent 15 hours over three days during the Thanksgiving weekend scouring the budget for those cuts. His recommendations are part of the new 2012 plan, and include cuts in mileage, training, repairs and utilities. McKnight also cut his own salary increase of $4,914, and obtained agreement from the city’s management team to cut estimated raises by $7,677. McKnight’s budget also cuts $16,723 in anticipated pay adjustments for other city staff. It originally proposed cutting $25,000 for a part-time position in finance, but council members agreed to fund a consultant in that role for $12,500, leaving the total amount of cuts at $162,500. McKnight repeatedly described the budget as “very, very tight,� and vowed it would be closely monitored throughout the year. “We’ll watch every line item,� McKnight said.

Farmington’s 2012 budget plans have recently undergone dramatic change. For months, the budget’s centerpiece was a plan to fund large projects through cash raised by multiple years of property tax increases instead of adding bonded debt. In 2012, the plan was to kick off with a higher increase than in later years. Laura Adelmann is at laura. At first, Walters cal- adelmann@ecm-inc.com. culated taxes on the aver-

Avenue, is the site of administrative operations. Space is tightening, however. Station Four, located on 185th Street near the water treatment facility and the police station, would provide space for growth and keep operations and administration separate, according to a memo from Fire Chief Mike Meyer. Currently, Meyer and other administrative staff occupy the first level of Station One, a hindrance to fire operations in that area because of crowding. Station One would be remodeled with updated carpeting and kitchen cabinets and counters, Appliances

would be reused. The $215,000 project was originally budgeted for this year, but Fire Department staff needed extra time to carefully consider their options, Feller said. Construction management services firm Contegrity Group, which is the firm hired to manage the Heritage Center construction, would also manage the fire department project. This would save the city money on inspection services, Meyer said in his memo. Aaron Vehling is at aaron.vehling@ecm-inc.com and www. facebook.com/thisweeklive.

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THISWEEK December 2, 2011

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Obituaries

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Age 83, of Rosemount, formerly of Lakeville, died Nov. 27th surrounded in prayer at The Lodge hospice in Burnsville following his battle with colon cancer. Known for his dedication to community, Bob served the greater Lakeville area as Lakeville mayor, Dakota County Commissioner, and in the State of Minnesota House of Representatives. His leadership delivered infrastructure and park development during the rapid growth of the area from the 1960’s to the 1990’s. Bob was born to Axel and Alma Jensen on October 29, 1928 in Minneapolis. He was raised on a farm south of Buck Hill Ski area, formerly the site of Jackson Landscape Supply, Inc. Bob attended Orchard Lake School and married Bernice Pahl on September 21, 1948. In 1949, they started their family and began dairy farming in New Market. In 1957, they moved to Lakeville, built a large family farm and Bob became involved in local government. In 2001, they moved to Rosemount and began enjoying winters in Arizona. Bob was also active in the Optimist club, the Lions club, and the Knights of Columbus. Bob was preceded in death by his parents Axel and Alma and his son, Bernard. He is survived by his lovely wife of 63 years, Bernice and his children, Jane (Kirby) Smith, Ken (Patti) Jensen, Doris (Steve) Wilson, Beverly (Bruce) Rydeen, Jerry Jensen, Sarah (Jack) Matasosky, Mary (Gary) Morgan, Willy Jensen (special friend Ina Newton) Tom (Lori) Jensen, Kate (Eric) Herness along with 19 grandchildren and 10 great grandchildren. Bob is also survived by his close brothers Jim (Arlene) Jensen, Vernon (Tonete) Jensen and sister, Camilla (Stanton) Lilly. Memorials will be shared among Bob’s favorite civic favorites, including Lakeville Parks. Memorial Mass will be 11 AM, Monday, Dec. 5th at Church of St. Joseph, 13900 Biscayne Ave., Rosemount with visitation Sunday, Dec 4. from 2-6pm, White Funeral Home, 20134 Kenwood Trail, Lakeville and 1 hour prior to Mass at church. White Funeral Home Lakeville 952-469-2723 www.whitefuneralhomes.com

Patrick “Pat� Berdan Age 69, formerly of Sleepy Eye, died peacefully at his home in the presence of his family on Sunday, November 27, 2011. The visitation was held Thursday from 4-7 p.m. at Ballard-Sunder Funeral Home, 4565 Pleasant Street SE, Prior Lake, and one hour prior to the mass at church. The Mass of Christian Burial was on Friday at 11 a.m. at St. John the Baptist C a t h o l i c C h u r ch , 4 6 2 5 W es t 125th Street, Savage. Pat was laid to rest at Fort Snelling National Cemetery, with full military honors. Pat was born August 2, 1942, in Minneapolis, Minn. He was later adopted by E. A. “Ted� and Ann C. (Nusser) Berdan. He grew up in Sleepy Eye, Minn. and graduated from St. Mary’s High School. In January 1960, Pat joined the U.S. Army. Pat primarily was a self-employed manufacturers’ representative. He was united in marriage to Elaine Schueller on July 2, 1966, at St. Mary’s Catholic Church, Sleepy Eye, Minn. They made their home in Burnsville, Minn., where they raised their two children, Christopher and Katie. An avid sports fan, Pat also enjoyed fishing, boating, golfing, softball, and coaching his kids’ sports teams, as well as watching football, hockey, and car racing. Pat liked to travel and a history buff especially WWII. Mostly, he cherished spending time with his family and especially his grand girls, Sophia and Kennedee. Pat will be deeply missed by wife, Elaine; son, Christopher (Manami) Berdan of Robbinsdale; daughter, Katie (Tom) Voller-Berdan of Duluth; grandgirls, Sophia Voller-Berdan and Kennedee Berdan; sister, Marnie Roberts of Tucson; sister-in-law, Donna Berdan of Nisswa; and many other loving relatives and devoted friends. Pat is preceded in death by his parents, Ted and Ann; birth father, William “Peter� Harriman; brothers, Paul and Robert Berdan. Arrangements made by Ballard-Sunder Funeral Home, Prior Lake Chapel

   

Ashton Steven Joyce

Ashton Steven Joyce was born October 21, 2011 at Abbott Hospital to Matt Joyce and Krista Tainter of Eagan. He weighed 5 pounds 5 ounces and was 19 inches long. Grandparents Steve and Sandy Joyce of Eagan, Jeff Tainter of Westby, WI, Andy and Colette Skundberg-Radtke of La Valle, WI.

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All Saints Catholic Church

Sharon “Kay� Eisma Age 67 of Prior Lake, passed away November 27, 2011 surrounded by her family. Preceded in death by son, Todd. Survived by husband, Don; children, Stephanie, Steve (Karmin), Tom (Shari), Joel (Kristen); treasured grandchildren, Nathan, Brandan, Lauren, Emily, Evan, Caleb; parents, Charles and Helen Houlton; siblings, Elaine (Chuck) Skogman, Bruce (Janet) Houlton, Doug (Sue) Houlton. Beloved wife, sister, daughter, mother and grandmother. Kay had a heart of gold and lived a life of love. A disciple of Christ she lived life to the fullest and cherished her family. She will be missed. Funeral Service, was held 11 AM Thursday December 1, 2011 Peace Reformed Church 2180 Glory Dr. Eagan. Visitation was Wednesday, November 30, 2011 from 5-8PM at White Funeral Home 12804 Nicollet Ave. S. and also one hour prior to service at church. Interment Pleasant View Cemetery. Memorial to the Center for Lung Science and Health, University of Minnesota. Additional Memorial Service 11AM Sat. Dec. 3, 2011 at United Methodist church Ireton, Iowa. Reception to follow. White Funeral Home Burnsville 952-894-5080 www.whitefuneralhomes.com

Lee William Myers

Folsom Bohmbach

Age 74 of Rosemount, MN, passed away on November 25, 2011. Lee is preceded in death by parents, Oscar and Mary Ruth Myers; brothers, Raymond “Bud� Myers and Julius Myers; and sister, Mary Myers. He is survived by his wife, Jessie “Kay�; children, Debra, Teresa, Vicki (Chuck) Jensen, Glenda (Steve) Ellingson, Brian (Debi) and Patrick; 6 grandchildren, Joshua, Lucas, Nicholas, Megan, Tyler, and Jacob; sister, Joan Fusselman; also by many nieces and nephews and friends. Mass of Christian Burial was held Tuesday, November 29, 2011 at All Saints Catholic Church, Lakeville. Interment was at All Saints Cemetery. www.whitefuneralhomes.com

Ashley Folsom, daughter of John and Cindy Folsom of Apple Valley and Nate Bohmbach son of Mick and Patt Bohmbach of Hager City, WI announce their engagement. Ashley is a 2001 graduate of Apple Valley High School and a 2005 graduate of Minnesota State University, Mankato. Ashley works at HighJump Software in Eden Prairie, as an Events & Tradeshow coordinator. Nate is a 2001 graduate of Red Wing High School and a 2005 graduate of the University of Minnesota Duluth. Nate works at Ergodyne in St Paul, as a Product Line Manager. A New Years Eve wedding is planned in Minneapolis.

Cross of Christ Community Church

19795 Holyoke Avenue Lakeville, Minnesota 952-469-4481

Forms for birth, engagement, wedding, anniversary and obituaries announcements are available at our office and online at www.thisweeklive.com (click on “Announcements� and then “Send Announcement�). Completed forms may be e-mailed to class.thisweek@ ecm-inc.com or mailed to Thisweek Newspapers, 12190 County Road 11, Burnsville, MN 55337. If you are submitting a photograph along with your announcement, please only submit photographs for which you have the right to permit Thisweek Newspapers to use and publish. Deadline for announcements is 4 p.m. Tuesday. A fee of $50 will be charged for the first 5 inches and $10 per inch thereafter. They will run in all editions of Thisweek Newspapers. Photos may be picked up at the office within 60 days or returned by mail if a self-addressed, stamped envelope is provided.

Sunday Worship

8:30am & 10:45am Education for all 9:40am Nursery available East of 1-35 on 185th Lakeville Pastor Lon Larson 952-435-5757 www.familyofchrist.com

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8748 210th St. West In Downtown Lakeville on the corner of Holyoke and 210th Street Ph: 952-469-3113 www. crossofchristchurch.org

Weekend Mass Times Saturdays at 5:00 pm Sundays at:

7:30, 9:00, 11 am & 5:30 pm

Sunday Morning Schedule

Reconciliation

Worship Service: 10:30AM Education: 9:30AM

Saturdays

8:30-9:30am & 3:30-4:30 pm

www.allsaintschurch.com

Nursery Available

Wednesday Eve 6:30 PM YOUTH REVOLUTION

A Progressive Christian Community

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Christmas Conspiracy: More Sharing

Sunday Worship Hour 10:30 AM Adult Education 9:30 AM

9:30a Contemporary 10:30a Blended

(Children’s Education during Worship)

Nursery/Children/Youth 9:30am & 10:30a

17671 Glacier Way

SE Corner of Cedar & Dodd, Lakeville

spiritofjoymn.com

952.469.PRAY (7729) www.crossroadschurch.org

   

                       

   

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“A place to discover God just as you are�

Not Your Usual Church

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Age 81 of Burnsville passed away November 24, 2011 at her home. Betty Lou (Henderson) Koentopf was born to Alf and Eleanor Henderson in Minneapolis on June 15, 1930. Betty graduated from Lakeville High School in 1948. It was there she met Virgel and it was love at first sight. They were married October 22, 1949, renewed their vows on their 60th wedding anniversary, and were blessed to celebrate their 62nd wedding anniversary this past October. Betty was a homemaker, and also worked as a secretary for many years. She last worked with Virgel as his marketing secretary for CJ Sales until they retired in 1998. Betty played the piano beautifully and had a song for every occasion. She loved many things such as music and dancing, and was very talented with crafts, needlepoint, and gardening. Betty enjoyed playing cards with family and friends and was very involved with her church. She had a wonderful sense of humor and wit. Betty and Virgel have six children, twenty grandchildren, and six great-grandchildren. They made time for everyone and were very involved with their children and grandchildren. Betty was always putting others first, and was the most caring and forgiving person to all who knew her. She was a loving wife, mother, grandmother, sister, daughter, aunt, and friend. Betty was courageous in her battle with cancer. She never complained and was strong in her faith. Betty was an inspiration to many, and will be greatly missed. Preceded in death by her brother, Robert Henderson. Survived by her husband, Virgel; children: Kathryn Herbert, Karen Rose, Keith (Teresa), Kimberly (Bryan) Olson, Konstance (Ted) Hill, Kirsten (Tim) Skalsky; 20 grandchildren; 6 great grandchildren; brother, Ronn (Glenice) Henderson; also by other loving relatives and friends. Memorial Service, was 11am Wednesday, November 30, 2011 at Hosanna! Lutheran Church (160th and Ipava Ave) Lakeville. Memorial Visitation was one hour prior to the service at church. In lieu of flowers memorials preferred to The Gideons International. White Funeral Home Lakeville 952-469-2723 www.whitefuneralhomes.com

Robert C. “Bob� Jensen

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8A

December 2, 2011 THISWEEK

Sports Standings

Tiger hockey continues to grow

South Suburban Conference Boys Basketball Team

Conference W 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Apple Valley B Kennedy B Jefferson Burnsville Eagan Eastview Lakeville North Lakeville South Prior Lake Rosemount

L 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Overall W 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

by Andy Rogers

L 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Friday, Dec 2 • Lakeville North at Edina, 7 p.m. • Lakeville South W at ayzata, 7 p.m. Tuesday, Dec 6 • White Bear Lake Area at Lakeville South, 7:15 p.m. Friday, Dec 9 • Lakeville North Chanhassen, 7:30 p.m.

Girls Basketball Team

Conference W Lakeville North 0 Lakeville South 0 Apple Valley 0 Eastview 0 Eagan 0 Burnsville 0 B Kennedy 0 B Jefferson 0 Prior Lake 0 Rosemount 0

L 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Overall W 2 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0

L 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 1 1 3

Saturday, Dec 3 • Owatonna at Lakeville South, 7:15 p.m. Tuesday, Dec 6 • Lakeville South at Lakeville North, 7:15 p.m. Friday, Dec 9 • Hopkins at Lakeville North, 7:15 p.m.

Boys Hockey Team Lakeville North Eastview Lakeville South B Jefferson Rosemount Burnsville Eagan Prior Lake B Kennedy Apple Valley

Conference Overall W L T W L T 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0

Saturday, Dec 3 • Edina at Lakeville South, 3 p.m. • Hopkins at Lakeville North, 3 p.m.

Girls Hockey Team

Conference Overall W L T W L T Lakeville North 1 0 0 2 1 0 Rosemount 1 0 0 1 2 0 Eagan 0 0 0 4 0 0 Apple Valley 0 1 0 4 1 0 B Jefferson 0 0 0 1 1 0 B Kennedy 0 0 0 1 2 1 Lakeville South 0 0 0 0 1 0 Burnsville 0 0 0 0 1 0 Prior Lake 0 0 0 0 2 0 Eastview 0 1 0 0 3 0 Friday, Dec 2 • Apple Valley at Lakeville South, 7:15 p.m. Saturday, Dec 3 • Farmington at Lakeville South, 7 p.m. Tuesday, Dec 6 • Lakeville South at Burnsville, 7 p.m. • Lakeville North at Bloomington Jefferson, 7:15 p.m. Saturday, Dec 10 • Eagan at Lakeville South, 2:45 p.m. • Prior Lake at Lakeville North, 3 p.m.

Missota Conference Boys Basketball Friday, Dec. 2 • Farmingotn at Rochester John Marshall, 7:30 p.m. Tuesday, Dec. 6 • Rochester Century at Farmington, 7:30 p.m. Friday, Dec. 9 • Farmington at Hastings, 7:15 p.m.

Girls Basketball Team

Conference W Red Wing 0 New Prague 0 Northfield 0 Shakopee 0 Chanhassen 0 Farmington 0 Holy Angels 0 Chaska 0

L 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Overall W 2 2 1 0 0 0 0 0

L 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 1

Friday, Dec. 2 • Rochester John Marshall at Farmington, 7:30 p.m. Tuesday, Dec. 6 • Farmington at Owatonna, 7:30 p.m. Friday, Dec. 9 • Farmington at Rosemount, 7:15 p.m.

Boys Hockey Team Northfield Red Wing Chanhassen New Prague Farmington Shakopee Holy Angels Chaska

Conference Overall W L T W L T 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Tuesday, Dec 6 • Farmington at Winona, 7:30 p.m. Thursday, Dec. 8 • Dodge County at Farmington, 7:15 p.m.

Girls Hockey Team Northfield Chaska/Chan Red Wing New Prague Farmington Holy Angels Shakopee

Girls hockey

THISWEEK NEWSPAPERS

Conference Overall W L T W L T 1 0 0 4 1 0 1 0 0 3 1 0 1 0 0 3 2 0 0 0 0 2 5 0 0 1 0 1 4 0 0 1 0 1 5 0 0 1 0 1 5 0

Saturday, Dec 3 • Farmington at Lakeville South, 7 p.m. Tuesday, Dec 6 • Eden Prairie at Farmington, 7:15 p.m. Thursday, Dec. 8 • Farmington at Red Wing, 7 p.m.

The Farmington boys hockey team would like to pick up where it left off last season. At one point in early February, the Tigers were on a three-game losing streak with a 9-12 record. The rest of the month proved to be exciting after winning five in a row, including a 6-1 victory at Rochester John Marshall for their first appearance in a Section 1AA semifinal. The Tigers finished with an overall record above .500 and tied for third in the Missota Conference with Red Wing. Departed after the 2011 graduation are Tyler Grubb, Dan Handberg, Zak Payne, Matt Provost, Trevor Hockert and goalie Aaron Dahl. “We have lots of scoring to replace from a year ago,” head coach Keith Revels said. “We graduated 11 from last season, three of them with double digit goal numbers. ... Even with significant graduation numbers we look to improve on 7-7 mark from last season. Would also like to at least match the first semifinal appearance in section last season.” The Tigers have 13 returning letter winners, including captains Andrew Peterson, who was the team’s secondleading scorer in 2010-11, and Blake Weinand. They will be on the ice with returning seniors Mi-

Photo by Rick Orndorf

Farmington goalie Victor Simones goes for the save against Rochester John Marshall on Tuesday. The teams tied 2-2. To view more photos, visit www.ThisweekLive.com. chael Giebel, Jake Elred, Ryan Schoening, Trevor Howard and Sean Johnson at forward along with Jack Buss on defense. Junior forwards Grand Hauswirth and Kevin Olund will see an increased role along with John Donnelly and Jason Thomas. Victory Simones is back in goal after playing nearly 1,000 varsity minutes last season.

With an experienced goaltender, strong depth at forward and on the defense, Revels feels the Tigers have many strengths as the season opens. “(We have a) hardworking and physical roster with bulk of them upper classmen,” he said. The early Missota Conference favorite appears to be the usual suspect in Holy Angels, while the relative newcomer

Lakeville South girls basketball has new leader Lakeville North looks to continue strong run of state tournament trips with wave of young talent by Andy Rogers THISWEEK NEWSPAPERS

Lakeville South girls basketball had a tough season last year. After winning its opener by 40 points over Minneapolis Henry, Lakeville South went on to lose 26 straight games. It was a young group of girls that is now a year older, more experienced and hungry for a win. “Many of the players dedicated themselves to getting stronger and worked on improving their skills this past summer and fall,” said new head coach Angie Iverson-Ohnstad. “They are hungry and are committed to turning our high school program around.” Iverson-Ohnstad comes to Lakeville from the University of Minnesota, where she was a four-year letter winner and led the nation in rebounding her junior year. She coached six seasons of basketball for Lakeville High School (later Lakeville North), but took a step back in 2006. She’s been a teacher at JFK Elementary for 12 years. “If you asked me last year at this time if I was ready to be the head coach at Lakeville South, I probably would have said that I wasn’t ready to take that step,” Iverson-Ohnstad said. “I had a very positive experience coaching with Andy Berkvam and Lakeville North, so I knew that I would eventually get back into coaching, just not this soon and not as a head coach.” When the position opened up, her husband, Mitch, encouraged her to give it a shot. “I felt that since our life at home really revolves around basketball, I felt confident about getting back into it,” Iverson-Ohnstad said. “It has been a lot of hard work, but very much worth it. I am having a terrific time. The basketball community at Lakeville South is very supportive.” She’s hoping to groom hard-playing, tough-minded and aggressive ball play-

ers. “I want my players to go into each practice and game ready to go to battle,” Iverson-Ohnstad said. “I also want my players to be very fundamental, which is something that they worked very hard on during the off season.” The Cougars are led by seniors Maddie Turbes and Baylee Meier and junior Bree Meier, all whom have been part of the varsity program for a few seasons. They know that the South Suburban Conference is tough. They hope to rise to the challenge this time around. “We will compete hard every game, every possession,” Iverson-Ohnstad said. The concern is several varsity minutes will be played by sophomores. The Cougars will count on Grayson Schroeder, Libby Swanhorst and Maddie Wolkow to play significant minutes. Just because they’re from the sophomore class, doesn’t mean the Cougars won’t compete. Since 6-foot-4 sophomore Kaitlyn Quandt played B-squad last year, she has improved after a terrific summer of AAU competition. “She will be a key player this year for us,” IversonOhnstad said. “We have a lot of sophomores who will see significant minutes playing this year.” The plan has worked so far. The girls won their season-opener 68-26 over Faribault on Tuesday. A big test will come Tuesday with a homecoming of sorts to Lakeville North.

Lakeville North As one of the most successful programs in Minnesota the past two years, the Lakeville North girls basketball team hopes to make that three. After winning the Class AAAA state title in 2010 and coming home with the bronze last season, the Panther squad has taken a serious hit thanks to graduation.

to the field, Chanhassen, has a strong roster. During early scrimmages against northeastern Minnesota clubs, the Tigers defeated Eveleth, Virginia and Proctor, allowing just one goal in each game. In the season opener, Farmington tied with Rochester John Marshall 2-2 with goals by Peterson and Olund and assists from Andy Rogers is at Donnelly and Hauswirth. andy.rogers@ecm-inc.com.

South’s new girls coach, Darwitz, excited over team’s prospects Lakeville South boys hockey armed with scoring talent by Andy Rogers THISWEEK NEWSPAPERS

Coming off one of the best seasons for any team in Minnesota, the Lakeville South girls hockey team is in a bit of a transition. Lakeville South won the conference title and qualified for the Class AA state tournament last season, but the girls lost several key members to graduation, including Chelsea Laden, Sam Moore, Morgan Fritz-Ward and Mara Post. The Cougars also have a new coach, who hopes to keep the team on the winning path. She happens to be one of the best players in women’s hockey history. Natalie Darwitz has taken over the Cougars team. She’s well versed in the world of South Suburban girls hockey, having played for Eagan and coaching as an assistant for the Wildcats between playing for the University of Minnesota and in the Olympics with the USA National Women’s Hockey team. She knows hockey, but taking over as a head coach has been a unique experience. “Being the head coach, a lot more is on your plate and it is ultimately your responsibility how the program is going,” Darwitz said. She has Dani Buehrer, KK Naasz, Tori Bailey and Ari Reid back on the ice after playing key roles in last season’s state tournament run. Darwitz feels the team has good speed and is willing to compete, but she admits it’s a young team with several eighth- and ninth-graders playing varsity. The goal is to get a little better every game. The Cougars’ early-season schedule isn’t easy. They started with a 2-1 loss to Edina, which was ranked No. 3 in the state in the preseason Let’s Play Hockey poll. The Cougars skated to a 1-1 tie going into the third period thanks to a goal by Reid. Goalie Taylor Gustafson stopped 32 shots. The girls tied No. 13 Lakeville North before Thanksgiving, 2-2. South earned its first win of the season with a 1-0 Andy Rogers is at victory over No. 12 North andy.rogers@ecm-inc.com. Wright County last week and Star players from the last two seasons Rachel Banham (Minnesota), Cassie Rochel (Wisconsin), Apiew Ojulu (Marquette), Hannah Hughes (St. Thomas) and Jaya Perkins (University of Minnesota at Crookston) are now playing basketball in college. Two key members of their state tournament title victory remain – Kenzie Hoelman, who plans on playing college basketball at Northern Illinois next season, and Taylor Stewart. Coupled with Simone Kolander, who played a vital role last season, the Panthers have speed and basketball smarts on their side along with an army of enthusiastic players. “We realize we graduated a lot of talent,” said coach Andy Berkvam. “I have six seniors that are anxious to prove they are solid basketball players and they have waited patiently for their turn. If we can get everyone going in the same direction and players accept their roles on the team, we will have a great year. We have the same high expectations.” Cassie Berkvam, Caroline Sjoberg, Erika Moede, Amanda Goodman, Lindsey Erstad, Allie Miller, Taylor Augustine and Rachel Ganske all saw the court during the Class AAAA state tournament last March. The team won’t have the height advantage they’ve had in the past. Another concern is depth off the bench. One plus is that the Panthers have the ability to play multiple defensive styles. “(The goal is to) compete for the conference, section and state championship,” Berkvam said. The Panthers have won 34 straight conference games, and they’re going for a new school record of 40 (set from 2001-03). The Panthers will play their sixth conference game on Jan. 10 against Eagan.

Few teams in the state went on a run like Farmington at the end of last season. The Tigers were 8-5 after finishing their own holiday tournament at the end of 2010, but went on to win 12 of 13 games and won the Missota Conference title leading up to the Section 1AA final against Lakeville South. That’s when Farmington’s season came to an end with a 6-2 loss, one game short of state. The Tigers went that far thanks to the positive play of Krystal Baumann and Hannah Alexander, but they both graduated after scoring 71 of the team’s 98 goals. The strength this year lies with the defense with Jessica Erchul back in goal and defenders Betsey Anderson, Katie Burgess and Molly Friedlund. The Tigers started the season with a 2-1 win against Rochester Mayo on Nov. 10, but lost four games to Hastings 3-2, Rochester Mayo 3-1, Chaska/ Chanhassen 8-1 and Wayzata 1-0. Haley Doll, Chloe Batta, Katelyn Burgess, Michaela Tonsager and Grace Gavin will try to make up the goals lost to graduation. Batta leads the team with three goals and Doll has one goal and two assists.

defeated Owatonna 6-2 on Monday. “We have battled with two top teams in the state and the girls are working hard and ready to compete,” Darwitz said. The girls will play host to Apple Valley on Friday and Farmington on Saturday.

Boys hockey The Cougars fell one long overtime game short of qualifying for the state tournament last season, losing to Lakeville North 2-1 despite outshooting the Panthers 5232 in the Section 1AA final. Lakeville South plans to advance at least one game further this time around. The Cougars return their top scorers – Justin Kloos, Alex Harvey, John Wiitala and Michael Chuinard. Kloos and Harvey are two of the top five returning scorers in the state. Charlie Heller and Joe Freemark join Harvey and Kloos as team captains. The team should be able to score. The question remains who will stop the other team from scoring. Tyler Schumacher and Hunter Ziniel are expected to anchor the net, but neither has much varsity experience. They will get some help from junior defenseman Cameron Jackson. “We do have a lot of talented returning players,” coach Kurt Weber said. “As with any year, it is important for everyone to find their role on the team and contribute at the highest level they can. Just because we have some talent doesn’t mean we will be successful. We need to work hard, work together and come ready to play every night.” The Cougars will kick off the season this weekend when Edina, the No. 6 ranked team by Let’s Play Hockey, comes to town for a 3 p.m. Saturday showdown. If that isn’t difficult enough, No. 2 Eagan is up next on Dec. 10. Other top 20 teams loom, including Burnsville, White Bear Lake, Bloomington Jefferson, Apple Valley, Eden Prairie and Hill-Murray. Andy Rogers is at andy.rogers@ecm-inc.com.


THISWEEK December 2, 2011

9A

Nor-Tech’s high performance Burnsville company evolves from parts sales to sophisticated computing systems by John Gessner THISWEEK NEWSPAPERS

The brand-new digital sign in front of Mystic Lake Casino is controlled by a high-performance computing system designed and built by Burnsville firm Nor-Tech. A Nor-Tech supercomputer helped Boeing analyze 170 distinct noise readings from an aircraft under development. The company, which started as a high-volume computer components dealer but now makes most of its profits from high-performance clusters and supercomputers, has even done business with DARPA, the Defense Department’s hightech development arm. “We’ve sold them to MIT,� said Todd Swank, Nor-Tech’s vice president of marketing. “We’ve sold multiple units to the University of Minnesota, the University of Wisconsin.� With 48,000 square feet of manufacturing, warehouse and office space on Cliff Road in north Burnsville, Nor-Tech (short for Northern Computer Technologies) isn’t the same

company that opened in smaller Cliff Road quarters in 1998. Nor-Tech still sells computer parts and builds its own line of personal computers under its Voyageur brand. But it’s the really hightech stuff that has helped the company make its mark and improve its bottom-line performance. “That’s where we’ve exploded in the last five years,� Nor-Tech President David Bollig said. Bollig used to sell computer hardware for Bloomington-based Globelle Inc., which closed in late 1997 – due in part, he said, to an ill-fated acquisition of another company. “Basically, there was a lot of inventory in that transaction that became dated very fast,� Bollig said. “Within a year of that acquisition, Globelle was going from becoming this huge, up-andcoming national distributor to bankruptcy court.� Bollig picked up where Globelle left off, launching Nor-Tech with 17 employees, eight of them Globelle refugees.

“We started out doing the exact same thing – we brought in computer components and we were selling them to mom-and-pop stores all over the Midwest,� Bollig said. His customers were computer resellers and repair shops. But the parts business took a hit from online competition, and his company lost pricing power, Bollig said. “It was difficult selling just the parts,� he said. “It became harder and harder, and the margins were thin.� In 2000 Nor-Tech created the Voyageur line of desktop PCs and servers, while continuing to sell parts. The computers featured namebrand components such as Intel motherboards and Seagate hard drives. “We chose to spend more to build a better product,� Bollig said. “In the end, that helps you.� The company’s next breakthrough was its acquisition of a company called Reason Computers, which sold machines to end-user customers including schools and hospitals. In 2004 NorTech merged its operations

with Reason’s, shuttering that company’s Minneapolis office and combining the two companies at Nor-Tech headquarters at 901 E. Cliff Road. “With their expertise behind us, I knew we could take it to another level,� Bollig said. Nor-Tech installed Reason’s engineering guru, Dom Daninger, as its vice president of engineering and began designing highperformance computing systems tailored to specific tasks. “We’re still using standard components,� said Swank, who, like Bollig, also worked at Globelle. “But to tie them together really takes some high-end engineering.� Standing behind NorTech has been Bollig’s partner and the company’s majority owner, Texas businessman David Chang, a former customer of Bollig’s at Globelle. Bollig calls him “the money dude� who has made the necessary capital injections at critical times. “We were just a middleman selling parts,� Bollig said. “That’s what we did.

Photo by John Gessner

David Bollig, left, president of Nor-Tech, and Todd Swank, vice president of marketing, are pictured in the company’s assembly area at 901 E. Cliff Road in Burnsville. But there was no margin.� Company sales peaked at $30 million when the main business was parts sales, Bollig said. Today, he puts annual sales at “north of $25 million.� “Margins were thinner, though,� in the early years, he said. “We’re more profitable now than we were then. And the fact that we’re

continuing to grow during a recession, we’re excited about.� Nor-Tech employees have another reason to cheer: Their company is one of few its size with an onsite child care. John Gessner is at john.gessner@ecm-inc.com.

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REACH NEARLY 1 MILLION HOUSEHOLDS! �� ��� ���� � �������� �������� �� �������� ���� ����� �� ������ �� �������� � ������� ���������� ���������� ������ ����� ��� ��������� ���������� ������� ���� ����� ��� �� ����� ����� ��������� ���� ������ ������� ��� �������������� ��� ���� ����������� ���������� � �������� ���������� �� ���� ���� ����������� �� ��������� ������� ���� ������� �� ������������� ������

MISCELLANEOUS: SHARI`S BERRIES - Order Mouthwatering Gifts! ��� ������� ������������ ������� ����� ����������� ������� ���� ������ ���� ���� �� ������� �� ���������� ����� ���� ���� ����� ������������������������ �� ���� �������������� ������

Personalized holiday gifts for Everyone �� ���� ����� ���� �� ������� ��� ���������� �������� ���� �������� ���������� �� TO INVESTIGATE OTHER ADVERTISING ������ ���� ������ ����� ���������������� ���� ���������� �� ����������������� �� ���� �������������� OPPORTUNITIES � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � ������ ������������������� ������ PROFLOWERS- Looking for a Holiday Gift that will really impress? ������� ����� HEALTH: Canada Drug Center is your choice for �� ������� ��� ���������� ����� ���� ��� ���� safe and affordable medications. ��� � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � �������� �������� ���� ����� �������� ���� � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � ������� ��� ���� ������� �� �� �� �� ���� �������������� ������ ���� �� ��� ���� ���������� ������ ���� ����� ������������ ��� ������ ��� ���� DISH Network. Starting at $19.99/month ����� ������������ ��� ���� ��������� ������ ���� �� ������� ����� �������� ���� ��� � ������� ����� � ��� ����� ���� ��� VIAGRA 100MG and CIALIS 20mg!! �� ������������� ���� � ������������ ������ ����� � ���� ��� ���� ���� �� ���� ������������ �������� ��������� ���� SOCIAL SECURITY DISABILITY BEN� � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � EFITS. ��� ��� �� ��� �� �������� ���� ���� ���������� ������ ���� ������ ��� �������������� ������ ����������� ���� ��� ���� ���� ���� � ATTENTION DIABETICS with Medicare. ������������� ������������ ������ ��� � ���� ������� ����� ��� �������� ������� �������� �� �� ����� ���� ���� ATTENTION SLEEP APNEA SUFFERERS ���� ��������� ���� �� ���� ���� ����� ������ with Medicare. ��� ���� ���� �������� � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � ���� �������� �� �� ����� ���� ���� ���� ��������� ���� �� ���� ������� ��� ���� ������������ ������ ����� ��� ��������� ���������� ���� ������������ ������ GENERAL HELP WANTED: H E L P W A N T E D ! ���� ����� � ���� ������� ��������� ���� ����� ���������� ������� ���� ��������� �� ���������� ��������� ����� ������������ ��������� ����������������� ����� �� ��� ������

MISCELLANEOUS: Wrap up your Holiday Shopping ���� ��� ������� ����������� ��������������������� ����� ������ � ���� �� ������� ���� � ���� ������ �� ������� ��������� ���� ������� ����� ����� ������������ �� ��������������������������� ��� ���� �������� ������

Full-Time or Part-Time

CASH FOR CARS: ��� ����������� ������� ������� �� ���� ��� ������ ����� �� ���� �� ���� ��� ����������� ���� ��� ������� ������ �������������� ������

Full-Time or Part-Time

��������� ����� ����������� ������������

AUTO: DONATE YOUR CAR, TRUCK OR BOAT TO HERITAGE FOR THE BLIND. ���� � ��� ��������� ��� ����������� ���� ������� ��� ��������� ����� ���� ��� ������������ ������

���� �������� ��������� ���� ���

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��� �� �� ����� ������������ ����������� ������ �������� ��� �������� ��� � ������ �� ��� Minnesota State Colleges & Universities System.

������ ���� ��� ����������� ������������

Part-Time

� � � � � � � � � � ����� ������ ���� ���� ������� ��� � ���� ����� ����� ������� ������ ������� ������ ������������ ������������

Mystery Shoppers

���� �� �� ���� ��� ���� ���������� �������� ������ �� ����� ������ ��� ������ ���������� ������ ���� ��� ����

888-912-1676

����� ���� ��� ���� �� ��� ���������������� ����������� ������������

Holiday Help

��� ���������� �� ��� ���� ����� ����� ���������� �������� ���������� ���� ������� ��� ���� ���� ���������� ������ ���� ���� 952-746-8999

Apt. Caretaker Couple Wanted-PT

Live on site at Apple Valley apt complex. Duties include cleaning, snow removal, assisting manager. Will train. Must have excellent work history/ references, and qualify for apartment. Full bkground check. Call between 9am-3pm M-F only for details & phone interview.

952-431-6456

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��������� ����� ������ ����� ���������� ����� �� ���������� ��������� ������ �� ������� ����� ������ ����� ���� ��������� �������� ��� � ����� ���������� ������� �� ����� ���� ���� ���� ����� ������� �������

Healthcare Transition Coordinator

South Central College �������� ����������� ������� ��� ������ ������������� �������� ������� ��� ��� ������ ���� �������� ������ ��������� ������ ������ ��� ���������� ���������� ������������� ��� ��������� ���������������� ������� ���������� ��������� ������������ �������� ��� ��������� ������������ ��� ��������� ��� ����� ��� ���������� ���������� ��� �������������� ��� ����� ������ �� http://www. southcentral.edu/human -resources/jobs-board .html ��� ����� �� �������� � �������������� ���������� Closing Date: December 2, 2011 � ������ �� ��� ��������� ����� �������� ��� ������������ ������ An Affirmative Action Equal Opportunity Employer/Educator

����� �� ������� ����� ������� ��� �����

Thomas Allen Inc.

Program Counselor

������ ������� ���� �� ���� ����������� ����� ���� ���� ��� �� ���� �� ��� ������� � ����� ������� Hours: � � � � � � � � � � �������� �������� ���� ���������� ����� ������ ��������� ���� ���� ���� ������ ������������ � ���� ���� ������� ���� ������������� ������������ ��������� ��� ���� ������

Email resume:

Khristah@ thomasalleninc.com visit us at www. thomasalleninc.com

Full-Time or Part-Time

�� ��� ���� ��� ��

Administrative Assistant

Residential Home Seeking PT CNA Flexible hours. Elko, MN 952-461-2197

�� ������� ��� � PT/FT Admin. Asst. ���� ����� ���� ���� ���� ��������� ���������� ����� ��������� �� ������� ���� �� �������� �������� ���� ����� ��� ���������� ��������� ���� ������� ��� ����������� ������ �� ����� �� ����������� ����� ����� ��� ���� ��������� ������ ����� ����� ������ � ����� ��� ���� ������� Send resume to employment@ mackin.com

Administrative Assistant/ Customer Service Representative ��������� ���� �� �������� ���� ��������� ������������� ��� �������������� ������ ������ ������� ������� ��� ���������������

����� ��� ������

�� ������ ���� ���������� �������� � ���������� ������� �� ����������� ���������� ���� ����� �� ��� ������� ���� �� ���� ����� ���� ����� ����������� �������� �� ������ ���������� �������� ��� ����������� ���������� �� ���� �� ����������������������� ������ �������� ����� �� �������� �� ������ � ���������� �� � ������� ����� ��� ��� ���� ����������� ��� ��� ����� � ������� ���������

���� �� ��� ��� ����� �������� ��� ��� ���� ������ � ������ ����������� � ������� ���� ��� �� ���������� �������� ����������� �� �����

������ ����� ������������������� ��������� �� ��������� �������� ��� ���� ���� ������������ ��� � ����� �� �������� �������� �� ����������� �� ����� ���� ����� ��� ��� ����� ������� �� �� ������������ �� ������ ���������������������� ������

Mackin Educational Resources

Full-Time or Part-Time

������ ���� �� ���� ��� ����������� ������������

���������� ������������� �������� ������� �� ��������� ��������� ������������ ��� ��� ��������� ����������

�� ����� ����������� �������� � ����� �� ��������� ��� � ���� ����� ��������� ���� �����

I am looking to contract dependable and responsible adults to deliver the Star Tribune newspaper in the Burnsville/Savage areas in the early morning hours. There is a $100 incentive available after 4 wks of route delivery. Profit potential is from $400 to $800 per month. For more information contact John @ 952-895-1910.

Star Tribune

Motor Routes

�������� � ������� ��������� ��� ����� ������ ������ ���� ���� �������� ������� ��� ���� ��������� ���� �� �� �� ������ �������� ����� �� ���� ���� ���������� ��������� ��� ������ ����� ����

Thomas Allen Inc.

Program Counselor(s) Richfield

������ ������� ���� �� ���� ���������� � ����� ������� ����� ����� ����� Position #1: ����� ������ ���� ��������� ��� ���������� ��� �������� OR Position #2: ��� ������� �������� �� �������� �������� ���� ������ ����� ������ ������ ���� ������� ���� ������ �������� ������������ ���� ������� ���� �� ���� �� ���� ������

Email resume: Suew@ thomasalleninc.com

visit us at www.thomasalleninc.com

��������� ����� ����������� ������������

651-322-7179

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�������� ������� �������� ������������ ��� �� ������ ���� ����������� ���� �������� �������� ��� ���������� ������ ���� ���������� �� ��� ������ ���� �������� ��� ����� ������� ���� ������� �� ���������� ����� ������ ���� ���� �������� �������� ��� �� ������� ��� ��� ������� ������ ������ ���� �� � ��������� ������ ����� ��� ����� �������� ���� �� �������� ��� ��� ��������� ������� �������� �� ���� ��� �������� ��� ��������� ��� �� ����� ������� ������ ����� ������������������������ �������� ������� �� �� ����� ����������� �������� ��������� �� ���������� ������� ����������

NAR-PT- Night Shift �� ��� ������� � ������� ��������� �� ����� �� ��� ������ ������� ������� ��������� ������ ������� ��������� ��������� ���� ����� ����� ��������� ������� ������ ���������� ��� ������������ ����� ���������������� ���� �� �� ��� ��������� ���������

Dietary Aide PT-Evenings ������ ������� ����� ���� ������������ ������� � ��������� Trinity ������ �� ����������� ������������ ������� �� �������� �� � ��� � ��������� ���� ������

Please apply at:

TRINITY CARE CENTER 3410 213th Street West Farmington, MN 55024 Or send resumes to:

mpomroy@sfhs.org ������

Place an ad day or nite! �������������������� Full-Time or Part-Time

Houseaides PT/FT Community Assisted Living

�� ������� ��� PT/FT Houseaides �� ���� �� ��� ��� ����������� ���� ������ ���� �� ��� ������� �� ����� ������� �� ���� �������� �� �������� ��� ����� ����������� ��� ������ ������� ��� �������� �� ���� ���� �������� ��� ������� ����� �������� ������ ���� ���������� �� ����������

Call 952-440-3955 for application address.

Full-Time or Part-Time Parts Dept.

Looking for Person to Work in Heavy Equipment Parts Dept. ���� ���� �������� ������� ������ ������� ������� �� ��� ��������� � �������� ��� ������� ��� ��� ���� �� ��� Wage starting at $10/hr.

Tom 952-469-3456

HHAs/CNAs

Live-in, hourly, and overnight positions! Must have CNA and HHA experience. Drivers license, vehicle, and auto insurance required. $12.50-$15/hour or live-in starting at $160/day.

Baywood Home Care 651-699-5070 763-546-8899

��������� ���������� ����������� ��� ����������� � ���� �� ���������� ����� ������� ��� ������� ������ ���� �� � ���������� ������ �������� ���������

�������� ����������� ���������� ������ �������� �������� �������� ��� ����������� ��������� ��� ��� ���������� ������� ���� �� ���� �� ���� ���� �������������� ������ ��� ����� ���� �� � ��������� ��������� ��� ���������� �������� ��� �� ����� ������� ������ ����� ������������������������

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Part-Time

Looking to earn extra money

Burnsville

Full-Time or Part-Time ����������� ������������

Part-Time

�������� ������� �� �� ����� ����������� �������� ��������� �� ���������� ������� ����������

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������ ����� ������������������������� ��� ������� ������� ��� �� �������� �� ������ ������������ ��������� �������� � ������� �� �� ����� ����������� ��������

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������� � ���� ������ Apts & Condos

Houses For Rent

Apts & Condos

��� ���� ������ ��������� ��� �� ���� ��������� �� ������� �� ��� ���� ������� ��� ����� ����� �� ������� �� ��������� ���� ���������� ���������� �� ��������� ������ ����� �� ����� ������ ����� ����� ���� ��������� �������� ���� ���� �� �������� ������� �� �� ���������� �� ���� ��� ���� ����� ������� ���������� �� ����������� ������ �������� ������ �������� �������� ����� ��� ��� �� �� ���� ��� ���� ������� �� ����� �������� ���� �������� ������ ��� ������ �������� ������� �� �������� ����� ��� ���� ��������� ���� ��� ����� ����� ������ ��� ����������� ��� ���� ������ ����� �� �� ��������� �� ��� ���� ��� ������� ��� ������ �������� ���� ��� ��������� �������� ����� �� ���� ��������� ��� ������ ���� �� �� ����� ����������� ������ �� �������� �� ����������� ���� ���� ��� ��������� �� ��������������� ��� ��������� ��������� ������ ��� ��� ������� �������� �� ���������������

Farmington

Effic Apt Avail 11/1 $495/Mo.

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651-332-2340 or 612-722-4887

fairviewapartments farmingtonmn@hotmail.com

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RENTS START AT

1BR $685 2 BR $775

Rosewood Manor 14599 Cimarron Ave. Rosemount

651-423-2299

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Drywall Ken Hensley Drywall

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Electrical & Plumbing

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HELP WANTED ���� ���������� ������� ����� �� ������� �������� ���� ���� �������� ������� �������� ����� ������� �� �������� ����� �� �������� ������� ��� ����� ��� ����� ������ �������� ���� ������������ MISCELLANEOUS FOR SALE ���� ������� ���� �������� ���� �������� ���� �� ��� ����� �������� �������� �� ������ ��� �� ������ ���� ����� ����� ��������������� ������������ ������ ���� ��� �������� � ��� �������� ������ ����� ���� ������� � ��������� ��� �� �� ������ � �� �������� �������� ������ �������� ������ ���� ����� ��� � ���� ������������ MISCELLANEOUS ���� ���� ������� ���� �������� �������� �������� �������� ������� �������� ���� ��� ������� �� ������������ �� ������� ������� ����� �������� � ����� ������� ���� ��� ������������

WANTED TO BUY ������ �������� ���� ������ ��� ����������� ����� ����� �� �� ������� �������� ����� �������� ������� �������������� �������������������������� Reader Advisory: The National Trade Association we belong to has purchased the above classifieds. Determining the value of their service or product is advised by this publication. In order to avoid misunderstandings, some advertisers do not offer employment but rather supply the readers with manuals, directories and other materials designed to help their clients establish mail order selling and other businesses at home. Under NO circumstance should you send any money in advance or give the client your checking, license ID, or credit card numbers. Also beware of ads that claim to guarantee loans regardless of credit and note that if a credit repair company does business only over the phone it is illegal to request any money before delivering its service. All funds are based in US dollars. Toll free numbers may or may not reach Canada.

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12A

December 2, 2011 THISWEEK

Thisweekend â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Nutcrackerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; returns to Burnsville PAC Experience Elvis Twin Cities Ballet of Minnesota presents the Christmas classic Dec. 9-11 Twin Cities Ballet of Minnesota has found magic in its new home at the Burnsville Performing Arts Center. The nonprofit dance group, formerly known as Lakeville City Ballet, is run by Rick and Denise Vogt of Lakevilleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Ballet Royale dance studio. They moved their flagship holiday production of â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Nutcrackerâ&#x20AC;? to the Burnsville venue in 2010 after several years of staging the show at Lakeville South High School. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The whole theater experience â&#x20AC;&#x201C; for the dancers, producers and audience â&#x20AC;&#x201C; has been tremendous,â&#x20AC;? Rick Vogt said of the move to the 1,000-seat Performing Arts Center. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The move was to better reflect the quality and level the show has achieved.â&#x20AC;? The cast of approximately 120 in this yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s show consists of professional dancers and ballet students, the bulk of whom hail from Ballet Royale. Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll be presenting â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Nutcrackerâ&#x20AC;? five times over three days, Dec. 9-11. Tickets range from $12 to $26 and are available at the box office and via Ticketmaster at (800) 982-2787 or ticketmaster. com. More information about the production is at Carly Fredericks and Rachel Schwartz, both 14 and TwinCitiesBallet.org. of Lakeville, rehearsed their roles in â&#x20AC;&#x153;Nutcrackerâ&#x20AC;? on â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Andrew Miller Tuesday at the Ballet Royale studio in Lakeville.

File photo

Photos by Rick Orndorf

More than 100 dancers, both ballet students and professionals, have a part to play in Twin Cities Balletâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Nutcrackerâ&#x20AC;? production.

The Burnsville Performing Arts Center has announced it will host â&#x20AC;&#x153;Hope is Alive,â&#x20AC;? an Elvis tribute concert and silent auction to benefit St. Jude Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Research Hospital, on Saturday, Jan. 21. The concert will feature The Elvis Experience (above), the father-and-son duo of Steve and Tommy Marcio, whom south-of-the-river audiences may remember from their hip-swiveling, lipcurling performances at Burnsvilleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Wednesdays in the Park summer concert series. Tickets for the Jan. 21 event are $21 and can be purchased at the Performing Arts Centerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s box office and through Ticketmaster at (800) 982-2787 or Ticketmaster.com.

â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Beeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;

Photo submitted

Chameleon Theatre Circleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s production of the musical comedy, â&#x20AC;&#x153;The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee,â&#x20AC;? will be Dec. 2-18 at the Burnsville Performing Arts Center, 12600 Nicollet Ave., Burnsville. Tickets are $20 at the box office ($17 for seniors, students, audio description patrons, and groups of eight or more). Tickets are also available from Ticketmaster by phone at (800) 982-2787 or online at Ticketmaster.com.

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THISWEEK December 2, 2011

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Thisweekend theater and arts briefs Monroe Crossing to perform in Lakeville

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Coupleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 1,550-mile hike featured In April 2010, Mike Link and Kate Crowley, a local retired couple, set off from Duluth on a 145-day, 1,550mile hike around Lake Superior. The couple will share their experience, including stories of people they met and the wilderness they explored in an effort to preserve freshwater from 11 a.m. to noon Saturday, Dec. 10, at Galaxie Library, 14955 Galaxie Ave., Apple Valley. For more information, visit www.dakotacounty.us/ library or call (952) 891-7045.

13A

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Bluegrass and gospel quintet Monroe Crossing will perform at 7:30 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 3, at the Lakeville Area Arts Center. Tickets are $18 in advance or $20 at the door. Tickets are available at the Lakeville Area Arts Center, 20965 Holyoke Ave. For tickets or additional information, call (952) 985-4640.

theater and arts calendar Concerts Lorie Line â&#x20AC;&#x153;Christmas Bells are Ringing!â&#x20AC;? will perform Dec. 2 at 7:30 p.m. and Dec. 3 at 3 p.m. at the Burnsville Performing Arts Center, 12600 Nicollet Ave., Burnsville. Tickets are $47 at the box office, by calling (800) 982-2787 or at ticketmaster.com. The Allegro Choral Academy will present its winter concert, Hallelu, at 7 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 3, at Shepherd of the Valley Lutheran Church, 12650 Johnny Cake Ridge Road, Apple Valley. Tickets are $8 for adults and $6 for seniors/children. Children under 12 are free. Information: www.allegroca.org. Bluegrass and gospel quintet Monroe Crossing will perform at 7:30 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 3, at the Lakeville Area Arts Center. Tickets are $18 in advance or $20 at the door. Tickets are available at the Lakeville Area Arts Center, 20965 Holyoke Ave., (952) 985-4640. The Dakota Valley Symphony will present â&#x20AC;&#x153;Amahl and the Night Visitorsâ&#x20AC;? at 2 p.m. Sunday, Dec. 4, at the Burnsville Performing Arts Center, 12600 Nicollet Ave., Burnsville. Tickets range from $5 to $15 and can be purchased at the box office, by calling Ticketmaster at (800) 982-2787 or at ticketmaster.com. The South Metro Chorale will present its Christmas concerts at 7:30 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 10, at All Saints Catholic Church, 19795 Holyoke Ave., Lakeville, and at 2:30 p.m. Sunday, Dec. 11, at St. John the Baptist Catholic Church, 4625 W. 125th St., Savage. Tickets are $10 for adults, $8 for students/seniors at (612) 386-4636 or south_ metro_chorale_tickets@yahoo. com. Eagan Women of Note will hold their winter concert at 4 p.m. Sunday, Dec. 18, at Peace Church, 2180 Glory Drive, Eagan. The concert is free, but a $5 per person donation is requested. Information: www.eaganwomenofnote.org. The BoDeans will perform at 8 p.m. Friday, Dec. 30, at the Burnsville Performing Arts Center, 12600 Nicollet Ave., Burnsville. Tickets are $39 and $42 at the box office, all Ticketmaster locations, by phone at (800) 745-3000 and online at ticketmaster.com. Theater Chameleon Theatre Circle will present â&#x20AC;&#x153;The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Beeâ&#x20AC;? Dec. 2-18 at the Burnsville Performing Arts Center, 12600 Nicollet Ave., Burnsville. Tickets are $20 at the box office ($17 for seniors, students, audio description patrons, and groups of eight or more), from Ticketmaster by phone at (800) 982-2787 or online at ticketmaster.com.

   

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The Allegro Choral Academy will present its winter concert, Hallelu, at 7 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 3, at Shepherd of the Valley Lutheran Church, 12650 Johnny Cake Ridge Road, Apple Valley. Tickets are $8 for adults and $6 for seniors/children. Admission for children under 12 is free. Additional information and upcoming audition information can be found at www.allegroca.org.

Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Castle Theater will hold auditions for the musical â&#x20AC;&#x153;Peter Panâ&#x20AC;? from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Monday and Tuesday, Dec. 12 and 13, at the Lakeville Area Arts Center, 20965 Holyoke Ave., Lakeville. The script includes more than 60 singing roles for ages 5 and older as well as a handful of non-singing roles. Visit www.childrenscastletheater.com or email childrenscastletheater@gmail. com for more information.

 

The Lakeville Area Arts Center will host its annual Holiday Art Sale from noon to 5 p.m. Friday, Dec. 9, and 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 10. The sale will remain open through Dec. 16 during business hours. As part of this sale, the pottery studio will sponsor an â&#x20AC;&#x153;empty bowlsâ&#x20AC;? fundraiser. Potters have donated their time to produce approximately 60 soup bowls, which will be available at a suggested donation of $8 each. All proceeds will go to 360 Communities food shelf. The Lakeville Area Arts Center is located at the corner of Holyoke Avenue and 210th Street. For more information, call (952) 9854640.

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14A

December 2, 2011 THISWEEK

â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;BabyLoveâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; brings local families together New birth and child-care education center aims to support new moms by Jessica Harper THISWEEK NEWSPAPERS

Photo by Jessica Harper

Erin Stertz-Follett plays with her 8-month-old daughter, Evelynn, at BabyLove where she attends classes and a nursing momâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s groups.

The 34-year-old mother of two said she was intrigued by the centerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s small class sizes. No more than 10 mothers can register for a class. â&#x20AC;&#x153;With my first child we took hospital classes, and it wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t a terrible experience but too specific to the hospital,â&#x20AC;? she said. Stertz-Follett said she appreciates that the centerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s educators provide objective information. Sara Gumke, another client, said she enjoys the support she gets from both owners and moms at BabyLove.

County seeks input on local greenways Area residents are invited to an open house to review and provide comments on two future greenway corridors in Rosemount and Empire Township. The open house is scheduled 6 to 8 p.m. Thursday, Dec. 8, at Rosemount Community Center, 13885 S. Robert Trail, Rosemount. Input from the open house will help shape the future of the Rosemount Interpretive Greenway from Lebanon Hills Regional Park to Spring Lake Park Reserve and the Mississippi River

â&#x20AC;&#x153;They are good about reassuring you that you are not the only one,â&#x20AC;? she said. The 29-year-old firsttime mom said she also likes that BabyLoveâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s nursing momâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s club fit well in her busy schedule. These experiences are what Jacobsen and Kubricky were hoping for when they opened BabyLove. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We wanted to create a place where parents could learn and grow,â&#x20AC;? Jacobsen said. The only challenge so far, she said, has been in marketing the center. It was Jacobsenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s own ex-

Frederickson reaps conservation kudos Local conservation organization Friends of the Minnesota Valley has awarded its 2011 Carlson-Minge Award to Dennis Frederickson, a longtime Minnesota state senator from New Ulm and currently southern regional director for the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources. Named in honor of former Gov. Arne Carlson and former Minnesota U.S. Rep. David Minge, the CarlsonMinge Award is given to a current or former elected official, public figure, or public employee who has demonstrated outstanding leadership on the conservation of natural resources within the Minnesota River Watershed.

Regional Trail and the Vermillion Highlands Greenway from Lebanon Hills Regional Park to the Vermillion River. Staff will be on hand to answer questions and give information on alignment alternatives, design character, habitat restoration and interpretive themes. The two greenways are part of a planned 200-mile county-wide greenway network. For more information, visit the project website at www.hkgi. com/projects/dakota.

Farmington Briefs Bake & take cookie classes offered

Saturday, Dec. 3, and at 2 p.m. Sunday, Dec. 4. Performances will be held in the auditorium at Farmington Area Community Education will Boeckman Middle School, 800 Denmark Ave. Tickets offer Bake & Take Cookie classes from 6 to 9:30 p.m. are $8 for adults and $5 for Dec. 9, 15 and 16 at Dodge students and senior citiMiddle School. Cost is $39. zens and are available at the door. The play is not recomRegister for a class online at www.farmingtonce.com mended for young children. or call (651) 460-3200 for information.

Roundbank donates to food shelf

FHS to present â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;The Savage Dilemmaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; The Farmington High School Theatre will present â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Savage Dilemma,â&#x20AC;? a mature comedy about friendship and reality, at 7 p.m. Friday, Dec. 2, and

Roundbank of Farmington made a $400 donation to the Farmington Food Shelf for this yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Thanksgiving meal baskets. The financial donation helped buy the food ingredients needed for a Thanksgiving meal for 50 area families.

periences as a new mother that inspired her to become a certified doula in 2007. While in labor with her first child, Jacobsen became frustrated with the hospital staffâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s bedside manner. â&#x20AC;&#x153;There was no support from the doctor or nurses,â&#x20AC;? she said.â&#x20AC;?I decided I wanted to be the person I needed as a first-time mom.â&#x20AC;?

  

The Farmington Library will host the following childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s programs: â&#x20AC;˘ Monday, Dec. 5, ages 3-12, 1 to 2 p.m., Polar Bear Sculpture with Abrakadoodle. Registration required. â&#x20AC;˘ Monday, Dec. 5, 3:30 to 4:30 p.m., Wii Games for Teens. â&#x20AC;˘ Thursday, Dec. 8, 3:30 to 5:30 p.m., Omiyage Fabric Crafts for Teens. Registration required. These library programs are free. The library is at 508 Third St., Farmington. For more information, call (651) 438-0250.

 

   

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PUBLIC NOTICE Credit River Township Board Meeting Monday, December 5, 2011, 6pm Agenda Call Meeting to Order, Pledge of Allegiance 1 Approve or Amend Agenda 2 Consent Agenda 1) November 7 & November 21, 2011 Board Meeting Notes 2) October 2011 Treasurerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Report 3) November 2011 Developerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Escrow Statements 3 Open Forum 4 Old Business 1) Territory Remaining Work Agreement 2) MAT Annual Conference Report 3) 2012 CSTS Budgets and Contract 5 New Business 1) P.L.A.Y. field usage, Credit River Parks 2) Clerk Appointed Position 6 Technology Report 1) Communication and Website 2) Security System 3) Clerk Computer 7 Road Report 8 Engineerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Report 1) Creekside Circle road improvement 2) Lynn, Monterey and 207th Street 3) Consider Krieger Encroachment Agreement 4) Request to excavate pond at 18540 Legends Club Circle 5) Final acceptance of Thoroughbred Acres 6) Brekke Update 7) Boone and Highpoint Pay Estimate 9 Treasurerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Report 1) Transfer Funds 2) GASB 54 Policy / Resolution 3) 2012 Budgeted Revenues/ Expenditures 4) Gopher State One Call Update 5) Merchants CD 6) Audit Update 7) Escrow Update 8) CSTS Cash on Hand 9) Vacation Time 10 Review and Pay Bills 11 Adjourn 2837005 12/2/11

earliest years,â&#x20AC;? she said. Jacobsen was the one who inspired Kubricky to become a doula after she coached Kubrickyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s first child birth. Kubricky trained with DONA, an international doula association, in 2010 and is awaiting certification. She is a certified childbirth educator. For more information on Jacobsen, Kubricky or BabyLove, visit www.BabyLoveMN.com or call (651) 200-3343.

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Richfield moms Erin Stertz-Follett (left) and Sara Gumke bring their infants to BabyLove in Eagan every Tuesday morning for the centerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Baby Cafe, a support group for nursing mothers. Each group is overseen by BabyLove owners Veronica Jacobsen (right) and Brittany Kubricky (not pictured).

Over the following years, the Richfield resident coached countless numbers of mothers and earned certifications in childbirth education, lactation counseling and child-seat safety. Jacobsen taught various classes for the next three years at hospitals, while continuing to serve as a doula. Jacobsen said the most rewarding aspect of being a doula and child-care educator is the opportunity to support mothers during a life-changing experience. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s wonderful to be with them from pregnancy through birth to the childâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s

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For the past four years, Veronica Jacobsen has become intimately acquainted with countless families as a birthing coach and prenatal and neonatal educator. Yet Jacobsen felt she couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t provide the kind of one-on-one support she desired in her classes at area hospitals. â&#x20AC;&#x153;With a hospital, you donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know who will be teaching the class or what it will be like,â&#x20AC;? she said. Most classes were taught by different educators to large groups of parents in an auditorium, and Jacobsen wished to created a more intimate setting. Last September she and fellow doula (birth coach) Brittany Kubricky achieved this goal by opening BabyLove, a birth and child care education center at 4590 Scott Trail in Eagan. The independentlyowned center offers childbirth, breast-feeding, baby care and safety classes. All classes are taught by Jacobsen or Kubricky, and the cost between $40 for car seat safety to $165 for Lamaze. Jacobsen noted that some health insurance providers will pay for Lamaze classes, which provide education in natural child birth. The center also hosts workshops and free momsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; groups. BabyLove client Erin Stertz-Follett said she heard about the center from Jacobsen, who served as her doula.

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