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www.SunThisweek.com

Farmington | Lakeville April 27, 2012 | Volume 33 | Number 9

Special Section

Arts centers

coexist in south metro

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Home & Garden special section Spring in Minnesota means it is time to turn one’s attention to projects around the house. Inside today’s edition

Opinion Charitable gambling deal Minnesota Legislature should allow electronic pulltabs and bingo to help fund Vikings stadium. Page 4A

news DanceWorks at 25 Lakeville-based DanceWorks has been teaching a variety of styles since November 1986. Owner Ann Proudfoot details the trials and tribulations of owning one’s own dream. Page 6A

sports

The Lakeville Area Arts Center (left) and Burnsville Performing Arts Center have coexisted in the south metro for the past three years.

Opportunities to see national acts and for local, emerging artists to blossom by Michael Ricci Sun Thisweek

Two Dakota County cities prove that there is more than one way build, operate and define an arts center’s role in the community. The 11-year-old Lakeville Area Arts Center turned a church into a community gathering place for performances, special events and classes, while the three-year-old Burnsville Performing Arts Center is banking on national entertainment to fill its revenue stream and its place in the arts scene. Because of the way the two arts center projects were launched and supported by municipal governments, they have different relationships with their communities.

In Brief

Larry Werner, Sun Thisweek general manager and editor, writes today about how the arts enrich the lives of children. Page 4A

Photo by Rick Orndorf

Photo by Rick Orndorf

The Lakeville Area Arts Center targets much of Much of the interaction at the Burnsville its programming on workshops and classes for Performing Arts Center is between artist and patron. local residents to be involved in creating art. The embattled $20 million Burnsville project was opposed by one Burnsville City Council member and vocal local residents every step of the way, while city leaders cooperating with residents was key to Lakeville’s success. Following a year of deep deficit, in 2011, the Burnsville center’s operating losses totaled more than $275,000 – about $115,000 less than the more than $392,000 loss that was budgeted for the year. “I am very pleased with the direction the BPAC is going financially and with its programming,” said BPAC executive director Brian Lu-

ther, who was hired in October 2011 to become the center’s third leader. “We plan to continue this in the future.” While the city contracts with Iowa-based VenuWorks to operate the facility, Friends of the BPAC, a volunteer and fundraising organization, supports the center. The organization raised more than $400,000 in cash and in-kind donations from citizens, foundations and businesses during the center’s construction. See Arts, 22A

Lakeville’s K-9 unit celebrates 25 years Dogs are key part of police work

Panthers top Cougars, 2-1

by Aaron M. Vehling

The Lakeville North baseball team continued its winning ways with a 2-1 victory over its crosstown rival. Page 16A

thisweekend

Photos by Rick Orndorf

Sun Thisweek

Photo by Aaron Vehling

Lakeville City Council Member Matt Little participates in a police canine unit demonstration at the Lakeville Police Department K-9 unit’s 25th anniversary celebration Friday, April 20. Little wore a special sleeve so Shadow’s bite could not hurt his arm. Shadow’s handler, Officer Chad Loeffler (right), initiated and ended the dog’s bite with verbal and non-verbal commands.

Lakeville Mayor Mark Bellows ran a short distance before a German shepherd jumped and bit his arm. Not long after, Council Member Matt Little’s arm also found a home in the canine’s mandible. In each instance, the dog, Shadow, held onto the arm tight until his handler, Officer Chad Loeffler, told him to let go.

But all was well – Bellows and Little each wore a special glove and suffered no injuries. It was all part of a demonstration. It has been 25 years since Dakota, partnered with Officer Tom Hakala, became the first dog in the Lakeville Police Department’s thennew K-9 unit. The department celebrated the milestone Friday, April 20, with demonstrations from Zeus and Shad-

ow, the current police dogs, and a short reception at the police headquarters. “These are exceptional animals,” Police Chief Tom Vonhof said. “They are very much a part of the team.” There have been seven police dogs in those 25 years, including Shadow and Zeus, who is paired with Officer Jason Jensen. “You’ve built up an inSee k-9, 24A

Cedar transitway hits A downtown spring another roadblock CD brings vets ‘Home Again’ An album of songs by local musicians about the modern veteran experience is being offered at this year’s Scoops for Troops. Page 14A

Index Opinion. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4A Announcements . . . . . . . 9A

BRT operations likely to be delayed until spring, 2013

by Laura Adelmann Sun Thisweek

The wait for Dakota County’s long-planned Bus Rapid Transit system is going to get a little longer. Instead of a November debut, the station-tostation shoulder-operating busway likely won’t be operational until spring, 2013. And, the system may be even further delayed if Apple Valley and the county do not agree on design ele-

Public Notices. . . . . . . . 10A Sports . . . . . . . . . . . 16-17A Classifieds. . . . . . . . 18-21A

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In Brief

Transitway planning marches on despite delays. Page 23A

ments for stations at 140th and 147th Streets. Apple Valley officials want raised walkways over Cedar Avenue at those stations as part of the initial project construction, while Dakota County has eliminated them from the plans until ridership grows to justify the expense. During a contentious Regional Rail meeting April 24, county commissioners expressed frustration at the delayed opening and Apple Valley’s demands for skyways. Dakota County Board Chair Nancy Schouweiler said at a recent meeting with county and city offiSee Cedar, 24A

Photo by Robyn Wright

Spring was in full bloom in downtown Lakeville Wednesday, April 25, creating a natural sanctuary in Pioneer Plaza.


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April 27, 2012 Sun Thisweek

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Gerster Jewelers victim of break-in

Sun Thisweek April 27, 2012

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Police increase downtown patrol after smash-and-grab heist

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by Laura Adelmann

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A group of three or four thieves shattered the front glass door of Gerster Jewelers on April 19, demolished glass display cases and grabbed handfuls of merchandise, escaping within minutes. Farmington police responded four minutes after the 10:23 p.m. store alarm sounded, but even with the assistance of its canine unit, found the crime scene abandoned and the floor covered in broken glass. “They ran up and down and smashed every one of our display cases,” said store owner Jim Gerster Jr. “Someone ran up the back and someone ran up the front and another was holding the bag.” Farmington Det. Sgt. Lee Hollatz, who described the break-in as a “smash and grab,” said early estimates of damage and merchandise lost is $100,000. Jewelry missing included gold chains, rings, earrings and bracelets. Gerster said all the store’s most valuable pieces and customer jewelry was kept secure in the safe, which was not breached. Hollatz said police believe the thieves are professionals. Gerster said there have been similar jewelry store break-ins recently around the Twin Cities, including stores in Eagan and Apple Valley. Although neighboring bars and restaurants were open at the time of the break-in, there were no witnesses to the theft. The Gersters are work-

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Jim Gerster Sr. is surrounded by broken glass after a Thursday night break-in at the Gerster’s Jewelry store owned by his son Jim Gerster Jr. An insurance representative is photographing the extensive damage. ing with their insurance company to cover the damage. A board was placed over the front door until a new, more secure replacement arrived Wednesday, and Gerster said even after thorough cleaning and shampoo all carpet must be replaced. “There’s glass all over it,” Gerster said. “The glass dug its way deep into the carpet. I can see glass sparkles everywhere.” Hollatz said the police are still investigating the incident and increasing patrols in the downtown area. Farmington Business Association president Clyde Rath said business community members are concerned about the incident and the loss the Gersters suffered. “I think everybody was pretty surprised by it all,” Rath said. “They are concerned obviously that they were able to come in there that quickly and do as much damage as they

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did, and we’re concerned for the Gersters in having their loss,” he said. Rath said there is a heightened awareness among business owners to be more alert and aware of the people and activities downtown. Gerster’s Jewelry store has operated in Farmington since 1920 and has been in its current location since 1961. The only similar incident Gerster could recall was years ago when someone broke in and stole a watch, Gerster said. Days after the theft, Gerster said he felt violated and expressed anger at the loss of freedom he felt. “I thought this was Mayberry RFD, the safest place in the world,” Gerster said. “But it doesn’t matter, you can’t hide from the bad guys no matter where you go.” Laura Adelmann is at laura.adelmann@ecm-inc. com or facebook.com/sunthisweek.

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Opinion

April 27, 2012 Sun Thisweek

The arts enrich the lives of children in powerful ways by Larry Werner sun Thisweek

When I was growing up in small-town Michigan, my mother was offered a handme-down accordion after cousin Billy got a new one. She asked me whether I would take accordion lessons, an offer I politely declined, and I’ve regretted that decision until this day. I love the arts but never took lessons in a musical instrument, in singing, in painting or any other artistic pursuit, but I’ve seen the power of art in the lives of my children and others. Whether it was in the beautiful rendition of “You’ve Got a Friend” that my older son sang to his wife at their wedding, or the excellent education my younger son received at an art charter school after he couldn’t find success at mainstream schools, I’ve seen the difference art can make in the lives of kids. And in Dakota County, the opportunities are everywhere for children to succeed as artists, even if they can’t succeed as athletes or scholars. No one knows that better than Helen Peterson, who has spent her career teaching young people to play musical instruments. She is director of the Minnesota Valley Conservatory of Music and Kindermusik of the Valley in Burnsville. While expressing optimism about her thriving private businesses that provide musical instruction to youth, she is distressed by cutbacks in music programs in the public schools. “It opens the brain and calms the body,” Peterson said about music in the basement office of an old mansion that is home to her businesses and other arts organizations. “Music touches every part of the brain.” Later in the day, she would be teaching a music-appreciation class to toddlers and their parents. No, she isn’t teaching babies how to play the piano, but she is letting them feel the

Sun Thisweek Columnist

Larry Werner

rhythms of music while parents rock them and massage them. She believes that a child who hears a musical piece when very young will retain some memory of it when he or she hears it later in life. That familiarity, Peterson believes, breeds a comfort with music that helps kids learn reading, writing, math and other life skills. “I think the arts – whether visual art, music arts or dramatic arts – put math, science, the social sciences into context,” she said. She said jazz helps us understand the events of 1920s America. And musical beats, she said, are mathematical. Music students tend to learn other disciplines, such as math, more easily, she said. So she offers Kindermusik movement and music classes to children from newborn to 6 years of age at the building on River Ridge Circle overlooking the Minnesota River. And in her other business, the Minnesota Valley Conservatory of Music, she offers instruction to older children and adults in a dozen instruments. She also teaches in a North Minneapolis outreach program, where she sees the calming effects of art on the at-risk youth who live there. “Children learn that music is something they can use to work through emotions and to control their emotions,” she said. Peterson, who took over the conservatory of music after its founder, Scott Winters, couldn’t keep it going while he was dealing

Photo by Larry Werner

Helen Peterson, director of the Minnesota Valley Conservatory of Music and Kindermusik of the Valley in Burnsville, knows the value of teaching young people to love music.

with other business issues at the old mansion he tried to turn into a center for the arts. Because she was operating her Kindermusik franchise down the hall from the conservatory, she decided to try to keep both businesses going. Both are now profitable, proving to her that there is great demand for music education in Dakota County. Despite that demand, she said, music programs are being cut back as school districts wrestle with funding issues. “It breaks my heart,” she said, “to see how much music is being dropped out of schools.” She mentioned cuts in music programs in Lakeville, where she lived before moving to Savage, and the threat to the arts as the financial pinch forces cuts in other local school districts. Getting back to my two sons, I think about the gift their artistic skills have made in their lives. For Eric, who is 36, music was an activity

that he pursued in addition to athletics. He was captain of the soccer team at Edina High School, but he also sang in the school choir, and he now uses his singing voice at weddings – his and his sister’s in recent years – and in bars equipped with karaoke machines. For Zack, who is 21, art played a more crucial role when he was young. Zack had soccer skills, but his attention deficit disorder made it difficult for him to comply with the directives of coaches and to coordinate his play with teammates. His teachers tried to be patient with him, but large classrooms and homework made it impossible for Zack to succeed in the Lakeville schools. During one of his most difficult times, in fourth grade, he agreed to try out for a play by Giant Step Theatre, which is run by Pete Martin, the longtime, now retired, director of community education in Lakeville. Zack, like so many young people, didn’t fit in on the athletic field. But he found his place at ARTech charter school in Northfield, on the stage of Martin’s Giant Step and in welding classes at Dunwoody Institute, where he learned the skills he needed to become a metal artist. We tend to salute the people who teach our kids to hit a baseball and kick a football, and they are to be thanked for their efforts. But it’s just as important to thank the Helen Petersons and Pete Martins of our community, who teach our children the value of art, which, Peterson says, is more than a sidelight for kids. “It’s a way of knowing,” she said. Larry Werner is editor and general manager of Sun Thisweek and the Dakota County Tribune. He can be reached at larry.werner@ecm-inc. com. Columns reflect the opinion of the author.

Charitable gambling deserves the break Hope for a Vikings stadium deal this legislative session waxed and waned this week, the result of irresolute or ornery legislators who seem to reflect the conflicted views of their constituents. But the rush to assemble a stadium funding package did expose a problem that deserves fixing, with or without a stadium package. Minnesota’s charitable gambling outlets have fought high taxes and dwindling receipts for years. Under a stadium deal forged in the House of Representatives, the charities got much of the relief they sought, and the state got its source of annual stadium debt payments from increased charitable gambling revenues. The deal allows charities to add electronic pulltab operations wherever they operate traditional paper pulltabs. Gamblers would play out of the same “jar,” whether tearing cardboard tabs or touching images on the screen of a portable device kept inside the venue. The deal also allows electronically linked bingo, which would allow play within a single tavern or through a network of digitally con-

ECM Editorial nected bars and restaurants. If the games offer an 85 percent payback to players, number-crunchers at the Minnesota Gambling Control Board estimate, they will add $72 million a year to charitable gambling activity in the state. The stadium deal splits that down the middle — $36 million to the state for debt payments, and $36 million to the organizations in the form of tax relief and reform that would cut their tax bills by an average of 29 percent. Among the tax changes is a switch to taxing gross gambling receipts instead of taxing net receipts. It’s not a perfect stadium solution. It may fall $6 million short right off the bat, and if expanded gambling revenue is less than forecasted, backstop measures such as a stadium seat-licensing fee and a ticket tax would kick in. “If I had it to do over again, I wish nobody had ever suggested we be tied to a stadium,” King Wilson, executive director of Allied Charities of Minnesota, told the ECM

Editorial Board. But someone did suggest it — DFL Senate Minority Leader Tom Bakk, Wilson said — because it seemed a politically viable way in a shrinking menu of options to raise the state’s share of stadium funding. Charitable gaming is fighting years of erosion. During its early boom phase, the industry was hit with an abrupt tax increase that helped balance the state budget but, Allied Charities says, has never been revisited. State gambling taxes on charities jumped from $26.85 million in 1989, the year the tax was raised, to $52.63 million in 1990. Allied Charities also blames the smoking ban, a lowered threshold for drunken driving and the Great Recession for driving down business. Gross receipts for charitable gambling peaked in 2000 at $1.48 billion (before prizes paid to players). By 2009, they had fallen to slightly less than $1 billion. The number of charitable gambling operations has fallen in recent years from 1,800 to 1,200, Wilson said. The erosion is felt in local communities. People have differing views about whether

gambling money should go to public purposes, but in the case of charitable gambling, the benefits are some of the most visible and most taken for granted. Charitable gambling helps pay for fields, for dugouts, for park equipment and police gear. About 30 percent of charitable gambling proceeds in Minnesota go to local governments, according to Allied Charities. Wilson said 95 percent of what his organization in Columbia Heights gives away goes to the school district and the city recreation department. The stadium package and the charitable gambling solution deserve a final look before the 2012 Legislature limps home. If legislators have another go at the stadium in 2013, charitable gambling should remain on the table. The high-drama politics may not be what Wilson wanted, but the exposure may help him gain what his members and their communities deserve. This editorial is a product of the ECM Editorial Board. The Dakota County Tribune and Sun Thisweek are part of ECM Publishers Inc.

Letters Enough with the stadium threats To the editor: Is it just me, or are there others out there who are sick of hearing about the Vikings stadium? At a time when some school districts have buildings in need of repair, and families don’t have money to pay for food or car repairs, Gov. Mark Dayton threatens us to build a stadium or lose the Vikings.

As an “old mother,” I know I learned if you put a baby in the playpen against that child’s wishes, the child will cry and scream to get out. If you wait and hold your own, the child will adjust to the toys within and quiet down and be happy with the situation. As a taxpayer I say hogwash to Dayton. I don’t like his threats. Let the big time (and highly paid) sportsmen build their own stadiums throughout our

USA. Does the governor want a future generation of men in their 40s whose bodies are already suffering the effects of the rough sport, or does the governor want to plan a future generation of scientists, social workers, musicians, etc. Think. ELIZABETH SCHREINER Lakeville

Letters to the editor policy Sun Thisweek welcomes letters to the editor. Submitted letters must be no more than 350 words. All letters must have the author’s phone number and address for verification purposes. Anonymous letters will not be accepted. Letters reflect the opinion of the author only. Sun Thisweek reserves the right to edit all letters. Submission of a letter does not guarantee publication.

Laura Adelmann | FARMINGTON NEWS | 952-894-1111 | laura.adelmann@ecm-inc.com Aaron Vehling | Lakeville NEWS | 952-846-2056 | aaron.vehling@ecm-inc.com Andy Rogers | SPORTS | 952-846-2027 | andy.rogers@ecm-inc.com Mike Jetchick | AD SALES | 952-846-2019 | mike.jetchick@ecm-inc.com Managing Editors | Tad Johnson | John Gessner Publisher. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Julian Andersen President. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Marge Winkelman General Manager/Editor. . . . . . . . . Larry Werner Farmington/District 192 Editor. Laura Adelmann Lakeville/District 194 Editor. . . . . Aaron Vehling

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National Day of Reason offers alternative To the editor: On Thursday, May 3, while Christians prostrate on the Capitol steps in St. Paul for the National Day of Prayer, the Minnesota Atheists will be celebrating the National Day of Reason inside the Capitol’s rotunda at noon. The celebration is open to the public and we welcome all who are interested. The National Day of Reason is celebrated by secular organizations throughout the nation on the first Thursday in May as a collective response to the National Day of Prayer. This is also a day that we highlight religious-based unconstitutional practices, policies, and referendums such as the anti-GLBT marriage amendment on this November’s statewide ballot. While it may be true that the texts of Abrahimic religions (Christianity, Islam, and Judaism) forbid GLBT sexual relationships, we can take comfort that we do not live in a Christian nation where the Bible dictates our lives in the bedroom. John Adams left little doubt about religion’s role in our government when he and Congress ratified the Treaty of Tripoli

in 1797 which clearly indicates that “the United States of America is not, in any sense, founded on the Christian religion.” It’s also important to note that the framers of our Constitution carefully made no mention of God or Jesus in our nation’s most sacred, law giving document. Our godless Constitution was written by men of science and reason who valued the teachings of Spinoza, Locke, and Hume. It is due to their devotion to reason, not Jesus, that the framers wrote “Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof.” Most atheists and many people of faith agree that our nation is strengthened when we preserve the Jeffersonian wall between religion and government. Both institutions are cheapened when one overreaches into the other. Whether you’re tired of impressionable children being led by their public school teacher to pledge their allegiance to a nation “under God” or policy makers making an overt display of prayer, you can respond by actively celebrating reason every day with the Minnesota Atheists. ERIC JAYNE Apple Valley

Editor’s note: Jayne is associate president of Minnesota Atheists

Stingy legislators To the editor: A letter from parents about the proposed reduction for a school schedule caught my eye. Reduced buying power in a local school district is forcing the district to make suggestions that reduce time in school, a concern for parents. This forced reduction in class time is necessitated by the stinginess of a state Legislature bent on forcing funding to come from the local school district rather than from the state level. This extreme ideological stance punishes our children, and change a hopeful future to one that is, at best, only mediocre. Minnesota used to have a national reputation as a leader in education funding. No longer is that so. Local economists bemoan it, school districts are expected to “do more with less,” and parents are concerned. Nothing moves the decision makers. Legislators, some of them educators themselves, need a wake-up call that may not be able to be delivered until November. JUDY FINGER Apple Valley


Sun Thisweek April 27, 2012

5A

Roundabout delayed; senior fees could increase No more circuses across Interstate 35, has working people in their 50s es. for Lakeville Arenas by Aaron M. Vehling committed $75,000 in an can use the center’s hun- This was an era before Official cites desire to not offend

tightly that they can’t move and denying them veterinary care. “PETA commends Lakeville Arenas for taking a stand against cruelty to animals, public endangerment and violations of federal law,” said PETA Foundation Director of Captive Animal Law Enforcement Delcianna Winders in a statement. Ratcliff said that though PETA provided some key information that contributed to the board’s decision, ultimately the decision rested on the viability of circuses as entertainment for the community. “We realized that circuses in general could be offensive,” Ratcliff said. Lakeville Arenas hosts events such as circuses and derbies to “generate revenue to offset ice rates.” “It was never our intent to offend anyone,” he said. The City of Lakeville and the Lakeville school district jointly own Lakeville Arenas. Tom Liebel, owner of the circus company, could not be reached for comment.

by Aaron M. Vehling Sun Thisweek

The circus might have been in town earlier this week, but in the future, Lakeville Arenas (which operates the Ames and Hasse arenas) will no longer rent its sites to circuses that use animals. This is in part because of pressure from PETA, the animal rights group, which notified Lakeville Arenas about the The Great American Family Circus that performed on Monday night, April 23. Owned by the Liebel family, the circus company has been fined by the United States Department of Agriculture in relation to the housing of an elephant, according to a story in the Orlando Sentinel. In an email exchange between Kristine Baney of PETA and Shayne Ratcliff, manager of the Arenas, Ratcliff said that while the organization was contractually obligated to host the April 23 circus, “we have reevaluated our rental policy and will no longer offer our facility to circus companies in the future.” In the email, Ratcliff said that he met with the board of directors of the Arenas on April 18 and formalized the policy. According to PETA, the Liebel Family Circus has a long history of animal abuse, including chaining animals so

Aaron Vehling can be reached at aaron.veh l i n g @ e c m - i n c. c o m or facebook.com/sunthisweek.

Sun Thisweek

Delaying roundabout construction and increasing senior center fees were among the topics the Lakeville City Council discussed at its April 23 work session. The council does not take official action at work sessions, but the meetings are often the incubator for ideas voted on at regular meetings.

Roundabout delay Interim City Engineer Zachary Johnson and Public Works Director Chris Petree recommended that the city delay construction of a roundabout at 205th Street and Kenrick Avenue. This would allow for potentially more favorable bids in spring 2013, because that would be at the start of the construction season, Johnson said. Consultant SRF is about 95 percent complete with the roundabout’s plans. The $630,000 project would take six to eight weeks to complete, following a three to four week bidding process, Johnson said. The construction cost would be about $500,000, with the balance going toward engineering and other costs. The city’s 2012-2016 Capital Improvement Plan budgeted for a $375,000 project, but the costs increased because of several significant design changes and safety improvements, Johnson said. Walmart, which will be located down the street and

escrow toward the project. To use the money, the city needs to complete the project by 2014, Johnson said. The remaining $555,000 would come from Street Reconstruction Bonds, which would be repaid with property tax levies of about $61,000 per year for 10 years, Johnson said. The more favorable bidding season could drive down the tax levy because of the reduced cost of the project, he added.

Senior Center fees Senior Center rates are set to double, generating between $18,000 and $22,000 annually in revenue. Below are the current rates with the proposed increase in parentheses: • Resident single member: $9 a year ($18); • Resident couple: $15 ($34); • Non-resident single: $15; ($30). There is no special for non-resident couples. Of the about 1,110 Lakeville Senior Center members, 60 percent are residents. Part of the reasoning behind the rate increase is the improved amenities at the Heritage Center, which will open this fall, Parks and Recreation Director Steve Michaud said. Mayor Mark Bellows said the increase is still rather low. “When I tell people senior fees are $9,” he said, “they say ‘a month?’ ” Discussion began about a tiered system. Given that

ubiquitous personal video game systems, and so the ordinance (based on a 1970s state statute) was designed to prevent potential nuisances associated with the devices at places such as bowling alleys, movie theaters and bars. Revenue is marginal, topping out at about $3,000 a year from renewals, associate planner Allyn Kuennen said. In the 30 years since its passage, there have been no cases of issues or nuisances associated with the amusement devices, Kuennen said. He recommended eliminating the regulation effective January 2013. Council Member Colleen LaBeau lauded the recommendation, saying that it will make “doing business easier in Lakeville.”

dreds of offerings, the mayor said, “We can justify the higher dues.” The senior center recently introduced a punch card system, in which historically free programs now carry a surcharge. Free programs now require a single punch, valued at 50 cents, Michaud said. Council members in general were not enthused by the system. “We can give it a go, but if it didn’t work out, I wouldn’t be terribly disappointed,” Council Member Kerrin Swecker said.

Reduced regulation It’s nearly game over for an early Reagan-era ordinance that regulated devices such as pinball machines and other arcade amusements. It was a trend back then to require places with vending and amusement devices to pay a license fee for permits to operate such devic-

Aaron Vehling can be reached at aaron.vehling@ecm-inc. com or facebook.com/sunthisweek.

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April 27, 2012 Sun Thisweek

DanceWorks celebrates 25 years Owner offers safe, tolerant learning environment by Aaron M. Vehling Sun Thisweek

For more than 25 years, Ann Proudfoot’s Lakevillebased DanceWorks Performing Arts Center has navigated the cutthroat waters of intense competition, the confounding dynamics of changing dance trends, family tragedy and a particularly brutal economic recession to reach the thriving station it enjoys today. “People come up to me and say this program is great,” Proudfoot said. “That’s the best thing, where you have something you get so much joy from.” DanceWorks started in November 1986 as Cedar Street DanceWorks at 160th Street and Cedar Avenue with a 1,200-square-foot studio. It was one of the first dance studios in town. Proudfoot and her husband, who worked with Northwest Airlines, moved from the Chicago area because he was relocated. Proudfoot had been operating a dance studio for four years and decided to open DanceWorks when they arrived. “When you start any business, the high point is the excitement and actually building a program and having it succeed,” she said. The studio has moved around Lakeville, growing larger as time has progressed. Now the company has two locations: one near County Road 50 and Dodd

Boulevard and another farther north at Dodd Boulevard and 175th Street, the latter topping out at 14,000 square feet. The former is for sale, Proudfoot said, “because we don’t need it anymore.” The studio offers training to an age range of 3 to adult in styles ranging from the foundations, such as ballet, jazz, tap, ballroom, to various forms of hip-hop and modern dance. “You have to do it all nowadays,” Proudfoot said. She has not raised rates in six years and strives to maintain a teacher-to-student ratio of 1:12. “You have to remain competitive with other local programs,” she said. “The hard part is I feel the quality is so much higher; my overhead is higher because of the quality of my instructors.”

Always the dance Proudfoot has always been a performing arts aficionado, even if she did not necessarily have an official outlet for it. She grew up in Chicago with aspirations to take classes at a dance studio. “We didn’t have access to it and wouldn’t be able to afford it,” she said. That situation changed drastically, thanks to a change in geography and the generous offerings of her new suburban school district. “I was introduced to it as part of a physical educa-

Photo submitted

DanceWorks in Lakeville is celebrating more than 25 years of dance education, starting out in a 1,200-square-foot space and eventually expanding to one that covers more than 14,000 square feet. Owner Ann Proudfoot said most of her experiences during these more than two decades teaching dance have been pleasant ones. tion class as part of the high school curriculum,” she said. She went on to the University of Utah in Salt Lake City and majored in dance and physical education. Before getting into the dance studio business, Proudfoot taught physical education in the Chicago public school system.

After all these years, she could not pinpoint one dance style that is her favorite. “I’ve enjoyed professional performances of all types,” Proudfoot said. As is true with all art, tastes in dance can be rather subjective. “Some leave you in tears,” she said. “Others you look at and think what the heck are they doing up there?” Proudfoot, along with her staff of adult instructors, have enjoyed years of instilling the arts in students in Dakota County. The average tenure of a teacher at DanceWorks is about 14 years. That is fairly low turnover, Proudfoot said. “Very few places can say that,” she said. It is with those teachers that she found a thriving business.

“The amazing staff and the friendships: That’s what has led to the success of the program,” Proudfoot said. “I have awesome teachers.” Ballet teacher David Stright has worked with Proudfoot for about 14 years. He said his boss has integrity. “It’s a good thing to have in a boss,” she said. “So I’ve stayed.” Stright, of Inver Grove Heights, has a professional background as a ballet dancer and teaches special education at a charter school for his day job. “(Proudfoot) has high standards for teachers,” Stright said. “Students learn to dance, they don’t just come in and have a good time.” Nevertheless, Proudfoot does not approve of a hostile learning environment – whether the bullying is from students or teachers. “She’s really committed to it being a nice, emotionally safe place for kids to come,” he said. Among the most memorable moments over the past 25 years, Proudfoot said, are those that involve helping students participate in dance who could otherwise not do so. “I’ve given a lot of kids free classes because they couldn’t afford it,” she said. “It’s probably something that when you see them do something, you get so much joy out of it.” One girl eventually became a semi-professional dancer after spending eight years at DanceWorks – free of charge. “She went on to get a scholarship in dance,” Proudfoot said. “Now she is an attorney.” Proudfoot offers free classes to low-income families because “I think that if I were that young girl, how nice it would be to work hard and get so much joy out of this.” Her own experience with challenged access to

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a studio contributes to this empathy. New competition over the years and even the worst economic recession since the 1930s have not derailed Proudfoot’s goals. But what has changed her plans is an accident on a dock in a lake. Proudfoot said that her husband and three sons have always come first. But when her son was paralyzed after falling off a dock and diving into too-shallow water, her energies have been refocused. Scott was a science major, whose first job involved purifying synthetic DNA. A champion diver in Lakeville, Scott went head first when he fell off that dock on July 9, 2011. With a broken neck, Scott has endured months of physical therapy and treatment, though maintaining movement above his chest and a clear, acute mind. Modern technology, such as voice activated software, have helped immensely, Proudfoot said, but he still needs his family. She foresees “transitions in the next few years,” she said. “At this point, family comes first.” Proudfoot sees herself getting more involved in state politics, advocating for legislation that would provide funding for stem cell research – surgery centered on which could provide her son with a future opportunity to walk again. Overall, Proudfoot said it has been a good run, and that “95 percent of it has been positive.” “I’m fortunate to have the people in my life that I do,” she said. As part of the celebration of the studio’s 25 years, DanceWorks will put on a recital at 10 a.m. and 1 and 4 p.m. May 12 at Lakeville North High School. Aaron Vehling can be reached at aaron.vehling@ecm-inc. com or facebook.com/sunthisweek.


Sun Thisweek April 27, 2012

7A

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Farmington resident Christy Jo Fogarty has advocated in Washington, D.C., to encourage expansion of a dental therapy program that trains dental hygienists to perform some of the same services as dentists.

Dental therapists on the rise? Farmington resident appears on television, before Congress to spread message

by Laura Adelmann Sun Thisweek

Farmington City Council Member Christy Jo Fogarty has taken the national stage to encourage expansion of the first dental therapy program that trains dental hygienists to perform some of the same services as dentists. Dental therapists provide dental services to the poor and uninsured who are not getting regular treatments, in part due to a shortage of providers who accept Medicare and other public assistance. In 2009, Minnesota became the first state in the nation to allow dental therapy training, and Fogarty, a dental hygienist, was in the program’s first graduating class last year. Dental therapists fill cavities, clean teeth and perform extractions under a dentist’s supervision. After 2,000 hours experience, they earn the title of “advanced dental therapist,” and are free to expand their work outside of the dentist office, such as in nursing homes, to perform additional procedures but still following a dentist’s treatment plan. Although the idea of similar educational programs have been discussed in other states, Minnesota’s front-runner status has allowed Fogarty a platform upon which to advocate for the program to spread beyond state borders. At the request of U.S. Sen. Al Franken, in February Fogarty testified before a U.S. Senate committee for expanding the training to other states. She was also interviewed for a PBS’ “Frontline” report about the issue set to air in June. The show took hours to film and the crew “almost

Education Chess tourney A team from Greenleaf Elementary, Apple Valley, won first place in the Southern Metro Chess Tournament hosted by Lakeville Area Community Education on April 14 at McGuire Middle School in Lakeville. A total of 35 schools participated in the tournament matching 86 players in 240 games of chess. Lakeville’s Cherry View Elementary took second place and Lakeview Elementary placed third.

took over part of the clinic,” Fogarty said. She said they asked a wide range of questions that she was instructed to respond as if they had not asked her a question. “I thought they’d interview me for five or 10 minutes and it would be about a two-minute spot, but it was a two-and-a-half hour interview,” Fogarty said. “It really surprised me.” Testifying in Washington, D.C., was a whirlwind experience for Fogarty, who said she arrived, testified and returned home in less than 24 hours. She had been recommended to appear before the committee by her instructor. Fogarty remains interested in more opportunities to advocate for similar programs in other states.

She said Vermont legislators are interested in the program, including U.S. Sen. Bernie Sanders, chair of the committee that Fogarty addressed. While Fogarty is working to expand dental therapy programs in other states, the American Dental Association and similar advocacy groups oppose allowing non-dentists to perform surgical or irreversible dental care like extractions, citing patient safety concerns. Fogarty said an advanced dental therapist is not a replacement for a dentist, but will help everyone, including seniors and children, have access to oral health care. Laura Adelmann is at laura. adelmann@ecm-inc.com or facebook.com/sunthisweek.

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College news Tessa Beckstrom, daughter of John and Lisa Beckstrom of Lakeville, was honored with the Outstanding Community Service Award on April 15 at the University of Minnesota-Duluth. She is a sophomore at UMD. Stephanie Olson of Apple Valley was recognized with the Kloubec Scholarship in Character in Leadership III at the Jamestown College (N.D.) Honors Convocation on April 12.

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April 27, 2012 Sun Thisweek

Forces join to battle homelessness Campaign launch is May 14 at Mary, Mother of the Church

by John Gessner Sun Thisweek

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Jean MacFarland of Burnsville has been helping people in need find homes for 35 years. MacFarland and her late husband, Tom, were foster parents for Dakota County. In the early 1990s Jean was director of the Lewis House women’s and family shelter. Today MacFarland chairs the board of the 125-congregation Metropolitan Interfaith Council on Affordable Housing. For all the attention focused on homelessness over the years – including in relatively prosperous Dakota County, once thought immune to it – MacFarland says there’s never been a better time to attack the problem. Her optimism stems from campaigns unfolding statewide under the Heading Home Minnesota banner. Locally, the Heading Home Dakota campaign will be launched at a public forum on May 14 at 6:30 p.m. at Mary, Mother of the Church in Burnsville. “What really excites me about Heading Home Dakota is that this is a communitywide effort, a collaborative, bringing people together to work on (hope-

lessness),” MacFarland said. “I wouldn’t say that I’ve seen any of that. Organizations may partner together on a project, but this is all sectors in the community really working together on it.” Heading Home Minnesota is a public-private partnership working to end homelessness. It includes individual campaigns in eight counties and in six regions blanketing Minnesota. Nationally, more than 250 plans have been developed – the result of a Bush administration push to bring community resources to bear, said Eric Grumdahl, housing manager for Dakota County Social Services. The ultimate goal: End homelessness in 10 years, Grumdahl said. “It’s an ambitious goal,” he said. “It will require a lot of work.” Dakota County government – including the county’s housing and redevelopment agency — are on board. Some 60 parties to the effort include local government agencies, churches and faith-based groups and long-standing housing advocates such as MICAH and the Coalition for Affordable Transitional Hous-

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ing, a group of congregations that provides six units of transitional housing in Dakota County. How widespread is homeless-

ness in the county? “We don’t have significant numbers sleeping on the streets and such,” MacFarland said. But there’s more to it. The county’s annual “point-in-time” count, measured this year on Jan. 25, showed 1,013 Dakota County residents to be homeless. That’s a 20 percent increase from the 2011 count of 841, although the county added two categories to the 2012 count: people living in an apartment or home with the utilities shut off (66) and people in a treatment facility or hospital (32). The increase is 9 percent if those categories are excluded.

A number of people moving out of troubled Country Village Apartments in Burnsville, whose rental license has since been

revoked, contributed to the 20 percent increase, Grumdahl noted. Under the federal definition of homelessness, Dakota County had only 353 homeless people on Jan. 25. The Department of Housing and Urban Development doesn’t count people who are doubling up or in similarly precarious arrangements as homeless. Even under the narrower federal definition, Dakota County’s homeless count was 17 percent higher than the 2011 count of 302. Statewide, the number of people without permanent shelter rose 25 percent from October 2006 to October 2009, according to the Wilder Foundation, which takes a county every three years. On any given night, there

www.save.org

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In an extensive report, Heading Home Dakota sets out goals and two dozen strategies for preventing homelessness, ensuring an adequate supply of housing, boosting outreach to the homeless, improving services and systems for addressing homelessness, and engaging the public in fighting the problem. The work will take money – nearly $42 million over five years, Heading Home Dakota estimates. Nearly 80 percent of that is for brick-and-mortar construction, renovation and preservation of affordable housing. The campaign, under the direction of its lead agency, the Affordable Housing Coalition, is eyeing federal and state grants, county and city funds and private funding. “My heart is in housing,” MacFarland said. “It’s so basic to the well-being of children and families and individuals.” John Gessner can be reached at john.gessner@ecm-inc. com or facebook.com/sunthisweek.

Treat Depression

Prevent Suicide

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may be 13,000 homeless Minnesotans, not counting people doubling up or living temporarily with family or friends, Wilder estimates. Homelessness is a family problem. Dakota County’s 2011 count showed that 46 percent of homeless people sheltered in emergency or transitional housing were children under 18 accompanied by parents. “By measures of our need, Dakota County’s homeless population has grown,” Grumdahl said. “We’re not getting a handle on the situation,” MacFarland said. Meanwhile, the vacancy rate for rental housing in Dakota County is 3.4 percent, the lowest in a decade, Grumdahl said. According to the county’s Community Development Agency, it takes annual income of $49,160 – about $24 an hour – to afford the average three-bedroom apartment in Dakota County. “The low availability of affordable, sustainable housing is one of the most substantial challenges in ending homelessness,” Grumdahl said.

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Sun Thisweek April 27, 2012

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Local tattoo shop hopes to ‘rock’ breast cancer walk by Jessica Harper Sun Thisweek

Georgia D. (Wiedenman) Terwilliger A woman of strength and beauty, ended her life journey on April 13, 2012, surrounded by family and loved ones. Born Feb. 22, 1925, in Iroquois, So. Dak., the youngest of five children of Henry and Ethel Wiedenman, Georgia married the love of her life, Raymond W. Terwilliger, on Sept. 19, 1944, in San Diego, Calif. Following the end of WWII, Georgia and Ray farmed for several years in South Dakota, and resettled in Minnesota in 1953. Georgia attended South Dakota State University, Brookings, and earned an associate’s degree from Normandale Community College. She served as executive assistant to the superintendent of Ind. School District 191 for 28 years. Her dedication, impeccable work ethic, and professional demeanor set the standard through the tenure of five different superintendents. The Georgia D. Terwilliger Media Center at Hidden Valley Elementary School was established in her honor in 1989. After her retirement, Georgia spent her remaining years doing what gave her most joy, spending time with family and friends. Georgia’s graciousness, patience, gentle spirit, accepting nature, and generous and loving heart endeared her to all who had the good fortune of knowing her. She will be remembered for her smiles, her courage, her sense of wonder, and her calm and caring presence. She has been a gift to her family, her friends, and to the world, and she will be sorely missed. Preceded in death by parents, Henry and Ethel, and siblings Boyd (Elaine) Wiedenman, Phoebe (Nick) Jones, Maxine (Gene) Annis, and Reva (Duane) Garry. Survived by loving husband of nearly 68 years, Raymond Terwilliger; children, Charlene (Cal) Hoe, Pamela (Sonny Haas) Terwilliger, and Scott (Peg) Terwilliger. She was immensely proud of her 10 grandchildren: Kala (Kapua) Hoe, Liko (Hoku) Hoe, Kawai Hoe, Brian Martodam, Craig (Sara) Martodam, Shana (Jeff) Schmidt, Alisa (Jim Carter) Martodam, Kelly (Matt) Davis, Kristofer (Ashley Bendt) Terwilliger, and Nikolas Terwilliger; and her great-grandchildren: Kahiwa, Maile Emma, Keenan, Marla, Bailey, Blake, Brayden, and Austin. A celebration of Georgia’s life will be Friday, June 29, 2012, 2-7 p.m., at Cleary Lake Regional Park Pavilion, Prior Lake. Memorials preferred to the Alzheimer’s Association, or to a cause close to your heart.

Edward Wallin 8/11/1957-3/18/2012 THANK YOU

Thanks to the support of family, friends, and community members, Eddie was able to receive the final arrangements and resting place he so richly deserved. Thank you again for your generosity and kindness. Ed was truly a shining star in the Lakeville Community.

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Coltrain Moench Tom and Sheri Moench of Lakeville announce the engagement of their son Jeff, to Samantha Coltrain, daughter of Rick and Cheri Coltrain of Balwin, Wis. Samantha is a 2007 graduate of Baldwin High School. She is currently employed at Club Monaco at MOA. Jeff is a 2002 graduate of Lakeville High School. He is currently employed at Walsh Construction of St. Paul. A September wedding is planned.

To submit an announcement Forms for birth, engagement, wedding, anniversary and obituaries announcements are available at our office and online at www.thisweeklive.com (click on “Announcements” and then “Send Announcement”). Com­pleted forms may be e-mailed to class. thisweek@ecm-inc.com or mailed to Sun Thisweek, 15322 Galaxie Ave., Suite 219, Apple Valley, MN 55124. If you are submitting a photograph along with your announcement, please only submit photographs for which you have the right to permit Sun Thisweek to use and publish. Deadline for announcements is 4 p.m. Tuesday. A fee of $50 will be charged for the first 5 inches and $10 per inch thereafter. They will run in all editions of Sun Thisweek. Photos may be picked up at the office within 60 days or returned by mail if a self-addressed, stamped envelope is provided.

Whether it’s style, rebellion, symbolism or culture, everyone has a unique reason for getting a tattoo. But one Eagan tattoo shop owner hopes area residents will get inked for a good cause – fighting breast cancer. Rockin Tattoos will give tattoos of pink ribbons and other cancer symbols from noon to 6 p.m. May 5 in an effort to raise money for the Susan G. Komen 3-Day walk. Artists will also accept requests for other ribbon colors, which symbolize various types of cancer. In addition to permanent tattoos, which cost between $40 and $300, attendees can purchase temporary tattoos for $2 at the event called Tats for Tatas. While waiting for their tattoos, attendees will be able to munch on pizza donated by Carbone’s. All proceeds will be donated to a local 3-Day team called Team Breast Foot Forward. Owner Joe Christensen said he was inspired by his sister’s battle with cancer to become involved in raising money for cancer research. “After seeing how so many people helped my sister, I wanted to give back,” Christensen said. At age 36, Christensen’s sister, Tina Marsh, was diagnosed in 2007 with breast cancer, which had already metastasized to the lymph nodes.

Religion Farmington

Spring fair Trinity Lutheran Church, 600 Walnut St., Farmington, will hold its annual Spring Fair from 5 to 7 p.m. Saturday, May 12. Dinner will be a hot roast beef sandwich, mashed potatoes and gravy, beverage and dessert. Cost is $7 for adults; $6.50 for seniors and children ages 6-10; free for children under 6. The event will include a bake sale.

Today’s The Day Stop Smoking

“I was devastated,” she said. “All I could think about was my three boys.” At ages 1, 6 and 7, Marsh’s sons were too young to understand the seriousness of her illness. Christensen, too, was stunned by the news. “It didn’t seem real at first,” he said. “You never think it will happen to someone close to you.” Over the next two years, Marsh endured chemotherapy, a single mastectomy and several reconstructive surgeries. Through it all, Marsh said she was able to stay strong with the support of family and friends. During her battle, Christensen donned the image of a pink ribbon and horseshoe, along with Tina’s name on his leg, in dedication of her courage and luck. Marsh’s cancer has been in remission for several years now, and today she dedicates her time to raising awareness. Previously, Christensen has helped raise money for the Angel Foundation. So, naturally he agreed without hesitation to raise money for his sister’s cancer walk team. Pink Courage will be at the event as well to sell its iconic pink goods. The nonprofit plans to donate 20 percent of its proceeds to the team.

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Photo by Jessica Harper

Rockin Tattoos owner Joe Christensen plans to host an event at his shop May 5 called Tats for Tatas to raise money for a Susan G. Komen 3-Day team. His sister, Tina Marsh, is a member of the team and a breast cancer survivor. Rockin Tattoos is located Jessica Harper is at jesat 3390 Coachman Road, sica.harper@ecm-inc.com or Suite 210, in Eagan. For facebook.com/sunthisweek. more information, call (651) 340-0257 or visit rockintattoos.net.

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10A

April 27, 2012 Sun Thisweek

Lakeville man charged in alleged drunken burglary

Police say he had .22 blood alcohol level by Aaron M. Vehling Sun Thisweek

kitchen sink. Reme voluntarily submitted to a breath test, which resulted in a measured blood alcohol level of .22, the complaint said. Officers noticed that a DVD player had been removed from one of the cars in the driveway and was sitting atop a garbage can in the garage. They also noticed several other electronic items organized neatly on the island in the kitchen. The homeowner assured police those items were not there when he went to bed, and said it appeared that they were removed from various locations in the kitchen and living room. A car’s GPS unit was found in the pantry in the kitchen. According to the complaint, Reme told police he had entered the home with two friends through an unlocked garage, and that his friend Jake lived at the house. However, it became evident that Reme was unsure which of his friends accompanied him into the house. Police searched the house and garage and did not find anyone else. Reme is charged with first-degree burglary, tampering with a motor vehicle and underage drinking. The latter two charges are misdemeanors that could mean up to 90 days in jail for each charge, but the former charge is a felony that carries a maximum of 20 years in jail.

A 19-year-old Lakeville man is facing charges for an alleged drunken burglary that occurred on April 14. At about 4 a.m., according to the criminal complaint, an inebriated Anthony Garon Reme entered a Lakeville home through an unlocked garage, removed several electronic gadgets from the homeowner’s cars, searched a refrigerator for a water bottle and proceeded to “zone out.” According to the criminal complaint, it all started when the homeowner’s wife awoke, hearing some activity downstairs. The wife awoke the husband, who encountered Reme searching through his refrigerator. The homeowner asked Reme what he was doing and who he was. “Water bottle,” Reme said. The homeowner repeated the question. “I’m looking for a water bottle,” Reme allegedly replied. “My friend Zach told me I could get a water bottle.” The homeowner told police he instructed Reme to sit down because he was going to call the police. Reme complied. In the meantime, Reme appeared to act “weird and seemed zoned out,” the homeowner told the police. Once officers arrived, the complaint said, they noticed that Reme seemed intoxicated and had trouble speaking in complete sentences. They searched Reme and found the Aaron Vehling can be reached homeowner’s keys in his pock- at aaron.vehling@ecm-inc.com et, which the homeowner had or facebook.com/sunthisweek. said were previously on the

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ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS LAKEVILLE NORTH HIGH SCHOOL ROOF REPLACEMENT Lakeville North High School 19600 IPAVA AVENUE LAKEVILLE, MINNESOTA 55044 Lakeville Area Public Schools (ISD #194) will receive single prime sealed bids for the Lakeville North High School Roof Replacement until 2 p.m. local time on May 3, 2012 at the District Office, 8670 210th Street West, Lakeville Minnesota 55044, at which time and place all bids will be publicly opened and read aloud. Bidding documents, including the Proposal Form, Drawings and Specifications, will be on file at the Offices of the Architect, Wold Architects and Engineers, 305 St. Peter Street, St. Paul, Minnesota 55102. (651) 227-7773; at the Minneapolis Builders Exchange; Builders Exchange at St. Paul; McGraw Hill Construction /Dodge Plan Center; Reed Construction; iSqFt Plan Room (St. Paul, MN); and from Plan Well at American Reprographics Company at www.earc.com. This project includes: Complete tear-off and re-roof of a portion of Lakeville North High School Roof with 90-mil fully adhered EPDM. American Reprographics Company, 2007 E. 24th Street, Minneapolis, MN 55404 (612) 722-2303, facsimile (612) 722-3745, will provide complete sets of the Bidding Documents to prospective bidders and subcontractors. The copies will be available about April 16, 2012. Both a deposit check in the amount of $70 and a non-refundable check in the amount of $30 made out to “Lakeville Area Public Schools (ISD #194)” for each set ordered are required or Bidding Documents may be ordered via the internet at www.e-arc.com and clicking on the PlanWell icon, then the Public Plan Room icon, select Lakeville North High School Roof Replacement. The following information must accompany the deposit: Company name, mailing address, street address, phone and facsimile numbers and type of bidder (i.e. General, Mechanical or Electrical Subcontractor to General, or other). A refund of $70 will be sent to prime contractors who submit a bid to the Owner and subcontractors for each set (including addenda) returned to American Reprographics Company in good condition within ten (10) calendar days of the award date, subject to the conditions of AIA Document A701. Refunds will not be given if the plans are returned to the Architect’s Office. Make proposals on the bid forms supplied in the Project Manual. No oral, telegraphic or telephonic proposals or modifications will be considered. Submit with each bid, a certified check or acceptable bidder’s bond payable to Lakeville Area Public Schools (ISD #194) in an amount equal to five percent (5%) of the total bid. The successful bidder will be required to furnish satisfactory Labor and Material Payment Bond, and Performance Bond. Bids may not be withdrawn within thirty (30) days after the scheduled time of opening bids, without the consent of the Owner. The Owner reserves the right to accept any bid or to reject any or all bids, or parts of such bids, and waive informalities or irregularities in bidding. The Owner requires Substantial Completion of the project on or before August 17, 2012. Independent School District No. 194 8670 210th Street West Lakeville, Minnesota 55044 Kathy Lewis, Clerk Publish: April 20, 2012 & April 27, 2012 2980613 4/20-4/27/12

PUBLIC NOTICE

TOWN OF EUREKA PUBLIC NOTICE: CALL FOR ROAD GRAVEL BIDS The Town Board of Eureka Township is calling for gravel bids, to be used on township roads/ projects. The outside of the envelope should indicate, "Bid for Gravel" Type of Materials: Material to follow specifications as presented in Chapter 3138, Aggregate for Surface and Base Courses, of the MnDot Standard Specifications for Construction Material. (2005 edition) 1. 100 % crushed limestone-, meeting MnDot Spec #3138-1 Class 5b modified with not less than 8% or more than 12% passing the #200 sieve. 2. Surfacing gravel meeting MnDot Spec#3138-1 Class 5a modified with not less than 8% or more than 12% passing the #200 sieve Eureka Township reserves the right to test materials. Measurement: Each load must be weighed by a certified weighing device and a receipt will be delivered to a township official at time of delivery. Quantity: Material #1 Approximately 4600 tons delivered to various Eureka Township roads. Material # 2 Approximately 4000 tons delivered to various Eureka Township roads. Start date, quantity, delivery location and rate of delivery to be as directed by Eureka Township representative. Bidders are advised to submit bids by the ton, all taxes included, delivered. Sealed bids should be mailed to: Eureka Township Office, P.O. Box 576, Lakeville, MN 55044. Bids will be accepted until 7:00 p.m. Monday, May 14, 2012. Bids will be publicly opened at the Regular Town Board Meeting on Monday, May 14, 2012 at 8:00 PM, at the Eureka Town Hall located at 25043 Cedar Ave. Farmington, MN. Nanett Sandstrom Clerk/Treasurer of Eureka 4/20 & 4/27/2012 2979397 4/20-4/27/12

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PUBLIC NOTICE

PUBLIC NOTICE

PUBLIC NOTICE

ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS MULTI-SITE BITUMINOUS REPAIRS LAKEVILLE, MINNESOTA 55044 Independent School District #194 will receive single prime sealed bids for the Multi-Site Bituminous Repairs until 2:00 p.m. local time on May 3, 2012 at the Independent School District #194 District Office, 8670 210th Street West, Lakeville, Minnesota, 55044, at which time and place all bids will be publicly opened and read aloud. Bidding documents, including the Proposal Form, Drawings and Specifications, will be on file at the Offices of the Architect, Wold Architects and Engineers, 305 St. Peter Street, St. Paul, Minnesota 55102. (651) 227-7773; at the Minneapolis Builders Exchange; Builders Exchange at St. Paul; McGraw Hill Construction/Dodge Plan Center; Reed Construction; iSqFt Plan Room (Brooklyn Center); and from American Reprographics Company at www.e-arc.com. This project includes: Crack fill, sealcoat, and repair of existing bituminous parking surfaces at multiple facilities throughout the School District. American Reprographic Company, 2007 E. 24th Street, Minneapolis, MN 55404 (612) 722-2303, facsimile (612) 722-3745, will provide complete sets of the Bidding Documents to prospective bidders and subcontractors. The copies will be available about April 16, 2012. Both a deposit check in the amount of $70 and a non-refundable check in the amount of $30 made out to "Independent School District #194" for each set ordered are required or Bidding Documents may be ordered via the internet at www.ersdigital.com and clicking on the PlanWell icon, then the Public Plan Room icon, select “Multi-Site Bituminous Repairs”. The following information must accompany the deposit: Company name, mailing address, street address, phone and facsimile numbers and type of bidder (i.e. General, Subcontractor to General, or other). A refund of $70 will be sent to prime contractors who submit a bid to the Owner and subcontractors for each set (including addenda) returned to American Reprographics Company in good condition within ten (10) calendar days of the award date, subject to the conditions of AIA Document A701. Returns will not be given if the plans are returned to the Architect's Office. Make proposals on the bid forms supplied in the Project Manual. No oral, telegraphic or telephonic proposals or modifications will be considered. Submit with each bid, a certified check or acceptable bidder's bond payable Independent School District #194 in an amount equal to five percent (5%) of the total bid. The successful bidder will be required to furnish satisfactory Labor and Material Payment Bond, and Performance Bond. Bids may not be withdrawn within thirty (30) days after the scheduled time of opening bids, without the consent of the Owner. The Owner reserves the right to accept any bid or to reject any or all bids, or parts of such bids, and waive informalities or irregularities in bidding. The Owner requires Substantial Completion of the project on or before August 17, 2012. Board of Education Independent School District No. 194 8670 210th Street West Lakeville, Minnesota 55044 Kathy Lewis, Clerk Publish: April 20, 2012 & April 27, 2012 2980503 4/20-4/27/12

ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS MULTI-SITE FLOORING REPLACEMENT LAKEVILLE, MINNESOTA Lakeville Area Public Schools (ISD #194) will receive single prime sealed bids for the Multi-Site Flooring Replacement until 2:00 p.m. local time on May 2, 2012 at the District Office, 8670 210th Street West, Lakeville, Minnesota 55044, at which time and place all bids will be publicly opened and read aloud. Bidding documents, including the Proposal Form, Drawings and Specifications, will be on file at the Offices of the Architect, Wold Architects and Engineers, 305 St. Peter Street, St. Paul, Minnesota 55102. (651) 227-7773; at the Minneapolis Builders Exchange; Builders Exchange at St. Paul; McGraw Hill Construction/Dodge Plan Center; Reed Construction; iSqFt Plan Room (St. Paul, MN); and from PlanWell at www.e-arc.com. This project includes: Removal and replacement of existing carpet and VCT flooring at multiple facilities throughout the School District. American Reprographic Company, 2007 E. 24th Street, Minneapolis, MN 55404 (612) 722-2303, facsimile (612) 722-3745, will provide complete sets of the Bidding Documents to prospective bidders and subcontractors. The copies will be available about April 16, 2012. Both a deposit check in the amount of $70 and a non-refundable check in the amount of $30 made out to "Lakeville Area Public Schools (ISD #194)" for each set ordered are required or Bidding Documents may be ordered via the internet at www.e-arc.com and clicking on the PlanWell icon, then the Public Plan Room icon, select Multi-Site Flooring Replacement. The following information must accompany the deposit: Company name, mailing address, street address, phone and facsimile numbers and type of bidder (i.e. General, Mechanical or Electrical Subcontractor to General, or other). A refund of $70 will be sent to prime contractors who submit a bid to the Owner and subcontractors for each set (including addenda) returned to American Reprographic Company in good condition within ten (10) calendar days of the award date, subject to the conditions of AIA Document A701. Refunds will not be given if the plans are returned to the Architect's Office. Make proposals on the bid forms supplied in the Project Manual. No oral, telegraphic or telephonic proposals or modifications will be considered. Submit with each bid, a certified check or acceptable bidder's bond payable to Lakeville Area Public Schools (ISD #194) in an amount equal to five percent (5%) of the total bid. The successful bidder will be required to furnish satisfactory Labor and Material Payment Bond, and Performance Bond. Bids may not be withdrawn within thirty (30) days after the scheduled time of opening bids, without the consent of the Owner. The Owner reserves the right to accept any bid or to reject any or all bids, or parts of such bids, and waive informalities or irregularities in bidding. The Owner requires Substantial Completion of the project on or before August 17, 2012. Independent School District No. 194 8670 210th Street West Lakeville, Minnesota 55044 Kathy Lewis, Clerk Publish: April 20, 2012 & April 27, 2012 2980796 4/20-4/27/12

MULTI-SITE WALL FINISH PROJECT Lakeville, Minnesota Independent School District #194 will receive single prime sealed bids for the Multi-Site Wall Finish Project until 3:00 p.m. local time on May 2, 2012 at the District Office, 8670 210th Street West, Lakeville, Minnesota, 55044, at which time and place all bids will be publicly opened and read aloud. Bidding documents, including the Bid Form, Drawings and Specifications, will be on file at the Offices of the 7773; at the Minneapolis Builders Exchange; Builders Exchange at St. Paul; McGraw Hill Construction/Dodge Plan Center; Reed Construction; iSqFt Plan Room (St. Paul, MN); St. Cloud Builders Exchange; and from American Reprographics Company at www.e-arc.com. This project includes: Vinyl wall covering removal, substrate preparation and repainting of existing surfaces at multiple facilities throughout the District. American Reprographics Company, 2007 E. 24th Street, Minneapolis, MN 55404 (612) 722-2303, facsimile (612) 722-3745, will provide complete sets of the Bidding Documents to prospective bidders and subcontractors. The copies will be available about April 16, 2012. Both a deposit check in the amount of $70.00 and a non-refundable check in the amount of $30.00 made out to "Independent School District #194" for each set ordered are required or Bidding Documents may be ordered via the internet at www.e-arc.com. The following information must accompany the deposit: Company name, mailing address, street address, phone and facsimile numbers and type of bidder (i.e. General, Subcontractor to General, or other). A refund of $70.00 will be sent to prime contractors who submit a bid to the Owner and subcontractors for each set (including addenda) returned to American Reprographics Company in good condition within ten (10) calendar days of the award date, subject to the conditions of AIA Document A701. Refunds will not be given if the plans are returned to the Architect's Office. Make bids on the bid forms supplied in the Project Manual. No oral, telegraphic or telephonic bids or modifications will be considered. Submit with each bid, a certified check or acceptable bidder's bond payable to Independent School District #194 in an amount equal to five percent (5%) of the total bid. The successful bidder will be required to furnish satisfactory Labor and Material Payment Bond, and Performance Bond. Bids may not be withdrawn within thirty (30) days after the scheduled time of opening bids, without the consent of the Owner. The Owner reserves the right to accept any bid or to reject any or all bids, or parts of such bids, and waive informalities or irregularities in bidding. The Owner requires Substantial Completion of the project on or before July 6, 2012 (Cherry View Elementary), July 27, 2012 (Lakeview Elementary) and August 17, 2012 (Lake Marion Elementary). Board of Education Independent School District No. 194 8670 210th Street West Lakeville, Minnesota 55044 Kathy Lewis, Clerk Publish: April 20, 2012 & April 27, 2012 DISTRICT # 194 2980823 4/20-4/27/12

PUBLIC NOTICE

PUBLIC NOTICE

ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS LAKEVILLE SOUTH HIGH SCHOOL TRACK AND TENNIS RESURFACING 21135 JACQUARD AVENUE LAKEVILLE, MINNESOTA 55044 Independent School District #194 will receive single prime sealed bids for Lakeville South High School Track and Tennis Resurfacing until 2:00 p.m. local time on May 1, 2012 at the ISD #194 – District Office 8670 210th Street West, Lakeville, Minnesota 55044 at which time and place all bids will be publicly opened and read aloud. Bidding documents, including the Proposal Form, Drawings and Specifications, will be on file at the Offices of the Architect, Wold Architects and Engineers, 305 St. Peter Street, St. Paul, Minnesota 55102. (651) 227-7773; at the Minneapolis Builders Exchange; Builders Exchange at St. Paul; McGraw Hill Construction/Dodge Plan Center; Reed Construction; iSqFt Plan Room (St. Paul, MN); and from PlanWell at www.e-arc.com. This project includes: Repair and resurfacing of the existing track and tennis courts at Lakeville South High School. American Reprographics Company, 2007 E. 24th Street, Minneapolis, MN 55404 (612) 722-2303, facsimile (612) 722-3745, will provide complete sets of the Bidding Documents to prospective bidders and subcontractors. The copies will be available about April 16, 2012. Both a deposit check in the amount of $70 and a non-refundable check in the amount of $30 made out to " Independent School District #194" for each set ordered are required or Bidding Documents may be ordered via the internet at www.e-arc.com and clicking on the PlanWell icon, then the Public Plan Room icon, select Lakeville South High School Track and Tennis Resurfacing. The following information must accompany the deposit: Company name, mailing address, street address, phone and facsimile numbers and type of bidder (i.e. General, Mechanical or Electrical Subcontractor to General, or other). A refund of $70 will be sent to prime contractors who submit a bid to the Owner and subcontractors for each set (including addenda) returned to American Reprographics Company in good condition within ten (10) calendar days of the award date, subject to the conditions of AIA Document A701. Refunds will not be given if the plans are returned to the Architect's Office. Make proposals on the bid forms supplied in the Project Manual. No oral, telegraphic or telephonic proposals or modifications will be considered. Submit with each bid, a certified check or acceptable bidder's bond payable to Independent School District #194 in an amount equal to five percent (5%) of the total bid. The successful bidder will be required to furnish satisfactory Labor and Material Payment Bond, and Performance Bond. Bids may not be withdrawn within thirty (30) days after the scheduled time of opening bids, without the consent of the Owner. The Owner reserves the right to accept any bid or to reject any or all bids, or parts of such bids, and waive informalities or irregularities in bidding. The Owner requires Substantial Completion of the project on or before August 3, 2012 Independent School District No. 194 8670 210th Street West Lakeville, Minnesota 55044 Kathy Lewis, Clerk Publish: April 20, 2012 & April 27, 2012 2980746 4/20-4/27/12

PUBLIC NOTICE

NOTICE OF HEARING ON PROPOSED ASSESSMENT 195TH STREET EAST IMPROVEMENT PROJECT Notice is hereby given that the Town Board of Credit River Township, Scott County, Minnesota, will meet at 7:00 p.m. on the 7th day of May, 2012, at the Credit River Town Hall, to pass upon the proposed assessment of costs related to the improvements of 195th Street East. The area proposed to be assessed is all those properties abutting or having access to 195th Street East, all located in Credit River Township. The proposed assessment roll is on file for public inspection by contacting Lisa Quinn, Credit River Town Clerk. The total amount of the proposed assessment is $76,549. Adoption of the proposed assessment by the Town Board may be taken at the hearing. Written or oral objections will be considered at the meeting. No appeal may be taken as to the amount of the assessment unless a written objection, signed by the property owner, is filed with the Town Clerk prior to the hearing or presented to the presiding officer at the hearing. An owner may appeal an assessment to the District Court pursuant to Minnesota Statutes Section 429.081 by serving written notice of the appeal upon the Town Chairman or Town Clerk within thirty (30) days after the adoption of the assessment and filing such notice with the District Court within ten (10) days after service upon the Town Chairman or the Town Clerk. The Town Board may consider adopting a deferment policy at this public hearing pursuant to Minnesota Statutes Section 435.193 through 435.195. Minnesota Statutes Section 435.193 through 435.195 authorize a Town Board to defer the payment of assessments against homestead property owned by persons 65 years of age and older, or who are retired because of permanent and total disability under circumstances where it would be a hardship for such person to make the assessment payments. When deferment of the special assessment has been granted and is terminated for any reason provided in that law, all amounts accumulated plus applicable interest become due. If the Town Board adopts a deferment policy any assessed property owner meeting the requirements of this law may, within 30 days of the confirmation of the assessment, apply to the Town Clerk for the prescribed form for such deferral of payment of this special assessment on said owner's property. _____/s/____________________ Lisa Quinn, Clerk 2980905 4/20-4/27/12

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ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS CRYSTAL LAKE EDUCATION CENTER IMPROVEMENTS 16250 Ipava Avenue Lakeville, Minnesota Independent School District #194 will receive single prime sealed bids for Crystal Lake Center Improvements until 2:00 p.m. local time on May 1, 2012 at the Independent School District #194, District Office, 8670 210th Street West, Lakeville, Minnesota 55044, at which time and place all bids will be publicly opened and read aloud. Bidding documents, including the Proposal Form, Drawings and Specifications, will be on file at the Offices of the Architect, Wold Architects and Engineers, 305 St. Peter Street, St. Paul, Minnesota 55102. (651) 227-7773; at the Minneapolis Builders Exchange; Builders Exchange at St. Paul; McGraw Hill Construction/Dodge Plan Center; Reed Construction; iSqFt Plan Room (St. Paul, MN); Albert Lea Builders Exchange; Builders Exchange of Rochester, and from PlanWell at www.e-arc.com. This project modifications includes: Interior improvements to the Crystal Lake Education Center, including new interior finishes, mechanical, electrical, doors and door hardware, minor space reorganization. American Reprographics Company, 2007 E. 24th Street, Minneapolis, MN 55404 (612) 722-2303, facsimile (612) 722-3745, will provide complete sets of the Bidding Documents to prospective bidders and subcontractors. The copies will be available about April 16. Both a deposit check in the amount of $70.00 and a non-refundable check in the amount of $30.00 made out to "Independent School District #194" for each set ordered are required or Bidding Documents may be ordered via the internet at www.e-arc.com and clicking on the PlanWell icon, then the Public Plan Room icon, select Crystal Lake Center Improvements. The following information must accompany the deposit: Company name, mailing address, street address, phone and facsimile numbers and type of bidder (i.e. General, Mechanical or Electrical Subcontractor to General, or other). A refund of $70.00 will be sent to prime contractors who submit a bid to the Owner and subcontractors for each set (including addenda) returned to American Reprographics Company in good condition within ten (10) calendar days of the award date, subject to the conditions of AIA Document A701. Refunds will not be given if the plans are returned to the Architect's Office. Make proposals on the bid forms supplied in the Project Manual. No oral, telegraphic or telephonic proposals or modifications will be considered. Submit with each bid, a certified check or acceptable bidder's bond payable to Independent School District #194 in an amount equal to five percent (5%) of the total bid. The successful bidder will be required to furnish satisfactory Labor and Material Payment Bond, and Performance Bond. Bids may not be withdrawn within thirty (30) days after the scheduled time of opening bids, without the consent of the Owner. The Owner reserves the right to accept any bid or to reject any or all bids, or parts of such bids, and waive informalities or irregularities in bidding. The Owner requires Substantial Completion of the project on or before August 3, 2012. Independent School District No. 194 8670 210th Street West Lakeville, Minnesota 55044 Kathy Lewis, Clerk Publish: April 20, 2012 & April 27, 2012 DISTRICT #194 2980786 4/20-4/27/12

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Sun Thisweek April 27, 2012

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April 27, 2012 Sun Thisweek

District 191 erred in not releasing full agreement with Chance State agency opinion released

by John Gessner Sun Thisweek

School District 191 didn’t follow state data privacy law when it concealed information in its $255,000 separation agreement with ex-administrator Tania Chance, a state agency has said. The Burnsville-EaganSavage district shouldn’t have redacted nine lines from the agreement or

withheld two letters of recommendation for Chance written by district officials, the agency said. The redacted lines revealed that Chance, the district’s former human resources director, had agreed to drop charges against the district she had pending with the state Department of Human Rights, and to drop a complaint about Superintendent Randy Clegg

made to the Minnesota Board of School Administrators. The agreement also required letters of recommendation for Chance from Clegg and School Board Chair Ron Hill. Under the agreement, Chance was paid $254,815 and resigned on Feb. 1, with 18 months remaining on her two-year contract. The Star Tribune and St.

Paul Pioneer Press objected to the redactions in copies of the agreement the district released. In response, on Feb. 24, the district’s attorney, Maggie Wallner, sought an advisory opinion from the Department of Administration’s Policy Analysis Division on her advice that portions of the agreement were classified under state law.

That opinion came on April 20 from Department of Administration Commissioner Spencer Cronk. On April 23, the district released the unredacted agreement on its website. The district continued to shield the redacted information for nearly two months after news broke that the charges existed. Less than a week after Wallner sought the opinion, Thisweek Newspapers (now Sun Thisweek) obtained a full copy of the agreement, without blacked-out lines and with copies of the recommendation letters. Thisweek published a story revealing the redacted lines and excerpts from the recommendation letters. Other media outlets later obtained copies. The settlement angered many district residents and teachers, culminating in a hostile audience of nearly 200 at a School Board listening session on March 1. Anger deepened when board members said they could divulge no details on the advice of their attorney. Even now, the nature and details of Chance’s claims against the district remain hidden from the public. In a March 2 statement responding to Thisweek’s story, the district said that “most claims made to (state) agencies are dismissed.” But to get a dismissal, an employer “must spend significant time and money — even for claims that have no merit whatsoever,” the statement said. “When employers are faced with potential litigation, they have to consider the cost of defense versus settlement — and that is especially true for a public school district,” it said.

In an April 23 statement accompanying release of the unredacted agreement, the district repeated its contention that it had no choice but to follow its attorney’s advice and redact information “that it believed was private data.” “No school district can afford to release information that is later determined to be private data about an employee — that can cost a school district hundreds of thousands of dollars,” the district said.

Opinion State statute requires that terms of and specific reasons for a public-employee buyout of $10,000 or more be made public. Wallner contended that only information in the agreement that revealed terms of the agreement was public. The stipulations that Chance release the district from charges constituted “conditions” of the agreement, not “terms,” Wallner contended. Commissioner Cronk rejected that distinction, opting instead for “the plain language of the law and its common and approved usage.” Cronk also wrote in his opinion that the redacted lines did constitute “specific reasons” for the agreement. Wallner had contended that the redacted version already provided legally sufficient reasons for the agreement. The letters of recommendation, Cronk wrote, are “presumptively public.” John Gessner can be reached at john.gessner@ecm-inc. com or facebook.com/sunthisweek.

Golf Guide


Sun Thisweek April 27, 2012

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April 27, 2012 Sun Thisweek

Thisweekend Songs of soldiers, survivors and struggling vets Artists featured on ‘Home Again’ CD to perform at Scoops for Troops event April 29 by Andrew Miller Sun Thisweek

From conception to completion, “Home Again: Songs of the 21st Century Veteran Experience” took just six weeks to complete. Bill Woodson, who recruited the eight artists featured on the album, says it wasn’t hard finding Twin Cities musicians eager to

create a track for the CD about the modern veteran experience. “They all accepted the challenge – everyone just kind of fell in love with the idea,” said Woodson of Apple Valley, an architect by profession who sidelines as a musician and wrote the song “Strength of Will” for inclusion on the CD.

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Woodson created the album in his role as music director of Scoops for Troops, the annual event in Eagan that benefits the families of fallen soldiers in Iraq and Afghanistan. This year’s event on Sunday, April 29, kicks off with a fun/run walk at noon, followed by an ice cream social Bill Woodson from 1 to 5 p.m. at Ring Mountain Creamery, 1965 Cliff Lake music artist, all Road, at which “Home the songwriters on Again” will be available for the CD are from purchase (with a suggested the Twin Cities donation of $10), and five area, among them of the artists featured on James Loney, Edie Rae, Steve Wolff the album will perform. The music on “Home and the five-piece Again,” Woodson said, band Inukshuk Pass, whose speaks of the experience of vocalist, Patti Ryan, conmilitary members and those tributed the painting that connected with them from was used as the cover art on unexplored points of view “Home Again.” – the female vet, the war And three of the artists widow, the father of a fallen on “Home Again” – Lynne, soldier, the vet struggling to Matthew Griswold and Josh fit in upon returning home Revak – are veterans. Lynne served with the Army’s from war. Aside from Rockie 82nd Airborne Division, Lynne, the popular North while Griswold is an Iraq Carolina-based country veteran and Revak saw time

family calendar To submit items for the Family Calendar, email: darcy.odden@ecm-inc.com.

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Wednesday, May 2 Drive One 4UR School fundraiser from 3 to 8 p.m. in the west parking lot at Eastview High School. Take a free 10-minute test drive in a new Apple Valley Ford vehicle and Ford will donate $20 to the Eastview Senior Party. Must be 18 or older with a valid driver’s license. One person per household can participate. Qualified drivers will get a free hot dog combo meal and be entered into a raffle to win a 2013 Ford Explorer. Contact Diana Hogan at the5hogans@ comcast.net to schedule an appointment. Walk-ups also welcome. Thursday, May 3 Lakeville National Day of Prayer from noon to 1 p.m. at Lakeville City Hall, 20195 Holyoke Ave. Saturday, May 5 Kids and More Sale from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. at Ames Arena, 19900 Ipava Ave., Lakeville. Children’s clothing, toys, home decor, sports equipment, men’s and women’s clothing and more. Free parking and admission. Information: www. TreasureHuntSales.com. Spring Fling family fundraiser from 11:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Primrose School of Lakeville North, 9711 163rd St. W., Lakeville. Families attending can enjoy food, bouncers, pony rides, petting zoo, face painting, crafts, silent auction,

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and carnival games. Proceeds will support local charities. Information: www.primroselakeville.com or (952) 4358885. Sunday, May 6 Kids and More Sale from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Ames Arena, 19900 Ipava Ave., Lakeville. Children’s clothing, toys, home decor, sports equipment, men’s and women’s clothing and more. Free parking and admission. Information: www.TreasureHuntSales. com. Blood drives The American Red Cross will hold the following blood drives. Call 1-800-RED CROSS (1-800-733-2767) or visit redcrossblood.org to make an appointment or for more information. • May 1, 12:30 to 6:30 p.m., Messiah Lutheran Church, 16725 Highview Ave., Lakeville. • May 3, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., South Suburban Evangelical Free Church, 12600 Johnny Cake Ridge Road, Apple Valley. • May 5, 9 a.m. to 2 p.m., Lakeville Fire Department, 20190 Holyoke, Lakeville. • Monday, May 7, 1 to 7 p.m., Apple Valley Fire Department – Station 1, 15000 Hayes Road, Apple Valley. Memorial Blood Centers blood drive: • Friday, May 4, 9 to 11:30 a.m., Fantastic Sams, 270 E. Travelers Trail, Burnsville, (952) 890-7267.

in Afghanistan. Though Lynne isn’t on the roster of artists set to perform at Scoops for Troops, he is, in fact, scheduled to be at the event – as a “celebrity scooper,” joining local luminaries such as Eagan Mayor Mike Maguire and WCCO meteorologist Lauren Casey in dishing up ice cream to guests. More about “Home

Again” and Scoops for Troops, proceeds from which will benefit the nonprofit Tribute to the Troops, can be found at www.scoopsfortroops.net. Andrew Miller can be reached at andrew.miller@ ecm-inc.com or facebook. com/sunthisweek.

theater and arts briefs Archaeological mysteries Professor Steven Derfler will present “Archaeological Mysteries of the 1st Century” at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday, May 1, at the Robert Trail Library, 14395 S. Robert Trail, Rosemount. The event is part of the Minnesota Mosiac series with Dakota County libraries; the theme this spring is “Know the Art of the Book.” Geared to adults, the event is free and open to the public. More information is at www.co.dakota.mn.us under the “Library” link.

World War II re-enactment The third annual World War II Weekend will be May 19-20 at Dakota City Heritage Village, 4008 220th St., on the fairgrounds in Farmington. Hours will be 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. on Saturday and 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Sunday. A variety of history organizations will set up encampments and portray American, British, Canadian, Russian and German soldiers.

Admission will be $5 with a nonperishable food item for the local food shelves or $7 without a food item. Children 5 and younger will be admitted free. For more information, visit, www.dakotacity.org.

Arctic author at IMAX Florian Schulz, author and photographer of the book “To the Arctic,” will be at the Great Clips IMAX Theatre at the Minnesota Zoo at 7 p.m. Thursday, May 3, for an evening of Arctic stories and images. Doors open at 6 p.m. Books available for purchase. Free. RSVP by April 30 at http://awlmplsevent. eventbrite.com/.

Children’s art festival The annual Children’s Art Festival exhibit is on display through June 2 at Burnsville Performing Arts Center, 12600 Nicollet Ave. The exhibit features more than 120 pieces of artwork by students from ISD 191 elementary schools. The exhibit is free and open to the public during gallery hours. Call (952) 895-4685 for more information.

‘The Three Bonnies’ DAdance will present “The Three Bonnies” at 7:30 p.m. Friday, June 8, at Burnsville Performing Arts Center, 12600 Nicollet Ave. Tickets are $26 for adults, $19 for seniors and $16 for students and can be purchased at the box office or via Ticketmaster at (800) 982-2787 or ticketmaster. com.

‘Ole & Lena’ renew vows “Ole & Lena’s 50th Anniversary and Vow Renewal” will be performed at 7:30 p.m. Friday, May 11, at Lakeville Area Arts Center, 20965 Holyoke Ave. Tickets are $15. Reservations can be made by calling (952) 985-4640.


Sun Thisweek April 27, 2012

theater and arts calendar To submit items for the Arts Calendar, email: darcy. odden@ecm-inc.com.

Camps The Allegro Choral Academy is now accepting registrations for its “Pitch Perfect” Summer Singing Camp June 18-21 at St. John’s in Lakeville for children ages 6 to 11. Find information and registration materials at www.allegroca.org or (952) 8468585, artisticdirector@allegroca. org. Comedy Sal Demilio with special guest Andy Beningo at 8:30 p.m. Friday, April 27, and Saturday, April 28, at MinneHAHA Comedy Club, 1583 E. First Ave., Shakopee (lower level of Dangerfield’s), (612) 860-9388, www.minnehahacomedyclub. com. Tickets: $13. The Second City Laugh Out Loud Tour will provide entertainment during Comedy for Caring, the Burnsville Rotary’s annual community fundraising event, to be held at 8 p.m. Saturday, April 28, at Burnsville Performing Arts Center, 12600 Nicollet Ave. S. Tickets are $36 orchestra and balcony; $75 VIP meet and greet. Tickets are available at the box office, ticketmaster.com or (800) 982-2787. Concerts Three local handbell ensembles will present “Bell Fantasia” at 7:30 p.m. Friday, April 27, at the Burnsville Performing Arts Center, 12600 Nicollet Ave. Bells of the Lakes, the St. Olaf Handbell Choir and the Northern Lights Ringers will perform. Tickets range from $15 to $25 and can be purchased at the box office, at Ticketmaster.com or by calling (800) 982-2787. South Metro Chorale will present “All Creation Sings” at 7:30 p.m. Saturday, April 28, at St. John the Baptist Catholic Church, 4625 W. 125th St., Savage, and at 4 p.m. Sunday, April 29, at St. John’s Lutheran Church, 20165 Heath Ave., Lakeville. Tickets are $10 for adults, $8 for students and seniors. Purchase tickets by phone at (612) 386­-4636 or email tickets@southmetrochorale.org. Information: www.southmetrochorale.org. Orkestar Bez Ime will perform at 2 p.m. Sunday, April 29, at the Lakeville Area Arts Center. Tickets are $12 for adults and $10 for seniors and students. Tickets are available at the Lakeville Area Arts Center, 20965 Holyoke Ave., or by calling (952) 985-4640. Violin concert by Chad

Hoopes, Minnesota Public Radio’s Artist in Residence, 7 p.m. Saturday, April 29, at the Lakeville Area Arts Center, 20965 Holyoke Ave. Tickets range from $24 to $29 and are available at the arts center and online at www.lakevillemn.gov. Lorie Line’s “Live In The Sunshine” performance, 7:30 p.m. Tuesday, May 8, at Lakeville Area Arts Center, 20965 Holyoke Ave. Tickets are $39 and are available at the arts center or by calling (952) 985-4640.

Dance Twin Cities Ballet will perform “Wizard of Oz The Ballet” May 11-13 at Burnsville Performing Arts Center, 12600 Nicollet Ave. S. Tickets range from $12 to $26 and are available at the box office, via Ticketmaster at (800) 982-2787 or ticketmaster.com. Group discounts are also available. Visit www.TwinCitiesBallet. org or call (952) 452-3163 for more information. Poetry In celebration of National Poetry Month, Caponi Art Park and Learning Center is hosting a poetry performance workshop, “Frankenstein: Bring Your Words to Life,” on Monday, April 30, from 4 to 6 p.m. at the Wescott Library, 1340 Wescott Road, Eagan. Call (651) 4549412 to register. Poet Bill McCarthy will speak at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday, May 1, at the LeDuc Historic Estate, 1629 Vermillion St., Hastings. Free. Information: www.dakotahistory.org or (651) 437-7055. Theater The Chameleon Theatre Circle will present “True Love” at 7:30 p.m. April 27-28 and at 2 p.m. April 29 at the Burnsville Performing Arts Center, 12600 Nicollet Ave. General admission tickets are $20 ($17 for seniors, students, audio description and ASL patrons) in person at the box office, via Ticketmaster at (800) 982-2787 or www.ticketmaster. com. Burnsville High School Theatre Guild will present “Willy Wonka” at 7:30 p.m. April 2628 at Mraz Center, Burnsville High School, 600 E. Highway 13, Burnsville. Tickets are $8 for students, $9 for seniors, and $10 for adults. Tickets can be reserved online at www.MrazCenterTickets.com or purchased at the door. Lakeville North High School will present “A Midsummer Night’s Dream” at 7:30 p.m. April 26-28 and 2 p.m. April 28 in the school auditorium. For ticket information, contact the box of-

fice at (952) 232-3777 or theatreLNHS@gmail.com. Lakeville South High School will present “The Wizard of Oz” at 7 p.m. April 26-28 and at 2 p.m. April 28 in the school auditorium. Tickets are $10 for adults and $5 for students/seniors. Ticket sales begin April 16 from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the LSHS Commons, 21135 Jacquard Ave. Information: (952) 232-3322. Farmington High School Drama will present “Fiddler on the Roof” at 7 p.m. April 26-28 at the Boeckman Middle School auditorium. Tickets are $8 for adults and $5 for students and may be purchased in advance in the first floor office at Farmington High School. Tickets will also be available at the door on performance dates beginning at 6:15 p.m. All seating is general admission and doors will open at 6:30 p.m. “Ole & Lena’s 50th Wedding Anniversary and Vow Renewal” performances will be at 7:30 p.m. Friday, May 11, and Saturday, May 12, at the Lakeville Area Arts Center, 20965 Holyoke Ave. Tickets are $15. Call (952) 985-4640 for information. The Christian Life School Drama Club will present “Fairy

Tale Salad” Friday, May 11, at 7 p.m. and Saturday, May 12, at 2 and 7 p.m. at Christian Life School, 6300 212th St. W., Farmington. Tickets are $8 for adults and $5 for students. Tickets are available at the door or at the school office. More information at www.christianlifeschool.org or (651) 463-4545. Workshops/classes Music Together in the Valley offers classes for parents and their infant, toddler and preschool children in Rosemount, Farmington, Lakeville and Apple Valley. Information: www.musictogetherclasses.com or (651) 439-4219. The Eagan Art House offers classes for all ages. For a complete listing go to www.eaganarthouse.org or call (651) 6755521. Dan Petrov Art Studio in Burnsville offers oil painting classes for beginners, intermediate and advanced skill level painters, www.danpetrovart.com, (763) 843-2734. Teens Express Yourself with Paint, 5 to 7 p.m. Mondays at Brushworks School of Art in Burnsville, www.BrushworksSchoolofArt.com, (651) 214-4732.

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Drama/theater classes for ages 4 and up at River Ridge Arts Building, Burnsville, (952) 736-3644. Special needs theater program (autism-DCD), ages 5 and older, Burnsville, (952) 7363644. Join other 55-plus adults at the Eagan Art House to create beaded jewelry. The Jewelry Club meets on the third Friday of each month from 1 to 3 p.m. Fee is $3 and includes all supplies. Bring any old jewelry you would like to re-make. 3981 Lexington Ave. S., (651) 675-5500. Savage Art Studios, 4735 W. 123rd St., Suite 200, Savage, offers classes/workshops for all ages. Information: www. savageartstudios.com or (952) 895-0375. Soy candle making classes held weekly in Eagan near 55 and Yankee Doodle. Call Jamie

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at (651) 315-4849 for dates and times. $10 per person. Presented by Making Scents in Minnesota. Country line dance classes held for intermediates Mondays 1:30 to 3:30 p.m. at Rambling River Center, 325 Oak St., Farmington, $5/class. Call Marilyn (651) 463-7833. Beginner country line dance classes on Wednesdays, 5:30-7:30 p.m., at the Lakeville VFW, 8790 Upper 208th St. $5/ class. Call Marilyn (651) 4637833. Country line dance classes on Wednesdays at the Lakeville Senior Center, 20732 Holt Ave. Beginners, 9-10 a.m.; Intermediate, 10 a.m.-noon. $5/class. Call Marilyn (651) 463-7833. The Lakeville Area Arts Center offers arts classes for all ages, www.lakevillemn.gov, (952) 985-4640.


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Sports

April 27, 2012 Sun Thisweek

Betzold sisters give boost to Tiger softball Farmington off to 6-1 start

by Andy Rogers Sun Thisweek

When recent college graduates mingle with high school students, they sometimes think, “if I had only known then what I know now.” Mallory Betzold has the opportunity to share her thoughts as an assistant coach with the Farmington softball team, where she was a star in the pitching circle just a few years ago. She spent the last four years at St. Mary’s University in Winona, where she was first-team All-Minnesota Intercollegiate Athletic Conference 2009 and 2011. She tries to pass on knowledge to her sister Ashley, the Tigers’ current pitcher who is following in Mallory’s steps. That is, when Ashley listens. “I just, like, brush her off,” Ashley said with a laugh. “It’s hard not to, but I guess I should listen to her. She knows more than I do ... I thought we’d be fighting a lot more, but we’re not, surprisingly. It’s good, she helps out a lot.” The advice comes in all forms. “I tell her you’re a student and then you’re an athlete,” Mallory said. “Grades are important.” She also brings a college Photo by Andy Rogers perspective on pitching and Farmington’s Ashley Betzold throws a pitch against New Prague on Tuesday. She was the hitting mechanics. winning pitcher in the Tigers’ 6-2 victory. Her sister Mallory Betzold is an assistant coach “In college they had me at Farmington after playing for St. Mary’s University in Winona the past four years.

Panthers’ defense, pitching shutting down opponents Lakeville North edges South, 2-1

by Andy Rogers Sun Thisweek

Lakeville North remains one of the surprises early in the South Suburban Conference baseball season. The Panthers weren’t on any top-10 lists when the season opened. They had few returning starters, and several underclassmen were expected to play important roles. But after a 6-1 start, the Panthers are being noticed. “We knew we’d be inexperienced in terms of guys not playing varsity,” head coach Tony Market said. “But we also knew we were very capable with our pitching staff. We knew we’d be better defensively, and we had to be with the new bats – not a lot of trampoline effect anymore.” The Minnesota State High School League requires teams to use Batted Ball Coefficient of Restitution (BBCOR) bats this season, after the National Federation of State High School Associations banned the use of composite bats. The new bats act more like wood bats with a dampened trampoline effect. With pitchers Jordan Jacobson, who got a complete-game victory against Lakeville South on Monday, and Joel Klinkhammer, who is undefeated this season, the Panthers have allowed 10 runs, fewest in the South Suburban Conference. Eight of those runs were scored by SSC leader and defending state champion Burnsville. “You throw strikes and work fast, (the defense) likes to play behind you and if the defense likes to play behind you, it’s easier to pitch,” Market said. “We’re putting an emphasis on the defensive side of it.” Jacobson had seven strikeouts and was one out

use my legs more, so I can give (Ashley) a head start,” Mallory said. “You get a lot more power.” Before winning 36 games in college while batting .333, Mallory was a star pitcher for Farmington. “I had a really good four years here,” Mallory said. “I know the program always hasn’t been like it was in the past, so we’re trying to build it back up and I’m glad to help.” The sisters say there’s some risk to being on the same team, but so far it’s been a healthy experience for both as they grow their relationship and their abilities as a pitcher and coach. “It could have been a really big positive or a really big negative, but I have a great sister,” Mallory said. Getting into coaching was a goal for Mallory after college. She said she loves the game too much to leave it behind, but it’s been tough to stay in the dugout. “She lives vicariously through me,” Ashley said. Mallory said she would have entered coaching even if her sister wasn’t on the team, but she admits it’s been a nice bonus. “I really like it,” Mallory said. “It’s been tough, but 365 days ago I was the one playing out there.” While in college, Mallory rarely got to see Ashley pitch unless it was a game

in Red Wing – a drivable distance from Winona. Ashley didn’t get much of a chance to see Mallory pitch, either. The two of them have helped the Tigers to one of their best starts in years. After a 6-2 victory over New Prague on Tuesday, the Tigers stand at 6-1 with the loss coming against Chanhassen. “I didn’t think we were going to be this good,” Ashley said. “We’ve come a long way.” Ashley had 13 strikeouts in a 8-0 victory over Rochester Mayo, the team that ended Farmington’s season last year in the section playoffs. She also threw a twohit shutout over Northfield on April 12. She’s been a factor at the plate as well, going 5-for-5 in a victory over Chaska on April 17 and hitting a tworun double against New Prague. Aleah Williamson, Toni Hunsinger, Allie Rice, Ellen Wurst, Rachel Brietich, Taylor Yousse, Molly Berdan and Taylor Haakana have all had key hits and crafty defensive plays when it mattered during Farmington’s run. The Tigers will play Friday at Shakopee. Andy Rogers can be reached at andy.rogers@ecm-inc. com or facebook.com/sunthisweek.

Sports Briefs Cougar softball appreciation day Monday Head coach Colleen Powers and the Lakeville South varsity softball team invite Lakeville youth softball players to the Cougars’ game against Burnsville at 4:15 p.m. Monday. Ten minutes following the game, the coaches and players will hold a 30-minute mini-clinic focusing on throwing, hitting and baserunning. A $5 donation to the Lakeville South Softball Booster club is encouraged.

Correction The photo caption for the story, “Tigers stranding too many runners” on page 15 of the April 20 edition of Sun Thisweek incorrectly identified the Farmington baseball player. Spencer Merle is the player in the photo.

Farmington tennis league open Farmington Area Tennis League is now accepting online registrations for the 2012 season. The league, based in southern Farmington, includes singles and doubles tennis, and occasional interleague competition with other clubs. Any tennis player, regardless of skill level, is invited to sign up. Players do not have to be Farmington residents. Registration deadline is May 12. There is no registration fee.

Photo by Rick Orndorf

Lakeville South’s Nicolas Pecho (9) makes a play while Lakeville North’s Zach Creighton slides during a baseball game at South on Monday. Lakeville North won 2-1. from a shutout in a 2-1 victory against Lakeville South. It was a pitchers’ duel most of the game. South’s Will Lundquist and North’s Jacobson kept their opponents off the scoreboard for the first four innings until North’s Dalton Lehnen broke the tie with a home run in the fifth inning. “He tattooed it,” Lakeville South head coach Al Iversen said. “Other than that it was a good NorthSouth baseball game, just like last year.” Consecutive hits by Neil Engler, Austin Streit and Zach Creighton in the sixth inning gave the Panthers some insurance. Creighton drove in North’s second run. Lakeville South’s Garrett Delich drove home Tyler Schumacher with two outs in the seventh inning, but the game ended when Delich was tagged out in a rundown.

Just about every Panther had a hit, but Market wasn’t happy with North’s three errors. “We have been playing a little tighter,” Market said. “Things kind of bounced around on us today.” The Cougars haven’t put up the wins they expected. The loss to North left them 1-6 overall, and their coaches and players are frustrated. “Tonight was the first time we’ve been out-hit by anybody except for Prior Lake,” Iversen said. “It’s just that timely hitting. We had runners on first and second, and then another inning second and third. You’re almost begging to the baseball gods to get that next hit. That’s been our season. We get close. They’re working their tails off to get that hit. I don’t know who can fix it.” Iversen said he believes the Cougars are close to turning things around. In a 2-0 loss to sixth-ranked

Hopkins on April 19, the Cougars out-hit the Royals 9-6, but no runners crossed home plate. Beating North would have helped lift the Cougars’ spirits. Lakeville South had never beaten Lakeville North in baseball until last year when the Cougars swept the series. Yet, neither team considers the rivalry heated. “It’s just another game,” Market said. “It’s about teaching young people that one game isn’t a big deal. They shouldn’t need a game like this to get jacked up. You have to go play Eagan, Prior Lake and Eastview. Is it fun to beat your crosstown rival? Sure, I guess, but it’s just another game in a tough South Suburban Conference.” Andy Rogers can be reached at andy.rogers@ecm-inc. com or facebook.com/sunthisweek.

Panthers win SSC golf opener

Photo by Rick Orndorf

Lakeville North junior Joseph Smits returns his driver to the bag after hitting a tee shot in a South Suburban Conference boys golf tournament Monday at Minnesota Valley Country Club in Bloomington. Lakeville North won the opening SSC tourney, shooting 305 and finishing one stroke ahead of Prior Lake. Panthers sophomore Freddy Thomas was medalist with a 71.


Eagles boys, Cougars girls dominate Wildcat Invitational Farmington’s Lorencz sets three girls meet records by Mike Shaughnessy Sun Thisweek

Apple Valley and Lakeville South walked away as convincing winners at the Wildcat Invitational track and field meet Tuesday at Eagan High School. The Apple Valley boys, sparked by a victory in the 4x800-meter relay and second-place finishes in three other relays, came in 63 points ahead of Woodbury. Lakeville North was fourth, Eagan fifth and Farmington seventh in the eightteam meet. Lakeville South outclassed a field of 10 teams in the girls meet, scoring 189 points, 83 more than second-place Eagan. Apple Valley, Farmington, Lakeville North and Rosemount finished third through sixth. The Apple Valley team of Alex Brandel, Nick Hughes, Tyler Roberts and Mitch Hechsel won the 4x800 relay in 8 minutes, 16.50 seconds. The Eagles finished second in all three sprint relays. Hechsel also was a winner in the 400 dash in 50.26 seconds. Quinn Hooks emerged from a logjam of six high jumpers who cleared 6 feet, 2 inches to take first in the event. Apple Valley’s Jalen Stewart and Eagan’s Jackson Prestrud and Matt Anderson also

Photo by Rick Orndorf

A crowded pack in the girls 1,600-meter race at Tuesday’s Wildcat Invitational included (from left) Cami Sjoquist of Apple Valley, Chloee Sagmoe of Lakeville North, Megan Lubow of Lakeville South, Taylor Rambo of Rosemount, Alicia Hett of Farmington, Emily Davis of Rosemount and Liz Evenocheck of Rosemount. were among those clearing won the 800 in 2:26.78, 6-2 before a tiebreaker was three hundredths of a second ahead of teammate implemented. Other first-place finish- Kelli Praska. ers in the boys competition Lakeville South’s Annie included Lakeville North’s Brekken ran the 3,200 in Kyle McPhee (pole vault, 11:30.07, winning the event 13-9) and Ben Krynski by 27 seconds. athletes (shot put, 47-5 and discus, Farmington were champions in both 141-5). Eagan junior Danielle girls hurdles races, with Anderson won the girls Nadia Lorencz taking the 1,600-meter run in 5:08.26, 100-meter race in 14.97 and a meet record and the fast- Alyssa Parco winning the est reported time in the state 300 in 45.29. this season. The Wildcats’ Lakeville South won Maddie Gourley, an eighth- three of the relays in the grader, won the 200 dash in girls meet. Rachel Mickelson, Emily Wick, Morgan 25.46 and the 400 in 58.19. Eagan’s Anna VanWyk Pieri and Kaitlin VanWin-

kle teamed to win the 4x200 in 1:46.30. Rose Cozad, Rachel Mickelson, Shaina Burns and Kayt Larson took the 4x400 in 4:02.32. Emma Mickelson, Megan Kilbride, Brekken and Larson were first in the 4x800 in 9:31.48. Lakeville North’s Claire Seivert, Kendall Naatjes, Alexa Trakalo and Angie Anyaogu won the 4x100 relay in 49.90. Lakeville South put its field event strength to good use in the Wildcat Invitational as Pieri cleared 5-6 to win the high jump and Jordyn Thornton swept the throwing events. Thornton’s winning throws were 44-5 in the shot put and 133-11 in the discus. Farmington’s Lorencz left the meet with three first-place finishes. In addition to her 100 hurdles victory, she won the long jump (18-4) and triple jump (37-0 3/4). Lorencz set meet records in all three of her victories. Apple Valley girls swept the top three places in the pole vault, with Kelsey Harms clearing 11-6 to win the event. Mike Shaughnessy is at mike.shaughnessy@ecm-inc. com or facebook.com/sunthisweek.

Sun Thisweek April 27, 2012

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Cougars third at conference golf meet

Photo by Rick Orndorf

Mack Farley of Lakeville South takes a swing during a South Suburban Conference boys golf tournament Monday at Minnesota Valley Country Club in Bloomington. The Cougars finished third with a team score of 311. Lakeville North won with 305 and Prior Lake was second with 306. Freddy Thomas of Lakeville North was the medalist, shooting a 71.

Lakeville track teams shine in events big and small South girls dominate at quadrangular, North teams perform well at Mega Meet

by Andy Rogers Sun Thisweek

The Lakeville South girls track and field team had perhaps its strongest season ever in 2011, but it’s already on pace for a better year in 2012. “With the fifth-best team in the state last year, we are certainly looking for bigger and better things this season,” head coach Andrew Hilliard said. “If we can stay healthy, this team has the potential of being even stronger than last year.” At its own Mini Meet on April 20 against Farmington, Eagan and Rosemount, the Cougars set 78 personal records, the most in one meet in the program’s history. Jordyn Thornton, Shaina Burns, Kayt Larson, and Morgan Pieri ran, leaped and threw to some of the highest marks yet this spring in Minnesota. Burns ran the 100-meter hurdles in 15.48 seconds, a personal record and school record. The time puts her third on the state honor roll. In addition, she ran 47.33 in the 300 hurdles, which currently leads the state. Larson ran 5 minutes, 11.27 seconds in the 1,600, which at the time placed her first on the state honor roll, and Pieri is on top of the state leaderboard in the

high jump. “Kayt is running at a different level than she ever has before,” Hilliard said. Thornton, who holds school records in the shot put and discus, ranks in the top 10 in the state in both events after throwing 40 feet, 8.5 inches in the shot put and 124-8 in the discus at the mini meet. The Lakeville South boys track and field team also has a load of athletes ready to put some new marks in the record book. Lee Bares, who won a state title in the pole vault last season, has already cleared 14 feet. “He is a gifted athlete, has a great work ethic and is a good leader for our team,” Lakeville South boys head coach Jon Gilmer said. Bares’ talent will also be used in the 4x100 relay, 100 dash, high jump and long jump. Nick Bachinski, who finished 22nd in the state

110 hurdles, has laced up his track shoes as well. He also will compete in the high jump, long jump and triple jump. “His body has matured and it looks like he will have a fun and exciting senior season in track,” Gilmer said. “If you were to ask him his favorite (event) it would be the high jump. He would like to get to the magical 7-foot height by the end of the season.”

Lakeville North The Lakeville North track and field teams hosted one of the largest meets in Minnesota – the Lakeville Mega Meet – on April 20. The girls finished second in the 16-team meet. North was third in the boys competition. Prior Lake’s girls and Minnetonka’s boys were team champions. On the girls side, North’s Angie Anyaogu won the 100-meter dash. Max Leake was the best high

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jumper with her teammate Katie Killie not much lower at second place. Emma Erickson won the discus competition as well as the shot put. Taylor Perkins (fifth in the 1600), Lindsey Smits (fourth in the 300 hurdles, fourth in the triple jump), Anne Ferguson (fifth in the high jump), Delaney Miller (third in the discus, fourth in the shot put) and McK-

enzie Hoelmenn (fourth in the discus) helped the Panthers score 89.83 points. On the boys side, the Panthers won the 4x100 relay and finished third in the 4x200. Andrew Anyaogu was second in the triple jump and fifth in the 200. Teammate Ben Krynski had the second-best discus throw of the day, and Mike Manikowski was second in the

shot put. Issac Sandberg (fourth in the 100), Ben Saxton (fifth in the 1,600), Landon Johnson (sixth in the 110 hurdles) and Kyle McPhee (fourth in the pole vault) helped give the Panthers 66 points. Andy Rogers can be reached at andy.rogers@ecm-inc. com or facebook.com/sunthisweek.


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April 27, 2012 Sun Thisweek

iPads come to District 194 Lakeville scholls to receive about 1,600 total

by Aaron M. Vehling Sun Thisweek

A total of 1,600 iPads arrived in Lakeville on April 23 as part of the school district’s iLearn digital integration program, creating electronic/ traditional hybrid classrooms. Students in three academic disciplines – literacy, science and math – will use the devices. At the April 24 School Board meeting, Digital Learning Coordinator Trish Harvey showed a video of some classes using iPads for the first time.

One excited kid cried out upon touching his iPad for the first time, “This feels so new.” Teachers have been and will continue to undergo professional development to learn efficient ways to implement the devices in their curriculum, Harvey said. For the remaining six weeks of school, the district will assess the success of the iPads with the intention of fine-tuning implementation for the fall. “We will use this time to set up parameters for what research will be next year,”

she said. Part of that data collection process includes input from teachers and parents, she added. iLearn is an initiative inspired by Superintendent Lisa Snyder’s technology focus, a policy she has championed since her initial interviews with community members before she was hired last summer. Aaron Vehling can be reached at aaron.vehling@ ecm-inc.com or facebook. com/sunthisweek. Photo submitted

Staff members of the Lakeville school district prepare to unpack and setup about 1,600 iPads on April 23 for use by students as part of a digital learning initiative.


Sun Thisweek April 27, 2012

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April 27, 2012 Sun Thisweek


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April 27, 2012 Sun Thisweek

arts, from 1A Funds were used to enhance the arts center with better seats, a state-of-theart audio system, floors and mirrors for rehearsal rooms, floors in the Black Box Theater, as well as other amenities. “They were very instrumental during the construction phase,” Luther said. “They continue to raise funds to support the BPAC.” When the Lakeville center started, fundraising was critical to its launch. In its first 10 years, the Friends of the Lakeville Area Arts Center has

raised about $830,000. Fundraising has included a “Buy-A-Chair” campaign, which brought in $122,000, and a “BuyA-Brick” effort for donors names to be etched into bricks at the center. Other donations have included Avalon Real Estate Group, developer of the Timbercrest shopping center, donating a $30,000 grand piano. The Lakeville Rotary donated the $37,000 electronic sign at the front of the building. Community members also gave their time and talents toward the remodeling.

Complementary? As the two most visible performance venues in Dakota County, the two arts centers have competed for artists and patrons. A few months ago, both venues had performances by Elvis impersonators in the same week, and they often have like performances on the same weekend nights. The recently-formed Dakota County Regional Arts Collaborative grew, in part, out of some of this overlap. The collaborative hasidentified more than 100 Dakota County arts organizations and artists,

which means they are all seeking places and audiences. One of the collaborative’s major efforts is to increase communication among arts organizations and to assemble a common calendar of events. In some respects, the assets of the Burnsville and Lakeville center dictate their place in the arts scene. The Burnsville center has attracted scores of performers of varying styles, including internationally-known pop musicians Richard Marx and Melissa Manchester, comedians Louie Anderson, Bill Engvall and Sinbad, and local acts such as the Dakota Valley Symphony Orchestra and Chorus and Chameleon Theatre Circle. “We have a tremendous amount of artist performances,” Luther said. Kandice Nelson, the center’s marketing director, pointed out that the facility in not just for arts groups. “We are also host to the Miss Minnesota USA and Miss Minnesota Teen USA pageants,” Nelson said. “Our facility is also used by countless organizations like Burnsville Rotary, Burnsville Chamber of Commerce, and the Burnsville Convention and Visitors Bureau, for their fundraising events.” During the spring, dance competitions take up a lot of weekends as well as dance school recitals. BPAC’s mission is dedicated to fostering the growth, development, and appreciation of the performing arts through the presentation of the broadest possible range of cultural, artistic, and entertainment activities and events. It also strives to provide a home for major performing art groups in the community, while serving as a community center for the visual arts, business, and educational meetings. The facility features a main stage with a capacity to seat more than 1,000 and a Black Box Theatre that seats 150. According to Luther,

the center features as many as eight exhibits each year in the art gallery, which is open to the public free of charge. The facility offers a rehearsal room, meeting rooms, and green rooms, as well as its VIP suites and its upper lobby. The Lakeville center has served as city’s main cultural resource for more than a decade. Opened in 2001, the center in former All Saints Catholic Church has been remodeled into a modern theater. The center provides opportunities for community members to not only see national performing acts but also allows individuals to experience on-stage performing by way of a variety of community groups. Residents of all ages and different art backgrounds are able to learn art media such as pottery, painting, and drawing, as well as lampworking, silver crafting, and more. “It’s a chance for the community to be part of the arts instead of the audience,” said Tom Barnard, the center’s director. He wcited classes ranging in subject matter from working with beads to making teapots and string puppets along with oil, acrylic, and watercolor painting and pottery classes for parents and their children. “Here, community members can participate in as well as observe,” he said of the center’s options for community involvement, which sets the LAAC apart from larger venues that rely solely on the national touring acts and do not offer the number of hands-on activities for community members. St. Paul resident Holly Stone teaches classes at the LAAC and is a professional painter of more than 10 years who teaches oil and acrylic painting to adults at the center in three-week sessions. “I’ve been teaching about 10 years in the Twin Cities area,” she said, including locations

as the Edina Arts Center, the Bloomington and Minnetonka centers for the arts, and in St. Paul through community education. “I really enjoy helping people find their own voice, their own style,” she said. Stone said she was contacted by the center about teaching classes about a year ago. Since, she has developed quite a fondness for the local arts center. “It is wonderful place. Everyone is very friendly,” the professional artist and teacher said. “It’s been a good connection for me.” On average, Stone has five to 10 people in any one of her classes, with attendees coming from all walks of life – a variety of men and women, young and old, and parents and single people. Officials estimate that the center has had more than 300,000 visitors in its first 10 years at events such as the annual Taste of Lakeville, seminars, dance recitals and weddings. “We have something live on our stage almost every weekend of the year, except for holidays,” said Barnard, who is a city employee. . According to Barnard, the theater is not so big that it needs to reach its capacity of 300 to operate profitably, but the center does sell out for most of national acts. According to Barnard, the center is capable of hosting gatherings or any event that requires a large open space. In order to create such a space, the staff retracts auditorium seating. “It can be converted to a dinner theater,” he said, adding that this can be used for business events, weddings, birthdays, anniversaries, and other likestyled functions. “It’s really multi-functional in terms of its use,” Barnard said. Tad Johnson and Aaron Vehling contributed to this report.


SUN THISWEEK April 27, 2012

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Transitway planning marches on Layover facility construction, Robert Street planning advanced by Laura Adelmann

tinue to shuttle passengers to Minneapolis, St. Paul or the Mall of America for easy connections to other transportation systems including the Hiawatha Light Rail. Timing and technology is key to the transitway operations, as routes must coordinate seamlessly with the regional transit system, Dakota County Transportation Director Mark Krebsbach said. Forwarding that mission, commissioners authorized the planned addition of $200,000 for technology that will give buses signal priority at intersections. Commissioners also approved an agreement for an expansion of a 2008 feasibility study that will examine transitway alternatives on Robert Street, running from downtown St. Paul to UMore Park in Rosemount. Dakota County is leading that transitway project in partnership with Ramsey County and names numerous other state and federal entities as stakeholders, as well as 10 surrounding cities that include Eagan and Rosemount. The study is expected to be completed by next year.

SUN THISWEEK

Despite concern regarding possible delays with the opening of Cedar Avenue Bus Rapid Transit, the project also progressed April 24 with authorization for several planned and budgeted funding designations. Dakota County commissioners, acting as the Regional Rail Authority, authorized spending up to $1.5 million of transitway project funds, as budgeted, to design and construct the planned Apple Valley Transit Station vehicle layover facility. It is to be built on vacant land adjacent to the existing transit station and will have space for storing and staging up to 10 BRT vehicles. The layover facility will be owned and maintained by the Minnesota Valley Transit Authority and will include a restroom and vending machines for drivers. Final authorization also was granted to dedicate another $316,100 in Regional Rail levy funds for the purchase of seven sleek BRT buses designed for quick boarding and exiting, planned to provide quarter-hour stops at five stations on Cedar Avenue. Those BRT vehicles are Laura Adelmann is at laura. planned to run on bus-on- adelmann@ecm-inc.com or ly shoulder lanes, while ex- facebook.com/sunthisweek. press bus service will con-

  

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April 27, 2012 Sun Thisweek

k-9, from 1A

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credible K-9 department,” Bellows said to all the officers in attendance. He recalled the “adrenaline rush” of working with the dogs in the police reserves. The dogs, which usually come from central Europe, act as protection for officers, but that is not their only duty. Shadow, for example, can smell up to seven different types of drugs. When Loeffler and Jensen brought out their respective K-9 partners for the demonstration, the dogs were excited to work. They enjoy it and are always at attention, seeking the scents for which they are trained, Vonhof said.

cials that Apple Valley Mayor Mary Hamann-Roland agreed to a plan that builds the stations so the raised walkways could be added later. But, the Apple Valley City Council later opposed the compromise, and instead passed a resolution for walkways to be included as part of transit station construction in the city. Regional Rail Authority Chair Will Branning, whose district includes Apple Val-

‘A strong bond’ Over the course of four to five months of training, the dogs and their handlers develop the kind of tightknit relationship one would expect of a man and his dog involved in high-stress scenarios. “It’s a strong bond,” Jensen said. “I spend more time with (Zeus) than I do my wife and son.” This comes into the fore whenever the dogs are used to help solve or deter crime, Vonhof said. “Every time we’ve had one of them apprehend a dangerous criminal safely, so officers are not injured; every time we had them trap or find a lost person in the woods or somewhere; every time we’ve found illicit drugs, that tradition of excellence has carried on,” he said. The dogs can be used to find drugs in 10-15 minutes that officers alone could take four hours to find. Jensen described such a case when a dog was able to find two joints buried deep in a box truck. Sometimes dogs can smell the residue of marijuana use, even if a vehicle or person does not have any of the drug on them. That is because they are trained to seek out a scent and not necessarily the physical drug. Police cannot legally search a car without a warrant, probable cause or consent of the driver, and a scent can trigger suspicion. “Courts have said if a dog alerts, that allows us to search a vehicle more ... or use it as reasoning for a search warrant,” Loeffler said. For Jensen, having the protective presence of Zeus and Shadow is a powerful feeling. “I’ve been a cop for eight years and have been to far too many police officer funerals,” he said. “These dogs help keep officers safe.” Of course, a particularly dangerous situation could mean the life of the dog. “God forbid if I have to put my dog in that situation,” Jensen said. “I’ll mourn my dog ... miss my dog, but if he can keep an officer safe he did his job and he died a hero.” Aaron Vehling can be reached at aaron.vehling@ecm-inc. com or facebook.com/sunthisweek.

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ley, said without the walkways, the Apple Valley City Council may not approve a building permit for the stations’ construction. “So they’re going to hold us hostage?” asked County Commissioner Paul Krause. “It’s not holding you hostage,” Branning said. “You either comply with their resolution or you ask for amendments (to the city’s resolution).” “That’s an ultimatum in my mind, which is the same thing as holding someone hostage,” Shouweiler said. “If that’s the case, we have

no choice than to say well, we don’t get a building permit, we don’t open a line.” In an interview with Sun Thisweek, Hamann-Roland said the BRT runs through the heart of Apple Valleyand that the system should be built so people feel safe using it. She said the city is willing to risk slowing the BRT project to ensure that development of the walkway does not cause multiple disruptions to businesses and residents. “We want to do it right,” she said. “We want to ef-

ficiently build Bus Rapid Transit so people ride it, and we want to build it so transit-oriented development occurs.” County Transportation Director Mark Krebsbach said he will continue discussions with the city to resolve the issues.

This summer, the Minnesota Department of Transportation plans to begin a $7.5 million road-resurfacing project on Cedar Avenue (Trunk Highway 77) between 138th Street in Apple Valley and the Minnesota River bridge in Bloomington. According to the state, Driving distractions the work is set to begin Aug. Cedar Avenue’s transi- 6 and finish Oct. 11. tion from a road to a transitway has greatly affected Laura Adelmann is at laura. Apple Valley businesses and adelmann@ecm-inc.com or commuters, and the incon- facebook.com/sunthisweek. venience is expected to continue.

Thisweek Newspapers Farmington and Lakeville  

Weekly newspaper for the cities of Farmington and Lakeville, Minnesota

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