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www.SunThisweek.com NEWS Food truck rules in Burnsville Food trucks arrived in Burnsville last year, and with them comes a host of regulatory issues. Page 2A

Bringing Christians together The Rev. Paul Jarvis of St. Joseph Church in Rosemount is serious about promoting ecumenicism among area congregations. Page 4A

February 15, 2013 | Volume 33 | Number 51

Boundaries back on the table in 191 Years without change have left unbalanced schools by John Gessner SUN THISWEEK

OPINION

School District 191 Superintendent Randy Clegg amplified his call for attendance-boundary changes Feb. 7, telling School Board members that the current elementary-school boundaries are inefficient and concentrate poverty at

SKY OAKS ‘RACIALLY IDENTIFIABLE’ One district school, Sky Oaks Elementary in Burnsville, is working on an integration and improvement plan after being labeled as “racially identifiable” by the Minnesota Department of Education. See story on Page 9A. some schools. Avoiding concentrated poverty, Clegg said during a board workshop, “is one of your best returns on investment” for improving student achievement. Unchecked, concen-

trated poverty begins to affect learning for all students in a school at a certain point, and can harm a school’s reputation even sooner, Clegg said. The workshop discussion set the stage for what

‘Taming of the Shrew’

The bestselling youngadult author of “Shine” and the “Internet Girls” trilogy is set to talk at the Galaxie Library on Feb. 23. Page 17A

SPORTS

could be the district’s first boundary changes since 1996, when newly redrawn lines accompanied the opening of a new elementary school, Harriet Bishop in Savage. Changes wouldn’t come until the 2014-15 school year, giving the district time to adjust its bus routes, Clegg said. Board members agreed to review a proposed set of boundary guidelines, including a guarantee of socioeconomic balance

across the district. After that, Clegg said, he’ll appoint a team to study the boundaries, gather opinions and make recommendations for the board. Boundary changes are politically fraught, as the board learned when a facilities task force it appointed recommended new lines that would have sent 774 elementary students to different schools. Many parents protested, See BOUNDARIES, 9A

Pornography: ‘An economy of pain’ Topic will be addressed during Freedom Weekend in Lakeville, Burnsville, Rosemount

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Editor’s note: miliated, shamed This story is the and cut off from third installment in those most impora Sun Thisweek setant in their lives. ries on human trafMost of the local ficking that began men interviewed in the Feb. 1 edifor this story suftion. All the stories fered mental, are at www.SunThisweek. physical and/or sexual com. abuse as children, a common experience for sex by Laura Adelmann and pornography addicts, SUN THISWEEK Pornography is a bil- according to nationally lion-dollar worldwide known sexual addiction expert Dr. Mark Laaser, predator. It lures with lust and owner of Faithful and lies, connives and shames, True, a recovery center in cheapens and steals lives, Eden Prairie. He offers workshops wrecks marriages, defor men and women strugmeans sex and the victims gling with sexual behavPhoto by Rick Orndorf it entices. iors including fantasy, Some Dakota County Burnsville High School theater members rehearsed a scene from Shakespeare’s classic masturbation, fetishes and comedy “The Taming of the Shrew.” From left are senior Michael Hundevad, junior men lured through por- pornography use. Bram Car, junior Ian Fee and sophomore Tessa Nania. The play opened Feb. 14 and nography’s broad paperThe men who shared continues Feb. 15-16 and Feb. 21-23 at 7:30 p.m. at the school’s Mraz Center for the and-video entryway found See PORN, 7A themselves trapped, huPerforming Arts, 600 E. Highway 13. Tickets are $8.

CSM still committed to Lockheed site Twin Cities developer says it will resubmit application in next few months by Jessica Harper SUN THISWEEK

Eagan skaters win conference The Eagan boys hockey team is the South Suburban Conference champion for second straight year. Page 10A

ONLINE To receive a feed of breaking news stories, follow us at twitter.com/ SunThisweek. Discuss stories with us at facebook.com/ SunThisweek

Two months after withdrawing its plans to redevelop the Lockheed Martin property in Eagan, CSM representatives say the company intends to resubmit plans for the site in the near future. “We are definitely committed to moving forward with developing this property,” said Tom Palmquist, vice president of commercial development for CSM. “But I think it needs to be market driven.” Palmquist said he expects CSM will resubmit a planned development application in the next few

File photo

Representatives of CSM say the company intends to resubmit a planned development application in the next few months to turn the Lockheed Martin property in Eagan into a retail development. The developer withdrew its application in December while awaiting the results of a traffic study. months. neapolis, purchased the heed Martin announced CSM Eagan, a subsid- property off Pilot Knob its plans to vacate its iary of CSM Corp. of Min- Road in 2011 after Lock- 620,000-square-foot cam-

pus in 2013. The developer submitted a proposal last spring to turn the 51-acre site into a large-scale retail development. CSM withdrew its application in December while awaiting results of a traffic study by Dakota County. The study examined traffic on Pilot Knob Road in Eagan and its findings were presented in January. “The results of the traffic study solidified certain aspects,” Palmquist said. Palmquist said the company is still interested in bringing retail to the site, but in doing so will require a large anchor. The company is also looking at potentially adding a 40,000- to 70,000-square-foot medical office to further complement retail on the site, he said. See CSM, 8A

No cuts seen next Decorated Eagan cop retires health,” the He had spent five year in District 191 by Jessica Harper my 55-year-old Eagan years as a Dakota SUN THISWEEK

INDEX Opinion . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4A Sports . . . . . . . . . 10A-11A Announcements . . . . . 11A Public Notices . . . . . . . . .12 Classifieds . . . . . . 13A-15A

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Proposed budget taps reserves by John Gessner SUN THISWEEK

No cuts are proposed in the 2013-14 budget for Burnsville-Eagan-Savage School District 191. Administrators presented to the School Board Feb. 7 a budget that raises general-fund spending from $111.76 million

this school year to $114.97 million next year. Board Member Ron Hill, bracing for recommended cuts in programs or staff, was told there aren’t any. “There’s no reductions,” Lisa Rider, executive director of business services, told Hill. “We have only added. But you See BUDGET, 12A

Over the past two decades, Eagan police officer Bob Wegner has seen it all: drug smugglers carrying several pounds of meth and criminals hiding in odd places. But now Wegner has left crime fighting for a more relaxing life. Wegner retired in December after serving on the force for 24 years. “I want to enjoy life while I still have

resident said. County sheriff’s Wegner said deputy and served he looks forward as a military police to taking on new officer before that. challenges but will “Bob could almiss the camarade- Bob Wegner ways be depended rie among Eagan upon,” McDonald police officers. said of working The West St. Paul na- with Wegner as a rookie. tive started on the Eagan “He gave so much advice police force alongside in those early days.” Chief Jim McDonald in Since then, Wegner has 1988. But unlike McDonSee WEGNER, 13A ald, Wegner was no rookie.

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2A February 15, 2013 SUN THISWEEK - Burnsville - Eagan

Rapid-fire Shakespeare Apple Valley legislator proposes

tax credits for hiring veterans Unemployment rate is 23 percent for state’s vets by T.W. Budig ECM CAPITOL REPORTER

Photo by Rick Orndorf

Eastview High School earned a “starred performance” rating – the high school theater equivalent of a state athletic title – for its presentation of “The Complete Works of William Shakespeare (Abridged)” at the 2013 State One-Act Play Festival held Feb. 7 at the St. Catherine University campus in St. Paul. Cuong Duong and Jake Speikers (above) were joined by Jaclyn Anderson as the three-actor cast zipped through the comedies, histories and tragedies of the Shakespearean canon. For more photos from Eastview’s state one-act performance, go online to www.SunThisweek.com.

Rep. Anna Wills called her legislation a good first step. A first-term Republican serving Rosemount and a portion of Apple Valley in District 57B, Wills is proposing a tax credit to spur the hiring of military veterans. Minnesota veterans endure an unemployment rate of 23 percent, Wills said. This double-digit rate is starkly contrasted by the state’s seasonally adjusted unemployment rate in December showing the general unemployment at 5.5 percent. The state’s unemployment rate for veterans is one of the highest in the nation, Wills said. “We’re excited to have broad, bipartisan support,” she said of her bill. Wills lauded the proposal as a “win-win” for Minnesota.

She is teaming up with Sen. Chuck Wiger, DFLMaplewood, in her tax credit proposal. “Totally unacceptable,” Wiger said of the unemployment rate among veterans. Although the lawmakers do not have an overall cost of their proposal, they envision the state offering a $3,000 tax credit for a business hiring a disabled veteran, a $1,500 tax credit for hiring an unemployed veteran and a $500 tax credit for hiring a veteran. The taxes generated by getting the 30,000 unemployed veterans back to work, Wills believes, would cover the cost of the tax credit program. Wills and Wiger view their proposal as another tool in veterans employment. Democratic Secretary of State Mark Ritchie, who appeared at a Capitol press conference for

the bill’s unveiling, spoke of many ripples coming off seemingly small pebbles. Dennis Davis, chief translation officer for Metafrazo, a firm focusing on veteran hiring practices, theorizes the lack of a sizable activeduty military presence in the state contributes to the high unemployment rate. “They don’t understand the culture,” he said of potential employers. Wills’ legislation is supported by veterans advocacy groups, including the Military Action Group, the United Veterans Legislative Council, the Minnesota Assistance Council for Veterans and the Association of the United States Army. Democratic Gov. Mark Dayton has offered a number of veterans initiatives in his proposed state budget. He is proposing to ex-

pand the Minnesota G.I. Bill by $1 million and slated another $1 million for county veteran service office grants. Dayton is proposing $400,000 in ongoing funding for the honor guard program that assists at veterans’ funerals, and $200,000 in permanent funding for the Gold Star Program to assist the families of veterans killed in action. He is also including $425,000 for a new state veterans cemetery in Fillmore County, and $5 million for information technology upgrades at the Minnesota Department of Veterans Affairs. This should help ensure high-quality health care is delivered for state veterans, according to the administration. T.W. Budig can be reached at tim.budig@ecm-inc. com or facebook.com/sunthisweek.

Rules for food trucks Burnsville weighs regulations for culinary newcomers by John Gessner SUN THISWEEK

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Now that the growing food-truck movement has made its way to Burnsville, city officials are working their way through a host of regulatory issues the businesses bring with them. City staffers will develop an ordinance covering topics from permitted locations for the trucks to whether they can sell food alongside nonprofit concession stands at ballgames. Current city ordinances regulate door-to-door sales and outdoor sales in which a vendor camps out in one place for weeks or months. They don’t fully address location-hopping food trucks, although the City Council made some changes last year to allow the trucks. Suburbs in general have done little yet to clarify regulations for mobile food vendors, Community Development Director Jenni Faulkner said. “This really is a new kind of thing,” she said at a Feb. 12 work session. Three food trucks were licensed by the city last year. Proprietors of two — The Wicked Palate and Motley Crews Heavy Metal Grill — told the council they’re amenable to regulations the city is considering. One of the changes made last year allows vending on to employees of a business on the business’ property, so long as the vendor is invited or has permission. The Wicked Palate has sold food at corporate sites in Burnsville such as Northern Tool and Frontier Communications, said proprietor Dan

Gustafson, a former City Council member who operates the truck with his wife. Motley Crews, which opened in September, was invited to work the grand opening at the new Best Buy retail location at 14141 Aldrich Ave S. and to sell food there on Black Friday, said proprietor Marty Richie of Lakeville, who has taken his truck to other cities. Proposed regulations would generally prohibit vending in rights-ofway, consistent with current city code. Ice cream trucks are allowed because they’re on the move. The city would determine rights-of-way where food trucks could use onstreet parking without creating traffic or pedestrian hazards. Such spots would most likely be in the Heart of the City. “The less things stop in the middle of the road, the better off we’ll all be. ... Just day-to-day traffic in Burnsville is challenging enough,” Police Chief Eric Gieseke said. The prospect of food trucks in city parks has raised concerns with the Burnsville Athletic Club and Baseball Association 191, Mayor Elizabeth Kautz said. The BAC, which sells concessions at Sue Fischer Fields, and BA 191, which sells at Alimagnet Park, flow their profits back into park facilities and youth sports. The city is also a nonprofit concessionaire, notably at the Lac Lavon Park softball complex. Parks staffers recommend that food-vending permits for parks with an existing concessionaire be granted only with the concessionaire’s approval.

Gustafson and Richie said they’d be willing to not sell the same items the concessionaires are selling when working those parks. Gustafson said he wants to sell food at weeknight adult softball games the city operates. He said he worked some sporting events last summer under agreements with nonprofit concessionaires. “... Just serving lunches does not make for a living in Burnsville,” said Gustafson, who has limited his business to the city and said he wants to stay here. “You need something to do in the evening.” Council Member Dan Kealey said the nonprofits might make more money by making deals to allow food trucks. There’s an “enormous” market for more interesting fare at local ballgames than “stuff purchased at Sam’s Club and resold over the counter,” Kealey said. Proposed food-truck regulations also include an annual fee on the businesses and performance standards such as hours of operation and sign rules. Officials don’t propose limiting the number of vendors or barring those that already have a permanent business location in Burnsville. Writing the ordinance will take about two months and include hearings before the parks and planning commissions, officials said. John Gessner can be reached at john.gessner@ecm-inc. com or facebook.com/sunthisweek.

Creation Science S U N D A Y

February 24, 2013

Featuring Creation Scientist

Dr. Pat Briney PhD Microbiology University of Arkansas He will be speaking at 9:30am, 10:30am, & 6:30pm

Meeting at: Creekside Community Center* 9801 Penn Ave., Bloomington, MN ph. 612.310.0559 • www.metrobaptisttc.org *The City of Bloomington does not sponsor, endorse or have a relationship with organizations which hold meetings and events at Creekside Community Center unless specifically stated otherwise.


SUN THISWEEK - Burnsville - Eagan February 15, 2013 3A

Keeping bus drivers at the wheel Farmington resident hopes unemployment compensation for school bus drivers will improve retention by Jennifer Chick SUN THISWEEK

One Farmington school bus driver hopes to change unemployment compensation to include school bus drivers who are not employed in the summer. Kathy Plumley of Farmington drives a school bus for Durham School Services, a bus company that provides buses for Burnsville-Savage-Eagan District 191. She has been driving a school bus for four years after retiring from IBM. With no unemployment benefits available during the summer months, Plumley watches as many of her fellow trained school bus drivers leave in the spring to find other jobs. “We have a lot, a lot, of single parents that decide to get their CDL licenses to drive school bus,” she says, “and I’m seeing them start to leave. I think that’s not right. She says the lack of unemployment benefits causes high turnover in a career where students need consistency. School bus

drivers don’t only transport students, she said, they pass on observations to teachers, serve as spokespersons for the school system and are the first authority figures students encounter each morning. “The positive (or negative) atmosphere on the bus can set the tone for the rest of the day,” Plumley wrote in a draft petition she hopes to circulate to gain support for her idea. Plumley can’t understand why construction workers, landscapers, and even, in some cases, entertainment workers, like actors, stagehands, television producers, ballet dancers, and opera singers, can collect unemployment compensation between seasons when bus drivers can’t for the two months they are unemployed. On Feb. 1, Plumley and two fellow bus drivers, Kim Johnson, Plumley’s daughter, who also drives for Durham School Services, and Chris Rinehart, who drives for Marschall Lines out of Farmington, met

Suspect charged in theft spree at apartments by Andrew Miller SUN THISWEEK

A Minneapolis man is facing felony charges in connection with multiple thefts from vehicles – and the theft of a BMW sedan – at an Apple Valley apartment complex late last year. Two days after the eight separate theft incidents were reported at Kingston Green apartments, 15601 Foliage Ave., police in Minneapolis located the stolen car, and arrested 21-yearold Christopher J. Payne, while responding to a report of a disturbance. Payne, who police say was in possession of burglary tools as well as the key fob for the BMW when he was taken into custody, was charged in district court recently with two felonies – motor vehicle theft and theft over $1,000. The criminal complaint gives the following account: Apple Valley officers responded to the Kingston Green apartments, Building B, on Nov. 13 of last year after receiving several reports of thefts from an underground garage. Seven victims reported an array of items stolen from their vehicles – cell phones, phone char-

gers, checks, coins, garage door openers, a GPS system and clothing, among other belongings. An eighth victim reported a more substantial loss – his 2008 BMW sedan, valued at $75,000. On Nov. 15, an unrelated police call in Minneapolis led to Payne’s arrest and recovery of the BMW. A Chevy Malibu reported stolen in Burnsville earlier that day was also recovered from the scene, and police found the key to that vehicle in Payne’s backpack, the complaint said. A woman was arrested along with Payne but she has not been charged in connection with the Apple Valley crimes. Payne agreed to speak with police and admitted stealing the BMW and rummaging through vehicles in the apartment complex’s garage, the complaint said. The stolen BMW has since been returned to its owner, police said. If convicted of both charges, Payne faces a maximum penalty of 15 years in prison and $30,000 in fines. Andrew Miller can be reached at andrew.miller@ ecm-inc.com or facebook. com/sunthisweek.

with state Rep. Patrick Garofalo, R-Farmington. According to Plumley, Garofalo said he would do some research into the issue in other states. “He’s going to pursue it,” Plumley said. “He was so wonderful, not just to listen to us and take time out of his schedule, but saying that he and his staff will do some work.” Garofalo said it’s unlikely the law will change because of cost. “If the economy were better and things were going well, it would be an easier sell,” Garofalo said in a phone conversation. “I just don’t see the money there to pay for it. When you expand the pool. Someone’s got to pay for it.” But, he will study the issue, optimistic that there might be other ways to help those drivers who are struggling. Plumley first learned of unemployment compensation from Wisconsin bus drivers who were subbing for Durham. Those bus drivers said under Wiscon-

sin law, they are eligible to receive unemployment compensation during the summer. Durham School Services is the nation’s second largest student school transportation provider, working in 32 states. In some of those other states, the company’s school bus drivers do receive unemployment compensation. Plumley said with her small pension, Medicare and Social Security, she can stretch her budget to fill the summer months, but for other bus drivers, that’s just not possible. “It’s breaking my heart that they end up going to other companies that will provide 12 months employment,” she said. “It’s hard on the drivers, it’s hard on the aides, it’s hard on the students.” Plumley drives a bus for students with special needs. “It’s very rewarding,” she said. “When one of the kids looks at you and says, ‘I love you. Can we play some music?’ It makes it all worthwhile.”

Police: Burnsville traffic stop turns up marijuana, large amount of cash Police say a traffic stop prompted by an expired vehicle registration led to the discovery of more than a third of a pound of marijuana and thousands of dollars in cash. Dymoul Chhoun, 22, of Burnsville, was charged Feb. 4 with two felonies – sale and possession of marijuana – in connection with the incident. The criminal complaint gives the following account: A Burnsville patrol officer pulled the vehicle over at McAndrews Road and Burnhaven Drive the night of Oct. 19, 2012, after running a check on the vehicle and learning its registration had expired. As the officer approached, he smelled the “strong odor of fresh marijuana,” the complaint said, and the driver admitted there was marijuana in the vehicle.

The officer had the three occupants – including Dymoul, who was a passenger in the back seat – step out of the vehicle, and a subsequent search turned up a small amount of marijuana in the center console, as well as two backpacks containing a much larger amount of the drug in the rear passenger area. Inside the backpacks were seven small bags containing 165.45 grams, or about 6 ounces, of marijuana, according to the complaint. Police found $7,260 cash on Chhoun, who admitted the marijuana was his and also admitted selling marijuana to the driver of the vehicle, the complaint said. If convicted, Chhoun faces a maximum penalty of five years in prison and a $10,000 fine for each felony count. — Andrew Miller

Bill would regulate dog, cat breeders by Howard Lestrud ECM POLITICAL EDITOR

The current session of the Minnesota Legislature marks the sixth year an animal bill has been introduced to regulate dog and cat breeders. The Dog and Cat Breeder Regulation Bill aims to help eliminate dog and cat breeding practices and conditions that cause inhumane treatment and abuse. Regulation is supported in the bill language and would involve registration and licensing, annual inspections and enforcement and penalties. This legislation also aims at preventing the propagation of puppy and kitty mills. Sen. John Marty, DFLRoseville, is chief author in the Senate, says there are “sad illustrations” of dogs and cats being abused in less-than-favorable surroundings. “Lots of breeders are very good breeders, love pets and animals and make a living raising and selling them,” Marty said. Other breeders “cram things more tightly together” and pay less attention to the welfare of animals and are more concerned about making money with their business. The legislation does not target small, hobby breeders that fall below the threshold of 10 or more adult animals and more than five total lit-

ters in a year, said Nancy Minion, who for 19 years has run the nonprofit Second Chance Animal Rescue. Animal bills “are tough to get passed,” Minion said. She has worked on animal legislation for 24 years as a citizen, she said. Minion’s nonprofit organization is a member of the Speak Up for Dogs and Cats coalition working to pass legislation to regulate the dog and cat breeding industry. It has been reported on the Animal Folks MN website that over 220 Minnesota veterinarians and vet technicians have signed a petition in support of breeder regulation. More than 50 Minnesota animal organizations reportedly have joined in support. It is also reported that over 18,000 petitions signed by Minnesotans in support of commercial dog and cat breeder regulation were delivered to state legislators. Marty and Minion both express optimism that the legislation will pass this session and reach Gov. Mark Dayton’s desk for a signature. All breeders will be required to register, Marty said, but only the larger breeders will be required to be licensed and inspected. Dog and cat breeding is big business for some breeders, who have as many as

500 or more dogs or cats, Marty said. “In this case you are talking about a huge operation and a small licensing and inspection fee is not an onerous thing when other businesses have much more expensive fees and registration fees,” Marty said. Minion said she has rescued many animals that have been abused at breeding facilities. Opposition to the dog and cat breeder legislation has held up passage in previous years, Minion said. It comes from a variety of areas, she said. One of the opposition groups represents agricultural interests. Minion says they use a “slippery slope argument” that if you regulate dog and cat breeders, then you will come after the farms. “We are regulating the dog and cat breeding industry,” she said. Other opposition comes from breeders. “They’ve never been regulated before and don’t want to be,” she said. There is one situation where breeders are regulated by the U.S. Department of Agriculture. That’s when a breeder sells animals wholesale to pet shops or other brokers or breeders. The USDA is not an enforcement agency, however, and only a regulatory agency. When the USDA observes unfavorable situations, it is-

sues a violation and asks the breeders to comply and fix the problems. The general public, Minion said, is becoming more aware of abuse of animals and when they notice something that is not quite right, they contact law enforcement more freely. The current legislation was reduced in length after supporters met with breeders. “There are many good breeders in Minnesota,” Minion said. “This is a bill to address a problem, this is a bill not to put anyone out of business, or not a bill to hurt anybody,” she added. The legislation will “bring us up to speed with other states and to make sure there are not situations where animals are suffering and are hidden from the public,” Minion said. “It is a community issue,” she believes. Thirty-two states currently have dog and cat breeder regulation. Minnesota reportedly is one of the top puppy producing states with some of the largest kennels in the United States. A rally supporting the dog and cat breeder bill is planned from 3 to 4 p.m. in the State Capitol Rotunda Tuesday, Feb. 19. Hundreds are expected to attend. Howard Lestrud is at howard.lestrud@ecm-inc.com.

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4A February 15, 2013 SUN THISWEEK - Burnsville - Eagan

Opinion That Dakota County congregations all may be one by the Rev. Paul Jarvis SPECIAL TO SUN THISWEEK

“My prayer is not for them alone. I pray also for those who will believe in me through their message, that all of them may be one, Father, just as you are in me and I am in you. May they also be in us so that the world may believe that you have sent me. I have given them the glory that you gave me, that they may be one as we are one — I in them and you in me — so that they may be brought to complete unity. Then the world will know that you sent me and have loved them even as you have loved me.” – Jesus’ farewell discourse to his disciples in the Gospel of John 17: 2021 Christians are supposed to be together! The movement among Christians promoting Christian unity, as everyone knows, is the ecumenical movement. It is the attempt by Christian Church – in its broadest sense, throughout its various traditions – to practice what Our Lord prayed for on the night before he died for us. During one recent week, all sorts of Christians prayed for unity as Christ wills it. Not necessarily how any particular tradition or individual Christian would like to see it … which is usually in conformity with one’s tradition. As one of the first congregations established in Rosemount, we at St. Joseph Church have considered it our duty and privilege to join in this prayer

Guest Columnist

The Rev. Paul Jarvis for unity. In fact, as an assembly and as individuals, St. Joe’s parishioners are right now praying for individual Christian communities, by name, within Rosemount and neighboring cities. We’re praying that they grow in doing God’s will. Loving God … others … oneself. We ask that other communities pray for ours. Praying for each other is important, but just the beginning. Christian disciples of different traditions also need to spend time with each other. We might just learn something. And move beyond misinformation and prejudice. I have found in my life that when folks only associate with like-minded people, virtually living in separate worlds, it’s relatively easy to “them”-ify others. To think “them” weird. Perhaps even demonize “them.” Certainly to not give a hoot about “them.” This is why praying for other Christian denominations and congregations during this week of prayer for Christian unity – wishing their well, rather than wishing them gone or corrected or absorbed – needs to be accompanied by breaking through social barriers, and

spending time with “them.” To de“them”-ify other denominations’ Christians. I ask Christian readers, When was the last time you actually sought out the company of another Christian community’s members? Not to theologically argue or convert. But to get together. The occasional wedding and funeral aside – which are not exactly conducive to interdenominational fellowship – most Christians keep within their sectarian walls. And pastors: When was the last time you sought fellowship with another denomination’s pastor … outside of periodic meetings with community leaders? I’ve been blessed here in Rosemount. When I arrived at my new assignment one and a half years ago, two pastors reached out to me for fellowship: Pastor Per Nelsen of the Community of Hope, and Pastor Bill Goodwin of Lighthouse Christian Church. I now periodically meet with Per for lunch, just to talk. And only incidentally to creatively think of ways to collaborate. I’ve come to expect Bill Goodwin to be good enough to show up at St. Joseph Church events that we’ve invited area congregations to. And I try to return the favor. At St. Joe’s Leprechaun Days Tailgate Party and Fireworks Watch last summer, I humbly let Bill think he won the Commode Race between us. It was quite ecumenical of me. Last Fall, Pastor Karen Bruins of Rosemount United Methodist invited

St. Joe’s to join with them in resurrecting a dormant tradition: an ecumenical Thanksgiving Service on Thanksgiving Eve. True to the ecumenical spirit, Karen invited me to preach at the service in her congregation. Next year, the St. Joseph family is hosting the extended family’s gathering, and Pastor Bruins will be preaching. Last Good Friday, Easter Lutheran Church in Eagan invited congregations like St. Joe’s into their “Cross Walk.” It was a veritable United Nations of denominations taking turns in carrying that heavy wooden cross. And it was beautiful. Come 11 a.m. on the first Saturday in October, we’re hoping many pastors will join me and Deacon Steve Boatwright in blessing pets, farm animals, exotic beasts at our Blessing of the Animals. I figure half of those at the annual blessing are from other congregations. Praying for other congregations by name, praying for Christian unity is an important beginning. But in order to keep right with Jesus’ farewell wish for us, we need to be together. If you’ve got some ideas of how Christians of all shapes and stripes can come together … just to be together … please let me know. I’ll try them out with my new pastor-friends. The Rev. Father Paul Jarvis is pastor at St. Joseph Church and School. He can be reached at Paul.Jarvis@StJosephCommunity.org. Columns reflect the opinion of the author.

Church gives Valentine’s Day gifts that won’t be forgotten by Don Heinzman SUN THISWEEK

Members of a church in St. Bonifacious gave five couples a Valentine they won’t forget – a free wedding worth at least $1,500. Pastor John Braland of the Freshwater Community Church came up with the idea after realizing many couples want to get married but can’t afford the expense of the wedding. So he, his staff and volunteers removed all the barriers by providing at no charge: the wedding license, the space, the photographer, the music, the printed program, the reception and even the wedding cake. Over the “Wedding Weekend” of Feb. 8-10, Pastor Braland married a couple on Friday night and four brides and grooms on Saturday in separate ceremonies to the delight of many guests. The five were picked out of those who

Sun Thisweek Columnist

Don Heinzman responded to an appeal on Facebook. On Sunday of Valentine week, 14 couples renewed their wedding vows. The church supplied 19 sheet cakes for all the couples. Braland explains the reasoning of offering free weddings. Marriage is the bedrock of society. Married couples build better families, and better families make better communities. So you are wondering — what’s the catch? There is none. The couples do not have to be members of the church. In

fact, they don’t even have to be Christians. They did have to attend premarital counseling as part of a “Happily Ever After Marriage” series, to make sure they were ready for marriage. “We said if you say ‘I do,’ we say ‘We do,’ ” he said. Pastor Braland figures that, including a reception, the church is saving each couple up to $2,000. The 900 members of the church are paying the bills, because they believe this is one way to build better families and a better community. Pastor Braland has been getting positive reaction to the free weddings since the story by Todd Moen broke in the Waconia Patriot newspaper. The pastor probably would offer free weddings again on a smaller scale. This is an idea other churches should try, Braland agreed.

What about those who make a living selling wedding services to married couples? The pastor figures there are enough weddings to go around, saying these won’t make a dent in the wedding market. Vanessa Martinson, the church office manager who coordinated the wedding weekend, said, “We want to be a church that gives something and reaches out and helps the community.” With all the sad news lately, she said, it’s nice to have a good-news story that helps people. Come to think about it, that’s the real message of Valentine’s Day. Don Heinzman, an ECM columnist and former editor of the Elk River Star News, can be reached at don.heinzman@ecm-inc.com or facebook.com/sunthisweek. Columns reflect the opinion of the author.

Student ‘engagement’ declining dramatically – and what schools can do by Joe Nathan SUN THISWEEK

What can 5- and 6-year-olds learn from building a playground, or high school students learn helping to produce a play, writing a history of their community, creating YouTube videos about the value of Dual (high school/college) Credit Courses, conducting water quality testing, or planning and then building a community garden? The answer is clear: Students who participate in such hands-on, active learning generally will be more “engaged” in their learning. A 2012 Gallup poll of almost 500,000 American students, grades 5-12, helps explain why student engagement is so important. The poll also shows a dramatic decline in student engagement as students move thorough our public schools. How do we “engage” students? • Students at the School of Environmental Studies in Apple Valley have researched and help create exhibits for the Minnesota Zoo. • Students in many communities, including Apple Valley, Eastview, Eagan, Lakeville, the Main Street School for Per-

Sun Thisweek Columnist

Joe Nathan forming Arts in Hopkins, and Richfield have produced musicals that won awards from the Hennepin Theatre Trust. • In Little Falls, students in a combined biology/English/social studies class read and wrote about the history of the Mississippi. They also did water quality testing on the river discovering at one point that there was an unacceptably high level of bacteria in the water. • In Houston, students interviewed local residents for an area history. They discovered one elderly woman who had been a member of the French Resistance during World War II, causing them to do a lot of reflection about her high school years. • In St. Paul, students researched, planned and then built a playground with a zero budget. It was a very big day

in the life of the seven-year old co-chairs of the “sand committee” when six truck loads of sand, that they had arranged for, arrived. Let’s be clear. This is not an attack on teachers. That’s because teachers are being pushed hard to focus on standardized, multiple-choice tests. But as the national Gallup organization points out, we should care about this because “hope, engagement and well being of students accounts for onethird of the variance of student success. Yet schools don’t measure these things. Hope, for example, is a better predictor of student success than SAT scores, ACT scores, or grade point average.” Gallup found that from elementary to secondary school, student engagement drops from 76 to 44 percent.   Gallup concluded: “There are several things that might help to explain why this is happening – ranging from our overzealous focus on standardized testing and curricula to our lack of experiential and project-based learning pathways for students – not to mention the lack of pathways for students who will not and do not want to go on to college.”

We want students to read, write and do mathematics.  We also want them to be active, constructive citizens. We need to measure whether they are developing hope and a sense that they can accomplish important things.  You can read the report at http:// thegallupblog.gallup.com/2013/01/theschool-cliff-student-engagement.html. There are great examples of these applied projects at www.whatkidscando. org. Many families and employers want students who are active, positive, able to work with others … engaged.  Not just people with academic skills.  Academic skills are important, but not enough. Being “engaged” helps many students see the value of and develop those “3-R” skills, along with a belief that they can set goals and make a difference. Joe Nathan, formerly a Minnesota public school teacher and administrator, directs the Center for School Change. Reactions welcome, joe@centerforschoolchange.org. Columns reflect the opinion of the author.

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John Gessner | BURNSVILLE NEWS | 952-846-2031 | john.gessner@ecm-inc.com Jessica Harper | EAGAN NEWS | 952-846-2028 | jessica.harper@ecm-inc.com Andy Rogers | SPORTS | 952-846-2027 | andy.rogers@ecm-inc.com Mike Shaughnessy | SPORTS | 952-846-2030 | mike.shaughnessy@ecm-inc.com Mike Jetchick | AD SALES | 952-846-2019 | mike.jetchick@ecm-inc.com Keith Anderson | DIRECTOR OF NEWS | 952-392-6847 | keith.anderson@ecm-inc.com MANAGING EDITORS | Tad Johnson | John Gessner PUBLISHER. . . . . . . . . . . . . . Julian Andersen PRESIDENT . . . . . . . . . . . . .Marge Winkelman GENERAL MANAGER. . . . . . . . Jeffrey Coolman BURNSVILLE/DISTRICT 191 EDITOR . . John Gessner EAGAN/DISTRICT 196 EDITOR . . .Jessica Harper

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To the editor: Recent articles have discussed the governor’s proposals to close tax loopholes for higher income earners and broaden the state’s sales tax to include previously untaxed services like haircuts and gym memberships. Critics have protested that his proposals shouldn’t include items that make us healthier. And while there’s no overt criticism of his proposals to close loopholes, no great support has come from critics who want

to endear themselves to wealthier taxpayers anyway. Meantime the governor counsels critics to provide better options to reduce the deficit. This, unfortunately, has been lacking from those who disparage the governor’s ideas. I, for one, admire the governor’s mettle, in being willing to close the revenue gap. It’s easy to sit by and take potshots without providing alternatives. For too long, wealthy taxpayers say they should be able to continue to pay a lower overall rate of tax, as documented in the Revenue Department’s Tax Incidence Study.

They proudly claim the title bestowed on them by George W. Bush of “jobcreators.” But many of them have been more than willing to use tax incentives to move jobs overseas. I think it’s time to promote fairness and close some of those loopholes. To those who howl that hurts local industry, I express my doubt. It didn’t hurt us in the bullish ’90s, when we had relatively full employment. Let those who criticize the governor’s ideas provide better alternatives. NANCY HALL Burnsville


SUN THISWEEK - Burnsville - Eagan February 15, 2013 5A

Former GOP staffer charged with DUI Test reveals Michael Brodkorb was drunk when car crashed on I-35E by Jessica Harper SUN THISWEEK

Former Republican Senate staffer Michael Brodkorb faces DUI charges after blood tests determined he was intoxicated the night he crashed his car into a wall on I-35E in Lilydale. Brodkorb, an Eagan resident, was charged on Feb. 12 by the Lilydale city attorney with two counts of fourth-degree DUI, one count careless driving and one count of wearing no seat belt. The first three counts are misdemeanors, and the seat belt charge is a petty misdemeanor. The Bureau of Criminal Apprehension found that Brodkorb had an alcohol concentration of 0.10, which is above the legal limit of 0.08. Brodkorb, 39, was driving a 2004 Subaru For-

ester northbound on I-35E on Jan. 23 when it hit the wall at the walkway and Michael came to Brodkorb rest against the jersey barrier near the Mendota Heights-Lilydale border, according to the State Patrol report. The road condition on the three-lane northbound section was described as dry at the time of incident. Brodkorb was seriously injured in the crash and spent several days at Regions Hospital in St. Paul. If convicted of the misdemeanor charges, Brodkorb could face a $1,000 fine and or up to 90 days in jail. He faces a $300 fine if convicted of the seat belt violation. Brodkorb has been at

the center of attention after admitting to an affair he had with former Senate Majority Leader Amy Koch, R-Buffalo, when he was her executive assistant. He lost his job in December 2011, one day after Koch resigned her leadership position over an “inappropriate relationship� with a staffer. Last July, Brodkorb filed a lawsuit against the Senate, the state of Minnesota and Secretary of the Senate Cal Ludeman claiming gender discrimination. He claims he was treated differently than female staffers who had affairs with male legislators. The lawsuit, which is pending, is seeking damages in excess of $500,000. Jessica Harper is at jessica. harper@ecm-inc.com or facebook.com/sunthisweek.

Eagan high-speed chase ends with arrest, woman in hospital by Jessica Harper SUN THISWEEK

A woman was hospitalized and a St. Paul man faces felony charges after a high-speed police chase in Eagan. Jeremy James Rodriguez, 30, was charged with theft of a motor vehicle, fleeing a police officer (both felonies) and gross misdemeanor gross negligence while operating a motor vehicle. According to the criminal complaint, an Eagan police officer attempted to pull over the vehicle Rodriguez was driving at about 2 a.m. Feb. 6, after noticing it didn’t have a front license plate. Rodriguez allegedly fled, reaching speeds of 80 mph on Highway 13 in Eagan. Eventually, the vehicle hit an icy patch, spun out of

control and rolled at least once on the east side of the road, according to the complaint. Rodriguez was arrested as he climbed out of the vehicle. A female passenger was transferred to Regions Hospital in St. Paul for non-life-threatening injuries. Officers subsequently discovered the vehicle Rodriguez was driving had been reported stolen on Jan. 24 in Maplewood. The owner told police someone broke into her garage between Jan. 23 and 24 and stole the 2001 PT Cruiser, which had the keys in the ignition. Rodriguez’s passenger was interviewed by police and told them he picked her up in Maplewood about 30 minutes before officers attempted

to stop them. The woman reportedly said she saw the squad car with its lights on, but Rodriguez made a comment about getting into a high-speed chase. Rodriguez has a lengthy criminal history that includes felony convictions for theft, receiving stolen property, first-degree criminal damage and possession of a firearm by an ineligible person. If convicted of his latest charges, Rodriguez could face up to five years in prison for the felony theft, up to three years in prison for fleeing a police officer and up to a year in jail for gross negligence. Jessica Harper is at jessica. harper@ecm-inc.com or facebook.com/sunthisweek.

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6A February 15, 2013 SUN THISWEEK - Burnsville - Eagan

Education ISD 191 early childhood family fun

707-3908. For questions regarding Summer Break by Project KIDS, contact Stacey Konopa at (952) ISD 191 Early Child- 707-3008. hood Education will host Family Fun Night from 6 Randall to 8 p.m. Friday, Feb. 22, Travel Award at Diamondhead Education Center, 200 W. Burns- nominations ville Parkway. Cost will The deadline to subbe $7 per family prereg- mit nominations for this istered ($10 per family at year’s District 196 Andrew the door). Dinner will be Christopher Randall Meavailable at the Burnsville morial Travel Award is Senior Center from 5:30 Feb. 25. The award is givto 6:30 p.m. at a cost of en annually to recognize a $3 per person ($12 family District 196 employee who maximum), payable at the demonstrates the ability to door to the senior center. foster mutual respect beA Scholastic Book Fair tween individual students also will be held. For more and school staff. Any eminformation or to register, ployee, student, parent or call (952) 707-4150 or visit resident may nominate www.communityed191. a District 196 employee org. for the Randall Award. The nomination form is Summer School available on the district website (www.district196. Age Care org/district/departments/ randallaward) and can be registration Registration informa- submitted online. tion for Project KIDS Summer Break for students in grades K-7 and the EDGE for grades 6-9 is available online at www. communityed191.org. Sky Oaks and Hidden Valley elementary schools are the sites for students in grades K-3. Students in grades 4-7 may attend either Nicollet or Eagle Ridge junior high schools. Summer Break provides a full day of educational and recreational activities. The EDGE programs are provided in both a recreational and educational environment throughout the community. For information specific to the EDGE, contact Shar Lattery at (952)

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EVCF scholarship applications available The Eastview Community Foundation will offer more than 110 scholarships totaling more than $70,000 for graduating seniors in the Eastview attendance area. The online application process is open to students now and will close Sunday, March 3. For a full list of scholarships available and information on how to apply, visit www.evcf.org.

applications at the guidance office at Eagan High School and the School of Environmental Studies. The award can be used for any post-secondary training and/or educational pursuit at an accredited institution. It is not limited to college-bound students only. The application deadline is April 1.

Local teachers vie for state teacher of the year The following local teachers are among the 134 teachers vying for the 2013 Minnesota Teacher of the Year award. • Sharon Shelerud, Burnsville-Eagan-Savage • Chris Caduff, Farmington • Robin Kessler, Lakeville • Steven Albaugh, Rosemount-Apple ValleyEagan • Brad Johnson, Rosemount-Apple Valley-Eagan • Thomas Scott, Rosemount-Apple Valley-Eagan • Lisa Swanson, Rosemount-Apple Valley-Eagan Over the coming weeks, a 25-member panel of community leaders will name a group of semifinalists, and then finalists, culminating in the Teacher of the Year announcement on May 5.

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Senior-year students attending Eagan high schools or residing in Eagan may now apply for a scholarship through the Eagan Foundation’s 2013 Scholarship Program. A total of 110 scholarships are available totaling more STEM Career than $94,000. Applications Fair set Feb. will be accepted through 6 p.m. Feb. 28. Visit www. 26 eaganfoundation.org for Eagan High School will details and instructions. sponsor the STEM Career Fair from 6 to 8 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 26, in the EHS Woodland student commons, 4185 Elementary Braddock Trail, Eagan. All ISD 196 and area high scholarship Woodland Elementary school students and parents are invited to attend will award a $500 scholarthis free event and learn ship in honor and memory more about STEM-related of Terry Langager, Woodcareers from dozens of land’s first principal. This professionals. Informa- scholarship will be awardtion: http://team2220.org/ ed to a deserving high events/upcoming-and- school senior who attend- College news past-events/stem-career- ed Woodland for three or South Central Colmore years. fair. Students apply for this lege, Faribault, fall 2012 scholarship by obtaining president’s list, Josephine

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County seeking volunteers The Dakota County Board of Commissioners receives advice from a variety of volunteer committees. Positions are available on the following citizen advisory committees: • Dakota-Scott Workforce Investment Board – Meets monthly on the third Friday in West St. Paul. • Extension Committee – Meets bi-monthly in Farmington. • Human Services Advisory Committee – Meets monthly in West St. Paul. • Library Board – Meets monthly at varying locations. • Personnel Board of Appeals – Meets for fullday or half-day hearings

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ing; Mark Maki, B.S., mass communications; Abnet Melese, B.A., international relations, cum laude; Naomi Muckler, B.S., recreation and sports management; Kwaku Ofei-budu, B.S., mechanical engineering; Nathan Thorvilson, B.S., finance, and B.S., real estate, summa cum laude. Concordia University, St. Paul, University scholarship recipients, from Eagan – Benjamin Grounds, Charles Schauer. Saint Mary’s College, Notre Dame, Ind., fall 2012 dean’s list, Ellen Smith, an Eagan High School graduate and daughter of David and Claire Smith of Mendota Heights. Minnesota State College-Southeast Technical, Winona/Red Wing, fall 2012 president’s list, from Burnsville – James Claseman; from Eagan – Jonathan Bringle. University of Minnesota Rochester, fall 2012 chancellor’s list, Alyssa Craig of Burnsville. Riverland Community College, fall 2012 dean’s list, Nathan Rylander of Burnsville. University of Wisconsin-La Crosse, December 2012 graduates, from Burnsville – Ashley Sticha, B.S., psychology; from Eagan – Heidi Hager, B.S., education, honors; Kjirsten Jacobson, B.S., communication studies; Michael Peterson, B.S., marketing. University of Dayton, Dayton, Ohio, fall 2012 dean’s list, from Burnsville – Claire Girouard, Samuel Girouard.

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Lansana of Eagan. William Jewell College, Liberty, Mo., fall 2012 dean’s list, from Eagan – Kristian Brown, Cameron VanDyke. University of Wisconsin-Madison, fall 2012 graduates, from Burnsville – Morgan Bestenlehner, B.S., athletic training; Stephanie Menefee, B.B.A., business; Kevin Rilea, B.A.; Neal Route, B.B.A., business; Matthew Walker, B.S., geological engineering; from Eagan – Sarah Brenberg, M.S., occupational therapy; Andrew Czech, B.S., civil engineering; Leah Junker, B.S., education; Michael Ney, B.S., mechanical engineering; Alexander Olsen, B.S., chemical engineering; Jacob Rome, J.D., law; Joanna Thomsen, M.S., occupational therapy; Ana Will, B.A., journalism. St. Cloud State University, fall 2012 graduates, from Burnsville – Will Anderson, B.A., travel and tourism, magna cum laude; Stanikka Bradford-Brown, A.A., liberal arts and sciences; Andrea Doughty, B.F.A., studio art, cum laude; Avery Findlay, B.S., community psychology, cum laude; Mathew Huss, B.S., management; John Kahlow, B.A., communication studies; Allison Pike, B.A., art; from Eagan – Amanda Chapman, B.S., social work, magna cum laude; Graham Deiman, B.E.S., physical education – nonteaching; Merkle Greene, B.S., finance; Kyle Haire, B.E.S.; Erika Koeberl, B.A., travel and tourism, cum laude; Benjamin Larson, B.S., account-

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as needed in Hastings. • Planning Commission – Meets monthly or as necessary in Apple Valley. • Special Board of Appeal and Equalization – Meets every June in Apple Valley. Dakota County residents interested in serving on a committee can call (651) 438-4418 for an application. Applications are accepted on a continuous basis and are kept on file for one year. Incumbents may be eligible for reappointment. For information on committees, commissioner districts and specific qualifications, visit www. co.dakota.mn.us/Government/CAC/Pages.

Mobile Pantry arrives at Inver Hills Inver Hills Community College and the Eagan & Lakeville Resource Centers on Feb. 13 launched Mobile Pantry at Inver Hills, offering free food support for students in need. The Mobile Pantry at Inver Hills is available to any IHCC student who identifies himself or herself as in need of food support. Students “shop” from the Eagan & Lakeville Resource Centers’ Mobile Pantry, a retrofitted mini-bus stocked with a variety of healthy food, 70 percent of which is fresh and perishable. Each month, students can receive about 2-1/2 weeks’ worth of food for themselves and members of their families. Gardeners at the Inver Hills Community CollegeMetropolitan State University Interdisciplinary Community Garden will supply the Mobile Pantry with hundreds of pounds of fresh produce from May to October from the half-acre garden located on campus. For more information about the Mobile Pantry at Inver Hills, contact a counselor at (651) 4503508. Information about the Eagan & Lakeville Resource Centers is found at www.eaganrc.org.


SUN THISWEEK - Burnsville - Eagan February 15, 2013 7A

PORN, from 1A their stories in this newspaper said they hope they serve as a warning for others to stop, seek help and claim freedom. Ryan Hanson of Eagan was raised by an inattentive, promiscuous single mother who left him in situations where he was alone, molested and victimized. She eventually married an abusive alcoholic who was also a church deacon. To escape, Hanson’s mother soon took a job that brought her out of town five days a week, leaving Hanson behind. “He basically terrorized me,” Hanson said. As Hanson grew, he became independent of his family “because of the terrible things going on.” He wound up watching hours of pornography during sleep-overs at a friend’s home with an unlocked satellite dish. His interest in pornography grew, a secret he kept hidden from everyone, eventually including his wife. He neglected his family as pornography led him into “deviant things,” including extramarital affairs. Hanson’s marriage did not survive the eventual revelation of his sexual addiction, but he sought treatment and continues with an accountability group; he has been free of pornography since Nov. 15, 2007. He said pornography is part of the “huge infrastructure” of human trafficking, built through “an economy of pain.” Breaking Free, a St. Paul anti-trafficking ministry, reported that about onethird of the prostitution victims it helps have also been used in pornography. Since seeking help, Hanson has remarried and has four children. “When people don’t confront this problem, it can really take control of their life,” Hanson said. “It can take them down a path they never sought originally.” For “Robert,” 51, of Eagan who asked that his last name not be used, that path led to a felony conviction. “In my case online porn led to voyeurism,” he said. Robert began secretly viewing online pornography on his phone, sometimes for hours. “You just lose track of time,” he said. “You look once, and then the sites are meant to constantly bombard you with new material.” Mark Bellows, former Lakeville mayor and a marriage and family therapist, said pornography is one of most common issues that arises in marriage counseling, and it can trap men or women. “It’s affordable, accessible and anonymous,” Bellows said, referring to the abundance of free Internet porn. “It’s a huge problem in the country and in churches.” He said watching sex-

Sexual and porn addiction resources • Accountability software that blocks porn sites: www.covenanteyes.com • Online recovery forum, information: noporn.com • Sex Addicts Anonymous: saa-recovery. org • Dr. Mark Laaser: www.faithfulandtrueministries.com

ual acts stimulates brain chemistry, and as with any kind of addict, over time it takes new and more extreme material to stimulate that same “high.” For Robert, the new material he found online were sites featuring hidden Web cameras. “It’s shots of people who have hidden Web cams on girlfriends,” he said. After viewing that, Robert hid a camera in a bathroom a teenage relative used, but it was discovered. Police issued an immediate no-contact court order. A devastated Robert, who had a spotless record was jailed, charged and pleaded guilty; sentencing is this spring. He is in counseling and working to re-establish family relationships. Dakota County resident James, 44, who asked that his last name be withheld, suffered multiple homosexual rapes during his childhood, became addicted to crystal meth and was a high school dropout. “I got exposed to some really — twisted is the only word for it — porn early on,” he said. Abandoned by his father as an infant, others took advantage of that void. “I was abused, groomed

Linked to trafficking Many sex addicts turn to prostitutes and human trafficking victims who are usually forced and/ or brainwashed into “the life.” Heather Weyker, a St. Paul police officer who works undercover sex trafficking sting operations around the Twin Cities, said the johns she busts have included powerful attorneys, businessmen, legislators and drug addicts. “You never know what you’re going to get when he walks through the door,” Weyker said. “Some men stink, they’re grossly

overweight and they have awful hygiene.” Many of the men leave their wedding ring in the car and tell her a fake name. “Some don’t tell me a name at all,” she said. The “johns,” or “hobbyists,” as they like to call themselves, find her online. Calls seeking sex come immediately after she has posted an ad. “If it’s longer than five minutes, something’s wrong,” Weyker said. Sometimes, the callers are pimps trying to “recruit” her. “They ask if I want to make more money with them,” Weyker said. The offer is a lie; girls almost never keep what they are paid, and many are left at truck stops or motels until they meet financial quotas. Weyker said she has had repeat busts of the same john, including a man she had arrested about two months prior, although neither recognized the other until the man started recounting the time he was busted. As soon as she gave the signal, he realized who she was and barricaded the door with his body. She said she used “defensive tactics” to allow for the arrest. One of the hardest parts of the job are the children, many runaways, she frequently sees being trafficked. “They live in survival mode 24/7,” she said. “It’s awful for them. They live in fear.” She also encounters the traffickers, many of whom are gang members. “They are exploitative,” she said. “They manipulate and control. They are violent and cruel. They’re awful people looking at making a quick dollar.” Abuse is also rampant in pornography, and former performers have said they were tricked or forced into it.

Donny Pauling is a pastor’s son who spent nine years producing pornography and now works to expose its abuse and connection to human trafficking. He said he witnessed changes in the new “models” pornographers would regularly recruit. “They’d usually be college students or something, but over the course of time, you could just see them change,” he said. “You could see the life kinda get sucked out of their eyes.” Robert said he never really thought about the women in the videos he would watch, but would sometimes notice something was not right. “Occasionally, you could see in some of those videos on the women’s faces something indicated they didn’t want to be there,” he said. “You could see when someone was afraid.” When Jim Carlson, 26, of Eagan learned about the evils of human trafficking and realized his years of viewing pornography contributed to the problem, he was moved to change. His first pornographic exposure was a “Jerry Springer Uncensored” video at 12, and by college he was addicted to online pornography. The more he watched, the more he wanted something more shocking. “It was like a drug addict,” Carlson said. “I needed more to get the same high.” Carlson said he has learned porn creates addictive patterns that causes the brain to continually seek novelty, a progression that spurs the cycle of shame and isolation that cuts away relationships, as he experienced with his mother, sisters and girlfriend. Seeking freedom from his addiction, he opened up to his girlfriend; shocked and hurt, she

broke up with him. His desire to be free, increased awareness of the evils of human trafficking and growing faith in Jesus Christ last year gave him the strength to tell his then-fiancee Adri about his struggles. She responded with understanding and compassion. “We were sitting there looking at each other for about a half-hour,” Adri recalled. “He just started crying really, really hard, and I knew this is a big deal and it’s heavy on his heart. He said, ‘I have a problem with porn.’ ” She said she looked at him with grace and could see his raw pain. “I thought he is a man that needs freedom, and I want to support that,” she said. Adri is one of the organizers for Freedom Weekend, which starts this Saturday from 9 a.m. to noon at Hosanna! Church, 9600 163rd St. W., Lakeville. It continues Sunday from 9:30 to 11:30 a.m. at International Outreach Church, located inside Destiny Christian Church at 12119 16th Ave. S., Burnsville, and from 6 to 9 p.m. at Community of Hope Church, 14401 Biscayne Ave., Rosemount. The event will include presentations and information about trafficking and also provide resources, prayer and help for anyone who struggles with pornography and sexual addiction. “So much of the porn out there today — it’s not just naked women anymore — it’s very, very violent,” Carlson said. “It’s demeaning and repulsive what happens to these women.” For more information, go to www.freedomeweekendmn.com. Laura Adelmann is at laura.adelmann@ecm-inc. com or facebook.com/sunthisweek.

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by someone who got me involved in this gay thing,” he said. “But I’m not gay.” An alcoholic and sex addict, James is plagued with extreme shame, guilt and depression, battles against heterosexual pornography and struggles in relationships. “It emotionally disconnects you,” James said. “You are relying on porn rather than other people. It’s a mechanism that separates you from people.” He said it is not unusual for a sex addict to spend 60 hours per week viewing Internet porn while working full time. “It definitely makes you objectify women,” he said. “I think men do in general, but if you’re in the midst of sex addiction, especially porn, it’s all you can do.” James said he has paid for prostitutes and described the fear of getting caught as an adrenalinebuilder that adds to the “excitement level” while anticipating the meet. “You’re completely high the whole time,” he said, describing the encounters as “never satisfying” and “always a terrible experience” that left him enveloped in guilt. “This is the most shame-based addiction there is,” James said.

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8A February 15, 2013 SUN THISWEEK - Burnsville - Eagan

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The study explored the possibility of leaving the site as a large office campus, but Hartjes noted there is little demand for it in the current market. The group also presented the option of turning the site into an urban village. An urban village consists of a walkable retail area that features on-street parking, small parking lots, and parking structures. These developments often have a central theme, such as upscale fashion. Woodbury Lakes in Woodbury and the Heart of the City in Burnsville are examples of such developments. Once the real estate bubble burst, however, demand for this type of development plummeted within suburbs, Hartjes said. “It’s a long-term commitment and the marketplace isn’t there today,” he said. Palmquist concurred, adding that Eagan’s proximity to the Mall of America would make it especially difficult to create an urban village on the Lockheed site. Although they too don’t foresee an urban village on the site, council members reiterated their desire to see a mixed-use, pedestrian-friendly retail development. “I think it’s key with it next to Central Park and walking trails,” Council Member Meg Tilley said. Tilley and Maguire said they would also like to see a mix of housing – perhaps condos or senior living – incorporated into the development.

Shortly after CSM withdrew its application, the Eagan City Council stepped in and hired consulting firm Hoisington Koegler Group to conduct a study to determine best uses of the site. The city previously used the firm’s services while forming its comprehensive guide plan in 2009. Representatives of the firm presented various scenarios to the City Council at a Feb. 12 meeting. Council members Paul Bakken and Gary Hansen were absent. All scenarios would likely impact traffic levels equally, said Bryan Hartjes, of Hoisington Koegler Group. The group developed five retail scenarios for the site. One calls for a big box store surrounded by smaller retailers, while another depicts a large entertainment venue, such as a movie theater, surrounded by smaller retail buildings. A third concept has a mix of large and small retail stores with several parking lots of varying sizes, which are broken up by buildings. Two other scenarios allow for underground parking or parking structures. Council members preferred the idea of breaking up parking lots rather than one or two large ones. All agreed they want to avoid creating a strip mall with “a sea of parking.” Mayor Mike Maguire said he would like to ensure any retail development on the site consists of a mix of small and large buildings. “My concern with such large footprints is it Jessica Harper is at jessica. separates the development harper@ecm-inc.com or from the community,” he facebook.com/sunthisweek. said.

Burnsville Briefs Burnsville State of the City address

be replayed periodically on BCTV Channel 14. A schedule can be found at www.burnsville.tv.

The annual Burnsville State of the City address will be Wednesday, Feb. 20, at the Burnsville Performing Arts Center, 12600 Nicollet Ave. The keynote speech given by Mayor Elizabeth Kautz is scheduled to begin at 11:30 a.m. and is open to the public. The speech will be shown live on Burnsville Civic Channel 16 and online at www. burnsville.org. A luncheon will follow the State of the City at the Performing Arts Center. The luncheon is open to the public at a cost of $25 per person. Preregistration is required at least 24 hours in advance at www.burnsvillechamber. com. Registration questions should be directed to the Burnsville Chamber of Commerce at (952) 4356000.

Boy Scout memorabilia show is Feb. 23

Burnsville TV to cablecast quiz bowl live Burnsville Community Television will cablecast the Minnesota High School Quiz Bowl finals live from Burnsville High School beginning at 3:30 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 21, on BCTV Channel 14. Minnesota High School Quiz Bowl is a game showstyle competition that tests high school students’ knowledge on topics such as history, literature and science. In addition to live coverage, the finals will

The 11th annual Fundraiser and Scout Memorabilia Show by Boy Scout Troop 445 will be held from 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 23, at St. James Lutheran Church, 3650 Williams Drive, Burnsville. The public is welcome. The event will include silent auctions of items from local businesses throughout the day. Attendees can trade, sell or buy Scout memorabilia. There will be free appraisals of Scout items. Collections merit badge will be offered to Scouts. The event is free. All proceeds benefit Boy Scout Troop 445. For more information, contact Bob at (952) 894-2720 or email proscout@hotmail. com.

School safety donation The Burnsville Police Department recently received a $3,000 donation from First Wheels, a 20-year-old Burnsvillebased fleet services firm. The donation directed at school safety was for the purchase of equipment outlined in a letter to Burnsville Police Chief Eric Gieske.

Dakota County Input sought on regional trail Dakota County is looking for community input on the alignment of a fourmile section of the Mississippi River Regional Trail that is being planned through Spring Lake Park Reserve. The public is invited to an open house from 5 to 7 p.m. Wednesday, March 6, at Schaar’s Bluff Gathering Center, 8395 127th St. E., Hastings, to hear about and offer opinions on various alignment options. When completed in 2015, the Mississippi River Regional Trail will stretch 27 miles from St. Paul to Hastings. It will be part of a 3,000-mile trail that will connect the Mississippi River’s headwaters at Lake Itasca to the Gulf of Mexico. To learn more about the national Mississippi River Trail, visit www.mississippirivertrail. org. For more information about Dakota County’s greenway system, visit www.hkgi.com/projects/ dakota.

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SUN THISWEEK - Burnsville - Eagan February 15, 2013 9A

BOUNDARIES, from 1A public opinion of the school drops, he said. and the board dropped the Open enrollment and proposal in early 2010. district-granted enrollment “There’s been a resis- variances have contributed tance to doing a boundary to concentrations of poverchange, and we have not ty, and the district’s magnet done a boundary change schools have been popular for a significant number destinations for families of years,� Board Member leaving the poorer schools. Dan Luth said. Clegg said the four elChanges should be ementary schools with the made every three to five lowest socioeconomic proyears in a mature district files – Sky Oaks, Hidden like Burnsville-Eagan-Sav- Valley, Vista View and Edage, where both neighbor- ward Neill – have seen the hood turnover and “aging greatest net outflow of stuin place� alter the number dents. of schoolkids in an attenAt Sky Oaks, 117 studance area, Clegg said. dents have left through Enrollments at five of 10 intra-district enrollment elementary schools exceed variances, compared with suggested capacities. And 70 who have enrolled in to there’s a 56 percent vari- the school, district figures ance between schools in show. the percentage of students And they’re not the lowreceiving free or reduced- income students the district price meals. has tried to woo to underEnrollments range from utilized Rahn Elementary, 130 percent of capacity at according to Clegg. William Byrne (a STEM The families leaving Sky magnet school) and 112 Oaks have switched to the percent at Harriet Bishop Harriet Bishop and Wil(a gifted and talented mag- liam Byrne magnets, as well net) to 83 percent at Ed- as Rahn’s arts and technolward Neill and 84 percent ogy magnet, Clegg said. at Marion W. Savage. “They have the means,� Enrollments are also he said. comparatively high at Schools with the highthe district’s two poorest est socioeconomic profiles schools, Sky Oaks (104 per- have gained the most stucent) and Hidden Valley dents. A total of 122 stu(103 percent), which along dents have used enrollment with Harriet Bishop are the variances to attend Harriet largest elementaries. Bishop (with 21 percent At Sky Oaks, deemed free and reduced-price a “racially identifiable� meal students), compared school under state law (see with 32 who have left the related story), 77 percent school. of students qualify for free A total of 139 have enor reduced-price meals. At rolled into William Byrne Hidden Valley, 68 percent (39 percent free and requalify. duced), compared with 54 When schools reach 50 who have left. to 60 percent, learning for Harriet Bishop and Wilall students begins to suffer, liam Byrne far outpace the Clegg said. district’s other elementaries At around 40 percent in the number of students is a “tipping point� where attending through varianc-

es or open enrollment (237 for Harriet Bishop and 153 for William Byrne). Nearly half the students attending Harriet Bishop don’t live in its attendance area, Clegg said.

sic, including composer, title, style, time period and more, based on samples played for them. Burnsville’s team scored 93 points, just two points shy of first place. The team topped its regional competition last month to quality for state. All three students are

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by John Gessner SUN THISWEEK

Proposed guidelines Clegg proposed a set of boundary guidelines that include balancing schools’ socioeconomic profiles. No school would have 10 percent more or less than the district average of students receiving free or subsidized meals. The district average is 50 percent across the 10 elementary schools. Still pending before the board is Clegg’s schoolchoice recommendation, introduced last year, which would create two east and west clusters of elementary schools with educational themes and force parents to choose a school within their cluster. His boundary guidelines call for school choice “within a defined geographical area� and schools with educational themes or approaches attractive to parents. The guidelines call for maximizing classroom use in each school without “overcrowding,� and for attendance areas that recognize safety, walking and traffic patterns and “logical and natural boundaries.� Students would be able to remain in their current school until they complete its top grade. “I think we can hit most of these,� Clegg said. John Gessner can be reached at john.gessner@ecm-inc. com or facebook.com/sunthisweek.

Students 3rd in music listening competition The Burnsville High School team of Kristina Butler, Savannah Lim and Chris Neiner took third place at the Minnesota High School Music Listening Contest at Augsburg College in Minneapolis on Feb. 1. The competition asks students to identify mu-

Racially identifiable’ Sky Oaks crafts plan ‘

also involved in performing music. Butler is a singer and plays the flute. Lim sings and plays piano and guitar. Neiner plays French horn and composes music. For more about the competition, go to www. musiclisteningcontest. com.

As District 191 officials begin to consider boundary changes to address enrollment inequities, one school is being forced to look at new strategies to integrate its heavily minority student body. The school is Sky Oaks Elementary in Burnsville, where the percentage of students receiving free or subsidized meals is 77 percent, the highest in the district. A school committee is considering steps that could include joining the student bodies of Sky Oaks and nearby Gideon Pond Elementary, whose free-and-reduced student population is only 46 percent, below the district average of 50 percent. Under such a plan, students in grades kindergarten through three would attend one of the schools, and fourththrough sixth-graders would attend the other. Numerous other ideas abound in a proposed three-year plan for improving student achievement and providing “integrative experiences� for students at Sky Oaks and other district elementary schools. The review is prompted by Sky Oaks’ status under state law as a “racially identifiable� school with a minority population at least 20 percent higher than the entire district’s for the same grade levels. Of Sky Oaks’ 633 students, 221 are black (including the school’s large Somali population), 215 are Hispanic, 174 are white, 17 are Asian and six are American Indian. “I think it’s wonderful that my kids attend a wonderfully diverse school,� Abigail Alt, the Parent-Teacher Organiza-

tion secretary and a member of the school committee, said in an interview. “They’re learning about how different families do things differently, and I think that’s something that should be celebrated. “I can’t speak for other parents. But I know in conversations there are some parents who are concerned about the changes� in the school’s makeup. Her chief goal is to give support to the teachers, whom she said shouldn’t have to double as social workers for the needier students. “The teachers are wonderful. They’re teaching their hearts out,� Alt said. “They just need more support and a little bit of change at Sky Oaks to be as effective as they can be.� The two-school arrangement would “broaden the mix� of students and make it logistically easier to reach larger numbers in appropriate grade groupings for both academic intervention and enrichment, Alt said. Sky Oaks teachers also like the two-school plan and the flexibilities it would offer for group lessons, David Bernard, district instruction director, told the School Board at a Feb. 7 workshop. Committee recommendations include an early school start time and additional transportation to allow for after-school enrichment activities. Other recommendations focus on improved instruction, professional development and engaging hard-to-reach families in their children’s education. Some new programs are envisioned, such as AVID, a college- and career-readiness program. Officials said the school must connect more

with parents through programs such as C-PAS (Connecting Parents and Schools). Sky Oaks has a Latino cultural liaison but not a Somali liaison, Bernard said. A school social worker is a possibility. The school had limited success in involving minority parents in the planning, according to Bernard. Language and cultural barriers often impede full parental involvement in students’ education, he said. Board Member Paula Teiken told of one Somali father who said his school experience in his homeland was being dropped off by parents who had never attended school themselves. “That’s kind of where the expectation is for many Somali families,� she said. Board Member Ron Hill questioned whether the plan, which he said includes a number of programs already under way in the district, does enough to shake up the traditional school culture and produce real results for underachieving kids. For many of the needy families, “The issue is beyond the classroom,� Hill said. “It may be true that it’s beyond the classroom, but this is our opportunity to address it at a very primal level,� Teiken said. The board is scheduled to vote on the plan – and its budget – on March 7, after which it would be submitted to the state Department of Education. The department doesn’t give formal approval, Bernard said. John Gessner can be reached at john.gessner@ ecm-inc.com or facebook. com/sunthisweek.

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10A February 15, 2013 SUN THISWEEK - Burnsville - Eagan

Sports Wildcats still playing with something to prove Eagan wins second straight SSC boys hockey title by Mike Shaughnessy SUN THISWEEK

Eagan clinched another South Suburban Conference boys hockey championship Saturday. The time for celebrating will come later. “Well, it was Senior Night, and I think they were in a hurry to get to the taco bar,” coach Mike Taylor said with a chuckle. “It was also Sadie Hawkins at school, and they had a dance to get to. There were a few handshakes, a few hugs, but it wasn’t a big celebration.” An 8-2 victory over Lakeville North gave Eagan its second consecutive SSC championship. Since the league formed in 2010, the Wildcats are 42-6-3 in conference games. With the conference title in its pocket and a No. 1 seed in the Section 3AA playoffs all but locked up, Eagan appeared to have little to play for Tuesday night at Eastview. The Wildcats did everything but go through the motions, spanking the Lightning 7-1. Eagan put the game out of reach by scoring four times in the third period, including twice on 5-on-3 advantages. “They beat us the last time (a 4-2 Eastview victory Jan. 12),” Taylor said. “We didn’t have to say too much. They have a very good goaltender, they hustle and work hard. Our kids know a lot of their kids, and they respect them.” It’s not out of the question that Eagan and Eastview could play again, this time with playoff survival at stake. While Eagan (203-1) is certain to be the top seed in Section 3AA, East-

second place in the South Suburban with a victory or tie against Lakeville South at 3 p.m. Saturday at Hasse Arena. Burnsville improved to 12-4 in the conference with a 6-1 victory over Bloomington Kennedy on Tuesday night. Junior forward Tyler Sheehy, who recently committed to Ohio State University, had two goals and an assist for Burnsville. Senior forward Ian Taylor had two goals and junior forward Anthony Rikberg had a goal and two assists. The team is 0-4 against Eagan and Prior Lake but 12-0 against everybody else in the South Suburban. One of the Blaze’s biggest victories of the season was 3-2 in overtime at Bloomington Jefferson on Saturday night. Jefferson tied the game with 36 seconds remaining in the third period, but Burnsville won it on Sheehy’s goal at 7:02 of overtime. The Blaze is 14-91 overall, with all nine losses coming against teams ranked in the top 11 in Class AA by Let’s Play Hockey. The tie was against Breck, currently ranked No. 2 in Class A. The killer schedule should get Burnsville ready for the Section 2AA playoffs next week. Section seedings are not scheduled to be done until this weekend, but it appears the Blaze is locked in as the No. 3 seed. Edina (18-5) has the best record in the section and beat Burnsville during the regular season. Prior Lake (167) swept two SSC games from the Blaze. Jefferson Burnsville (14-9) lost to Burnsville The Blaze can clinch twice and seems to be a view (14-9-1) is in contention with Cretin-Derham Hall and East Ridge for the No. 2 seed. Eastview’s regular-season victory over Eagan could work in the Lightning’s favor come section seeding time. The Section 3AA quarterfinal round is scheduled Feb. 21. When the playoffs start, Eagan will be seeking a third consecutive trip to the state tournament. The Wildcats don’t have a lot of holdovers from last season; only Zach Glienke, Cullen Willox and Will Peterson scored more than eight points in 2011-12. “I think these kids are on a mission to prove they’re not just leftovers,” Taylor said. “They have very good chemistry and are a lot of fun to coach.” Glienke, recently named one of 10 finalists for the Mr. Hockey Award, scored a hat trick against Eastview. Josh Loew scored twice, and Jesse Gabrielle and Zach Schultz each had a goal and assist. Eastview sophomore goalie Zachary Driscoll stopped 64 of 66 shots in the Lightning’s Jan. 12 victory over Eagan. He saw 42 shots on goal in Tuesday’s game, including 17 in the third period. Kevin Wobschall scored Eastview’s goal in the second period. The final South Suburban Conference games of the season are Saturday. Eagan (15-1 in league play) goes to Apple Valley at 2 p.m., while Eastview (8-7-1 plays at Prior Lake at 3 p.m.).

Photo by Rick Orndorf

Top: Eastview’s Mitchell Cerrato (left) and Eagan’s Nick Wolff crash into the boards during a South Suburban Conference boys hockey game Tuesday night. Eagan won 7-1. Right: Eastview’s Mitch Beattie (left) and Brett Schweiger try to take the puck away from Eagan’s Zach Glienke. Cullen Willox of Eagan heads toward the net with Eastview’s Ryan McNamara in pursuit during the Wildcats’ 7-1 victory Tuesday night. safe bet for the No. 4 seed. Section 2AA quarterfinals are Feb. 21 with the higher-seeded teams at home. Mike Shaughnessy is at mike.shaughnessy@ecm-inc. com or facebook.com/sunthisweek.

Notebook: State dance team meet is this weekend Eastview looks to continue successful run in High Kick by Mike Shaughnessy SUN THISWEEK

Several local dance teams – including two of the most successful programs in Minnesota high school history – will put their talents on display at this weekend’s state meet at Target Center in Minneapolis. Eagan, Eastview and Burnsville are among the qualifiers for the Class AAA Jazz Division competition, which will take place Friday. Eastview, Eagan, Burnsville and Apple Valley advanced in the High Kick Division, which will have its competition Saturday. Eastview is seeking a third consecutive state championship in High Kick. Eastview won Section 1AAA championships in High Kick and Jazz, as well as the South Suburban Conference championship. The Lightning has been a state dance team power for a decade with six High Kick Photo by Rick Orndorf championships since 2004. EastBurnsville forward Georgi Donchetz goes to the basket in Tuesday view has been third in Jazz at the night’s South Suburban Conference basketball game at Apple Valley. state meet the last three years. Donchetz scored 15 points, but the Blaze lost 67-51.

Going hard to the hoop

Photo submitted

Eagan won the Jazz Division title at the Section 3AAA dance team competition and is one of several local schools that will send teams to this weekend’s state meet. This is the 17th year the has won the state championship Minnesota State High School six times. League has run the dance team Eagan qualified its teams competition (previous state through the Section 3AAA meet. meets were run by the Minneso- The Wildcats won a section title ta Association of Dancelines), in Jazz for the first time, winning but Burnsville’s history in dance a tiebreaker against Forest Lake team dates to the 1975-76 school and Spring Lake Park. year, when it placed fifth in Eagan will compete in the High Kick. Burnsville has been Class AAA Jazz Division preto state in that division every liminaries at 2:05 p.m. Friday. year since, with the exception Eastview will compete at 3:25 of 2010-11. The school’s High and Burnsville at 3:55. After the Kick teams have won 10 state preliminaries, the top six teams championships. will advance to the finals, which Eastview and Burnsville have take place at 7:15 p.m. Friday. dominated High Kick the last 15 See NOTEBOOK, 11A years. Since 1998, each school

IOC decision shocks, baffles wrestling community Former, current AVHS competitors could be affected by Mike Shaughnessy SUN THISWEEK

Wrestlers are trained to anticipate an opponent’s moves, but until Tuesday they had no reason to think of the International Olympic Committee as an adversary. Everything changed with the IOC’s recommendation to drop wrestling after the 2016 Games. Wrestlers, coaches and supporters across the world are struggling to understand why the recommendation was made and what, if anything, they can do to fight it. “I had no idea it was a possibility,” said Apple Valley High School head wrestling coach Dalen Wasmund, a twotime U.S. Olympic team alternate. “It’s a hard pill to swallow. But maybe this will mobilize us and make the sport a lot stronger.” The recommendation has potential impact on at least a couple of current and former AVHS wrestlers. Destin

McCauley, a five-time state champion while at Apple Valley, is a developmental resident at the U.S. Olympic Training Center in Colorado Springs hoping to qualify for the 2016 Games. If the recommendation goes through, 2016 might be McCauley’s last shot at going to the Olympics. “I can’t believe this news I’m waking up to,” McCauley wrote on his Twitter account. “No wrestling in 2020 Olympics?! I’m speechless.” Apple Valley ninth-grader Mark Hall, a two-time Minnesota state champion, also has Olympic ambitions. After finishing the high school wrestling season in 2012, he went to the U.S. Olympic Center to continue his training and completed his high school classes online. The recommendation would remove wrestling from the list of 25 “core sports” for the 2020 Summer Olympics. Wrestling now joins seven other “short-

listed sports” that will make presentations to the IOC’s executive board in May in hopes of being put back in the Games. The IOC is scheduled to finalize the 2020 Olympic program in September. Baseball and softball were removed from the program in 2005 but are making a bid to return. Golf and rugby sevens become Olympic sports in 2016. Considering that wrestling was part of the ancient games as well as the modern era of Olympics that began in 1896, it’s not hard to understand why many in the sport were blindsided by the news. According to the International Federation of Associated Wrestling Styles, the world amateur wrestling federation, the sport is in 180 countries and in a significant number of them it is the national sport. Pushback was expected from countries where wrestling is the national sport. At the same time, some of those

associated with wrestling were saying Tuesday that the sport needed to make changes that would make it more attractive to a television audience. Wasmund, a teacher in School District 196 for 30 years, had a chance to attend the 1984 Summer Olympics in Los Angeles. He was an alternate on the U.S. wrestling squad. “The Anaheim Convention Center, where the wrestling competition was held, was a neat place,” Wasmund said. “Getting a chance to interact with the other Olympic athletes was great. “There would still be the world championships and other international tournaments, but if wrestling was no longer in the Olympics, something would be missing. To wrestlers, the Olympics is a big deal.” Mike Shaughnessy is at mike.shaughnessy@ecm-inc.com or facebook.com/ sunthisweek.


SUN THISWEEK - Burnsville - Eagan February 15, 2013 11A

Eagan back in familiar spot Wildcats, Lightning sought place in state girls hockey tourney by Mike Shaughnessy SUN THISWEEK

The South Suburban Conference was guaranteed to have at least one team in next weekâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s state girls hockey tournament. Eagan and Eastview played for the Section 3AA championship Wednesday night at Veterans Memorial Community Center in Inver Grove Heights (the game took place after this edition went to press; for an update, go to www.SunThisweek.com). Lakeville North also had a chance to go to state when it played Dodge County in the Section 1AA final Thursday. Section seedings and quarterfinal pairings are scheduled to be announced Saturday. The Class AA quarterfinal round will start at 11 a.m. Feb. 21 at Xcel Energy Center. Eagan, which defeated Hastings 3-1 in the Section 3AA semifinals Saturday night, was trying to get to the state tournament for the second consecutive year and eighth time overall. Eastview defeated Apple Valley 3-1 in the other semifinal to advance to

the section championship game for the second time in three years. The Lightning has never been to the state tourney. Eagan (17-9-1) tied Lakeville North and Lakeville South for the South Suburban Conference championship. Eastview (11-14-2 overall) finished eighth in the 10-team SSC and had a 4-12-1 conference record. The two regular-season games between Eagan and Eastview both went to overtime. Eagan won 3-2 on Dec. 1 on Brooke Madsenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s goal at 7:15 of overtime. The teams tied 4-4 in the rematch Jan. 12. Eagan outshot Hastings 34-10 in the semifinals Saturday, but the Raiders scored with one second remaining in the first period to jump in front. It remained 1-0 until 53 seconds into the third period, when Emily Goff scored to tie the game. Olivia Asta scored with 1:49 remaining to give Eagan the lead, and Megan Wolfe added an empty-net goal with 11 seconds left. Madsen scored at 35

seconds of overtime to give Eagan a 5-4 victory over Rosemount in a section quarterfinal game Feb. 6 at Eagan Civic Arena. Again, the Wildcats fell behind early. Rosemountâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Krista Reuter scored two goals 52 seconds apart in the first period, and the Irish increased their lead to 3-0 when Alexandra Malecha scored on the power play at 2:01 of the second. Eagan responded with goals by Goff and Asta, but Reuter completed her hat trick with a power-play goal at 10:01 of the second period. Eaganâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Taylor Ramthun cut Rosemountâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s lead to one at 5:13 of the third period. Shelby Williams tied the game with 1:05 remaining. Madsen assisted on both of Eaganâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s thirdperiod goals. Rosemount, which defeated Woodbury in the section play-in game Feb. 4, finished 8-18-1. Eastviewâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s section semifinal game against Apple Valley was scoreless until the third period, when Natalie Snodgrass scored

twice to put the Lightning in front. Apple Valley cut the lead to 2-1, but Liz Palmi scored with 50 seconds remaining to clinch the Lightningâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s victory. Snodgrassâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; goal at 33 seconds of the second period was the winner in Eastviewâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 2-1 section quarterfinal victory at Burnsville on Feb. 6. Ellie Cardinal scored in the first period, and goalie Courtney Companion made 27 saves. Maddie Dockry scored in the second period for the Blaze, which finished 13-10-3. Apple Valley completed a 16-11 season with its loss to Eastview in the section semifinals. The Eagles defeated Park of Cottage Grove 7-4 in a quarterfinal game as Erica Power and Rachel Goodman scored two goals each. Emily Everson had a goal and two assists and was a plusfive for the game.

Announcements 

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Mike Shaughnessy is at mike.shaughnessy@ecminc.com or facebook.com/ sunthisweek.

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NOTEBOOK, from 10A

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In Saturdayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Class AAA High Kick preliminaries, Eastview competes at 2:45 p.m., Eagan at 2:55, Burnsville at 3:35 and Apple Valley at 3:55. The finals begin at 7:15.

Confusion clears When the list of boys individual state qualifiers was announced following the Section 6AA Alpine skiing meet Feb. 5, Burnsville sophomore Jon Garbe was not among them. He also was not on the list of state qualifiers sent to local media. That was an error. Garbe had, indeed, qualified for state by finishing in 14th place. He took the 10th and final spot available to individuals who arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t members of one of the sectionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s two statequalifying teams. Garbe and Burnsville teammate Tom Flickinger competed at the state meet Wednesday, after this edition went to press. For an update on local skiersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; state performances, visit www.SunThisweek.com.

&SOJF $MVCC

All together now ...

Photo by Rick Orndorf

Eastview High School hockey players Nick Abbott (left) and Ryan McNamara made the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Play Hockeyâ&#x20AC;? introduction at the Jan. 29 Minnesota Wild game at Xcel Energy Center. They were invited in honor of Abbottâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s natural hat trick â&#x20AC;&#x201C; all shorthanded â&#x20AC;&#x201C; in Eastviewâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s victory over Rochester Mayo at a holiday tournament in December. McNamara assisted on all three goals.

WIN FREE MOVIES FOR A YEAR AT PARAGON ODYSSEY 15! Go to www.paragontheaters.com/contest for details!

1,000-point club Two more local players recently reached the 1,000-point milestone for their high school basketball careers. Eastview sophomore Madison Guebert scored her 1,000th career point during the Lightning girls basketball teamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s victory over Rosemount on Feb. 5. Guebert, the Lightningâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s leading scorer, reached the mark in fewer than two full varsity seasons. On Tuesday, Apple Valley senior Jaryn Pipkins reached 1,000 career points in the Eaglesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; 67-51 victory over Burnsville. Pipkins last week signed with Dartmouth College to compete in track and field.

ZACH SMITH

KAT TORRES

BOYSâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; BASKETBALL

GYMNASTICS

JUNIOR POINT GUARD BURNSVILLE HIGH SCHOOL

SOPHOMORE ALL AROUND EAGAN HIGH SCHOOL

Gymnastics sections Eagan High School is the site of the Section 3AA gymnastics meet at 5:30 p.m. Friday. Eagan, Rosemount and Farmington are teams from the Sun Thisweek area in the field. Park of Cottage Grove is the highest-ranked team in the field at No. 6 in Class AA. Rosemount is eighth and Farmington is 16th. The team champion will advance to the state meet Feb. 22 at the University of Minnesota Sports Pavilion. Also, four qualifiers in each of the four individual events, plus the top four in the allaround, will go to the state individual competition Feb. 23, also at the Sports Pavilion. Mike Shaughnessy is at mike.shaughnessy@ecminc.com or facebook.com/ sunthisweek.

Zach is averaging 16 ppg, shooting over 50% for the season from the floor and over 80% for the year from the FT line. He has also averaged 24 ppg recently in games against Kennedy, Eastview, and Eagan.

Kat is a strong All Around Gymnast for the Eagan Wildcat Gymnastic Team. She has been a part of our program since she was a sophomore in High School. Her leadership, hard work and determination are a great asset to her success as an individual gymnasts as well as an outstanding leader to our team. Her favorite event is Vault but she is a strong competitor on all four events. AWARDS & ACCOMPLISHMENTS: 2011-2012 & 2012-2013 Team Captain 2011-2012 All-Conference South Suburban 2011-2012 State Qualifier in the All Around, Vault, Beam and Bars

Congratulations to this weekâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s highlighted athletes! Each will receive a $10 Gift Certificate to Paragon Odyssey 15 in Burnsville, courtesy of Paragon Odyssey 15 and Sun Thisweek.

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To submit an announcement Forms for birth, engagement, wedding, anniversary and obituaries announcements are available at our office and online at www.thisweeklive.com (click on â&#x20AC;&#x153;Announcementsâ&#x20AC;? and then â&#x20AC;&#x153;Send Announcementâ&#x20AC;?). Completed forms may be e-mailed to class.thisweek@ ecm-inc.com or mailed to Sun Thisweek Newspapers, 15322 Galaxie Ave., Suite 219, Apple Valley, MN 55124. If you are submitting a photograph along with your announcement, please only submit photographs for which you have the right to permit Sun Thisweek Newspapers to use and publish. Deadline for announcements is 4 p.m. Tuesday. A fee of $50 will be charged for the first 5 inches and $10 per inch thereafter. They will run in all editions of Sun Thisweek Newspapers. Photos may be picked up at the office within 60 days or returned by mail if a self-addressed, stamped envelope is provided.

2013 Spring Sports Registrations WHEN:

Saturday, February 9th Thursday, February 21st

9am-Noon 6pm-9pm

LOCATION: BURNSVILLE CITY HALL FOR:

Boys In House and Traveling Baseball Girls In House & Traveling Slowpitch Softball Girls Traveling Fastpitch Softball Boys and Girls Recreation Soccer Boys and Girls Lacrosse Register Online: www.bacsports.org **See individual sports @ www.bacsports.org (online registrations 2/1/2013 fees, start dates and sign-up deadlines)**

Registration is open to students currently in grades K-12 who live in Burnsville/Savage or attend school within the boundaries of District 191, to include sections of Eagan/Apple Valley & St. Johns Catholic School. For more information, contact the BAC hotline (952) 895-4425. Or visit the website at www.bacsports.org


12A February 15, 2013 SUN THISWEEK - Burnsville - Eagan

BUDGET, from 1A are using fund balance to pay for that – unassigned and restricted.” The 2013-14 proposal relies on reserves to bridge an estimated $4.82 million gap between revenue and spending. Costs are expected to rise by a little more than 4 percent. “We’re all heaving a huge sigh of relief,” Board Chair Sandra Sweep said. “This is the best budget we’ve seen since I’ve been on the board.” Anticipated spend-

ing would pressure fund reserves. The unassigned balance would drop from 13.9 percent of the general fund this year to 10.6 percent next year. The balance would fall to 2.9 percent in 2014-15, under spending and revenue estimates for that year. Superintendent Randy Clegg recommended spending about $4 million in unassigned fund balance next year for instructional technology upgrades. As the state moves toward requiring more on-

GB Leighton to headline Bite

line testing, Clegg said the current elementary school computer labs are consumed by testing all but six weeks a year. The district needs to shorten its technology replacement cycles and begin planning to replace the nearly 1,000 iPads it has bought so far, Clegg said. He proposes adding two more mental-health workers under the district’s contract with Headway Emotional Health Services. Every school has waiting lists for the services, Clegg said, adding that

no district in Minnesota offers more access to mental health services. The cost would rise from $140,570 this year to $186,720 next year. The board will hold a budget workshop Feb. 19 and is scheduled to approve the 2013-14 budget Feb. 21.

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GB Leighton will headline the 2013 Bite of Burnsville, hosted by the Burnsville Chamber of Commerce from 5:30 to 10 p.m. Thursday, March 14, at the Burnsville PerformJohn Gessner can be reached ing Arts Center. at john.gessner@ecm-inc. The annual Bite of com or facebook.com/sun- Burnsville will showcase thisweek. the cuisine of some of the area’s great restaurants.

The event will feature nearly 40 dishes to sample, as well as beverages and entertainment, and live and silent auctions. Tickets are $40 and can be purchased by calling the Burnsville Chamber at (952) 435-6000 or through the Performing Arts Center.

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SUN THISWEEK - Burnsville - Eagan February 15, 2013 13A

WEGNER, from 1A become highly regarded by the community and the department, McDonald said. “His work ethic and the way he treated his partners was admirable,” he said. “I wish we had more like him.”

Military beginning Before he became an officer, Wegner followed the footsteps of several relatives in 1976 by joining the U.S. Air Force at age 18. He left the military after his enlistment ended four years later. In 1983, Wegner joined the sheriff’s office after studying law enforcement at Inver Hills Community College. He started his career working in the county jail before moving to patrol for three years. Dakota County was rapidly growing at the time, yet much of the county consisted of rural townships. Deputies were responsible for covering vast portions of farmland alone. “I learned how to deal with people differently because I knew I wouldn’t have backup,” Wegner said. His first call as a patrol deputy was among the most heart-wrenching. A family called to report an unresponsive infant. It was later determined the child died of sudden infant death syndrome. At the time, Wegner’s own children were around the same age. After serving half a decade with the Sheriff’s Department, Wegner became interested in joining a K-9 unit. No openings were available at the Sheriff’s Department so he joined Eagan police.

Rookie turned mentor It was common practice at the time for rookies to first serve as community service officers before patrolling the pavement.

Due to his experience, Wegner was able to skip that step. Within six months of joining the force, Wegner trained at the St. Paul Police Canine Academy and received his first police dog, King. Wegner quickly fell in love with the unit. “I liked that it’s high stress,” Wegner said. “I got to go to all the exciting calls.” He soon learned to always trust his dog’s instincts. Early in his career, Wegner responded to an Eagan home to search for a suspect and King repeatedly stopped at a set of kitchen cabinets. Wegner had thought the dog smelled food inside. Eventually, he followed his dog’s lead and opened the cabinet to find the wanted man inside. “I learned I should always trust the dog,” Wegner said. Over the years, Wegner became known as an expert K-9 handler and was often approached for advice, McDonald said. In 1992, King finished among the top criminalapprehension dogs for Region 18 in the National Police Canine Trial. The trial provides a competition to show off police dogs’ skills. By 1996, King became too old to continue working as a police dog, and Wegner began training his new partner, Cody. Unfortunately, the two dogs didn’t get along so King lived the remainder of his days with a Wegner family friend. Wegner worked with Cody until 2003, when he retired to being the family pet. By that time, Wegner decided to move onto patrol. “I decided to let someone else have the opportunity,” he said. As a traffic officer, Wegner would often remind drivers to buckle up by simply pulling on his seat belt as he drove alongside them. “I always enjoyed edu-

cating the public on safe driving,” he said. Wegner served as mentor to many rookies over the years. In one memorable call, Wegner and a rookie found a garage bag full of packages wrapped in plastic wrap while searching a vehicle. The rookie thought the packages were wrapped meat, but Wegner’s years of police work told him otherwise. He looked at the rookie and said, “That’s not meat, son.” It turned out to be 11 pounds of methamphetamine worth $500,000. The drug smugglers were likely pretty upset they were caught, but in many instances, Wegner received letters of gratitude from people he’s arrested. Wegner received several letters over the years from DUI suspects thanking him for stopping them. He has received numerous awards from the community and Eagan Police Department throughout his career. Most notably, Wegner was recognized in 2001 for rescuing a couple from a house fire. Wegner had smelled smoke while on patrol and followed the scent to an Eagan home. The garage was on fire, and Wegner knocked on the door to see if anyone was home. An elderly couple were in the house and unaware of the blaze. The home had no working smoke detectors. Had Wegner not alerted the occupants, they likely would have been killed, fire officials said at the time. Following the incident, Wegner received a Certificate of Accommodation from the department and was named the Safety Officer of the Year by the Eagan Rotary Club. When he wasn’t educating others, Wegner devoted time to furthering his own education. In 2009, he earned a bachelor’s degree in police science from St. Mary’s University in Minneapolis. Two years later, Wegner earned a master’s in police leader-

ship from the University of St. Thomas. Wegner said he enjoyed all the different roles, but the most rewarding was serving as a police escort for the families of fallen police officers during an annual vigil in 2008 in Washington, D.C. In addition to protecting the city of Eagan as a police officer, Wegner served his community by raising funds for the Special Olympics and other nonprofit organizations. Much has changed since Wegner joined the force more than two de-

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As Wegner looks ahead, he hopes to spend more time with his adult children and young grandson. “My new grandson is the most exciting aspect of my life now,” Wegner said. Though he’s no longer protecting the community, Wegner continues to serve it by working as a service truck operator jump-starting vehicles for Mark’s Towing in Eagan.

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cades ago. The use and availability of advanced technology has been the greatest change in the department, he said. Today officers are able to read license plates, enter reports and collect data more efficiently with the aid of computers. Law enforcement seems to be ingrained in Wegner’s DNA, which has been passed on to his son, Christopher, an officer with the Inver Grove Heights Police Department. Wegner’s brother is also in law enforcement as a Minnesota state trooper.

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3320

Snowblowers & Equipment

YardMan Snowblower 5.5 hp, elec. start, like new! $350/BO. 952-884-4280

3700

Leisure

3720

Boats, New & Used

Chrysler 17ft, fiberglass open bow-tri hull, Good Cond. *New price $875 612-825-6283

4000

4100

Family Care Child Care

Vintage Occasional Sales

3 Days Every Month!

AV Opngs: French Immersion Mimi's International Daycare 651-242-8566

11 Vintage Shops within minutes - 7 in Carver & 4 in Chaska February 21, 22, 23

Thurs (10-5); Fri-Sat (10-4) Antiqs, Vintage & Seasonal Facebook: The Occasional Shops of Carver & Chaska

Cemetery Lots

3090

Bloomington Cemetery Plots priced at $1200 each Call 1-954-850-5223

Painting

2420

Lic. #BC626700

5500

Rental Information

All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex handicap, familial status, or national origin, or an intention, to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination.” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians; pregnant women; and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free telephone number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275.

4' x 8' - Delivered. Quantity discounts.

Lakeville, infant/prschl openings avail in lic daycare, 16 yrs exp, Candi at 952-469-4576

5000

5100

Rentals Senior Rentals

talheim

in chaska apartments

First-floor Apartment. Handicap Unit, Using a Walker or Wheelchair For 62+ years. Smoke Free Campus.

Available 4/1/2013.

6400

Apartments & Condos For Rent

AV- 1BR, 1BA, Private, Furnished 4 room apt. in my home. $595 per month, plus util, NP, NS, Avail 2/1 952-953-4317, or email: hartds@aol.com Eagan 1 BR Furn. Apt w/awesome view. $700 inc. utils, WiFi, 40” flat screen tv. 651-454-7179

SEE IT... LOVE IT... LIVE IT!!!

Come in to Lakeville Court TODAY for great specials! 2 Bedroom Apartments Available Rent Starting At $912 880 sq. ft., heat, water, sewer & trash removal PAID. ALL NEW: range w/selfcleaning oven, refrigerator, dishwasher, counter tops, maple cabinets, flooring, paint and neutral accent wall, Controlled entrance and private single stall garage w/opener. 3 Bedroom Townhomes Available Rent Starting at $986 1226 - 1383 sq. ft., water, sewer & trash removal PAID. ALL NEW: range w/selfcleaning oven, refrigerator, dishwasher, counter tops, maple cabinets, flooring, paint and neutral accent wall and attached private single stall garage w/opener. Call today to schedule your personal tour or visit www.sandcompanies.com

Lakeville Court Apartments & Townhomes 20390 Dodd Blvd Lakeville, MN 55044

952-469-1009

*Income Restrictions Do Apply

7000

7400

Real Estate Apartments & Condos For Sale

2BR, 2BA $850/1200SF, 2 A/C units & DW lge balcony,Garage $40m Brookside Apartments 16829 Toronto Ave. SE, Prior Lake MN 612-824-7554

8100

Manufactured Homes

Apple Valley/Lakeville border: 3 BR, many updates pets OK. $29,900 financing avl. 612-581-3833

9000

9020

Employment Business Opps & Info

Advertising Disclaimer Because we are unable to check all ads that are placed in our media, we encourage you to be safe and be careful before giving out any important information such as credit card numbers or social security numbers, when responding to any ad.

Call today to schedule a tour!

952.361.0310

Credit Cards Accepted

612-825-7316/952-934-4128 www.afreshlookinc.com Roofs, Siding, & Gutters

2510

Roofs, Siding, & Gutters

2510

5200

Townhouse For Rent

5300

General Contractors Storm Damage Restoration Roofing ■ siding ■ windows Established 1984

Senior Discounts

Great Service Affordable Prices 2490

Powerwashing

2490

Powerwashing

BOB’s

3970

Commercial and residential pressure washing Decks strip & seal, roof washing, house washing, concrete cleaning and staining. Full exterior washing.

Our job is to make you look good!

763-225-6200

www.sparklewashcmn.com

Pets

CAN YOU BE GENTLE AND TEACH BOGIE SOME MANNERS? Bogie is a 5-year-old Bichon mix that has attitude and needs a one-person home. He needs some time to relax and just be before you can be trusted by him. With an experienced home, he can be a great dog! $125. Call Kim 612-578-3350 or see him and other dogs at our adoption day every Saturday at the Apple Valley Petco from 11-3! All our dogs are on last-hope.org to learn more!

Last Hope, Inc. (651) 463-8747 5100

Senior Rentals

N ATTENTIO SENIORS!

Help Wanted/ Full Time

FT Infant Teacher

Small Christian Childcare seeking fun loving teachers to work with Infants and toddlers in Burnsville Email resumes to: ecc@riverhillsumc.org

952-895-0423

Outside Sales Rep, Minnesota territory, Supplier of fine paper headquartered in NJ has oppty for a results-oriented person to service long term sales relations & develop new accts. 3-5 yrs exp. Negotiating/closing skills & ability to function in fast-paced env. Career minded person who wants to work hard to establish career. Requires 30% travel. We offer stability, base slry + bonus, 401k, med/dental & more. Send resume to: Roosevelt Paper Co. HR Dept. One Roosevelt Dr, Mt Laurel, NJ 08054 FAX 856-642-1921 EOE employment@rooseveltpaper.com

Finish Carpenters

Schwieters Companies is hiring entry level to experienced finish carpenters. Please call 612-328-3140 to schedule an interview. Top Benefits & Pay: tools/medical/dental/401k www.finishcarpenters.com Immediately hiring for a large food production company located in Shakopee 1st shift starting at 5am no weekends. Pay is $8/ hr. No experience needed!! Apply today at

jobs@awardstaffing.com or call (952)924-9000 for more info.

Night-time Operator- for local Sweeping Co. Must have clean driving record. Call: 952-405-2440

CUSTOMER SERVICE BCSI, a business stationery printing company in Burnsville, is looking for an Account Coordinator. We need someone who has graphics/printing education and/or experience with strong communication, organizational and computer skills. Must be detail-oriented, able to work independently and multi-task while meeting deadlines! This is a full-time position, Monday – Friday. Competitive pay and benefits package. Call Stephanie at 952-895-6752 or fax to 952-736-8552 or email at stephanie.havemeier@bsp-mail.com

BANKING Bank of the West is seeking a Financial Services Consultant in Lakeville, MN to foster the growth of relationships within the bank through the sale/service of consumer loan and deposit products for new and existing customers. The qualified candidate will review and complete consumer loan applications with customers, participate in selling and cross-selling products and assist the branch in meeting goals by generating new business. Requires 1-2 years of banking related experience and a High School diploma or equivalent combination of training and experience. For immediate consideration, visit www.bankofthewest.com, click on ‘Careers’, search under ‘Lakeville, MN’ and apply to Req. ID #41386. Bank of the West and its subsidiaries are equal opportunity/affirmative action employers. Bank of the West Community Focused Banking

5100

Senior Rentals

Spruce Place Senior Apartments

651-463-2511 2 BRs available

SCOTT COUNTY Shop Supervisor In this position you’ll be supervising staff and operations for the efficient a smooth operation of the County’s Shop. Work will include both oversight and hands-on repair and maintenance of a wide array of vehicles and heavy equipment. MQs: Requires equivalency of an AA/AS degree in auto, truck, or heavy equipment mechanics and five years experience in the repair and maintenance of a fleet of cars, trucks and heavy equipment; two of which must include diesel engine repair. Requires a Minnesota Class A commercial driver’s license and Certification as a Minnesota Vehicle Inspector within 12 months of hire. Strong preference given for supervisor experience in a shop environment and experience in welding & shop scheduling. One must possess strong computer skills with maintenance and Microsoft software in a windows environment. A pre-employment DOT drug test (in accordance with Part(s) 382 and/or 655) is required. Salary Range: $51,358 to $70,685-DOQ. Selection: Rating of Training & Experience. Closing: 2/26/13. Obtain application from Scott County Employee Relations at (952) 496-8890 or on the internet at www.co.scott.mn.us. TTY/TDD: (952) 496-8170 Let’s work together.

EOE

Driver Top Pay, Great Benefits • Great pay-$55,000 to $65,000 • Earn more money with more at home time • Work in a stable, secure environment • Medical, dental, vision, life and 401(k) Requirements • Class A license • Clean driving record & great customer service skills

To apply E-mail: mnhr@mclaneco.com or Fax: (507) 664-3042

McLane Minnesota / 1111 West 5th Street Northfield, MN 55057 • Lobby Hours: Monday-Friday 8-5pm

©2010 McLane Company, Inc. All rights reserved. EOE

Community Editor Sun Newspapers (ECM Sun Group), publishers of community newspapers in the Minneapolis-St. Paul area, has an opening for a community editor. The editor will be based in the Osseo office & cover the city of Eden Prairie. The beat includes general reporting, government news, features, religion, seniors, & business news. InDesign experience preferred. The successful candidate will have a degree in journalism or related area, & experience reporting for a newspaper in an internship or professionally. Entry level, full time with benefits, including 401(k). Mail or e-mail cover letter & writing clips to: Joseph Palmersheim, Sun Newspapers 33 2nd St. N.E., Box 280 Osseo, MN 55369 E-mail applications may be sent to joseph.palmersheim@ecm-inc.com ECM Publishers, Inc. is a drug-free workplace.

9100

Help Wanted/ Full Time

Education

School Nurse Kinderberry Hill Child Development Center is accepting resumes for a school nurse for our Eden Prairie location. Ideal candidate will have a RN license. Keep your evenings and weekends free. Hours are m-f from 7-1. For more information or to schedule an interview call Heidi @ 952-345-8012 or Email resume to edenprairie@ kinderberryhill.com. E.O.E. Education

Toddler Teacher Kinderberry Hill Child Development Center in Eden Prairie is accepting resumes for a Toddler Teacher. Candidates must be teacher qualified under MN Rule 3 guidelines. We offer 401K, health, dental and life insurance plus more. For more information or to schedule an interview call Heidi @ 952-345-8012 or email resume to edenprairie@ kinderberryhill.com. E.O.E.

Anchor Block Company has a FT opening for a 2nd Shift Plant Laborer at our Shakopee Plant.

This position will adjust cubing equipment as needed during manufacturing. The laborer must maintain clear communication with coworkers for efficient operation. Apply via email:

HR@anchorblock.com

or call Human Resources at

952-933-8855

Looking for sales people and person to meet insurance adjuster and manage sales team (profit sharing). Contact us 952-239-9680.

Maintenance Electrician, 3rd Shift Truth Hardware, North America's leader in designing & manufacturing of quality operating hardware for windows, patio doors, & skylights, is looking for:

• Various hours/shifts • $13.80/hr • Previous supervisory exp. req. • Bachelor’s degree required

Tree Service

2620

9100

FRAMING Carpenters, Twin cities, Hiring for residential framing. Hard working and self motivated. Send your level of FRAMING experience and desired hourly pay. Job sites across the twin cities area. 40+ hour weeks steady year round. 12-20hr d.o.e. Steve@schmidtindustriesinc.com

Sanitation Lead

3500 Vicksburg Lane Suite 400-351 P l y m o u t h , M N 5 5 4 4 7 Lic # 6793

Tree Service

RN/LPN's

Regency Home HealthCare is seeking part time & full time day/eve/overnights RN/LPN's to provide services to ventilator dependent clients in private homes throughout the metro. Seeking help in White Bear Lake, Coon Rapids, Cottage Grove, Plymouth. Must have great attention to detail, strong problem solving skills, excellent communication and clinical skills. Current MN nursing license and CPR required. If interested please submit online application at www.regencyhhc.com or fax resume attn: Stephanie @ 651-488-4656 EOE

Help Wanted/ Full Time

• Mon. – Fri. • 7:30 am start • $13.30/hr

(763) 550-0043 (952) 476-7601 (651) 221-2600

2620

PCAs

Regency Home HealthCare is seeking both part time/full time; day, evening and night PCA's to care for clients in their homes throughout the metro. Seeking help in Mendota Heights, Apple Valley, and Burnsville. Responsible for all client cares, light housekeeping and food prep. Must be compassionate, reliable, have great attention to detail, excellent problem solving and communication skills. If interested please submit online application at www.regencyhhc.com or fax resume attn: Stephanie @ 651-488-4656 EOE.

9100

Full Case Grocery Selector

Duplexes/Dbl Bungalows For Rent

Pets

Health Care

• Mon. – Fri. • 6 am start • $11.25/hr

Rsmt 2 Bdrm Duplex 2 car gar. $850/mo. Credit chk. 612-251-0063

3970

9050

Repack Selector

Lakeville SPOTLESS BEAUTIFUL TH. 3BR, 4BA, finished LL Call 612-865-7124 LV Compl. Remod. 3 BR, 2 BA, TH. Bkgrd Credit chk req. pd for by applicant. $1250 W/D 612-490-6292

Jack of All Trades Handyman

Specializing in residential & commercial repairs & maintenance. Fully insured. Lic#20639540

Furn., Antiqs, Housewares

952-881-2122 763-381-1269

Interior/Exterior Painting by the Pros Bonded & Insured Free Est. • Senior Discounts

HANDYMAN

Carpentry, Remodeling, Repair & Painting Services. I love to do it all! 612-220-1565

5533 Hyland Courts Dr.

SNOW PLOWING

Commercial & Residential Dependable – Insured - Exp'd LSC Construction Svcs, Inc Mbr: Better Business Bureau

Dakota Home Improvement Kitchens, Baths, Bsmts Drywall, Tile & Flooring CC's accept'd 952-270-1895 Direct Solutions LLC For all your home remodeling & repair needs. Ests. Derrick 952-237-2750

Estate Sales

 Ideal Firewood 

A Fresh Look, Inc.

A-1 Work Ray's Handyman

No job too small!!

Why Wait Roofing LLC

accept Visa/MC/Discvr.

CR Services Int/Ext painting, fully insured 20+ yrs exp. Joe 612-212-3573

Electric Repairs

2180

 

Wall Paper Removal INTERIOR EXTERIOR

PINNACLE DRYWALL *Hang *Tape *Texture*Sand Quality Guar. Ins. 612-644-1879

Lic/Ins. 952-891-8586

Int/Ext Comm/Res 952-997-6888 10% Off

Ceiling & Wall Textures

PearsonDrywall.com 35 yrs taping, ceiling repair, remodel 952-200-6303

BBB Free Est. MC/Visa

4 Seasons Painting

H20 Damage – Plaster Repair

3-D Drywall Services 36 yrs-Hang • Tape • Spray • Painting 651-324-4725

Roofing/Tear-offs

3 Interior Rooms/$250 Wallpaper Removal. Drywall Repair. Cabinet Enameling and Staining. 30 yrs exp. Steve 763-545-0506

Painting & Drywall

Drywall

A Family Operated Business

New Construction

Quality Residential

3130

Bloomington Feb. 16 (9-5)

Int./Ext Painting/Staining & texturing. Free Est. 952-474-6258 Ins/Bond Major Credit Cards Accepted

Chimney & FP Cleaning

2110

Roofs, Siding, & Gutters

2510

Maintenance Electrician, 3rd Shift

Perform all electrical installations, maintenance and repair of company equipment; perform or assist in the installation, maintenance and repair of mechanical, hydraulic, pneumatic and plumbing systems. A Class A Minnesota Master and/or Journeyman License is required plus 2+ years industrial maintenance experience preferred. Truth Hardware offers a competitive salary and benefit package and is an EOE. Qualified candidates should apply directly to: Human Resources, Truth Hardware, 700 W. Bridge Street, Owatonna MN 55060 or

careers@truth.com

Now Hiring! Warehouse/ Packaging/Assembly

All shifts. Entry level to skilled positions available. Inbound Customer Service Representatives -Location in Chanhassen -Pay $11/hour -Monday Friday 6 am 6 pm (8 hours within that time) -9 Month contract position Email resume to:

jobs@awardstaffing.com or call (952)924-9000 for more info.

Parcel - Dock - Flatbed Vehicles Needed

URGENT - Our customers need you! Elite Transportation is looking for local on-demand delivery drivers w/ their own 2003 or newer car, pickup truck, van, dock truck or flatbed. Dock truck and flatbed operators must have 1 yr experience. GREAT opportunity, GREAT commissions! Mon - Fri daytime hours, home every night! Good driving record, DOT physical and solid English and customer service skills a MUST. Call Jim at Elite, 763-785-0124 or go to www. elitetransportationsys. com/ opportunities for more info.

PLUMBER

Roto-Rooter is looking for a licensed plumber to work evenings & weekends. Requirements are, full size white van and desire to make money. We are extremely busy on the weekends. $1000 bonus will be paid 30 days after on the job. No layoffs, year round work! Medical, Dental, 401K & paid vacation. Email resume to: James.Michael@rrsc.com 651-638-9990 ext 7

SPRING JOB FAIR

Sat, Feb 23rd 8am - 2pm Irrigation installation tech, lawn & landscape crew leaders & members, fertilization tech. CurbSide Landscape 12469 Zinran Ave, Savage 952-403-9012 curbsidelandscape.com


SUN THISWEEK - Burnsville - Eagan February 15, 2013 15A

9100

Help Wanted/ Full Time

Sr. Systems Admin needed w/ exp. using VMWare, Solaris, Linux, Cisco IOS. Emp. reimbursed travel to client sites beyond normal commute. Telecommuting & home-officing may be available depending on project needs. Resume to: CS Solutions, Inc., Attn: P. Kuttikadan, 4660 Slater Rd., Ste. 110, Eagan, MN 55122.

9200

Help Wanted/ Part Time

Appointment Setters Local remodeling co. Start immediately. Make up to $15/hr. Call Eric 952-887-1613 CHIROPRACTIC ASST. PT for busy Lakeville office. Outgoing, self-motivated, dependable. Attnetion to detail and able to multi-task and prioritize. Answer phones, schedule appts., filing & data entry. Fax Resumes to 952-898-7626

Driver- PT

MRCI is hiring a Driver in Rosemount to work a split shift of 7-9am & 2:30pm 4:30pm, Mon-Fri. No holidays or weekends! Safely transport vulnerable adults in MRCI vehicles. Good driving record and valid MN license required. For more information and to apply please visit www.mrciworksource.org or call 800-733-9935.

9200

Help Wanted/ Part Time

PART-TIME HOUSEKEEPER

Flexible 6-9 hours per week, 3-5 days M-F. Clean public areas of senior apartment building & apartments at time of turnover. 1 yr exp. & great customer service with seniors reqd. To apply complete an application at Ebenezer Ridges 13820 Community Drive, Burnsville, MN. EOE/AA Reliable HCAs for Rsmt & BV group homes. Wkend hours. 651-452-5781

Retail/Clerk PT evenings & Weekends for responsible adult. Apply in person:

Blue Max Liquors 14640 10th Ave S, Burnsville

Social Services

Help Wanted/ Part Time

9200

Social Services

Thomas Allen Inc. Program Counselor (South St Paul) Lots of fun activities!

Position 1: Every or E/O Sat and Sun 9am-2:30pm Position 2: E/O Sat and Sun 2:30p-8pm Work with 4 high functioning fun and active clients! Work one on one, 18 yrs or older, background clearance, Driver's lic., clean record, drive up to 50 miles, lift up to 30 lbs, Stand on feet for majority of shift and use stairs, 1 yr exp. with DD, Seizure and Dementia exp. pre'f, Send cover letter/resume to: Angelar@ thomasalleninc.com More OPENINGS at www.thomasalleninc.com AA/EOE

Help Wanted/ Full & Part Time

9250 OWNER NEEDED,

OPERATORS Fridley, MN,

Thomas Allen Inc. Pay up to 0.95/mile. 100% Program Counselor paid fuel surcharge, home weekly. 763-398-4009 (Burnsville)

One weekend per month Sat 8am-7:30pm and Sun 8am-10pm. Work with fun and active clients! 18 yrs or older, background clearance, Driver's lic., clean record, drive up to 50 miles, lift up to 30 lbs, Stand on feet for majority of shift and use stairs, 1 yr exp. with DD, Seizure and Dementia exp. pre'f. Send cover letter/ resume to: Angelar@ thomasalleninc.com More OPENINGS at www.thomasalleninc.com AA/EOE

NO COVER LETTERS OR RESUMES PLEASE. EOE/AA Expanding company with $billion brand. Looking for people, no experience required. Call 612-987-7104 KNOW ASL? Teach & Care for young woman with ASD. 952-894-1115

Sun•Thisweek Classifieds

WORK! 952.

846.2000

Nail Technician:

Cole's Salon and Spa Cole's Salon is hiring nail techs. Apply online at http://www.coles salon.com/ apply-online or call 952-892-9207

SALES CONSULTANT LAKEVILLE Seeking enthusiastic and customer focused sales professionals. Average pay is between $35-50k/ year, with opportunities to make $70k+. Apply online to our growing team! www.homefurniture.com

9500

Automotive Vehicles

06 Hyundai Sonata, GLS V6, 65 K, new tires/brakes. Clean! $9,150. 612-669-2052

9250

Help Wanted/ Full & Part Time

1997 Ford LTD Crown Vic. 154,000 miles, runs good! $2000/BO. 952-888-3576

*REDUCE YOUR CABLE BILL! * Get a 4-Room All-Digital Satellite system installed for FREE and programming starting at $19.99/mo. FREE HD/DVR upgrade for new callers, SO CALL NOW. 1-800-699-7159

9810

Junkers & Repairable Wanted

$$$ $200 - $10,000 $$$ Junkers & Repairables More if Saleable. MN Licensed

www.crosstownauto.net

612-861-3020 651-645-7715

$225+ for most Vehicles Free Towing 651-769-0857

Motorcycle, Moped, Motor Bike

9820

Motorcycles Wanted! Cash for used & Damaged 651-285-1532

Vans, SUVs, & Trucks

9900

04 Mitsubishi Endeavor LS, AWD, 4dr, dk brown, PL/PW, CD, cloth int. 86K $6800 Call 612-987-1044

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9250

Help Wanted/ Full & Part Time

Trinity Campus NAR – PT Shifts We are seeking nursing assistants to serve at our senior campus. Duties include assisting residents with their daily grooming, dining needs, ambulating and transferring residents. Candidates must be on the Minnesota Registry.

FT and PT positions available 4-year college degree required

$13 per hour

Construction Coordinator

TRINITY CAMPUS 3410 213th Street West Farmington, MN 55024

Salary Range: $31.31-$39.94/hr - DOQ

EEO/AA

Enhancing the quality of human life through the provision of exceptional healthcare services

An AA/EEO Employer

Imaging Quality Coordinator

PT CAREGIVERS 24 Hour Sleepover 8pm Wed. – 8pm Thursday In Bloomington To care for 4 physically challenged women Also 5 hrs/week, $10/hr. CALL FOR DETAILS:

Rob 612-670-1380 The City of Burnsville is currently accepting applications for the position of: ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT POLICE Regular Part-Time (32 hrs/wk) Starting Salary: $17.36-$20.31 per hour Pro-rated Benefits

Applicants must complete an online application to be considered. For complete job description and to apply, please visit our website at: www.burnsville.org. Closing date for applications is 02/25/13. An AA/EEO Employer

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16A February 15, 2013 SUN THISWEEK - Burnsville - Eagan

theater and arts calendar

â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Israelâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Pharaohâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; author in Rosemount

To submit items for the Arts Calendar, email: darcy. odden@ecm-inc.com.

Photo submitted

Steven Derfler, an archaeologist and retired university professor, will discuss his historical novel â&#x20AC;&#x153;Israelâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Pharaohâ&#x20AC;? at 6 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 19, at the Robert Trail Library in Rosemount. Based on Derflerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s travels and research in the Middle East, the book examines a number of â&#x20AC;&#x153;what ifsâ&#x20AC;? concerning history and archaeology in the region. Admission is free to the library event, which is part of the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Meet the Authorâ&#x20AC;? series sponsored by the Rosemount Area Arts Council. More about Derfler is at www.eduresources.org/bio.htm.

family calendar To submit items for the Family Calendar, email: darcy. odden@ecm-inc.com.

http://www.eventbrite.com/ event/5169363706# or (952) 882-9300. Feeding Your Dog for Life, Sunday, Feb. 17 7 p.m. in the conference room Free practice ACT test, at New Market Public Library. 9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., Sylvan Speaker: Dr. Ronald Gaskin Learning, 170 Cobblestone of Main Street Veterinary SerLane, Burnsville. Bring a cal- vice. Free. Information: (952) culator. Reservations: (952) 461-2765, windmillfeed@ 435-6603. To receive test re- gmail.com. sults, parents must be present at a follow-up appointment. Friday, Feb. 22 Fish fry by the Rosemount Thursday, Feb. 21 Knights of Columbus, 6 p.m., Free Alzheimerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s work- Church of St. Joseph Social shop, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Activities to Encour- Hall, 13900 Biscayne Ave. W., age Engagement,â&#x20AC;? 10 to Rosemount. Free-will offering 11:30 a.m., Home Instead accepted. Senior Care, 1600 E. Cliff Road, Burnsville. RSVP:

Saturday, Feb. 23 Boy Scout Troop Fundraiser and Memorabilia Show, 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m., St. James Lutheran Church, 3650 Williams Drive, Burnsville. Trade, sell or buy Scout memorabilia. Silent auction items from local businesses. Free appraisals of Scout items. Free admission. Proceeds benefit Boy Scout Troop 445. Information: Bob at (952) 894-2720 or proscout@ hotmail.com. South Metro Polar Bear Plunge, noon, Crystal Beach, 1100 Crystal Lake Road E., Burnsville. Cost: $75. Proceeds benefit Special Olympics. Information: www.plungemn.org.

Sunday, March 3, at Lakeville Area Arts Center, 20965 Holyoke Ave. Tickets can be purchased at (952) 985-4640 or Comedy tickets@southmetrochorale. Tracy Morgan will perform org. Information: southmetroat 7 p.m. Wednesday, March chorale.org. 20, at Burnsville Performing Velvet Tones, the senior Arts Center, 12600 Nicollet Ave. adult community chorus of Tickets are $49.50 and are on Apple Valley, will present its ansale at http://tinyurl.com/TM- nual Spring Festival of Music organPAC. Information: www. at 2 p.m. Sunday, March 3, at burnsvillepac.com. Eastview High School, 6200 W. 140th St., Apple Valley. Free. Dance Ballet Royale Minnesota Theater will present the interactive â&#x20AC;&#x153;An Chameleon Theatre Circle Evening of Art and Danceâ&#x20AC;? at will present â&#x20AC;&#x153;Completely Hol7:30 p.m. Friday, Feb. 15, at lywood (abridged)â&#x20AC;? Feb. 15-24 Lakeville Area Arts Center, at Burnsville Performing Arts 20965 Holyoke Ave. Tickets Center, 12600 Nicollet Ave. are $12 online at www.Lakevil- Tickets are $20 for adults, $17 leAreaArtsCenter.com or at the for students and seniors and box office. Information: (952) are available at the box office 985-4640. or through Ticketmaster.com or Ballet Royale Minnesotaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s (800) 982-2787. Summer Intensive Programs auditions will be 1 p.m. Sunday, Workshops/classes/other Feb. 24, 16233 Kenyon Ave., Ukulele workshop for ages Suite 100, Lakeville. Informa- 13 and older will be offered from tion: (952) 898-3163 or Balle- 4 to 5 p.m. Saturday, March 16, tRoyaleMN.org. at Rosemount United Methodist Church, 14770 Canada Ave. Exhibits W., Rosemount. Reserve a A youth art exhibit will be on loaner instrument (or bring your display from Feb. 25 to March own) by calling (952) 388-8652 10 at the Lakeville Area Arts or by email at rosemountarts@ Center, 20965 Holyoke Ave. gmail.com by Feb. 28. PreregAn opening reception will be istration is required at roseheld from 4 to 7 p.m. Monday, mountarts@gmail.com. Feb. 25. Information: (952) 985â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Ups and Downs of Jug4640. glingâ&#x20AC;? will be offered for adults Ten Brushesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Path of by Homeward Bound Theatre Lightâ&#x20AC;? exhibit runs through Company from 7 to 9 p.m. MonMarch 9 at Burnsville Perform- day, Feb. 25, at Scott Highlands ing Arts Center, 12600 Nicollet School in Apple Valley. InformaAve. Information: (952) 895- tion: (651) 423-7925. 4685. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Dr. Seuss and Meâ&#x20AC;? will be offered by Homeward Bound Music Theatre Company for students Twin Cities Community in first through third grade from Gospel Choir will perform Sat- 3:50 to 4:50 p.m. Tuesdays, urday, Feb. 16, 11 a.m. to noon, Feb. 26 through April 9, at Oak Galaxie Library, 14955 Galaxie Ridge Elementary School in Ave., Apple Valley. Free. Infor- Eagan and from 2:45 to 4 p.m. mation: www.dakotacounty.us/ Thursdays, Feb. 28 through library or (651) 450-2900. April 11, at Highland ElemenApple Valley High School tary School in Apple Valley. Inwill present â&#x20AC;&#x153;Broadway 2013: formation: (651) 423-7925. Twilight Zoneâ&#x20AC;? at 7:30 p.m. Feb. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Magic Storytellingâ&#x20AC;? will be 22-23 and March 1-2, and 2 offered by Homeward Bound p.m. Feb. 24 and March 3 at the Theatre Company for students high school theater. The box of- in first through third grade from fice is open 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. 3:50 to 5:05 p.m. Wednesdays, Feb. 13-28. Tickets also sold Feb. 27 through March 20, at one hour prior to performances. Rosemount Elementary School. Information: (952) 431-8208. Information: (651) 423-7925. South Metro Choraleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s CabTeen Poetry Jam/Rap Battle aret 2013 will be at 7 p.m. Sat- from 4 to 5 p.m. the first Tuesurday, March 2, and 2:30 p.m. day of each month at Apple Valley Teen Center, 14255 Johnny Cake Ridge Road, Apple Valley, (952) 953-2385. Ages 12-18. Teen artist gathering at the Eagan Art House from 3:30 to 5:30 p.m. Thursday, March 7, and from 1 to 3 p.m. Saturday, March 2. Cost: $3. Information: (651) 675-5521. Adult painting open studio from 9 a.m. to noon the first and third Fridays of the month at the Eagan Art House, 3981 Lexington Ave. S. Fee is $5

per session. Information: (651) 675-5521. Music Together in the Valley offers classes for parents and their infant, toddler and preschool children in Rosemount, Farmington, Lakeville and Apple Valley. Information: www. musictogetherclasses.com or (651) 439-4219. The Eagan Art House offers classes for ages 4 through adult. For a complete listing go to www.eaganarthouse.org or call (651) 675-5521. Dan Petrov Art Studio in Burnsville offers oil painting classes for beginners, intermediate and advanced skill level painters, www.danpetrovart. com, (763) 843-2734. Teens Express Yourself with Paint, 5 to 7 p.m. Mondays at Brushworks School of Art in Burnsville, www.BrushworksSchoolofArt.com, (651) 2144732. Drama/theater classes for ages 4 and up at River Ridge Arts Building, Burnsville, (952) 736-3644. Show Biz Kids Theater Class for children with special needs (ASD/DCD programs), In the Company of Kids 13710 Nicollet Ave., Burnsville, (952) 736-3644. Broadway Kids Dance and Theater Program for all ages and abilities, In the Company of Kids, 13710 Nicollet Ave., Burnsville (Colonial Shopping Center), (952) 736-3644. Join other 55-plus adults at the Eagan Art House to create beaded jewelry. The Jewelry Club meets on the third Friday of each month from 1 to 3 p.m. Information: (651) 675-5500. Soy candle making classes held weekly in Eagan near 55 and Yankee Doodle. Call Jamie at (651) 315-4849 for dates and times. $10 per person. Presented by Making Scents in Minnesota. Country line dance classes held for intermediates Mondays 1:30 to 4 p.m. at Rambling River Center, 325 Oak St., Farmington, $5/class. Call Marilyn (651) 463-7833. Country line dance classes on Wednesdays at the Lakeville Senior Center, 20110 Holyoke Ave. Beginners, 9-10 a.m.; Intermediate, 10 a.m.-noon. $5/ class. Call Marilyn (651) 4637833. The Lakeville Area Arts Center offers arts classes for all ages, www.lakevillemn.gov, (952) 985-4640. Rosemount History Book Club meets the second Tuesday of each month from 6:30 to 8 p.m. at the Robert Trail Library. Information: John Loch, (952) 255-8545 or jjloch@charter.net.

Pianist to perform MOVIES | DINING | THEATER | ENTERTAINMENT | SHOPPING | FESTIVALS & EVENTS BRING THE KIDS TO â&#x20AC;&#x153;THE BLASTâ&#x20AC;? IN EAGAN THIS WEEKEND FOR AN OUT-OF-THIS-WORLD EXPERIENCE

The Blast is an indoor playground that takes up two levels in the Eagan Community Center (1501 Central Parkway). The out-of-this-world indoor playground features a galaxy of play opportunities and interstellar delights. Your little ones can climb through a space shuttle tower

then ascend through two Apollo rocket propulsion launchers! This space-designed play area also gives children the opportunity to feel like they are flying an intergalactic space jet while exploring the Milky Way tunnel (not the candy bar). Watch your Space Ranger as they experience the

South Metroâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Favorite Movie T heater

daring space walks over suspension bridges and slide down the gigantic wormhole slide portal! â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Blastâ&#x20AC;? is open 9AM-8PM Monday-Friday, 8AM-8PM Saturday and 10AM to 8PM Sunday. Price depends on age ($5 or less per child). For more information on what to

do, where to dine and â&#x20AC;&#x153;Everything Eaganâ&#x20AC;? visit eaganmn.com. Connect with the Eagan Convention & Visitors Bureau if youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re on Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest or Google+.ater, Pinterest or Google+.

Pianist Stephen Carlson will perform works by Haydn, Beethoven, Chopin and Stravinsky at 7 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 23, as part of the Open Doors Music Series at Saints Martha and Mary Episcopal Church, 4180 Lexington Ave. S., Eagan. The concert is free and open to the public. Donations will be accepted to help 360 Communities combat hunger throughout Dakota County. Concert-goers also are asked to bring non-perishable

Stephen Carlson items to help restock the 360 Communities food shelves.

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SUN THISWEEK - Burnsville - Eagan February 15, 2013 17A

Thisweekend Controversy came with bestseller status for young-adult author ‘Shine’ author Lauren Myracle to speak Feb. 23 at Galaxie Library by Andrew Miller SUN THISWEEK

Lauren Myracle’s young-adult fiction has brought her success and controversy. The realistic depictions of teenage life she brought to her bestselling “Internet Girls” series and other works landed the author on the American Library Association’s list of “Most Challenged Books,” based on complaints to libraries and schools, in 2009, 2011 and 2012. The 43-year-old Colorado author, who will be visiting the Galaxie Library in Apple Valley on Feb. 23 to talk about her writing as part of the “Teens Know Best” author series, says the “Internet Girls” books touch on many of the pressures and challenges she experienced as a teenager. “The books follow high school girls through sophomore, junior and senior years – they talk about sex, going to Planned Parenthood, drugs – one of them smokes pot and gets busted for buying pot,” she said. “All of these things were part of my teenage rites of passage.” Myracle says her intent with the “Internet Girls” series and other books is to encourage critical thinking among her readers and not, as some have

they’ve also brought the author acclaim. Myracle has received numerous honors from the American Library Association, including the placement of “Shine” on the ALA’s “Top Ten Best Fiction for Young Adults” list in 2012. She’s also credited with penning the first-ever novel written entirely in the style of instant-message conversations. For “ttyl” – published in 2005 and the first book in the “Internet Girls” series – Myracle asked some of the teenage girls she’d hired as babysitters to send her transcripts of their instant-messaging conversations from the Internet. “It was a great, fun challenge because you don’t have access to normal writing tools like exposition and setting,” she said of creating “ttyl,” which is a teen-speak phrase short for “talk to you later.” Myracle’s appearance at the Galaxie Library, which Photo submitted is sponsored by the MetWhile some of Lauren Myracle’s books have generated controversy, they’ve also brought the author acclaim. Myra- ropolitan Library Service cle has received numerous honors from the American Library Association, including the placement of “Shine” on the Agency, runs from 1 to ALA’s “Top Ten Best Fiction for Young Adults” list in 2012. 2 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 23, and admission is free. The claimed, to corrupt AmerMyracle’s 2011 novel near death of her homo- books? library is at 14955 Galaxie ica’s youths. “Shine” probably didn’t sexual best friend. “I have three kids, and Ave. in Apple Valley. “I’m not out to earn a win her any converts One question Myracle actually they’re allowed to quick buck by being sa- among parents who had is frequently asked by read whatever they want,” Andrew Miller can be reached lacious,” she said. “I’m objected to her earlier adults who object to her she said. at andrew.miller@ecm-inc. not trying to write ‘Fifty books. It’s about a girl in- fiction is: Would you let While her books have com or facebook.com/sunShades of Grey’ for kids.” vestigating the beating and your own kids read your generated controversy, thisweek.

theater and arts briefs Family Night at IMAX Theatre The IMAX Theatre at the Minnesota Zoo in Apple Valley will host Family Night on Monday, Feb. 18. Admission for the 6:30 p.m. showing of “Mystery of the Nile” is $5 per person. Complimentary Subway sandwich and drink (while supplies last) will be served in the lobby beginning at 5:30 p.m.

Irish Mystery Dinner Theater

Eagan Theater Company. Purchase tickets at www.etcmn.org or in person at the Eagan Community Center. Tickets are $40 and include dinner and the performance. A cash bar will be available. Tickets must be purchased prior to March 8. Call Eagan Parks & Recreation at (651) 675-5500 for more information.

Local students in production Logan Daniels and Stefan Marc Chellsen of Apple Valley, and April Bailey and Eric Larson of Eagan are among the cast of Inver Hills Community College Theatre’s production of Agatha Christie’s “And Then There

Were None.” Performances will be at 7:30 p.m. March 1-2 and 8-9 in the Fine Arts Theatre, 2500 E. 80th St., Inver Grove Heights. General admission is $5; senior tickets are $4. Information: (651) 450-3588.

Quilt display at Eagan High Quilted Expressions, Eagan High School’s 18th annual quilt exhibit honoring Women’s History Month, will be available for viewing from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Monday-Friday, March 2-21, in the EHS Library at 4185 Braddock Trail, Eagan. The exhibit will be closed weekends and March 8. Admission is free.

Eagan Theater Company, in partnership with the Eagan 55+/Seniors, will present “Eat, Drink and Be Murdered” at 6 p.m. March 14 and 15 at the Eagan Community Center. “Chinese Audience members are Open Monday Cuisine” encouraged to show their thru Saturday, Irish spirit by wearing green February or other Irish attire. The 11 am to 9 pm Specials: event is intended for adult Lemon audiences. Irish music and Chicken Dine-In entertainment will begin at $1 off Beer 6 p.m. Dinner will be served Carry-Out and Wine at 6:45 p.m., followed by the Catering performance. 4321 Egan Drive (Cty Rd 42) Savage, MN 55378 Proceeds benefit the Eagan 55+/Seniors and the www.dfongs.com | 952-894-0800

Ballet Royale Minnesota Home of Twin Cities Ballet of Minnesota & The Nutcracker

Live the Dream. Summer Intensives

Audition February 24, 2013 1:00 pm For focused intermediate and advanced dancers.

Summer Classes, Workshops & Intensives For all ages and all levels.

Featured quilt designer Pam Dinndorf will present a free lecture at 11 a.m. Saturday, March 2, on “Adventures in Color.” Her quilt exhibit will be on display along with 70 additional quilts. This event will also be the Minnesota Quilters March morning meeting. Refreshments will be served and three local quilt vendors will be on hand. Doors open at 10 a.m. for viewing and shopping. For more information, call Laura Nagel at (651)

683-6933 or visit www.ea- poser and the No-Accounts gan.k12.mn.us/librarynew/ are Doug Otto, vocals and quilts/index.html. guitar, and Drew Druckrey, resonator guitar, vocals, and Coffee concert mandolin. The combined quinis Feb. 24 tet will present a crossover Carrie Vecchione, oboe/ program blending classical English horn, and Rolf music with Minnesota roots Erdahl, double bass, will and ethnic influences. combine with Julie Johnson Tickets are $14.50 for and the No-Accounts for general admission, $12 for the second concert of this seniors/students and are year’s Coffee Concert series available by calling (952) at 2 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 24, at 985-4640 or at the arts cenLakeville Area Arts Center. ter at 20965 Holyoke Ave. Johnson is a flutist/com-

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BODY WORLDS & THE CYCLE OF LIFE Science Museum • January 18 - May 5, 2013 (Includes Museum & OmniTheatre Admission) For more information on this exhibit visit the Science Museum website @ smm.org/BodyWorlds

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