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Apple Valley | Rosemount September 14, 2012 | Volume 33 | Number 29

Hit-and-run driver left couple injured, alone One victim was a longtime Rosemount Elementary School teacher by Laura Adelmann Sun Thisweek

State continues to excel on ACT Minnesota continues to be a leader in the percentage of students taking and scoring well on the ACT test. Page 4A

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Police are looking for a young man, possibly Hispanic, involved in a hit-and-run accident that injured a retired Rosemount teacher and his legally blind wife on Labor Day. The man was driving a black older four-door sedan, possibly a Pontiac, Aug. 31 when he plowed into David and Doreen Kennedy’s vehicle at around 5:30 p.m. as David was backing out of their driveway on Maple Street in Farmington. The loud noise of the crash startled 18-year-old college stu-

dent Brooklynn Searles, who was about two blocks away unlocking her car. She said she witnessed the man, wearing a flat-billed hat and a Run-D.M.C. T-shirt, get out of his damaged car, run to the Kennedy’s car and after about 20 seconds sprint back to his car and drive from the scene. “He literally ran into his car, got in, put it in reverse, flew backwards, whipped his car around and left,” Searles said. Doreen said the man came Photo by Laura Adelmann to her side of the car and asked with a Spanish accent if she was David and Doreen Kennedy stand next to the rental car they were forced to get after their car was totaled in a Labor Day hit-and-run accident that occurred at See hit-and-run, 5A the end of their Maple Street driveway, seen in the background.

Welcome to Friday night

It’s time for booya in Apple Valley Firefighters’ annual event is Sept. 15 by Andrew Miller Sun Thisweek

Eastview loses to Wayzata The Eastview football team lost to No. 2 Wayzata last week, but there were some encouraging signs in the loss. Page 10A

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Photo by Rick Orndorf

Rosemount Area Athletic Association youth football players gave out high fives to Rosemount High School varsity football team members as they were introduced in the game against Eden Prairie on Sept. 8. RAAA players were introduced and formed a tunnel to cheer on the Irish as they were introduced before the first home game. More photos are at SunThisweek.com.

Bootlegging in your backyard Local historian John Loch digs up details of the moonshineproducing underworld in Prohibition-era Dakota County. Page 8A

Online Look for photos from this weekend’s Rosemount High School marching band festival. For a full schedule of One Book, One Rosemount events, go online to the Rosemount page. Check out the opinion section where letters from all the communities Sun Thisweek covers are printed.

Index Opinion. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4A Announcements . . . . . . . 5A ThisWeekend. . . . . . . . . . 8A Sports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10A Classifieds. . . . . . . . . . . 12A

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For Apple Valley firefighters, cooking booya means burning the midnight oil. Under the watchful eye of head cook and retired Assistant Fire Chief Dan Engel, firefighters begin preparing the savory stew a day in advance of their annual File photo booya fundraiser, chopping vegeta- Each year, Apple Valley firefighters begin bles for three to the cooking process a day in advance of their four hours before booya fundraiser. filling the massive booya pots with meat and oth- lief Association. er delectables for the all-night In fact, it takes longer to cooking process. make the 400 or so gallons Start to finish, it’s about an of booya than it does to sell 11-hour undertaking. The end all of it. Each year, firefightresult is 400 or so gallons of ers start dishing up the booya booya which the firefighters in the late morning, and they sell, by the bowl and by the usually run out by about 3 quart, as a fundraiser for the Apple Valley Firefighters’ ReSee booya, 5A

Springsteen strums up money for marching band Rock legend’s autograph graces Rosemount’s silent auction item by Tad Johnson Sun Thisweek

What do Bruce Springsteen, Adele, Muhammad Ali and Justin Bieber have in common? They are all supporters of the Rosemount High School marching band. Well, at least indirectly. Memorabilia items centered around the international icons are part of a massive $43,000-plus estimated value silent auction Saturday, Sept. 15, during the marching band’s home show at Irish Stadium. If the chance at claiming an autographed Ali boxing glove or a Springsteen guitar are not enough to get you in the door, what about a Masters golf tournament package or a trip to see the Chicago Cubs from a Wrigleyville rooftop? Those and nearly 100 other items are part of the auction that runs from 4 p.m. when the gates open until about 8 p.m. The auction aims to raise money for the marching band that has seen cuts in recent years. Past fundraisers have collected enough money to buy the program sheet music for the year or an instrument or two, but

Photo by Rick Orndorf

The Eastview High School marching band will be one of the competitors in the Rosemount High School Marching Band Festival on Saturday, Sept. 15, at Irish Stadium. this effort aims to shatter minimum bid needed for the Swift. those money-raising efforts. $7,853 estimated item to be There’s a cruise ship ex The Masters package, sold. cursion, hotel stays and a which includes a hotel stay Other items on the list 40-person bowling party on and tickets to the practice include autographed mem- the list. rounds, has the highest re- orabilia from Aerosmith, Bids can be placed on oil serve ($3,900), which is the Ringo Starr and Taylor changes, restaurant gift cer-

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tificates and bottled water for a year. As with most good ideas, this one started with a simple connection. Gretchen Flynn, the mother band members Michael (2006) and seniors Molly and Patrick, had a friend refer her to Megan Jackson, who runs Shakopee-based Plan4APlan Event Coordination. After the marching band’s golf tournament fundraiser had gone flat, they turned to Jackson to organize a silent auction in conjunction with the marching band festival. “I know that we would not have had the success with the auction without her connections,” Flynn said. In past years, the silent auction has had about $16,000 worth of prizes donated, so being shy of about tripling that is a big deal. Jackson said she has connections to about 2,500 local businesses and retailers from all over the United States. “As an event coordinator, I love doing this type of work,” she said. “It is a See band, 5A

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September 14, 2012 Sun Thisweek - Apple Valley - Rosemount

A cut above the rest

Rosemount Saw & Tool forges 40 years in downtown by Tad Johnson Sun Thisweek

Gary Betters doesn’t have to look very far to see the results of his labor. When the owner of Rosemount Saw & Tool walks the few blocks to work nearly every day, he can see how the horsepower and sharp blades have done their duty on the finely clipped lawns and perfectly pruned trees along Rosemount’s neighborhood streets. Betters, who has owned the business for the past 36 years, is helping organize a 40th anniversary celebration from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 22, to thank all the shop’s customers for the past four decades. “I don’t see much change,” Betters said. “I walk home to work every day and have to cross High-

way 3. I know there’s a lot more traffic.” The understated Betters knows the 40-year milestone is a big deal. Not many businesses have been in downtown Rosemount as long as Saw & Tool, but there’s a few within shouting distance – Fluegel’s Farm, Garden & Pet; First State Bank of Rosemount; Shenanigan’s (formerly Shamrock Lounge); Rosemount BP (formerly Standard), and Titan Machinery (formerly Carlson Implement). Saw & Tool was opened by Bill Preston in 1972 in a building on South Robert Trail that from 1923 housed German shoemaker Adam Schneider’s harness shop that he later handed down to his son, Kurt. The Schneiders made and repaired

horse saddles, harnesses, belts and other leather items, according to local historian Maureen Geraghty Bouchard. The building was razed in 2007 to make way for the apartment/commercial building Rosemount Commons. At that time, NAPA Auto Parts had just moved from its location just a block to the south, so Saw & Tool moved into the spot at 14760 S. Robert Trail, which about doubled its space. Betters said he bought the business in 1976, not because he has a particular affinity for machines, but because he didn’t want to see the jobs lost. He still sees that as his mission – keep the business running so he can retain the head-of-household jobs in Rosemount.

Photo by Tad Johnson

The staff of Rosemount Saw & Tool includes (from left) Erik Miller, Geoff Kusick, Gary Betters, Mike Armstrong and Mike Warweg. The business will have an open house anniversary celebration Saturday, Sept. 22. By extension that means providing top-notch service to customers. “I couldn’t have done it without the young guys,” Betters said. Betters, who prospects and maintains accounts and manages the books, says he’s not much of a mechanic. He leaves that work up to the experts, though he says he’s done some sharpening when in a pinch. Another job he handles is calling customers to make sure their service experience went well and if they can do anything to improve upon it. “We are here to help people with their problems,” Betters said of those moments when a lawnmower won’t start or a hedge trimmer goes dull. “We want to make sure we have done the job correctly.” Geoff Kusick, general manager who has been with Saw & Tool for the past 27 years, said its client base continues to grow. While fixing lawnmowers, snowblowers and other small machines for residents has been a visible part of the business, Saw & Tool also has commercial customers like

Ace Hardware, Walmart, cabinet makers and school districts that span from as far away as Rogers and into western Wisconsin. Saw & Tool employees log hundreds of miles on the road each week picking up paper cutters that won’t clip from schools, weary saw blades from hardware stores or dull knives from kitchen departments. It hasn’t been easy to keep growing. Changes in industry with new materials, specifications, and equipment have meant the business has needed to invest in new equipment, which can run as much as $40,000 for a new sharpening machine, and pay for training. Every year one or two employees attend sessions organized by manufacturers of the equipment Saw & Tool sells and services. If the employees aren’t trained, then the business is unable to perform warranty work on the manufacturer’s products. “It seems like we are always going to school,” Kusick said. Maybe that’s the reason Saw & Tool supports local schools as much as it does

with monetary donations and making presentations to machine shop classes. Another community effort Saw & Tool has donated to is the Bluegrass Americana Festival during Rosemount Leprechaun Days. Betters, who says he can play some instruments “just a little bit,” has always had an interest in bluegrass music. “I thought that looked like something that would be fun, so we thought we could help them,” Betters said. “They have done all the hard work.” So people can expect to hear some music during Saw & Tool’s party, along with something for the little ones. People will have a chance to win a chain saw, lawn mower and hedge trimmers along with opportunities to talk to representatives from the manufacturers. On the menu will be chili dogs, hot dogs, chips, cake and drinks. More information on the business is at www.rosemountsawandtool.com. Tad Johnson can be reached at tad.johnson@ecm-inc.com or facebook.com/sunthisweek.

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Sun Thisweek - Apple Valley - Rosemount September 14, 2012

Eagle project spruces up Scott Highlands

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Garrett Broemer, 13-year-old Eagle Scout candidate from Rosemount, completed his Eagle project at Scott Highlands Middle School over the Labor Day weekend. Broemer enlisted fellow Boy Scouts and his billet brothers from the Northern Lights Jr. Hockey team in Bloomington to help him with the project. In addition to his family and friends, half of the junior hockey team showed up to volunteer their time planting flowers and trees and moving mulch to improve the attractiveness of the school entrance. Several teachers stopped by to thank Broemer for his efforts. Principal Dan Wilharber said this was an “awesome project” and thought the team did a great job.

Sun Thisweek

The Dakota County Regional Arts Collaborative was formed, in part, to synergize the efforts of arts groups. That cooperative spirit will resonate outside the Schaar’s Bluff Gathering Center from 3 to 5 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 23, at the Spring Lake Park Reserve Music Festival. The idea for the event, which will feature performances by the Rosemount and Hastings community bands, was born when members from the two cities’ arts councils were sitting next to each other at a recent collaborative meeting. Spring Lake Park Reserve, which is on the border of the two communities, was the natural location for the first-time event, which organizers hope will be come a major, annual fall event. The Rosemount Community Band, formed in September 2011 and which played most recently in Central Park during Rosemount Leprechaun Days, will take to the outdoors along with the Hastings-based River Valley Band. “We are not surprised in another performance so soon after they July performance,” said director John Zchunke, who also directs

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Community bands to unite by Tad Johnson

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Photo submitted

Rosemount, Hastings musicians to perform at music festival

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Organizers from Dakota County Parks, and the Hastings Prescott Area and Rosemount Area arts councils, are hoping people will be able to enjoy fall colors at the Schaar’s Bluff Gathering Center that overlooks the Mississippi River. People are encouraged to bring their own lawn chairs and blankets. Refreshments will be available for purchase by River City Popcorn Company. Parking is free. Guide dogs are allowed. The park’s address is 8395 127th St. E., Hastings. Additional information can be found at www.dakotacounty.us and www.rosemountcommunityband.org.

the Rosemount Middle School band. “In fact, we are setting out to add more performances over the next few years.” During the program, each band will perform a repertoire of marches, classical music, pop tunes and traditional band music. Zchunke said the band has added some new songs to its set list since July. “We are excited at being a part of the music festival,” he said of the band that practices most Mondays at the middle school. He said the hope is that the band will play several concerts each year. Its next performance is slated dur- Tad Johnson is at tad.johning Christmas at the Steeple son@ecm-inc.com or at faceCenter in December. book.com/sunthisweek.

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Opinion

September 14, 2012 Sun Thisweek - Apple Valley - Rosemount

Congratulations, concerns about Minnesota college entrance test scores by Joe Nathan Sun Thisweek

Congratulations and concerns. That’s how we might react to recently released Minnesota high school graduates’ performance on the ACT college entrance test. Where do the congratulations come in? Minnesota seniors ranked first among the 40 states where at least 30 percent of seniors took the test. The percentage of students taking the ACT in those 39 states ranged from 14 to 100 percent. Minnesota’s high school graduates also rank above national average in area of the ACT: English, Reading, Mathematics and Science. ACT’s research suggests that students who do well on their test are more likely to earn A’s and B’s in their first year of college. ACT says that 74 percent of Minnesota 2012 high school graduates took their test. That compares to 100 percent of seniors in nine states, including North Dakota. Nine states had a somewhat higher average score that the 22.8 that Minnesota students earned. All the states with a higher

Sun Thisweek Columnist

Joe Nathan

average had a far lower percentage of students taking the test (from 9 to 27 percent). The conventional wisdom is that if virtually all of a state’s high school seniors or graduates take a test, the average will be lower than if only those who are planning to enter a college or university take the test. That is not always true. For example, graduates of four states earned a 22.1 average, and had widely varying participating participation percentages. Seventy-one percent of Wisconsin grads took the test, 63 percent in Iowa, 25 percent in California, and 21 percent in Maryland. Minnesota’s high national rank is a tribute to students, faculty and families. Congratulations on that. What about concerns?

• Only 36 percent of Minnesota graduates scored at the level in all four areas that predict they will do well as college freshman. • Less than half of Minnesota graduates (42 percent) scored at the level in science that ACT says predicts strong college freshman grades. • More than a third of graduates (38 percent) scored lower in mathematics than ACT says will predict a good college freshman grade in that field. • The widely reported achievement gap shows up here, too. The percentage of white graduates who met at least three of the benchmarks was higher than any other racial subgroup – white (59 percent), Asian American (36), Hispanic (34), American Indian (30) and African American (16). You can find more about results from Minnesota and other states at www.act. org/newsroom/data/2012/states/minnesota. html. A test score is only one predictor of how well a student will do in college. At a recent meeting of college and high school faculty,

Andrew Nesset, then dean at Century College, pointed out that colleges have found that tests don’t measure the persistence, planning and responsibility skills that successful students need. Colleges study test scores. But they also look at grades and other factors to see if students are well prepared. It’s also important to remember that most of Minnesota’s two-year public colleges don’t require that students take the ACT test. These two-year colleges prepare many young people for good jobs. The results give us reasons to be proud. The scores also point to areas where more work is necessary, with a variety of students. Joe Nathan, formerly a Minnesota public school teacher and administrator, directs the Center for School Change. Reactions welcome, joe@centerforschoolchange.org. Columns reflect the opinion of the author.

The road to prosperity is with open trade borders by John Nerdahl Special to Sun Thisweek

The Guest Columnist piece by a former DFL candidate (Aug. 31) was thoughtful, well written and poignant. He wrote that America’s economic stature has slipped because we “created boundaries and friction” between us and we “let racism and war cloud our eyes.” He lamented the increased focus on self-centered consumerism, which has been abetted by politicians and businesses distorting our sense of perspective and commitment to the greater good. He argues that if it weren’t for society’s addiction (my word) to cheap products, businesses wouldn’t be exporting so many jobs and creating a huge income gap between the rich and middle class. He challenges us to work together, to invest more in our future, to consume less and to buy locally. The article presents a terrific philosophical framework to discuss several profound issues that often divide us. I agree with much of what the writer wrote (except for his assertion that racism is clouding our eyes. On the contrary, although there is still more to do, let’s give the us credit for making astonishing progress here). But assuming the writer is right on what we have

Guest Columnist become, the real question is what we can do about it without making things worse – oh those pesky, devilish details. A few questions: How much more are we willing to spend to buy American? And if our product isn’t manufactured in the U.S., should we go without? Would tariffs on foreign made goods level the playing ground, allowing U.S. manufacturers to compete? Will this make the U.S. and the world better off ? If U.S. businesses can’t compete with foreign made goods by leveraging lower manufacturing costs overseas, wouldn’t we effectively be exporting U.S. businesses rather than some jobs? Isn’t it better to have a U.S. business selling products with some foreign contribution rather than a foreign business selling us a similar product? (Many products are a combination of sub-products from various countries). Yes, it’s a complicated world. Before going forward, we must understand how much of the U.S.’s relative descent is attrib-

uted to natural and unavoidable events. I believe the U.S. has lost some of its economic superiority because the unique circumstances that engendered it are naturally waning, such as our relative bump from World War II and meeting the potential of a burgeoning middle class. Our “relative slippage” is a natural consequence of our success – what goes up, must come down. Other countries are catching up because the gap was so wide as the U.S. shares more global prosperity. In the end, the good news is that our economies become more globally integrated and developed. We are much less inclined to make war with nations with whom we share economic self-interest. And nearly all reputable economists feel that harsh tariffs and overly nationalistic economies hurt more than help over time. But, as the writer indicated, globalization has contributed to greater income disparity as some businesses have tapped into this increasing global prosperity – but the middle class isn’t any poorer because the rich are richer. Although this imbalance is a challenge and a social problem, demagogues make things worse by divisively condemning the rich and by manipulating people into believing

they’d be better off if it weren’t for the rich. So the question is not how to return us to a special and unique time in U.S. history, but how to deal with the immutable realities facing us today. There are reports of jobs coming back to the U.S. because the combination of more costly overseas jobs and less costly U.S. jobs has made U.S. manufacturing more competitive. And the increasingly prosperous citizens of other countries have become customers of the U.S. In the long run, it’s truly a win-win situation. Understandably, this is small consolation for the manufacturing middle class who has lost so much clout. We must be sensitive to this unfortunate outcome of globalization for the U.S. middle class and decide on policies to ameliorate it – including common sense constraints on unbridled capitalism and free trade. But the key to their prosperity is not closing our borders to the global economy. John Nerdahl is a Lakeville resident. Columns reflect the opinion of the author.

Letters Correction In the Sept. 7 story about Senate District 57 candidate Pat Hall, the name of the church where he is pastor was incorrect. The correct name is True Light Covenant Church. Sun Thisweek regrets the error.

Local service organizations deserve support To the editor: The Apple Valley Rotary Club, Lions Club and American Legion do many great things for our community and deserve our thanks and support. The members of these organizations donate their time to help support worthy causes and needs of individuals in Apple Valley. Please consider joining one of these organizations or support

their fundraisers. Rotary, Lions and the Legion are made up of great people who want to give back to their community. Much of the money they raise goes to many good causes. The Rotary Club is holding its annual fundraiser. Members are selling $20 tickets for an Oct. 20 drawing at Apple Valley Ford Lincoln. First prize is a 2012 Ford Focus, second prize is a gas grill from Warner Stellian’s and third prize is $500 cash. The raffle is an important fundraiser. The club awards scholarships to students at Apple Valley and Eastview high school and awards the Teacher of the Year Award at AVHS. The club supports 360 Communities food shelf, Boy Scouts, Beyond the Yellow Ribbon Network, support for military families

and much more. The Lions Club project of collecting used eyeglasses and hearing aids to give to those in need is important. Lions also support the high school senior party, provide scholarships and support a food shelf drive. It is hard to list all of the contributions of the Legion to our community. It is a big supporter of the Fourth of July Freedom Days celebration on both a financial basis and as participants. The Legion sponsors Memorial Day, Flag Day and Veterans Day observances and have been supportive of the AV Beyond the Yellow Ribbon Network and Boys and Girls State Program. It would take pages to list all of the contributions of Rotary, Lions and the Legion. Their efforts and your support are what make Apple Valley such a great

Letters to the editor policy Sun Thisweek welcomes letters to the editor. Submitted letters must be no more than 350 words. All letters must have the author’s phone number and address for verification purposes. Anonymous letters will not be accepted. Letters reflect the opinion of the author only. Sun Thisweek reserves the right to edit all letters. Submission of a letter does not guarantee publication.

city in which to live. Next time one of these organization members wants to sell you a raffle or spaghetti dinner ticket or if you see a veteran or service member, thank them. Their success depends on you. Bill Tschohl Member, Apple Valley Rotary Club

No conscience? To the editor: Military families are very proud of their members who are serving for our country. Our son is a sergeant in the Marine Corps. He has been to Iraq and Afghanistan, which was very stressful for him and us, thankfully he came home from both places safe. He is now stationed in California. We have hung a Marine flag on our house since he left, which was April of 2006. Then just recently someone stole the flag and pole. It was very sad to think that someone had no thoughts of what the flag meant to us. Whoever stole it should be ashamed of themselves and think twice before they steal something from another family. TERRI TARKEY Apple Valley

Andrew Miller | Apple Valley NEWS | 952-846-2038 | andrew.miller@ecm-inc.com Tad Johnson | Rosemount NEWS | 952-846-2033 | tad.johnson@ecm-inc.com Andy Rogers | SPORTS | 952-846-2027 | andy.rogers@ecm-inc.com Mike Shaughnessy | SPORTS | 952-846-2030 | mike.shaughnessy@ecm-inc.com Mike Jetchick | AD SALES | 952-846-2019 | mike.jetchick@ecm-inc.com Keith Anderson | Director of News | 952-392-6847 | keith.anderson@ecm-inc.com Managing Editors | Tad Johnson | John Gessner Publisher. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Julian Andersen President. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Marge Winkelman General Manager. . . . . . . . . . . . Jeffrey Coolman Apple Valley/Thisweekend Editor. Andrew Miller Rosemount Editor. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tad Johnson District 196 Editor. . . . . . . . . . . . Jessica Harper

Photo Editor. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Rick Orndorf Sports Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . Mike Shaughnessy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Andy Rogers Sales Manager. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mike Jetchick Office Manager. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ellen Reierson

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Get it straight To the editor: I don’t know whether it is your reporter who is confused (Churches enter amendment debate, 8/31), or the apostate priests, or whether both have been taken in by the lies regarding the marriage amendment on the November ballot. Your story, the DFL Party and their local candidate Jeff Wilfahrt want us to believe that the amendment “bans gay marriage” but that is a flat-out lie. Whether the amendment passes or fails, nothing changes for those

few gay people that want to marry. Obviously, they can go into many of these churches and have a lifelong commitment solemnized, just as they can today. All the amendment really does is put the question of staterecognized marriage before the voters, and a “Yes” vote will make it less likely that that the inevitable lawsuit finds an activist judge to impose a gay marriage law on all of us, without the people or the Legislature having a say in the matter. The amendment doesn’t change gay marriage law; it is just a question of who decides— millions of voters or one judge. Please, give us the straight story. Jerry Ewing Apple Valley

Phy ed should have separate classes To the editor: I am concerned about my son being pushed beyond his limits in physical education class both physically and emotionally. My son is overweight and it is a condition we are working on albeit a slow process. How can he be expected to keep up with his peers with innate athletic abilities? Why should he be “made fun of ” because he is last to the finish line breathing so heavily every breath feels like his last compounded by the echoing sensation of his chest pounding? He is afraid to tell the teacher because he would rather feel physical pain than the emotional pain of being humiliated by his peers or, worse yet, the teacher who calls him out in front of the class. Instead he comes home from school upset, feeling bad about himself … feeling like a “big fat loser.” It’s heart wrenching.

Shouldn’t we be teaching and conditioning our youth that exercise doesn’t have to be painful by instructing them on the proper way to do a sit-up or crunch (quality over quantity)? A physical therapist stresses the importance of “tightening those abs so you don’t injure your back!” My son overall likes school but will attempt to miss it for a day if he knows he has to face a long race and suffer the embarrassment and cruelty of name calling. Physical education is a required class just like math, science, reading, and language. However, these classes have accelerated classes for students who do extremely well or remedial classes and assistance available for students who need a little extra help. Why not have different levels for physical education? I know I’m not the only parent who feels this way. There are genetic, intellectual and emotional reasons why our children grow up to be NFL players, scientists, accountants, computer technicians, or video game creators. Amy Chambers Lakeville

Don’t pick winners, losers To the editor: I have a different perspective to a part of a letter submitted by Timothy Duecker regarding “The Truth” (Sun Thisweek Sept. 7). Instead of “I proudly stand with Americans who say there are winners and losers and it’s not our government’s job to pick ’em,” I would say that it is not the job of any religion to do this through our government. SUE OLSON Eagan


Sun Thisweek - Apple Valley - Rosemount September 14, 2012

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Mattson - Winter Shirley Jensen Barb and Jerry Mattson of Eagan MN, are pleased to announce the engagement of their daughter, Stephanie Mattson to Travis Winter, son of Sue and John Winter of St. Augusta, MN. Stephanie is a 2005 graduate from Eagan High School and attended college at Bemidji State University, graduating with a Marketing Communications degree. She currently works for Modern Piping a mechanical contracting company located in Cedar Rapids IA, as a Facilities Financial Consultant. Travis is a 2003 graduate from Tech High School and attended college at Bemidji State University. He earned his Business Administration degree while playing hockey for the Bemidji Beavers as Captain. Currently, Travis is a hockey coach for the Cedar Rapids Rough Riders in the USHL. The wedding is planned for September 21st, 2012 in the Twin Cities.

Jensen, Shirley Ann age 76 of Lakeville passed away unexpectedly after suffering a stroke. Preceded in death by brother Bill Baier; sisters Margie Weyer and Lorraine McCardle. Survived by husband Norbert; children Bradley, David, Kristy (John) Bertsch and Peggy (Jim) Spadafore. 7 grandchildren; sisters Judy (Bob) Giardino and Marylou Droster; brother Jim (Joanne) Baier. Memorial Mass 11AM Tuesday, September 11, 2012 at All Saints Catholic Church, 19795 Holyoke Ave. Lakeville, MN. Gathering of family and friends one hour prior to Mass at church. Interment, All Saints Cemetery. White Funeral Home Lakeville 952-469-2723 www.whitefuneralhomes.com

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Ethel Elizabeth (Kraemer) Comas

Happy Birthday George Gleim! Oh no, the Big 5-0! “It is what it is” Happy Birthday George! Love and best wishes, Mom, Russ, Ann, Ellie and Henry!

To submit an announcement Forms for birth, engagement, wedding, anniversary and obituaries announcements are available at our office and online at www. thisweeklive.com (click on “Announcements” and then “Send Announcement”). Com­pleted forms may be e-mailed to class.thisweek@ ecm-inc.com or mailed to Sun Thisweek, 15322 Galaxie Ave., Suite 219, Apple Valley, MN 55124. If you are submitting a photograph along with your announcement, please only submit photographs for which you have the right to permit Sun Thisweek to use and publish. Deadline for announcements is 4 p.m. Tuesday. A fee of $50 will be charged for the first 5 inches and $10 per inch thereafter. They will run in all editions of Sun Thisweek. Photos may be picked up at the office within 60 days or returned by mail if a selfaddressed, stamped envelope is provided.

Ethel Elizabeth Comas, most recently of Burnsville, MN and Hilton Head Island, SC, died August 19, 2012 at Veterans' Victory House, Walterboro, SC, after a long illness. Born in Parkers Prairie, MN, February 11, 1915, to Anna and Mathias Kraemer, Ethel graduated as a Registered Nurse from Saint Mary's Hospital, Minneapolis where she worked as a newborn care and private duty nurse. She entered the U.S. Army as a nurse in 1944, and was sent to the Philippines for the duration of World War II, attaining the rank of 1LT. She returned to the U.S. in 1946, and worked at Saint Mary's as night supervisor, and as director of nursing at Groveland Terrace and Highland Park Nursing Homes, Minneapolis, before retiring in 1980. She is remembered as a devoted and loving mother, grandmother, and great-grandmother. Ethel was preceded in death by her parents, her husband Anthony, sisters Florence and Evelyn, and brothers George and Raymond. Her brother Ralph passed away on September 1, 2012. She is survived by her daughter Camille Avore and husband James (Hilton Head Island, SC); her son Timothy (Westminster, MD); grandchildren Brian Gilbert (Trish) of Mountain View, CA and Karin Davidson (Ross) of Fort Benning, GA; four great-grandchildren; and sister Joan Fuhrman of Jordan, MN. A Memorial Mass was held at Saint John Roman Catholic Church, Westminster, MD on August 31, 2012. Burial is scheduled for September 21 at 10:45 a.m. at Fort Snelling National Cemetery, Minneapolis. Memorial donations can be made to the Tidewater Foundation, 10 Buckingham Plantation Drive, Suite A, Bluffton, SC 29910 (www.tidewaterhospice.com).

booya, from 1A

hit-and-run, from 1A

o’clock. “Last year we served the last bowl at 2:15,” said Al Olson, firefighter and chair of the booya event. “It sold out fast last year because it was cold outside and a big bowl of booya was just what the doctor ordered.” This year’s booya event hosted by the Apple Valley firefighters starts at 10 a.m. Saturday, Sept. 15, at Fire Station 1 located at County Road 42 and Hayes Road. The 34th annual event will also feature bingo, children’s games and inflatables, a dunk tank, silent auction, bake sale and raffle. Raffle tickets are $1 and top prizes include a Lawn Boy lawn mower and gift cards to area businesses. In addition to the booya, there will also be a snack bar with hot dogs, pulled pork sandwiches and other offerings. More information about the event is at www.cityofapplevalley.org.

“OK” before running away, leaving the injured couple to fend for themselves. Searles ran to the Kennedys’s car where Doreen was still in the passenger side, bleeding profusely from a head wound. “She scared me because it looked like she was almost passing out,” Searles said. David, who retired this spring after 41 years of teaching at Rosemount Elementary School, had gotten out of the car, seemed dazed and was on the phone by the time Searles arrived. “It was a horrible impact,” Doreen said, adding that the car was “totaled” in the accident, which bent the frame several inches, keeping the passenger side from closing. The car was later hauled away on a flat bed truck; David is now driving a rental car as they look for a new vehicle. “Most of the impact happened at the back passenger door and the rear tire,” Doreen said. “They said if he had hit me further up on the car, I’d be hurt worse.” She said at impact, her head violently snapped toward David, then slammed back into the passenger’s side of the car frame. The couple, in their 60s, are both still undergoing medical treatment for their injuries. Doctors stapled shut the inch- to inch-and-a-halflong gash in Doreen’s head, but she still suffers pain on half her head. Her vision problems in her left eye have worsened vision since the accident. David suffered soft tissue damage; his knees and back are sore, and he is having trouble bending his left elbow; both have neck injuries and are receiving chiropractic care. “I can’t hardly stand to walk it hurts so bad,” Doreen said. Searles said the hit-andrun driver’s car was damaged and was leaking large amounts of radiator fluid when he left the scene. The Kennedys said neighbors told them there may have been a passenger in the man’s car, possibly a young person. “I think they were worried about that because of the severity of the crash,” Doreen said. David said he believes the man either ran the stop sign or was speeding because there was no traffic and it was a clear day. “We’ve always been concerned about the way cars come around that corner,” Doreen said, noting that despite the area being a school zone they often witness cars speeding on the road. “If he had been going the speed limit, he would have been able to stop,” Searles said. Anyone with information about this incident is asked to contact Farmington police at (651) 280-6700. Laura Adelmann is at laura. adelmann@ecm-inc.com or facebook.com/sunthisweek.

Andrew Miller can be reached at andrew.miller@ecm-inc.com or facebook.com/sunthisweek. band, from 1A lot of fun and brings enjoyment packaging all the items together, kind of like Christmas when the items come in, you never know what the vendors are going to provide.” People don’t have to get a ticket to the event to bid on an item since the auction tables will be outside Irish Stadium. “We hope to get the community involved more with the band and have the chance to see some of the top bands in the nation compete in Rosemount,” Flynn said. “With 18 bands scheduled to perform, it’s going to be a busy day.” Of course, there’s a marching band festival to support, too. Tickets are $9 for adults, $5 for students/senior citizens and admission for children 5 and under is free. The show starts at 5 p.m. with the band slated to perform last at 10 p.m. The performance schedule is: Class A – 5-6:30 p.m. Farmington (exhibition), ROCORI, Minnetonka, Pipestone, Hastings, Winona Cotter Class AA – 6:45-7:30 p.m. Chippewa Falls, Waseca, River Falls, Rochester Lourdes Class A and AA awards – 7:45 p.m. Silent auction bidding closes at the end of intermission Class AAA – 8:15-10 p.m. Cumberland, Sioux Falls Roosevelt, Sioux Falls Lincoln, Marshall, Eden Prairie, Eastview, Irondale, Rosemount (exhibition) Class AAA awards – 10:15 p.m. A list of silent auction items is at www.rosemountband.com/index.php/en/ special-events/2012-silentauction. Tad Johnson is at tad.johnson@ecm-inc.com or facebook.com/sunthisweek.

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September 14, 2012 Sun Thisweek - Apple Valley - Rosemount


Sun Thisweek - Apple Valley - Rosemount September 14, 2012

News Briefs Robert Trail Library programs Robert Trail Library, 14395 S. Robert Trail, Rosemount, has planned the following programs. Call (651) 480-1200 for more information. • Every Family Can Tell A Story, 10:30 a.m. to noon Saturday, Sept. 15. Hear a well-told story and learn how to tell your own story. Registration required; call (651) 480-1202. • An Old-Fashioned Story Time, 7 p.m. Monday, Sept. 24. Stories, songs and simple games of long ago. For ages birth to 6. • Family Story Times, 10:30 to 11:15 a.m. Thursdays, Sept. 20 and 27. Stories, music, activities and play time appropriate for all ages. • Baby Story Times, 10:30 to 11:15 a.m. Wednesdays, Sept. 19, Oct. 3, Oct. 17. Stories, bounces, songs and playtime for children newborn to 24 months. • One Book Kids Book Club, 7 to 8 p.m. Monday, Oct. 1. Join with other kids across Rosemount to discuss “Moon Over Manifest” by Clare Vanderpool. Register by calling (651) 480-1202. Free copies of the book are available when registering while supplies last.

Family run/walk set at Shannon Park Elementary District 196 Community Education will host the inaugural Run with Me 5K and 1 Mile Family Run/ Walk and Health Expo on Saturday, Oct. 6, at Shannon Park Elementary School, Rosemount. The event will feature a 1-mile walk/run and 5K race beginning at Shannon Park and continuing through some of Rosemount’s neighborhoods, followed by refreshments, family activities, and a Health Expo. Cost is $30 per family, $15 for additional team member. Registration information is at https://district196. thatscommunityed.com/ course/youth-fall-2012/runwith-me-1-mile-and-5kfamily-run-walk.

District 196 seeks members with legislative experience School District 196 is looking for five district residents with experience in government affairs lobbying or the legislative process who are interested in serving on the district’s new Legislative Advisory Coun-

cil (LAC), which will meet for the first time in December. The deadline to apply is Oct. 12. The council’s role will be to provide input on the district’s legislative priorities, review legislative suggestions submitted by citizens and staff and provide input to the School Board regarding proposed legislation. Applications for the five at-large citizen positions will be accepted through Oct. 12. Interested residents can complete and print a an application at www.District196.org or call (651) 423-7775 to request an application.

College news Iowa State University, summer 2012 graduate, Adam McChesney of Rosemount, B.A., interdisciplinary studies. University of WisconsinEau Claire, summer 2012 graduate, Karissa Danes of Rosemount, M.S.E., school psychology. Jakob Gomez of Apple Valley is playing the role of Archer Brown in the Minnesota State University, Mankato, Sept. 19-22 production of David Mamet’s “November.”

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September 14, 2012 Sun Thisweek - Apple Valley - Rosemount

Thisweekend Booze and bootlegging, right in your backyard Local historian digs up details of Dakota County’s Prohibition-era underworld

by Andrew Miller Sun Thisweek

John Loch is finding that booze was abundant, and moonshine raids by federal agents were commonplace, in Dakota County during Prohibition. Loch, an Apple Valley resident John Loch and vice president of the Rosemount Area Historical Society, has been poring through old newspapers on microfiche at the library, and talking with

locals who were alive at the time, to piece together a picture of the bootlegging underworld in Dakota County at the time of Prohibition when production and sale of alcohol was illegal. There was the massive, 70,000-gallon distillery – said to be the largest distillery west of Chicago – operating on the outskirts of Rosemount. It was raided in 1924 or 1925. There was the deputy sheriff from Rosemount who kept confiscated moonshine stills in his backyard as trophies and disposed of illegal booze by pouring it

into the city sewer system. And in Miesville, there seemed to be a citywide conspiracy. “Just about everybody in Miesville was involved in producing or selling moonshine,” Loch said. “The farmers made it, the intown people sold it at their dance hall. “They were never raided – there’s one highway that runs through Miesville, and they had lookouts. If an unknown car passed through town, they’d sound the alarm.” Loch will present his findings in a talk titled

“Blind P i g s , Speakeasies and Moonshine” on Thursday, Sept. 27, at the Robert Trail Library in Rosemount. The talk, presented under the auspices of the Rosemount Area Historical Society, is one several community events being held as part of the One Book, One Rosemount program. This year, the One Book program has residents reading “Moon Over Manifest” by Clare Vanderpool, part of which deals with bootlegging during Prohibition. As for the title of Loch’s presentation, he borrowed a bit of Prohibition-era lingo. “Speakeasies” were highend establishments where alcohol was served, while “blind pigs” referred to lower-end establishments. Patrons were charged admission to see a blind pig, or some other freakish animal attraction, and were given a glass of ale with admission.

‘I Read It in the Paper’

“Blind Pigs, Speakeasies and Moonshine” is one of two presentation Loch will

be g i v ing this month as part of One Book, One Rosemount. On Sept. 22 he’ll present “I Read It in the Paper,” an interactive talk at which guests will piece together details from the life of a prominent, early-1900s Rosemount resident based on articles published in the Dakota County Tribune. Loch, who researches local history by reading old editions of newspapers at the Wescott Library in Eagan, said he uncovered about 300 short news items about William Cadzow, who was involved in politics, owned a hotel, managed a baseball team and had his hand in a host of other aspects of Rosemount civic life. The presentation, Loch said, is about “how you really can find out the history of an individual and a place by reading the columns you find in old newspapers.” “I Read It in the Paper”

Photo by Andrew Miller

In addition to his talk “Blind Pigs, Speakeasies and Moonshine,” local historian John Loch this month will present “I Read It in the Paper,” an interactive event at which guests will piece together details from the life of a prominent, early-1900s Rosemount resident based on articles published in the Dakota County Tribune. will be held from 2:30 to 4 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 22, and “Blind Pigs, Speakeasies and Moonshine” is set for 6:30 to 8 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 27. Both events will be held at the Robert Trail Library in Rosemount and are geared to adults and youths ages 12 and older. Admission is free. Andrew Miller can be reached at andrew.miller@ ecm-inc.com or facebook. com/sunthisweek.

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Sun Thisweek - Apple Valley - Rosemount September 14, 2012

theater and arts briefs Area residents in ‘The Music Man’

“In the Oaks Pasture” by Todd Voss

From comic book beginnings, artist evolved to oil on canvas Todd Voss is the featured artist at this year’s Lakeville Art Festival by Andrew Miller Sun Thisweek

Todd Voss first started doing art as a child, drawing the characters in his favorite comic books – Bugs Bunny, Road Runner, Porky Pig, the whole gang. He began getting serious about it Todd Voss – and considering art as a vocation – his senior year of high school. “My last year of high school I took nothing but art classes – and, I think, one gym class,” he said. “I’ve been doing art since I was a little kid and I just never stopped.” As the Best in Show winner as the 2011 Lakeville Art Festival, Voss will be the featured artist at this year’s festival, which runs Sept. 15-16 on the grounds of the Lakeville Area Arts Center. Lakeville will be the final stop on Voss’ summer art fair schedule. A full-time professional artist, he averages about 10 such events throughout the Midwest each year, where he sells his oil paintings. Last weekend saw him at an art fair in central Wisconsin. The real work – his painting – he does mostly at his home in Detroit Lakes, Minn. He admits there isn’t much pingpong played in the basement rec room of his split-level home. His wife, Fern Belling, is also a painter, and the couple has

converted the basement of their home into an art studio. “Some people say two artists can’t live together, but we seem to get along fine,” he said. Voss also does a lot of outdoor painting, picking a bucolic locale and doing a “field study” – a smaller painting with less detail than the works he produces at home. And he shoots a lot of photos during these outdoor sessions. “I’ll then use the field study and the photos to make a larger painting in my home studio,” he said. One thing influencing Voss’ artwork is his practice of transcendental meditation, or TM. It’s something he learned as a student at Maharishi International University in Fairfield, Iowa, which he attended from 1986 to 1990. “It’s a regular four-year college, but in addition to that it teaches TM and the science of consciousness, to connect the subjects you’re studying back to yourself,” he said. “I still practice TM. I don’t consciously try and integrate things from TM and meditation into my painting, though meditation is bound to have an effect on whatever you do.” To view samples of Voss’ work, visit www.mnartists. org/todd_voss. Andrew Miller can be reached at andrew.miller@ ecm-inc.com or facebook. com/sunthisweek.

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Jillian Jacobson of Burnsville, Kati Devitt and Atlee Jensen of Apple Valley, and Morgan Guinta and Tawny Greene of Eagan are featured as members of the ensemble in the Eat Street Players’ production of “The Music Man” at the Howard Conn Fine Arts Center, 1900 Nicollet Ave. S., Minneapolis. Performances are Sept. 14-15. For more information, visit www. eatstreetplayers.org.

Local artist’s works on display Nancy Miller of Rosemount is among seven recipients of a 2011 Emerging Artists Grant from VSA Minnesota whose work will be exhibited Sept. 13-29 at Homewood Studios Gallery, 2400 Plymouth Ave. N., Minneapolis. An opening reception will be held from 6 to 8 p.m. Friday, Sept. 14; a reading with the artists will be 6 to 8 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 18. The artwork is for sale. VSA Minnesota’s events are fragrancefree.

Lorie Line holiday concert Pianist Lorie Line will bring “Immanuel,” her holiday extravaganza, to the Burnsville Performing Arts Center at 7:30 p.m. Friday, Nov. 30, and 3 and 7 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 1. Also performing will be Line’s Fab Five – including award-winning drummer Jean-Pierre Bouvet of Lakeville.

Tickets are $48 and can be on Thursday and Sunday purchased at the box office or and $15 on Friday and Satvia phone at (952) 895-4680. urday. Tickets are available online at www.hahatickets. com or by calling (651) 5288454.

‘White Christmas’ auditions set

The Play’s the Thing Productions will hold auditions for “Irving Berlin’s White Christmas” from 6 to 9 p.m. Sept. 24 and 25 in the cafeteria of Metcalf Junior High School in Burnsville. Performers ages 10 to 18 are eligible to audition. Auditions are by appointment, email dnacsr@aol.com with preference for an on-the-hour time slot, with callbacks the following Wednesday evening, time to be determined. Initial auditions will be singing and dancing only. Prepare 32 bars of an upbeat/ Broadway style song. Bring sheet music in the appropriate key. No a capella singing. Accompanist provided. For the dancing audition, wear comfortable clothing and dance shoes, choreographer will teach the routine for the dance audition. Play performances will be weekends Dec. 14-30 at the Lakeville Area Arts Center.

Laugh Lines Comedy Laugh Lines Comedy will have its grand opening Oct. 11-14 at the GrandStay hotel in Apple Valley. Stand-up comedian Chad Daniels will headline. Laugh Lines plans to host comedy shows one weekend per month through the fall, winter and spring months. Shows will be at 7 p.m. Thursday, 7 and 9:30 p.m. Friday and Saturday, and 7 p.m. Sunday. Tickets are $12

Holocaust survivor program Holocaust survivor Eva Mozes Kor, who as a child was subjected to human experimentation at Auschwitz concentration camp, will speak from 10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Friday, Sept. 21, in the Fine Arts Theater at Inver Hills Community College, 2500 E. 80th St., Inver Grove Heights. The event is free and open to the public.

Ghost town in Dakota County Inver Hills Community College professor Jeremy Nienow will share from 3 to 4:30 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 20, a selection of artifacts, documents and discoveries from an IHCC summer dig which discovered an 1850s failed frontier community and two Native American sites in southern Dakota

County. The free presentation, titled “This Summer in the Life of an Archaeologist,” will be in Room 290 of the College Center building. For more information, visit www.inverhills.edu/interestingconversations.

Hispanic Heritage Month Dakota County Library will celebrate Hispanic Heritage Month (Sept. 15-Oct. 15) with the following programs: • The Adventures of Don Quixote, 7 to 7:45 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 11, Wescott Library, 1340 Wescott Road, Eagan. Interactive, bilingual show about Don Quixote, a famous character from Spanish literature. • Ticket to Brasil, 11 to 11:45 a.m., Saturday, Oct. 13, Galaxie Library, 14955 Galaxie Ave., Apple Valley. Take an inspiring journey through the world of Brazilian music, traditional percussion playing and dance. For more information, visit www.dakotacounty. us/library or call (651) 4502900.

family calendar To submit items for the Family Calendar, email: darcy. odden@ecm-inc.com.

Saturday, Sept. 15 Junk Market from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. at Towne and Country Shopping Center, 1998 Cliff Road E., Burnsville. Free admission. Held rain or shine. Eagan Charity Run/Walk 5K at Diffley/Lexington Athletic Fields, 4201 Lexington Ave., Eagan. Registration opens at 8:15 a.m. Race begins at 9:30 a.m. Online registration at www. eaganwt.org under the 5K tab. Hosted by the Eagan Women of

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Today, (651) 354-5827, eaganwt@gmail.com. Who Done it Hike, 9:30 a.m. registration, 10 a.m. hike at Ritter Farm Park, 19300 Ritter Trail, Lakeville. For all ages. Collect clues, gather information and solve mysteries while walking the trails. Free. No registration needed. Information: Lakeville Parks and Recreation, (952) 985-4600. Apple Valley Firefighter’s Relief Association’s Booya, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. or until booya pot is empty, at Fire Station 1, 15000 Hayes Road, Apple Valley.


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Sports

September 14, 2012 Sun Thisweek - Apple Valley - Rosemount

Tough tests continue for Lightning Eastview falls 24-7 to Wayzata; Lakeville North up next muffed a punt catch, only to recover the ball at the Lightning’s 29 and score The Eastview football five plays later. team went to Wayzata last Wayzata also kicked a Friday with the No. 8 rankfield goal on the last play of ing in the state high school the first half, three points it football Class 6A poll. Earmight not have scored if not ly-season rankings can be for a holding penalty that subject to wild fluctuations, nullified an Eastview first and there likely was some down and forced the Lightlingering uncertainty about ning to punt the ball back to just how good the LightWayzata in the final minute ning could be. of the second quarter. The Lightning didn’t get Still, there were issues a victory, but it might have for the Lightning (1-1). The gotten an answer. offense managed only 119 “Number one, you beyards and struggled to move long on the field with that the ball until the fourth team,” Eastview coach quarter. Eastview was in Kelly Sherwin told his playWayzata’s half of the field ers after a 24-7 loss to No. only twice, and one of those 2-ranked Wayzata on Fritimes started a possession day night. there after blocking a punt. Sophomore running back Will Rains prevented a shutout by scoring on a 1-yard run with 2:24 remaining. Rains led his team with 62 yards on 18 carries. “Against a team like Wayzata, first-down yardage is a big deal,” Sherwin said. “You can’t have second and 13 or third and 11 against them. But I think we’ll be fine. We have a lot of young guys on offense, and as the season goes Photo by Brian Nelson Eastview’s Henry McIsaac tries to run against a stingy along we should be able to attack more.” Wayzata defense. by Mike Shaughnessy Sun Thisweek

Asked later if he thought the players believed that, Sherwin said, “I think they know. The kids understand there isn’t that much of a difference between Wayzata and them, but there are things we have to do better if we’re going to beat a team like Wayzata.” While the score might suggest another one-sided victory for a Wayzata team that has been in the state large-school championship game the last two years, Eastview saw missed opportunities to keep the score much closer. One third-quarter Wayzata touchdown was set up by an Eastview turnover. Later in the quarter the Trojans

Photo by Brian Nelson

Eastview players, including Ben Oberfeld (44), try to block a Wayzata field goal attempt. Wayzata won the Sept. 7 non-conference game 24-7. Eastview’s defense allowed 292 yards but made several big plays to keep the game close. The Lightning held on fourth and goal at the 2 when senior defensive back Anthony Munos broke up a pass. The defense also recovered two fumbles, including defensive lineman Max Kane jumping on a

bad snap at the Lightning 18. Any lessons Eastview learned against Wayzata could be put to use almost immediately when it plays fourth-ranked Lakeville North at home at 7 p.m. Sept. 14. North, the defending South Suburban Conference champion, hung 10

touchdowns – yes, 10 – on Bloomington Kennedy in a 70-25 victory last week. As explosive as North has been – the Panthers scored 117 points in their first two games – defense is considered the team’s strength. Lakeville North See football, 11A

Eagles, Blaze play to a wind-blown tie

Photo by Mike Shaughnessy

by Mike Shaughnessy

Apple Valley goalkeeper Ethan Meiburg (left) comes out of the net to scoop up the ball in the second half of his team’s 1-1 tie with Burnsville on Tuesday.

Sun Thisweek

When a team begins a season with seven consecutive victories, it tends to attract attention from people who vote in state polls. So it was for Apple Valley’s boys soccer squad, which was ninth in the Class AA preseason rankings but zoomed to No. 1 by Sunday. The Eagles played for the first time as the state’s top-ranked team Tuesday and rallied for a 1-1 tie against South Suburban Conference rival Burnsville. Senior midfielder Mitchell Dawson, one of Apple Valley’s captains, said the Eagles weren’t flustered by their rapid rise in the state poll. “We’re kind of used to it,” Dawson said. “We’re Apple Valley.” The Eagles were ranked No. 1 as recently as the beginning of the 2011 season, when they were coming off back-to-back state championships. For now, coach Chuck Scanlon could do without his team being at the top of the poll. “I want to be ranked No. 1 at the end of the year, not now,” said Scanlon, whose soccer teams have won nine state championships. “Being ranked No. 1 puts a target on your back. You have to work harder.” Apple Valley (7-0-1) certainly had to work hard against Burns-

ville (4-1-1) in a game that included numerous fouls, several yellow cards and one ejection. Burnsville went most of the overtime with 10 players after losing one to a red card. “There must have been 50 fouls, and that’s tough on us because we’re a smaller team,” Scanlon said. Burnsville, working into a 30 mph wind in the first half, took the lead on senior Mauricio Mendoza’s goal in the 24th minute. “The first half, we didn’t play the way we wanted to, but we picked up our game in the second half,” Scanlon said. Burnsville, the home team, appeared to have everything its favor in the second half because it had the lead, had the wind at its back and faced a team that’s not as familiar with playing on artificial turf.

Playing the ball in the air was problematic because of the wind, and when the Eagles played it along the ground they had difficulty adjusting to the faster surface. “We like to play a lot of through balls, but that’s harder to do on turf,” Dawson said. The Eagles tied the game with four minutes left when Connor Flanagan nudged the ball into the net just before colliding with Blaze goalkeeper Mayowa Lekuti. Flanagan, the Eagles’ leading scorer with eight goals and 18 points, then left the game because of a strained abdominal muscle. He did not return. “We expected a challenge,” Dawson said. “We thought we’d win if we played our game, but it was tough today.” The Eagles were scheduled to play Eastview on Thursday and See soccer, 11A

Drawing a crowd

Photo by Rick Orndorf

Rosemount receiver Dimitri Williams picks up yardage as several Eden Prairie tacklers try to bring him down during a Sept. 7 non-conference football game at Rosemount High School. Williams caught six passes for 79 yards and one touchdown, but Eden Prairie won 34-7.

Photo by Rick Orndorf

Apple Valley volleyball players Stephanie Hechsel (25) and Colleen Moore block at the net against Cretin-Derham Hall.

Eagles spikers third in Aerie Challenge Coach says progress is evident by Mike Shaughnessy Sun Thisweek

– three of the most feared hitters in the state – Lundin said she believes they have enough athletes to cause problems for opponents. One thing evident from the Eagles’ play against Stillwater in the Aerie Challenge is they will use a lot of quick sets and try to attack before the opponents can get their blockers in position. Lundin said her coaches at Maine used that philosophy, and she has borrowed it for her team. Senior outside hitter Shanotta Bawek, one of Apple Valley’s three captains, has been on varsity since eighth grade. Sophomore Colleen Moore also could be an impact player for the Eagles; Lundin praised her athletic ability. Also serving as captains are senior middle hitter Alex Wangen and senior defensive specialist Garet Milner. Juniors on the roster are outside hitter Chaz Flanagan, middle hitter Katie Shabatura and libero Janelle Lam. Moore, setter Isabelle Rieth, right-side hitter Stephanie Hechsel and outside hitter Harmony Huglen-Hawkins are sophomores. Middle hitter Julia Running, an eighth-grader, also is on the varsity roster. Lundin said she regarded the Eagles’ performance in the Aerie Challenge as a positive step, especially coming off the first Stillwater match. “We would have liked to be in the championship game, but we lost our semifinal match 15-17 in the third,” she said. “But we played much better matches, and that’s what we wanted to see.” Apple Valley will face an even stronger field when it plays host to the Eagle Invitational beginning Sept. 21. The field includes the No. 1-ranked team in each of Minnesota’s three enrollment classes.

After Apple Valley lost quickly and decisively to Stillwater in a volleyball match last week, Eagles coach Shelly Lundin had one request for her players. “I want my team back,” she said. In other words, she wanted to see the team that had been improving steadily in practice, not the one that fell flat in the Sept. 6 non-conference match. It’s likely the Eagles gave Lundin what she was looking for in last weekend’s Aerie Challenge at Apple Valley High School, where they finished third – and defeated Stillwater in their final match, just two days after being blown out by the same team. “We didn’t even have a practice to fix what went wrong,” Lundin said, “but I think it worked out. Instead of talking about what happened (in the first Stillwater match), we had to play again.” Apple Valley responded with victories over Hastings, St. Francis and Stillwater in the Aerie Challenge last Friday and Saturday. The Eagles’ only loss was to Cretin-Derham Hall in a best-ofthree semifinal match that went to a 17-15 third game. CDH went on to beat Lakeville South in the championship match. Apple Valley was 3-4 after losing to Burnsville in a South Suburban Conference match Tuesday night. Lundin, a former University of Maine player, is in her first season as head coach at Apple Valley after several years as an assistant. So far, “I love it,” she said. “As a coach, you always have your own ideas about how you want to do things, and now I have a chance to put them in place.” While the Eagles don’t have someone like Eden Prairie’s Sarah Mike Shaughnessy is at mike. Wilhite, Lakeville North’s Alyssa shaughnessy@ecm-inc.com or faceGoehner or Eagan’s Taylr McNeil book.com/sunthisweek.


Sun Thisweek - Apple Valley - Rosemount September 14, 2012

Sports football, from 10A returned nine of 11 defensive starters after reaching the state quarterfinals in 2011. “They have a very good defense,” Sherwin said. “They might not be as fast as Wayzata, but they probably have more size.”

Apple Valley

game for a while against defending state large-school champion Eden Prairie, but the No. 1-ranked Eagles ultimately rolled to a 34-7 victory. The Irish scored with one minute left in the first quarter on a 30-yard pass from Sean Kalinowski to Dimitri Williams. That touchdown cut Eden Prairie’s lead to 14-7. Williams had six catches for 79 yards. Kalinowski completed eight of 16 passes for 83 yards, and sophomore Jackson Erdmann had six completions in eight throws for 39 yards.

Two weeks into the regular season, two South Suburban Conference teams are undefeated – Lakeville North, which probably surprises nobody, and Apple Valley, which might surprise everybody, considering the Eagles won only once in Mike Shaughnessy is at mike. shaughnessy@ecm-inc.com or 2011. The Eagles moved to facebook.com/sunthisweek. 2-0 with a 30-8 victory at Bloomington Jefferson on Sept. 7. They play host to Prior Lake at 7 p.m. Friday in Apple Valley’s homecoming game. Senior running back Quinn Hooks scored on two explosive plays against Jefferson, a 63-yard run and a 71-yard pass from Tommy Singer. Steven Wilson (26 yards) and Dom McDew-Stauffer (1 yard) also had touchdown runs. Harry Sonie got the Eagles’ first score on a 41-yard interception return. Apple Valley led 30-0 at halftime and didn’t let Jefferson get on the scoreboard until the fourth quarter, when the Jaguars had a touchdown and safety. Prior Lake, the Eagles’ opponent this week, is 1-1. The Lakers defeated Eagan 30-11 in their season opener but were routed by Lakeville South 49-14 last week.

Rosemount The Irish (0-2) will go for their first victory of the season at 7 p.m. Friday at home against Bloomington Kennedy, also 0-2. Both teams are coming off losses to highly ranked opponents last week. Kennedy was routed 70-25 by Lakeville North, which is fourth in the state Class 6A poll. Rosemount stayed in the

soccer, from 10A will go to Park of Cottage Grove for a non-conference game at noon Saturday. Burnsville will face Cristo Rey Jesuit High School of Minneapolis at home at 7 p.m. Friday. Mike Shaughnessy is at mike. shaughnessy@ecm-inc.com or facebook.com/sunthisweek.

Dance clinic The Eastview High School Lightning dance team will hold its annual community dance clinic from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 6, at the high school, 6200 140th St. W., Apple Valley.

The clinic is open to children ages 4 to 14. The advance registration fee is $35 per participant ($25 each additional family member). Registration at the door is $39. The fee includes a Tshirt, personal instruction by the Eastview dance team, a snack, and free student admission and popcorn at the Eastview Dance Invitational if you wear your shirt. Registration information is at www.lightningdanceteam.com.

Today’s The Day Stop Smoking

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September 14, 2012 Sun Thisweek - Apple Valley - Rosemount

Rosemount tax impact aims for zero Rosemount Leprechaun Days by Tad Johnson Sun Thisweek

Zero. That number may not be as fun as some of the others, but when it comes to taxes it’ll do. Zero is the estimated change in the city of Rosemount’s portion of property taxes from 2012 to 2013 for the median residential homestead property. That estimate comes as a result of the City Council’s approval of the preliminary 2013 levy and budget at the Sept. 4 regular meeting. The median value homestead of $194,100 is estimated to pay $854 in 2013. While that’s the same for the median property in 2012, tax bills dropped in each of the previous four years. Council Member Jeff Weisensel said he was disappointed that the budget didn’t keep that string on a roll and asked for more innovation and cost cutting. Finance Director Jeff May said the city is becoming more efficient because and finding ways to make cuts or find savings in order to add amenities and operational costs and still maintain zero. “I see zero as a positive,” he said.

City Administrator Dwight Johnson said the city could have put last year’s surplus fund toward debt reduction for an immediate reduction in taxes, but the council has tentatively accepted a plan to use that money to stabilize health insurance rates. “I think we made a good decision to help us in that regard,” he said. “We bought ourselves some real stability for years to come … so we don’t have a yo-yo budget.” The sample property would have seen a reduction in the city portion of property taxes if the median value would have slipped as much as it had in previous years. Rosemount had the smallest median home value reduction (-3.34) of any city in Dakota County. The median value percentage change has ranged from -5.86 to -8.83 in the past three years for Rosemount. City officials reported the overall tax base did not decline by much because new growth offset some of the decline in existing property values. The city’s levy and funding needs are proposed to increase from 2012 to 2013 1.26 and 1.76 percent, re-

spectively. Cities are required to set a preliminary budget by Sept. 15. At this point, the levy amount can only be reduced before the final levy is set in December. Property owners will receive their tax statements in November prior to the city’s Dec. 4 required budget hearing. The 2013 budget includes not filling two positions that had retirements in 2012 (receptionist and public works operations superintendent). Not all of the costs associated with those positions will be saved. Some funds are budgeted in the event a part-time receptionist is hired, and some salary increases were passed along when public works operation superintendent duties were assigned to current employees. The city, which has 76 full-time employees, has trimmed full-time positions by five since 2008. Salary increases for all employees was 1 percent for 2012, along with another 1 percent increase slated for Jan. 1, 2013, and July 1, 2013. Tad Johnson can be reached at tad.johnson@ecm-inc.com or facebook.com/sunthisweek.

button winners announced The winners in the 2012 Rosemount Leprechaun Days Button prize giveaway were announced this week. The Rosemount Area Seniors sold the official Rosemount Leprechaun Days buttons during the July 2331 festival this year. At the same time people purchased a button, they were given a chance to enter the prize giveaway. Money raised through the effort will help fund future senior programs. Volunteer leaders of the seniors group said they appreciate the support of the community. The winners are: $100 cash prize – Dave Haukas $50 cash prize from Larsen P.A. – Karen Peterson $50 cash prize from Master Transmission (2) – Nikole Kesner and Avarie Otto $50 cash prize from Phil’s Body Shop – Don Cregan $50 gift card from MGM Wine & Spirits – Terry Kaeder $25 gift card from BP Gas Station – Bob Anderson $25 gift card from

Casper’s Steak House – Mike Hamre $20 gift card from Terry’s Hardware (2) – Sue Collin and Colleen Adams $10 gift card from Nadia’s Hair Shop (2) – Lori Dousett and Lois Norgard $10 gift card from Baker’s Square (2) – Sheryl Kendall and Tracy Tobritzhofer Rosemount Floral gift card – Linda Tutko Gift Bag of Hair Products – Cost Cutters (3) – Jim Koslowski, Wayne Snyder and Colleen Alcin Emerson Round Slow Cooker – Connie Kellington

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Sun Thisweek - Apple Valley - Rosemount September 14, 2012

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September 14, 2012 Sun Thisweek - Apple Valley - Rosemount


Sun Thisweek - Apple Valley - Rosemount September 14, 2012

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September 14, 2012 Sun Thisweek - Apple Valley - Rosemount

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����� ������� PUBLIC NOTICE

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING PROPOSED CONDITIONAL USE PERMIT IN THE CITY OF APPLE VALLEY NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Planning Commission of the City of Apple Valley, Dakota County, Minnesota, will meet at the Municipal Center, 7100 147th Street West, on Wednesday, October 3, 2012, at 7:00 p.m., or as soon thereafter as possible. The purpose of the meeting is to hold a public hearing on a proposed request for an outdoor display and sales conditional use permit in a “RB” (Retail Business) zoning district. Said hearing relates to property located at 7501-75 145th Street West, and legally described as: Lots 1 and 2, Block 2, BOR-NEL, Dakota County, Minnesota, according to the recorded plat thereof, on file and of record in the Office of the Dakota County Recorder. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that these proceedings are instituted upon the petition of Kwik Trip, Inc. All interested parties will be given an opportunity to be heard at said time and place. DATED this 4th day of September, 2012. /s/ Pamela J. Gackstetter Pamela J. Gackstetter, City Clerk 3149041 9/14/12

�� ���� ���������� ������ �������� ������ ��� ��������� ���� ��� �� ���� �� ��� ��� ����� ������ ������������ ���� ��� �� ���� ��� ���� ������� ���� ����������� ��� ��� ����� ��� ���� ������� ��������� �������� ���� �� ��������� ������ �������� ���� ��� ��������� �� ��� ��������� �� ���� ������ ���� �������� �� ��� ���������� ��� ������ ���� ����� ��� ���� ���������� � ��������� ������ �� ������� ���������� ���� �������� ������ ���� ��� �������� ���� ���� ����������� ����������� ������ ��� �������� ���� ������� ������ ��� ����� �� ��� ��������� �� ��� ��� ���� �������� ���� ������� �� ���������� ��� ���������� ���� ��� �������� ������� ������ ����������� ��� ������� ���������� ������� ��������� ��� ���� �� � ������� ����� ���� �� ������������� ������ ��� ��� ��� ����������� ��������� �� ������� ������ ���� ����������� ����� ����� ���� ������� �� ���������� �� ��� ��������� ������ ���� ����� ��� ����������� ������ ��� ����� ���������� ������ ������ ������� ������� ����� ��� �� ��������� �������� �������� �� ������� ���� ������� ��� �������� ��������� ��� ��� ������� ��������� �������� �������� ���� ��������� ��� ��� ����������� ������ ���� � ������ �� �������� ����� �� ����� ���� ���������� ����� ������ �� �������� ������� ���������� ���� �� ��� �������� ��� ��� ��� ������ �� �� � ������ ���� ���� ������ ��� �� ����� ����� ��� ��� ����� ��� �� � ���� ���� ��� ��� ������� �������� ��� ��������� �� � ����������� �������� ���������� ���� ���� ��� ������� ��������� �������� ���� ��� ���� ������������ ����������� ���������� ����� ������� �������� �������� �������� �� ���������� ��� ������������ ������� ��������� ��������� �� ���� ��� ����� �� � ����������� ����� ����� �� ��� ������� �������� ������� ������ ��� ������� ���� ������ �������� ���� �������� � �������� �������� ���� �� ����� ��� ����� ������ �������� � ������������ ������ ��� �� ��� ���������� ������� ��� ������ � ������� � ����� ������� ��������� ��� ������� ��������� ������� ������ ��������� ����� ��� ����������� �������� ��������� �� ��� ��� ������� ���� ��� ����� ����� ��� ���� ������� ��������� �������� ������� ����������� ���� ���� ������� ��������� ���� �������� ��� �������� ������� �� ����� ��������� ���� ���� ��������� ���� ���� �������� ��������� ��������� ���� ������������ ���������� ��� ���������� ���� ����� �� � ����� �������� �� ��� ���������� ������ ��� �������� ���� �� �������� ����� ��� ��������� ������ ��� ����� ���� ��� ���������� �������� ����������� �� ����������� ������ ������ ��� �������� ��������� �� � ���� ����� ������� �� ��� ��� �������� ��� ������ �� �������� ���� �� ������� ��������� ������� ����� �������� ��� � ��������� ������� ������� ������ �������� ��� ������ ����������� ����� ��� ���������� ���� ������ ������ �� � ��� ���� ��������� �� ������ ������ �������� ������� �� �������� �� ����� ���������� ��� ������� ��� �� ��� ��� ���� ������� ��� ��� ������ ���������� ������� ��� ��� ������ �������� ��� �������� ����� ��� ���������� ������� �� ���������� �������� �� �������� ��� ��� ������ �������� ���������� �� ���� ������� ������� ���� ��� ������ ��������� ��������� ��� ���� ������ ���� ������ ���� ������ ��� ����� ���� ��� ��� ���� ��� �� ������ ��� ��� �������� �� �������� ��������� �� ������ �� ������� �������� �� ����� ����� ��� �������� ���� ��� ������� ������ �� ����� ��� �� ������ ������ �� ������� ����� �� ������� ��� ������� �� ���� ���� ������� �������

PUBLIC NOTICE District 917

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING PROPOSED CONDITIONAL USE PERMIT IN THE CITY OF APPLE VALLEY NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Planning Commission of the City of Apple Valley, Dakota County, Minnesota, will meet at the Municipal Center, 7100 West 147th Street, on Wednesday, October 3, 2012, at 7:00 p.m., or as soon thereafter as possible. The purpose of the meeting is to hold a public hearing on a proposed conditional use permit for outdoor storage of vehicles in conjunction with a commercial operation in a “RB” (Retail Business) zoning district. Said hearing relates to property located at 7600-147th Street W. and legally described as follows: The East 85 feet of Lot 1, Block 2 and the West 40 feet of Lot 2, Block 2, Valley Commercial Park First Addition, Dakota County, Minnesota, according to the recorded plat thereof on file at the Office of the Dakota County Recorder. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that these proceedings are instituted by Timothy Shiels and Keith Sperbeck. All interested parties will be given an opportunity to be heard at said time and place. DATED this 7th day of September, 2012. /s/ Pamela J. Gackstetter Pamela J. Gackstetter, City Clerk 3149234 9/14/12

School Board Proceedings

This is a summary of the Intermediate School District 917 Regular School Board Meeting on Tuesday, September 4, 2012, with full text available for public inspection on the district website at www.isd917.k12.mn.us or the District Office at 1300 145th Street East, Rosemount, MN 55068. The meeting was called to order at 5:30 PM. Board members present: Arlene Bush, Dan Cater, Ron Hill, Jill Lewis, Kathy Lewis, Deb Clark, Vanda Pressnall, Veronica Walter, and administrators were present. Absent: Tom Ryerson. Good news reports were presented. The following Consent Agenda items were approved: minutes, personnel, , bills to be paid, and wire transferst. Recommended actions approved: Policy 9.24, Imprest Petty Cash Fund, and Goals for 2012-2013. Also recommended to set all future Board meetings at 5:15 PM instead of 5:30 pm. Adjournment at 6:31 PM. 3148922 9/14/12

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Sun Thisweek - Apple Valley - Rosemount September 14, 2012

Ramble Jam this weekend by Laura Adelmann Sun Thisweek

Farmington Rotary’s biggest fundraiser, Ramble Jam, returns this weekend at the Dakota County Fairgrounds and is bigger than ever. The country music festival has added another full day of entertainment that includes national acts and begins today with Sara Lynn Wallin at 3:30 p.m. Performers include Randy Houser; Dustin Lynch;

Service news Nicholas A. Manning has graduated from the U.S. Air Force Academy, Colorado Springs, Colo. Manning He received a bachelor of science degree and was commissioned as a second lieutenant. A 2008 graduate of Rosemount High School, Manning is the son of Michael and Monica Manning of Rosemount. C a d e t Bryce Wilberding, son of Jay and Judy Neudecker of Ro s e m o u n t , c o m p l e t e d Wilberding Cadet Basic Training at the U.S. Military Academy at West Point. Wilberding graduated from Rosemount High School in June 2012. He plans to graduate from West Point in 2016 and be commissioned as a second lieutenant in the U.S. Army.

Whiskey Meyers; Rocket Club; Lost Highway; Greene & Hurst; Sunny Sweeney and Josh Thompson. One of the headliners, Lee Brice, is nominated for new artist of the year by the Country Music Association. Rotary Club president Pam Hadler said the event will also feature food and beverage vendors, merchandise for sale and a mechanical bull.

Religion Briefs New church in Farmington meets

The Real Tree Church will begin services at 10 a.m. Sunday, Sept. 16, in the little theater at Robert Boeckman Middle School. The church is led by Pastor Shon McIntyre, who has a bachelor’s degree in biblical studies/ theology and is working on his master’s of divinity. The Real Tree Church is a member of the Fellowship of Evangelical Churches. For more information, go to www.therealtreechurch.org.

Community meals Grace Lutheran Church in Apple Valley will serve free community meals on Mondays, Sept. 17 and 24. Dining hall doors will open at 5:30 p.m. Dinner will be served from 6 to 6:30 p.m. The meals are for senior citizens, single-parent families, families in transition and all others in the surrounding community seeking a

U.S. Service Academy Information Day is Sept. 15 U.S. Rep. John Kline will host a U.S. Service Academy Information Day for students who live in Minnesota’s 2nd congressional district from 9 a.m. to noon Saturday, Sept. 15, at the Diamondhead Education Center, 200 W. Burnsville Parkway, Burnsville (Door

Gates open at 2 p.m. Friday and noon Saturday. Hadler said the profits are used to benefit the community, including scholarships, mentoring programs for at-risk youth and work with senior citizens. Tickets prices vary; they are available at the door or at a discount online at www. ramblejamcountry.com. Laura Adelmann is at laura. adelmann@ecm-inc.com or facebook.com/sunthisweek.

7). The information session will provide important information to candidates and their families about the application process and how candidates can seek nomination through his congressional office, as well as their U.S. senators.

healthy meal in a relaxed and fun environment. Free will donations are accepted. Grace Lutheran Church is located at the intersection of Pennock Avenue and County Road 42. For more information, call the church at (952) 432-7273.

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September 14, 2012 Sun Thisweek - Apple Valley - Rosemount

Burnsville duo brings homeland cuisine to town Tawakal will serve East African fare by John Gessner Sun Thisweek

Yussuf and Ifrah Shafie, longtime Burnsville residents by way of Kenya and Somalia, are bringing East African cuisine to Burnsville. The brother-sister team is opening Tawakal Restaurant on Sept. 21 in the Nic-Burn strip mall east of Nicollet Avenue and north of Burnsville Parkway. “This is the first Somali restaurant in Burnsville,” 23-year-old Yussuf declared, explaining that the menu will be mostly Somali fare with a sampling of Ethiopia and Kenya. He and his 25-year-old sister have seen many East African immigrants come behind them since they arrived in Burnsville with their family in 2000. “I’m really confident” in the restaurant’s prospects, Yussuf said. “People drive 20 minutes to Minneapolis to get Somali food. We have a huge Somali population here.” He hopes the restaurant builds a fan base with nonAfricans, too. “I want to change perceptions in the community. I want to educate others who don’t know much about us,” said Yussuf, who is originally from Somalia but spent most of his childhood in Kenya. “I’m 23 years old and I’m opening my own restaurant. That’s the American dream.” One of seven Shafie children, Yussuf started seventh grade at Nicollet Junior High and graduated from Burnsville High School in 2006. “It was tough — language barriers, a lot of racial stuff,” he said of his early school experiences here. “Burnsville back in 2000 was the whitest place you could find. Now, it’s very diverse. ... But I think I

did pretty good handling all that as a youngster.” In May, he got a bachelor’s degree in social work from Metro State University. He plans to pursue a master’s of social work at the University of Minnesota or Augsburg. “I want to give back to my community,” Yussuf said. “Literally, I enjoy helping people. I want to empower people.” Graduate studies will wait a year, he said, while he gets the restaurant off the ground. Savings from his job with a residential group-home provider and his sister’s savings from her job as a nurse are helping bankroll the business, Yussuf said. Another family member is a minority investor, and the business has a bank credit line, he said. Tawakal Restaurant promises Halal (permissible according to Islamic religious law) meats and seafood, farm-fresh vegetables, and breads and pastries baked daily. Goat, fish, chicken, lamb, chicken steak and beefsteak are staples of the 40-plus menu items, along with rice, Yussuf said. “Which is very similar to lots of parts of the world,” he said. “It’s good stuff. I am very confident you guys will like our food.”

Photo by John Gessner

Yussuf Shafie, above, and his sister Ifrah are opening Tawakal Restaurant in Burnsville on Sept. 21.

Spicy? “You can make it hot,” said Yussuf, who lives at home with his family. “It’s up to the customer. We have many different spices we can add. We have a homemade hot sauce on the side you can have. It’s the best.” The menu will have halfplate ($7) and full-plate ($10) options and daily lunch specials, Yussuf said. For opening day on Sept. 21, the restaurant is offering one free lunch special per customer from noon to 3 p.m. Tawakal Restaurant is located in a newly renovated space at 12609 Nicollet Ave. For information, call (952) 500-8954 or visit www. tawakalrestaurantmn.com. John Gessner can be reached at john.gessner@ecm-inc.com or facebook.com/sunthisweek.

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SUN Thisweek Apple Valley and Rosemount