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Apple Valley | Rosemount

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April 20, 2012 | Volume 33 | Number 8

sports

Photo courtesy of Alan Merrick

Alan Merrick (6) plays in a Minnesota Kicks game against the New York Cosmos at Metropolitan Stadium in the 1970s. The Cosmos’ roster included worldwide stars such as Pele (10) and Giorgio Chinaglia (9). Merrick, a longtime soccer coach and trainer in the Twin Cities area, was named Eagan High School boys head coach last week.

Boys lacrosse set to takeoff Several of the state’s best high school boys lacrosse teams are in Dakota County, including Eagan, Eastview and Rosemount. Page 4A

Special Section Mature Lifestyles Writing workshop in Dakota County to help people turn stories told around the dinner table into timeless tales.

Page 8A

Alan Merrick brings deep

soccer roots to Eagan Alan Merrick

Former Kicks player will be boys team’s head coach

by Mike Shaughnessy Sun Thisweek

thisweekend

Young dancer enters spotlight Apple Valley eighthgrader Maggie Selner has a starring role at the Minnesota Dance Festival in St. Paul next month.

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Online Check out the new Sun Thisweek website at www.SunThisweek.com. Like the Sun Thisweek Facebook page at www. facebook.com/ sunthisweek. Look for photo slideshows from Rosemount lacrosse and Apple Valley baseball action. Short Redhead Reel Reviews of new movies are at the Thisweekend web page.

Index Sports . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-5A Opinion. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6A Lifestyles. . . . . . . . . . . 8-9A Legal Notices . . . . . 16-17A Classifieds. . . . . . . . 17-19A

General Information 952-894-1111 Distribution 952-846-2070 Display Advertising 952-846-2011 Classified Advertising 952-846-2000

Alan Merrick’s first United States residence was an apartment in Eagan. Thirty-six years later, things have come full circle as he returns there to coach high school soccer. “I’m very familiar with Silver Bell Road,” he said with a laugh.

Eagan High School hired him for his soccer background, not for his familiarity with city’s geography. Merrick, a longtime player, coach and trainer – as well as a Minnesota resident since 1976, when he arrived from England to join a professional team called the Minnesota Kicks – will be head coach of the Wildcats

boys soccer program. He has coached professional and college club teams, but not a high school team. So, why now? “It’s very simple – I’ve never done it before,” said Merrick, 61, who now lives in Lakeville and lived in Apple Valley for many years where his daughter played soccer. “I’ve coached high

school kids and have been involved in high school soccer as a parent, but I’ve never had the opportunity to be involved with every aspect of coaching a high school team. I suppose you could say it’s something to cross off the bucket list.” He will be only the second head boys soccer coach Eagan High School has

Dealing with autism is ongoing struggle for Apple Valley family Mike & Kelly Kausel family works to ensure autism education, funding by Andrew Miller Sun Thisweek

Kelly Kausel says she began noticing troubling signs when her son Noah was just a few months old. He wasn’t making eye contact, wasn’t sitting up or moving around, and as Noah continued to fall behind his peers in behavioral development, Kelly and her husband Mike were referred to the University of Minnesota’s Autism Spectrum Department, where Noah was diagnosed with autism in November 2010. Since then, it’s been a period of sacrifice for the family, who recently moved to Apple Valley from New Ulm to get 3-year-old Noah closer to the services he needs. Fortunately, the family found a form of therapy

– called Applied Behavior Analysis, or ABA – that they say has seen Noah making progress. Before the therapy, Noah had limited ability to communicate, struggled to learn basic selfcare skills and would act aggressively and bite. “Noah is saying two to three words at a time and now he says ‘hi’ to people – last year it was just screaming,” Kausel said. Currently, Noah’s 40 hours of ABA each week through homebased treatment provider Lovaas is fully covered by insurance. But Kausel says there’s concern that may change, as her family’s health insurance provider has announced plans to cut funding for ABA altogether by July of this year.

A chance phone call a few years ago is the reason a 44-member Swedish college choir will perform next week for St. Joseph Catholic Church students and the public in Rosemount. Karen Arlandson, who

attends the church when she’s in town for grandparent duties, received a call in 2010 when the Vettern College Choir was in the Twin Cities for a series of concerts. The crew sought housing for their professors and college president and found Arlandson’s number

Rosemount band to have garage sale Donations, volunteers sought for annual event Sun Thisweek

Photo submitted

The Kausel family of Apple Valley – Mike, Kelly and 3-year-old Noah – attended the Steps of Hope Walk, a fundraising event through the Autism Society of Minnesota, at Ridgedale Shopping Center in March. Kausel has now taken up the fight to ensure passage of Minnesota Senate File 1020, which requires private health insurance plans to provide medically

necessary care for children with autism. “Basically, what this bill is trying to enable See Autism, 7A

Church member helps organize concert by college choir Sun Thisweek

See Merrick, 15A

by Tad Johnson

Swedish choral tradition rings in Rosemount by Tad Johnson

had. Kurt Virgin coached the Wildcats for 22 years, but retired from teaching and coaching in January while School District 196 officials and Eagan police investigated his handling of money from youth sports programs he ran. Merrick said EHS girls

on a list of possible hosts. “I asked when they were coming, and they said in two days,” she recalled. “So I rushed down to our farm house and got things ready for them.” This year, Karen and her husband, John Arlandson, were in charge of setting up the choir’s concert

venues, which include two close to her heart – St. Joseph and the Bernadotte, Minn., church where she plays the organ and piano. The Arlandsons have lived in a farm house in the Bernadotte area for many years. To be closer to their See choir, 2A

Buying an old cookie jar or a picture frame at the Rosemount High School Band Garage Sale will be music to the ears of many young people this spring. That’s because the proceeds from the 10th annual sale Saturday, May 5, will fund such essentials as sheet music or a scholarship for a student who can’t afford band participation fees. It’s that higher purpose that organizers hope will spur people to donate gently used items to be sold and for people to bring cash or their checkbook to the sale that has a cornucopia of hidden gems, including Christmas decorations, clothes, kitchen contraptions and much more. The goal for this year’s sale is $10,000 to match the 10th year sale milestone. Last year, the program netted $8,500, which funded sheet music for all the school’s bands. “The proceeds have also made scholarships available for students who wouldn’t be able to participate without the financial assistance,” said Tricia Remus, a garage sale organizer, “whether it’s for instruSee sale, 3A


2A

April 20, 2012 Sun Thisweek

choir, from 1A four children and seven grandchildren, in 2004 they purchased a townhome in Rosemount where two of their children live – Scott Arlandson and his wife, Alesia, and Dawn Schwab (a Shannon Park Elementary teacher) and her husband, Christopher. Karen raves about the quality of the choir, which she has seen perform in the United States and in Sweden in 2011 when the Arlandsons were tracing their family history. “It is just a stunning Other performances on the Vettern College Choir’s tour will be in: Bernadotte at 7 p.m. April 20, House of Hope Presbyterian Church in St. Paul at 10 a.m. church service April 22, Salem Covenant Church at 4 p.m. the same day, Bethel University in Arden Hills at 7:30 p.m. April 23, St. Andrew’s Lutheran Church in Mahtomedi at 7 p.m. April 24, and Gloria Dei Lutheran Church in St. Paul at 7 p.m. April 26. For more information about the choir and its school, go online to http://svf.fhsk.se.

choir,” Arlandson said. “The young people are just exemplary.” It was during the Arlandsons’ most recent geneaology trip to Sweden when they signed up to schedule the choir’s performance venues for this tour. “That has been a real adventure for us,” Karen said of the couple who are in their 60s. “We had to bring a presentation on our computer. We had to get pretty savvy for that.” The sales pitch must have been effective as the choir will perform at seven Minnesota venues in nine days. The choir, which is comprised of 24 women and 20 men, performs a repertoire that includes traditional choral works, Swedish ethnic music and hymns. “It’s kind of lyrical,” Karen said. “Its speaks to you. It’s not out of reach of the average person. It speaks to the spirit of humanity. It speaks to who we are around the world. It is inspiring the young people are sharing their talents.” They are accompanied by five professors who play various instruments and are all professional musicians. The nearly hour-long concert at 12:30 p.m. Monday, April 23, is free to attend, but an offering will

be made to help defray costs of the trip. In addition to performing, the students will travel to some places in Minnesota that will tell the history of Swedish immigration to America, such as Lindstrom and the St. Croix Valley area. Karen knows the story well as her then-17-year-old grandfather was sent to America by his parents, who stayed behind. “He recalled that he had tears in his eyes as he stood at the end of Photo from Vettern College the path to their The Vettern College Choir will perform at 12:30 p.m. Monday, April 23, at St. Joseph Catholic house thinking he Church in Rosemount for students at the St. Joseph School and the public. would never see The college, which is them again,” Karen said. In the early 1900s, Min- known in Sweden as Södra Folkhögnesota became the most Vätterbygdens skola, has great interest Swedish of all states, with in these ties to the larger Swedish-Americans constiworld, according to Karen. tuting more than 12 percent of Minnesota’s population “I really embrace this,” in 1910. In some areas, such Karen said. “I think there as Chisago or Isanti coun- is hope for the world when ties north of Minneapolis, I hear this music.” Swedish-Americans made up close to 70 percent of Tad Johnson can be reached tad.johnson@ecm-inc. the population, according at com or facebook.com/sunto Augustana College, Rock thisweek. Island, Ill.

summer Golf Guide

Photo submitted

Karen and John Arlandson, who helped to bring the Swedish Vettern College Choir to St. Joseph Catholic Church, have had a townhome in Rosemount since 2004.

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Sun Thisweek April 20, 2012

Search for missing man continues

3A

Moreno-Pacheco, 61, has dementia by John Gessner Sun Thisweek

As of Wednesday morning, the search continued for a Burnsville man who was last seen at around 6:30 a.m. Sunday, April 15. Lorenzo Moreno-Pacheco, 61, does not speak English and suffers dementia from a head injury, according to Burnsville police. He is 5-foot-6, 150 pounds, with a heavy black mustache, and he walks with a limp. He was last seen in the area of Burnsville Parkway near the Savage border. Moreno-Pacheco lives on the 14700 block of West Burnsville Parkway in one of the two mobile home parks there. To the south are heavsale, from 1A ment rental or to participate in the marching band.” Proceeds also help to offset transportation costs related to the marching band’s equipment trailer. Funds help repair and purchase some of the school-owned instruments, including percussion, tuba, bass clarinet, baritone, bassoon, French horn, etc. Band director Steve Olsen said the school never used to use fundraiser money to purchase such instruments, but it does now. “Due to recent budget cuts (the past few years) as our band program continues to grow, we have used a small portion of the garage sale profits to purchase traditionally provided ‘schoolowned’ instruments for students that enter our program from middle school so they have an instrument to use and may continue their participation in the band program in high school,” Olsen said. Despite the budget shortfalls, Olsen said the school district has allocated fund-

Photo submitted

Lorenzo Moreno-Pacheco

ily wooded areas in Burnsville’s Cam Ram Park and Scott County’s MurphyHanrehan Park Reserve. Numerous agencies have been involved in the search for Moreno-Pacheco, who may have been wearing ing very fairly. “Funding is tight for everything,” Olsen said. “We do rely on a significant amount of fundraising efforts to maintain the same level of music education that we have traditionally offered to our students at Rosemount.” Donations for the sale, which raises money to support the band program, will be accepted Saturday, April 28, from 10 a.m.-2 p.m., Sunday, April 29, from 12-3 p.m., and Monday, April 30, through Thursday, May 3, from 5-8 p.m. Large items such as furniture will be received Friday, May 4, in the student center beginning at 2:30 p.m. There will be two semitrailers, donated by Justman Freightliners of Eagan, in the high school parking lot to collect and store items. Organizers are seeking volunteers to help during the collection week and most importantly during setup on Friday afternoon and during the sale. “We have wonderful volunteers,” Remus said. She said the sale requires

black pants and a red shirt, or a light-colored shirt with a red stripe, when he went missing, said Burnsville police Sgt. Rory Bochniak. “It’s sketchy,” Bochniak said. “He’s got no money on him. He’s got no identification. They’re not exactly sure what he was wearing.” Moreno-Pacheco has a wife and a children, and they’re “frantic,” Bochniak said. “They’re obviously concerned and looking. ... They’re staying in touch with the Police Department.” It’s also unclear whether Moreno-Pacheco was dressed for the chilly days earlier in the week. “That’s not a good thing for somebody with his health problems,” Bochniak at least 30 adult volunteers and about 90 students to collect, sort and display the items. Volunteers also are cashiers and chefs at a food stand outside the school. “The RHS band students never cease to impress me with their willingness to volunteer and have fun while doing it,” Remus said. As one would guess, most of the adult volunteers are parents of students in the band program. But that’s not a prerequisite for helping out. Remus said adults and students are still needed to lend a hand. “The more the merrier,” Remus said. Those who are interested can register online at www. rosemountband.com and click on the garage sale logo. For more information, contact Tricia Remus at triciabremus@gmail.com or Tracey Casey at tracey. casey@gmail.com. Tad Johnson is at tad.johnson@ecm-inc.com or facebook.com/sunthisweek.

Original full length production of the familiar classic tale.

Tickets: In person at the Burnsville Performing Arts Center Box Of�ce, via Ticketmaster at 800.982.2787 or at ticketmaster.com

said. A search begun on Sunday at around 8:30 a.m. was suspended at 6 p.m. because of approaching bad weather. Searchers included Burnsville police, the Hennepin County K-9 Unit, the sheriff’s departments in Dakota and Scott counties, Three Rivers Park District rangers and Burnsville’s Mobile Volunteer Network. Burnsville police re-

sumed the search the following morning. Neighborhood residents, State Patrol helicopters and even searchers on horseback from a private club have also been involved, Bochniak said. A tip led to another search of Cam Ram Park Tuesday night, which turned up nothing, Bochniak said. A photo of Moreno-Pacheco has been widely circu-

lated. “We’re still heavily involved in this and using all the resources we can,” Bochniak said. Anyone with information is asked to call Burnsville police detective Christi Carpenter at (952) 895-4592. John Gessner can be reached at john.gessner@ecm-inc. com or facebook.com/sunthisweek.


4A

Sports

April 20, 2012 Sun Thisweek

Summer trip sets up Eastview for success Boys lacrosse team shows off its firepower in early-season action

by Mike Shaughnessy Sun Thisweek

It’s not cheap to send a high school lacrosse team out of state to play in summer tournaments, but Eastview’s boys are getting the payoff this spring. The Lightning won its first two games, including a come-from-behind victory over then-No. 2-ranked Minnetonka, and established itself as a contender for the state championship. Eastview coaches and players said a trip to the eastern United States last summer set the stage for what’s happening now. “It definitely helped,” said senior attackman Erik Gage. “We had high expectations anyway because we worked together the whole off-season.” Eastview’s summer traveling team, the Eastview Grizzlies, journeyed last summer to play three tournaments. Tim Roche, the Lightning’s varsity head coach, said it was the first non-all-star team from Minnesota to make such a trip. Coaches, parents and players were so pleased with the results that a similar trip is planned this summer. “We knew we might get our butts handed to us, playing all those good teams from out East,” Roche said. “But it was a great experience, and we now know we have a lot of kids who can play. “We’ve never had this kind of depth in our program before. We’ve got 25, 26 good players.” The off-season work also might have instilled some hunger in the players. Minnesota high school lacrosse practices started the last week of March, which also was Eastview High School’s spring break. Usually, coaches have to accept the idea of players missing practices while on spring break. Not so with the Lightning. “Not one kid who’s on the varsity or junior varsity missed a practice,” Roche said.

Photo by Mike Shaughnessy

Photo by Mike Shaughnessy

Eastview midfielder Bradley Hogan tries to evade a Minnetonka defender during the Taylor Carroll (20) of Eastview defends against Minnetonka’s Erin Dolan in a non-conference girls lacrosse Lightning’s 16-15 overtime victory over the No. 2-ranked Skippers. game last week. Eastview showed off an each of the team’s first two Field and senior defender explosive offense in its first games. Delaney McKay, got their two games, scoring 30 goals. Eastview’s next game introduction to youth laJunior attackman Ryan Mc- is 7 p.m. Tuesday at home crosse on boys teams. Namara, who Roche calls against South Suburban “I remember it was a lot the state’s best player, had Conference opponent Prior of hit ’em, get the ball and six goals and three assists in Lake. The first week in May run,” Field said. “I enjoyed Eastview’s 16-15 overtime could tell a lot about the switching to the girls game victory over Minnetonka Lightning playoff chanc- and learning about the fiin the Lightning’s season es as it plays SSC powers nesse you needed to play it.” opener April 12. Jacob Eagan and Rosemount “When we went to girls Heppner also scored six and former state champion lacrosse, we at least had an goals against Minnetonka, Blake in a five-day span. idea of what we were supincluding one that tied posed to do,” McKay said. the game 15-15 with 30.5 Eastview girls The younger players seconds remaining. Gage Eastview’s girls lacrosse on Eastview’s roster also scored the game-winner in team split its first two games, seem to know what to do. overtime with McNamara losing to Minnetonka 14-7 Sophomore Julia Young assisting. on April 12 and beating and ninth-graders Megan “We knew Minnetonka Wayzata 15-5 on April 14. McNamara and Christine was a good team, but we The Lightning, which is Leikvold scored three goals Photo by Mike Shaughnessy thought we’d be able to in its fourth season on its each in the victory over Eastview’s Ryan McNamara, surrounded by Minnetonka score some goals against own after the Eastview-Ap- Wayzata. them,” Gage said. ple Valley girls lacrosse co- “Our young players all defenders, still manages to score in the first half of an April Eastview also defeated op dissolved, believes it is have a lot of talent,” senior 12 boys lacrosse game. Wayzata 14-7 on April 14, close to being able to com- forward Amara Peterson LaxPower.com Minnesota they competed almost evenwith McNamara scoring pete with the state’s best said. five goals and Heppner teams. Several of Eastview’s Numbers also are in- computer rankings, broke ly with one of the state’s four. core players are seniors with creasing in the Eastview a 4-4 tie against Eastview top-ranked teams. Sophomore Tanner Ha- at least three years of varsi- program, with 41 girls on by scoring five consecutive “If we do the things mill also is seeing some ty experience. the varsity and junior var- goals to open the second we’re supposed to, we know we’re a good team,” Peterplaying time at attack. “And some of them have sity teams. That eliminated half. The Lightning has a vet- been playing lacrosse to- the need for “bubble” play- “We weren’t as aggressive son said. eran defense with seniors gether since they were sixth- ers – girls who had to be as we were in the first half, Nick Cates, John Schweich, graders,” coach Lauren available for possible duty and we talked about that,” Mike Shaughnessy is at mike. Billy Lawrence and Shane DeZellar said. in both the varsity and JV said DeZellar, who also shaughnessy@ecm-inc.com or pointed out to her players facebook.com/sunthisweek. Keneaely. Andrew Koenen A couple of players, se- games. earned the victory in goal in nior midfielder Shannon Minnetonka, fifth in the that there were times when

Much expected of AV seniors, and they deliver Girls lacrosse team wins first two matches by Mike Shaughnessy Sun Thisweek

Eagles edged in extras

Photo by Rick Orndorf

Apple Valley catcher Logan Kohorst reaches for the throw as Lakeville North’s Neil Engler scores the tying run in Tuesday’s South Suburban Conference baseball game. Lakeville North went on to win 2-1 in eight innings. Apple Valley’s record dropped to 1-4.

Sports Briefs TAGS shines at Rising Stars Invite The Level 7 Team from TAGS South in Apple Valley competed at the Rising Stars Invite held March 1718 at North St. Paul High School, scoring 109.725 points. The Level 7 team had many strong performances. On the vault, Teagan Ramboldt of Eagan led the team with a 9.1. Taylor Thorberg of Farmington followed closely with an 8.9. Taylor Zoellner of Lakeville

earned a third-place finish in her age division with an 8.5. Sarah Wilken of Eagan had a team-leading 9.25 on uneven bars. Thorberg scored 9.225 on her routine. Zoellner placed first in her age division with a 9.0. Zoellner earned another first-place finish on beam with a 9.1. Wilken and Kayla Brunner of Eagan both earned scores of 8.9. Lauren Casey of Eagan followed closely with an 8.775. The team tumbled its way to success on floor exercise, with Ramboldt scoring 9.6. Thorberg earned

a 9.5 for her floor routine. Following closely was Abby Schwartz of Farmington earning a 9.475. Zoellner went on to earn another first-place finish in her age division with a 9.35. Kelsey Dolejs and Lexie Johnson of Apple Valley also competed on floor exercise, with Dolejs earning a 9.15 and Johnson scoring 8.7. Thorberg led the team in the all around with a 36.25. Zoellner took home another first-place finish in her age division with a 35.95. Following closely was Lauren Casey with a 35.75.

“Senior leadership” is a term sometimes thrown around lightly in high school sports because you don’t necessarily have to be a senior to be a good leader. But, Apple Valley girls lacrosse coach Alexandra Ross makes it clear that a lot will be expected of her nine seniors, on and off the field. So far they have delivered. The Eagles won their first two games, 16-12 over Wayzata and 22-3 over Rochester Mayo. “It’s really nice to have all those seniors,” Ross said. “They know my style, and I know what they’re going to do. “I returned five of my top six scorers from last year, and they all played in summer tournaments all over the country. They had the experience of playing against some really good competition, and that will only help them here.” Four of the seniors are captains – midfielder Hannah Segar, forward Katrina Vogelgesang, forward Liz Hermes and defender Dilini Sundaram. Vogelgesang had 12 points, including eight goals, in the first two games. Segar and Hermes each had a four-goal game. Senior forward Mandie Kaiser scored 10 goals in the first two games, five each against Wayzata and Rochester Mayo. Ashlynn Seely, another senior, started in goal

in both games. Younger players are making contributions, including sophomore midfielder Katie Larson, who had five goals through two games. “Our scoring’s been pretty spread out, which is something I like to see,” Ross said. “That makes it tough for teams to defend against us.” Ross had to re-stock the Eagles’ defense and did so by asking a couple of returning players to take on new roles. Senior Alyssa Lewis moved from midfield to defense, and junior Jordyn Haupert switched from attack to defense. “Alyssa caused three or four turnovers in the Rochester Mayo game and leads our team in interceptions,” Ross said. Forward Anna Nguyen and defender Tess Rybar also are part of the Eagles’ senior group. A year ago Apple Valley was 10-4 but lost to Eagan/ Rosemount 14-13 in the Section 3 quarterfinals. The Eagan/Rosemount co-op has since split into separate teams. Ross said the growth of girls lacrosse in the metro area, and particularly in the southern suburbs, has made the games less predictable. “Last year Eagan beat us in the playoffs,” Ross said. “(Bloomington) Jefferson went to the state tournament for the first time. (Bloomington) Kennedy had only one loss, and it

was to Jefferson in the playoffs. “Lakeville North graduated only their goalie from last year. Eastview has a good group of freshmen coming in. I think there are going to be a lot of close games in our conference.”

Apple Valley boys

The Eagle boys faced two of the state’s top lacrosse teams recently, and scoring goals was a problem. After beating Wayzata 7-2 in their season opener, they lost 13-5 to Eden Prairie (second in the Minnesota Lax Hub rankings) and 10-4 to fourth-ranked Benilde-St. Margaret’s. Senior attackman Connor Uzlik had two goals and one assist in the Benilde-St. Margaret’s game Tuesday while goalie Max Chlan, a ninth-grader, made 14 saves. Uzlik, defender Blake Broberg and midfielder Derek Falteisek are Apple Valley’s captains. Chlan stopped 10 of 12 shots in the Wayzata game and sophomore attackman Tim Toavs led the Eagles with four goals. Apple Valley, led by firstyear head coach Michael Evans, played No. 1-ranked Eagan on Thursday. The Eagles will travel to Lakeville North for a South Suburban Conference game at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday. Mike Shaughnessy is at mike. shaughnessy@ecm-inc.com or facebook.com/sunthisweek.


Sun Thisweek April 20, 2012

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Rosemount benefits from lacrosse boom Irish boys are one of state’s top teams; girls start first season as independent program the coach said. “It the same conference doesn’t count in the (South Suburban) conference or secand playoff section, tion standings, but which could make when we play those for some memoragames, we’ll know ble games later this what it takes. spring. “The second quar But Rosemount ter is where we kind has a game from of let down (against last spring that it Minnetonka). But remembers all too we made some great well. The Irish went halftime adjustinto the Section 3 ments and played playoffs as the No. much better in the 1 seed but lost to third and fourth Burnsville 14-13 quarters.” in the semifinals. V a n O v e r b e k e It was their only scored four goals loss of the season against Minnetonka following 14 victowhile Weller, Carter ries. That loss still Yepsen and Conner was fresh in the Yepsen scored twice returning players’ minds as they faced Photo by Rick Orndorf each. Burnsville on Tues- Rosemount’s Jake O’Malley (center) battles Burnsville’s Nate Kopetzki (left) The Irish will play day night, and they and Charlie Fredericks for possession during a South Suburban Conference Woodbury in a non-conference responded with an boys lacrosse game Tuesday. Rosemount won 19-8. game at 7 p.m. Fri18-9 victory to imday before returnprove to 2-1. more than 20 goals each in opener as VanOverbeke had ing to South Sub Scoring should seven goals and two assists, urban Conference action at not be a problem for Rose- 2011. mount. Junior attackman Rosemount returns sev- They got a better idea of 5:30 p.m. Tuesday against Jefferson. Grant VanOverbeke had eral experienced defense- where they stood against Bloomington 58 goals last season and se- men, including seniors Gabe one of the state’s top teams Both are home games for nior attackman Matt Weller Moulier, Jake O’Malley and when they lost 13-12 at Rosemount. scored 50. Three other re- Matt Larson. Junior goalie fifth-ranked Minnetonka Rosemount girls turnees – junior attackman Chase Olson was 12-1 last on Saturday. It was a loss, but not a The boys aren’t the only Carter Yepsen and senior season. midfielders Logan Lindberg The Irish crushed East catastrophe, Kuehn said. lacrosse team at Rosemount and Jake Mortenson – had Ridge 19-1 in their season “That’s not a bad loss,” with players who can find

by Mike Shaughnessy Sun Thisweek

Does Pilot Knob Road have mystical powers? Probably not, but there’s no question it’s a place where lacrosse players flourish. One hot spot of talent in the metro area is what Rosemount High School boys coach Lance Kuehn calls the “Pilot Knob Road Lacrosse Area.” Why? “Because anybody who touches Pilot Knob seems to be great at lacrosse,” he said. “When you drove on that road, you used to see hockey nets in the driveways. Now you see a lot of orange pipes (lacrosse goal frames).” The RAVE (Rosemount/ Apple Valley/Eagan) youth program helped spread lacrosse across Dakota County, and high school teams are now seeing the benefit. Kuehn said it’s no coincidence that Pilot Knob Road goes through the attendance areas of three high schools – Rosemount, Eagan and Eastview – with strong boys programs. This week Eagan was first, Eastview third and Rosemount sixth in the Minnesota Lax Hub state rankings. Those three schools are in

the net. Junior midfielder Maddie Johnson scored 14 goals in the Rosemount girls first two games, including nine in a 13-11 victory over Park of Cottage Grove on April 12. This is Rosemount’s first year with its own girls lacrosse program. Previously, the Irish were in a co-op with Eagan. That team, called the Wild Irish, reached the Section 3 championship game last spring before losing to Bloomington Jefferson. Jeff Smith, who was head coach of the co-op team, is Rosemount’s varsity coach. Johnson, junior defender Sydney Lubeley and senior midfielder Cassie Miller are Rosemount’s captains. All played for the co-op team last season. Shaniah Anderson had a hat trick in the Park game. Miller had a goal and three assists and recovered five ground balls. Rosemount plays at Farmington at 6:30 p.m. Friday and faces Bloomington Jefferson at home at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday. Mike Shaughnessy is at mike. shaughnessy@ecm-inc.com or facebook.com/sunthisweek.

Eastview softball team has snappy start Pitchers Paige Palkovich, Marissa Leners keeping opposing hitters off-balance staff. Three varsity coaches, Nicole Newton, Brad McCumber and Paul Hassett, are taking on duties typically associated with a head coach. “We’ve been in the program for a few years, so I think there’s been a comfort level for the players,” Newton said. “We’re very happy that the girls are winning games and having fun with it.” The Lightning has been getting it done with two pitchers. Senior Paige Palkovich, a University of

by Mike Shaughnessy Sun Thisweek

A coaching staff rearrangement has done nothing to knock Eastview’s softball team off stride. The Lightning won its first four games, three by shutout. A 4-0 victory over Eagan on Tuesday kept Eastview undefeated. Mike Haugh, who had 204524A01 been head coach since 2006, resigned during the off-season. For 2012, the school decided on an interim jobsharing arrangement involving the remaining coaches on Digital Vision/Getty Images

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Minnesota recruit, and junior Marissa Leners both have thrown well, Newton said. Leners got the decision in each of Eastview’s first four games. Who pitches is “a gameby-game decision as far as we’re concerned,” Newton said. “Paige is a great infielder as well as a great pitcher. Marissa played well at second base in our game against Rosemount (a 12-5 victory in the Lightning’s season opener). “Marissa has a good bat and great softball knowledge

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and skill, as does Paige. We want both in the game. We don’t want to take one out for the other.” Seniors such as Alyssa Besch (center field) and Sam Weinberg (first base) have been a calming influence for a team that also is giving playing time to a couple of ninth-graders, Melissa Barry (right field) and Julia Luciano (third base). The senior group includes catcher Sophie Runing, infielder Ariana Hipolito, Sophie Albright and Meredith Cocker. Junior infielder

Rachel Young and ninthgrade catcher Kara Sjostrom round out the roster. This is the second year in high school softball that the pitching runner is 43 feet from home plate, moved back from 40 feet. Newton said the switch has forced fundamental changes in the game. “It’s more of a complete team game as opposed to a pitcher-catcher game,” she said. “I can see the benefit of that. You have to be more aggressive on defense and at the plate, and you have to try

to stay one step ahead of the opponent.” So far, the Lightning has been able to do that. “We’re only a few games in,” Newton said. “We’re very happy with the way the girls have played, but we also have some tough games ahead of us.” The Lightning will play at Burnsville, last year’s South Suburban Conference champion, at 4:15 p.m. Monday. Mike Shaughnessy is at mike. shaughnessy@ecm-inc.com or facebook.com/sunthisweek.


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Opinion

April 20, 2012 Sun Thisweek

Merrick is local hero who, like soccer, doesn’t get respect he deserves by Larry Werner Sun Thisweek

Our newspapers were filled with good stories last week, but a brief on the sports page caught my eye. The headline read: “Merrick named to coach Eagan boys soccer.” Mike Shaughnessy, one of our two sports editors, found out that Alan Merrick would be succeeding longtime Eagan coach Kurt Virgin, who resigned abruptly after an investigation was launched into his handling of finances for camps he ran. On today’s front page, you can read more about Merrick and enjoy a photo of him playing with Pele, perhaps the greatest soccer player of all time. We were going to place Mike’s story inside the paper, on the sports pages, but Managing Editor Tad Johnson and I decided to give it more prominent display after talking about what the story represents: It’s a story about a longtime Dakota County resident who made a name for himself in a sport – soccer – that is played by more Dakota County youths than any other sport. In other words, it’s the kind of story you expect from your community newspaper. As I’ve mentioned in this space before, I spent the middle part of my career as an editor at the Star Tribune. I argued futiley in news meetings that the newspaper

Sun Thisweek Columnist

Larry Werner

should give more attention to soccer, the sport my children played, which is how I fell in love with “the world’s game.” But the metro daily measures the value of sports stories by the number of people who pay to attend games. And a lot more people pay to see the Vikings and Twins than paid to see the Minnesota Kicks, the professional team Merrick played for, or the Minnesota Strikers, the indoor team Merrick later coached, or, currently, the Minnesota Stars, the pro team that plays at the National Sports Center in Blaine. But if editors allocated space in their papers by the number of participants in sports, soccer would get a lot more attention than it does, and we’d be reading less about the football, baseball and basketball teams and their endless demands for new taxpayer-financed facilities. I must confess that despite my love of soccer, I spend a lot more time watching our hapless Vikings, Twins, Wolves and

Wild than I do watching soccer. And I’m aware that few things can affect the Star Tribune’s circulation more than a good run by one of its big pro sports teams. Remember the Homer Hanky from the World Series years? That was a promotion that came out of the Strib’s marketing department. Here at Sun Thisweek, we deliver newspapers free to the vast majority of the homes in Farmington, Lakeville, Apple Valley, Rosemount, Burnsville and Eagan. So we don’t have to worry about what sells newspapers. But we do spend a lot of time talking about offering papers that contain stories about local people, places and events. Alan Merrick now lives in Lakeville. For years, he lived in Apple Valley and his daughter was a star with a soccer club called Bangu that featured top players from the cities we serve. Several months back, we met with the owners of a company called School Space Media. The company sells ads on electronic signs erected at high school sports venues. You’ve probably seen them at basketball and football games and track meets. The company decided to enter that business after doing some research that showed more people attend school sports than attend all the local pro games combined. So the Alan Merrick story is our kind of story at Sun Thisweek. He’s a Dakota

County resident who starred professionally and has coached locally in a sport boys and girls play in numbers that exceed any other parcipation sport. It’s true that the Kicks and Strikers failed as businesses, but the Eagan Wildcats will be on the pitch next fall providing good sport for players and good entertainment for the soccer moms and dads of Eagan. And in July, thousands of soccer players from south of the river will spend a hot week at the National Sports Center in Blaine for the USA Cup, the largest youth soccer tournament in the country. Now you’ve got my reasons for putting the Alan Merrick story on the front page. It’s a good story about a local man who will be coaching a team in the largest participation sport. I might not have been able to get soccer stories on the front page of the Star Tribune, but at a community newspaper, we measure the worth of stories by their effect on local communities rather than tickets sold at Target Field or the Metrodome. Skol Vikings! Larry Werner is editor and general manager of Sun Thisweek and the Dakota County Tribune. He can be reached at larry.werner@ecm-inc.com. Columns reflect the opinion of the author.

Residents urged to participate in National Day of Prayer by Sharon Auldrich

Guest Columnist

Special to Sun Thisweek

On May 3, thousands of National Day of Prayer observances will be held across the nation. From morning sunrise services in the Virgin Islands to setting-sun evening concerts of prayer in Hawaii, a huge wave of prayer will flow across this nation. A great variety of events mark this day. Small groups of individuals gather around flagpoles, early-morning prayer breakfasts are held and huge state capitol gatherings all honor the fact we have the freedom to gather and pray. This year will mark the 61st annual National Day of Prayer. It was instituted by a unanimous joint resolution of the U.S. Congress and signed into law by President

Harry S. Truman in 1952. In 1988 President Ronald Reagan and the Congress amended the law to designate the first Thursday in May as the day for the annual national observance. This act of Congress is intended to allow all people of faith to pray to the God of their understanding. It allows people of all theological and philosophical views to organize and participate in activities that are constant with their own beliefs. All who wish to pray for this nation are encouraged to do so in any way deemed appropriate and respectable.

As a state coordinator, I have volunteered to work with the National Day of Prayer Task Force. It works to prepare theme materials and give unified direction for those who wish to plan events consistent with the Judeo-Christian expression of prayer. All the NDP task force people who work hard to organize events are volunteers who pay for the related costs out of their own pockets. They do this out of love and respect for this country that has a history of being birthed in prayer. The very first act of the First Continental Congress in 1774 was for all 55 delegates to kneel in prayer. It lasted two hours, and they read the entire 35th Psalm. This prayer time gave them the strength

and courage to go on and make decisions that would set the course and process of forming this new nation. Our nation was birthed in prayer, and I believe it will continue to be a strong nation only if faithful people who believe the God of the Bible will pray! God still hears and answers prayer. Please do not assume the privilege of having a National Day of Prayer will always be here. We see privileges and rights being taken away at an alarming rate. Please look for NDP observances in your area and join in, or if there are none planned, then please plan one. Sharon Auldrich of Burnsville is the Minnesota state coordinator for the National Day of Prayer.

Letters Correction Due to incorrect information provided to Sun Thisweek, it was reported that Burnsville City Manager Craig Ebeling had not been in contact with some local legislators regarding the proposed voter ID bill. After the story ran March 23, Ebeling wrote the newspaper and said he has been in contact by email and through conversations with Rep. Pam Myhra, R-Burnsville, regarding the bill.

Debate over speedway should be fair

Vote no on the marriage amendment To the editor: If passed, the marriage amendment ballot question threatens my religious beliefs. As a Unitarian-Universalist, I believe marriage is a fundamental freedom. I believe marriage is based on love, respect, commitment, and spiritual connection with a partner. Some of you recall how you felt when your parents rejected your choice of whom to marry. Now imagine how you would feel if the state government told you whom you could or could not marry. We can all agree that marriage is about love. I have heard some folks say that government should get out of the way of people’s personal freedoms. Here is your opportunity – vote no on the marriage amendment.

To the editor: I always hear the negative impacts of everything, from politics to the anti-Minnesota Speedway Park petitions. I would like the positives of the speedway proposed to be built in Elko New Market put alongside the negatives of the speedway and let the people decide by a vote. Most of all be equal on both sides, print the facts Bill Randall from both sides and be fair. Eagan One-sidedness, blame and pointing fingers need to stay elsewhere, not in Elko New Market.

It’s worthwhile to volunteer

Mark D. Halvorson Elko New Market

To the editor: National Volunteer

Week (April 15-21) recognizes the importance of volunteering. I am one of those volunteers with the organization Kids ’n Kinship. It serves the communities of Apple Valley, Burnsville, Eagan, Farmington, Lakeville and Rosemount. It is a friendship mentoring program matching adult volunteers with children 5-16 in need of a supportive relationship. We meet with our mentees weekly with activities which are fun for both. Four times a year all the mentors and mentees meet together: for swimming and basketball and lunch at the Burnsville YMCA; for rollerskating; for bowling; and at the beautiful YMCA Camp Streefland. Other times free tickets are available to the Twins, theater and concerts. My mentee and I have attended several plays, attended a Twins game, and a University of Minnesota gymnastic meet. Right around home, we have cooked meals together, biked, cross country skied, played disc golf, had fun at a water park and read several books. Throughout Kids ’n Kinship’s 40 years it has matched over 2,000 children with adults. At this

Andrew Miller | Apple Valley NEWS | 952-846-2038 | andrew.miller@ecm-inc.com Tad Johnson | Rosemount NEWS | 952-846-2033 | tad.johnson@ecm-inc.com Andy Rogers | SPORTS | 952-846-2027 | andy.rogers@ecm-inc.com Mike Shaughnessy | SPORTS | 952-846-2030 | mike.shaughnessy@ecm-inc.com Mike Jetchick | AD SALES | 952-846-2019 | mike.jetchick@ecm-inc.com Managing Editors | Tad Johnson | John Gessner Publisher. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Julian Andersen President. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Marge Winkelman General Manager/Editor. . . . . . . . . Larry Werner Apple Valley/Thisweekend Editor. Andrew Miller Rosemount Editor. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tad Johnson District 196 Editor. . . . . . . . . . . . Jessica Harper

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15322 Galaxie Ave., Suite 219, Apple Valley, MN 55124 952-894-1111 fax: 952-846-2010 www.SunThisweek.com | Office Hours: 9 a.m. - 5 p.m. Monday-Thursday, 9 a.m. - 3 p.m. Friday

time the organization needs 14 women to mentor girls and 27 men to mentor boys. This is a very worthwhile experience for me.

I have learned how one young girl can overcome one obstacle after another with her positive attitude. I encourage you to join us and call Kids ’n Kinship,

(952) 892-6388, www.kidsnkinship.org. CYNTHIA KOEHLER Burnsville

Study should precede any changes to Met Council by Don Heinzman Sun Thisweek

In most legislative sessions, some senator or legislator is critical of the Metropolitan Council and wants to see some changes. The Met Council is an appointed body that operates the bus, light rail and commuter rail systems, collects and cleans wastewater, is the regional housing and redevelopment authority, plans and funds regional parks and plans and guides development of the region. This year the criticism is coming from the Scott County Board of Commissioners that is complaining about the way the council approved the transportation plan put together by its 33-member Transportation Advisory Board. There is a bill authored by Rep. Michael Beard, R-Shakopee, that would do away with the 33-member board and replace it with a 24-member regional transportation governance planning board, independent of the Metro Council. Beard’s idea also is to have the transit system operations and planning removed from the Metropolitan Council and run by a new transportation commission. Transportation planning would be done by the new regional transportation governance board with two county commissioners from each of the seven counties, 16 elected township and city officials and some citizen members. Beard says his bill does not have a number and has not been introduced. He says his idea to change how metropolitan transportation is governed and operated as a starting point for the Legislature to discuss and perhaps make changes next year. The legislator’s strategy is consistent with the position taken by the Association of Metropolitan Municipalities (Metro Cities), which is made up of many cities affected by the Metro Council’s decisions. It recommends that any systematic changes to the governing structure should not be considered until a comprehensive analysis of the region’s future is undertaken. In addition, Metro Cities supports the idea that regional level operations and planning functions should remain as integrated functions. In its latest study, Metro Cities is not asking for major changes of the council’s op-

Sun Thisweek Columnist

Don Heinzman

erations. It does recommend more local involvement in how the council members are appointed. This is not the year to be tinkering with the Metropolitan Council, whose performance generally is accepted by most elected officials of cities in the seven-county area. Beard’s concerns should become a part of an overall study of the council’s governance and operations authority, and he is wise not to introduce the bill during this session when legislators are in a mood to adjourn as soon as possible. In the past, the council has withstood most of the challenges or made changes to respond to the criticism. There was a time when the council was under attack for taking over functions local governments, including counties, could not do without having a council that made decisions on what’s best for the seven-county metropolitan area. At that time a big concern was that the council members and the chair were appointed by the governor rather than being elected. The argument for the appointed council is it makes decisions without regard to horse-trading votes, which too often happens in the elected decision-making process. That seems to have won out over the position that an elected council is more accountable, which of course is true. Most people are not aware of the Met Council’s services even though some directly affect everyone living in the seven-county area. Don Heinzman is chairman of the ECM Editorial Board. Sun Thisweek and the Dakota County Tribune are part of ECM. Heinzman can be reached at don.heinzman@ecm-inc. com. Columns reflect the opinion of the author.


Sun Thisweek April 20, 2012

Sawed-off shotgun discovered during arrest Police say a sawed-off shotgun was discovered among the belongings of a man arrested in Apple Valley last week for outstanding warrants. Derrik A. McGill Jr., 20, of Lonsdale, has been charged with possession of a short-barreled shotgun, a felony, after the firearm was allegedly found in his duffel bag during an inventory of his belongings at the Dakota County Law Enforcement Center. Sometimes referred to as “street sweepers” and noted for their concealability and effectiveness at short range, sawed-off shotguns are illegal for personal use in Minnesota and other states. The officer who inventoried McGill’s belongings reported that the 12-gauge

shotgun found in the identity, and he was duffel bag was loadarrested on outed, and that there standing warrants. were a dozen addi According to the tional cartridges in Dakota County the bag. Jail’s website, Mc According to the Gill had warrants criminal complaint, Derrik issued by Burnsthe arrest was made McGill Jr. ville police for asafter an Apple Valley sault and theft. officer approached McGill McGill, who remained as he was leaving a residence in custody at the Dakota on Hemlock Court at about County Jail as of Tuesday, 11 p.m. April 7, hoping to faces a maximum penalty question him in connection of five years in prison and a him with another case. $10,000 fine if convicted of McGill told the officer possessing a short-barreled he didn’t have an ID card on shotgun. He’s also been him and gave a false name, charged with giving false inthe complaint said. He then formation to police, a gross used the officer’s phone to misdemeanor. arrange to be picked up at a His next court appearnearby business. ance is May 8. As McGill waited for his —Andrew Miller ride to show, the officer was able to confirm McGill’s

Man charged with DWI following high-speed chase An Apple Vala.m. on Highway 3 ley man is accused near Canada Circle, of fleeing police in observed Benton’s a late-night, highvehicle drifting in speed chase on its lane and making Highway 3 in Rosejerking movements, mount last week according to police. that saw him driv The officer actiPeter Benton ing recklessly over vated his emergency curbs, onto the lights to make a shoulder and into oncom- traffic stop, and Benton iniing lanes of traffic. tially pulled over, but when Police say Peter F. Ben- the officer got out of his ton, 49, hit speeds of more squad car Benton shifted than 100 mph and nearly into drive and fled, police collided with two other ve- say. hicles during the April 9 After he surrendered, chase that ended when he police noted that Benton abruptly pulled over at West smelled of alcohol, had wa195th Street and surren- tery, bloodshot eyes, slurred dered. his speech and stumbled as The chase began after a he walked to the squad car. Rosemount officer, on rou- Benton declined to take tine patrol at about 1:30 a breath test to determine Autism, from 1A is that every child regardless of socioeconomic level should have affordable access to treatment for autism,” said Kausel, who is part of Autism Deserves Insurance, a Twin Citiesbased group of parents of children with autism who advocate for funding and education.

Kausel says she urges people to contact their state senators and representatives, and Gov. Mark Dayton, in support of funding for services related to autism, which according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control now affects 1 in every 88 children. “Three years ago, I didn’t know what autism was,” Kausel said. “In the last

his blood-alcohol concentration, but submitted to a blood draw, which was sent to the Minnesota Bureau of Criminal Apprehension for analysis. Benton is facing four charges: fleeing police, a felony; driving after cancellation, a gross misdemeanor; and fourth-degree DWI and driving without a valid license, both misdemeanors. If convicted of the felony charge, he faces up to three years in prison and a $5,000 fine. Benton remained in the Dakota County Jail as of Tuesday afternoon. His next court appearance is May 8. —Andrew Miller three years I have educated myself and it is time for Minnesota to do the same.” April is National Autism Awareness Month. For people who want to learn more about autism, Kausel recommends the website www. autismspeaks.org. Andrew Miller can be reached at andrew.miller@ecm-inc.com or facebook.com/sunthisweek.

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April 20, 2012 Sun Thisweek

Mature Lifestyles

Workshop aims to show everyone has a story to tell Participants to turn oral histories into timeless tales by Emily Hedges Special to Sun Thisweek

Remember a time you were embarrassed, or a time you failed? What job did you love? What was your best friend like? Helping memories emerge that might not have seen the light of day in decades, or ever, is the purpose behind the city of Eagan’s new workshop, Life Stories: Memories into Memoirs. “We’re not trying to write whole life stories. It’s about capturing memories,” said David Coward, storyteller, genealogist and librarian who will teach the workshop. “None of us is here forever. Our stories will continue to live if they are in writing.” Coward has worked in public and academic libraries for over 20 years, the last five years with the Dakota County Library system at the Wescott branch in Eagan. He is primarily a children’s librarian but has a passion for storytelling for all ages. “Children are regularly given the opportunity to hear and tell stories, but adults are not,” Coward said. “I approached Loudi (Rivamonte, recreation supervisor for the City of Eagan), and her enthusiasm was infectious.” Rivamonte knew from surveys and feedback that residents, especially seniors, would be open to a workshop like this. “Many people have no idea where to start. They have collections of things, with no idea how to go from oral to written, or written to oral,” she said. Finding the right prompt is the way to get someone talking. This is how Coward hopes to help students access specific memories and find a particular story to tell. “Most folks already re-

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David Coward, storyteller, genealogist and librarian will teach a class on storytelling in Eagan. member this and that story from Grandma. I want to encourage the ones you haven’t heard before,” he said. “How many have ever been asked, ‘Grandma, tell us about your life?’ It’s better to start with, ‘Tell me about the home you grew up in,’ ” for example. Coward already teaches a two-hour basic course with the library on how to use online resources to uncover family history and genealogy. “The census figures and other documents are like the skeleton, with names, places and dates, etc.,” he said. “The stories are the part

that flesh it out and bring our ancestors to life.” The structure of the workshop will be informal. “I want to create a space where folks can tell their stories in a safe setting. The intent of the course is to get people comfortable with it,” said Coward. The two-part workshop will begin May 14 when participants are encouraged to recall and share story images. Coward will then ask students to take those ideas and comments received during class home and put them into writing to be shared during the May 21 class. For anyone who is hesi-


Sun Thisweek April 20, 2012

Lakeville Seniors The Lakeville Senior Center is located at 20732 Holt Ave. Senior center inquiries can be directed to Linda Walter, senior coordinator, at (952) 985-4622 or lwalter@lakevillemn. gov.

What papers to keep, what not to keep

Penny Springer will give a presentation at 10 a.m. Friday, May 4, on what papers are important to keep and what papers can be discarded. Sign up by April 23. Cost: two punches.

Men’s golf

The Lakeville Senior Center’s men’s golf league plays at Gopher Hills in Miesville on Wednesday mornings May 2 through Oct. 17. Golfers must be members of the Lakeville

Senior Center and pay a $5 league fee at time of registration. Cost per round of golf (including cart) is $20 plus tax. Regular golfers and subs are needed. Carpooling is available. Golfers usually lunch at King’s Place in Miesville after their golf game. Sign up at the senior center or call (952) 985-4622 for more information.

Shredding event

A shredding event will be held Friday, May 18, at the senior center. Cost is $5 per person.

Driver safety classes

An eight-hour driver improvement course will be offered by the Minnesota Highway Safety and Research Center from 5:30 to 9:30 p.m. on April 23 and

24. Cost is $24 per person. Call 1-888-234-1294 to register.

Medica information meeting

A Medica representative will be at the senior center at 1 p.m. Thursday, April 26, to answer questions.

Pacific Northwest wine cruise & tour

This cruise and tour will be Sept. 13-22. Visit Vancouver, Nanaimo and Victoria in the province of British Columbia. Tour wineries in San Francisco, the Napa Valley, Monterey and San Diego. Prices start at $2,679. Call the senior center for more information.

Aging and wellness expo set The Elder Resource Association-South of the River will hold its Spring Aging and Wellness Expo from 2 to 6 p.m. Thursday, April 26, at Burnsville City Hall, 100 Civic Center Parkway,

Burnsville. The event is free. Exhibits will include free health screenings, information on caregiver resources, giveaways, door prizes and more. There will be an “Ask

the Expert Panel” from 4 to 5:30 p.m. featuring experts in funeral planning, law, Medicare and VA benefits. For more details, visit www.erasouth.org/expo. html.

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to connect with those who have gone before us.” These stories are what give meaning to life, although he knows that appreciation for family history sometimes takes years to acquire. “A lot of people get discouraged because they think no one cares. I love this quote from my son: ‘I know it’s interesting, Dad. I’ll be getting interested in about 30 years,’ ” Coward said. The two-day workshop will be May 14 and 21, 9:3011:30 a.m. in the Eagan Community Center Lone Oak Room. The cost is $3 per person for refreshments. Register by May 9 by calling (651) 675-5500. Space is lim-

ited to 15 students. For anyone interested in learning how to begin basic genealogy research, Coward will present the free class, “Family History on the Internet” on April 24, 2-4 p.m. at the Wescott Library. Registration begins April 10. Call (651) 450-2900 for more information. On April 25, he will be the guest speaker at a potluck from 10:30-11:30 a.m. in Eagan’s Municipal Center, Eagan Room, where he will answer questions on genealogy resources, his class offerings and the importance of storytelling.

tant to register because they’ve never written creatively before, Coward encourages them to give it a try. “We try to meet everyone at their particular area of need,” he said. “I hope we do get people who have never written before. The only skill required is remembering.” While some people might want to write with the intention of becoming a best seller, Coward says that is not most people’s goal. “Our stories are our gift to the future,” he said. “For those who have a story they want to pass on, it’s a way

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April 20, 2012 Sun Thisweek

Troubled waters ahead for timber bridges Rotting a concern by Laura Adelmann Sun Thisweek

Dakota County’s timber bridges are slowly rotting from the inside out and need replacement, but funding for the work is drying up. The problem is apparent in Dakota County’s southern townships, where all timber bridges need to be replaced within the next decade, said Todd Howard, assistant county engineer, to Dakota County commissioners at a Tuesday committee meeting. He called the condition of Dakota County’s timber bridges a concern, and said bond funds have been directed to state projects, including the Lowry bridge.

Howard said nine timber bridges in the county require a load restriction posting, an indication of the bridge’s strength and structural soundness, according to the Minnesota Department of Transportation. The bridge on County State Aid Highway 46 in Marshan Township is classified as functionally obsolete, because its narrow lanes do not meet today’s minimum federal clearance requirements for a new bridge, Howard said. The state of Minnesota’s timber bridges has raised the concerns of the Metropolitan Inter-County Association, which has made requesting bridge bonding

part of its 2012 legislative platform. According to MICA, local governments oversee 75 percent of the state’s 14,700 bridges. It stated that counties with growing populations, like Dakota, have bridges that may be structurally sound, but are no longer capable of handling increased traffic. Most of the state’s 1,631 timber bridges were built between 1940 and the 1970s, and 66 are in the metropolitan area. Timber bridges are difficult to inspect, because internal rotting is not always apparent from an outside inspection, Howard said. In 2010, a section of timber bridge in Nobles County near Brewster collapsed during an overlay project. MICA is calling on the

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The timber supports to the bridge on County State Aid Highway 85 in Hampton Township have been replaced by Dakota County so the bridge can remain open until the timber bridge is replaced with a box culvert later this summer. This is the only timber bridge planned to be replaced this year at an estimated cost of $300,000. Legislature to allow those bridges to be eligible for funding through the state’s bridge bonding program. Howard encouraged commissioners to discuss

the concern with legislators as well. “We absolutely need bonding to continue,” he said. “The township bridge account will in no way keep

up with the needs of replacing those township bridges.” Laura Adelmann is at laura. adelmann@ecm-inc.com or facebook.com/sunthisweek.

Some churches do, while others don’t Area congregations split on allowing alcohol, gambling at their events by Laura Adelmann Sun Thisweek

Some Dakota County religious organizations fundraise with events that include alcohol and gambling, while others refrain from those activities, citing concerns about the potential for harm and liability. The St. Paul Minneapolis Archdiocese allows member Catholic churches to establish their own policies regarding alcohol and gambling, Archdiocese spokesman Jim Accurso said. “Individual parishes need to follow local municipal and risk management guidelines and meet their requirements for dispensing liquor (and) providing alcohol and games of chance,” Accurso said. Rock music, alcohol and raffles are part of the Lakeville All Saints Church “All Saints Rocks” fund-

raiser held at the church this weekend. “I have been to virtually every one of these events that have happened since I have been here and I have never once seen a situation out of control,” All Saints Church Rev. Tom Wilson said. St. Michael’s Catholic Church, Farmington, conducts annual fundraisers that have included raffles, bingo and a bar that includes mixed-drinks. The Farmington City Council recently approved the church’s application for a gambling event permit and a temporary on-sale liquor license in the church’s social hall for its May 2 spring fundraiser. “It has been my experience that we do not overserve, said Eric Larson, director of music at St. Michael’s. Mary Rousseau, five-

year chair of the St. John Neumann Catholic Church’s annual congregational picnic, said any idea of including alcohol and gambling at their Eagan church’s social events would “get shot down” by the parish council. “It’s definitely not a good message,” she said. “There’s so many negative things that come around with alcohol, and so many negative things that happen with drinking and driving. The church has no business being a part of that environment.” Faithful Shepherd Catholic School in Eagan annually hosts “Septemberfest,” a large outdoor music festival billed as the “Biggest Rock the Flock Party in the Burbs,” and has included “happy hour” specials on alcoholic beverages. The concert portion of the event is open to the community, ages 21 and up, and

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beer, wine and a darn good time!” An “adults-only” “Mexican Fiesta!” offers food and “pop, beer and a bottomless pitcher of margaritas!” “Back to the College Days!” party advertises “plenty of beer, homemade WOP (an alcoholic punch) and lots of dancing music!” Wilson said the parties help build community and support church educational programs. While the events are promoted through the gala and their proceeds go to the church, Wilson said the events are “not a church activity” because they are held at parishioners’ homes. “Those are private parties people are sponsoring,” Wilson said. He added the party boards are a long-standing fundraising custom in the church that offer an opportunity for parishioners to socialize in the comfort of their own homes. In the five years Wilson

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draws crowds of between 1,000 and 3,000, said John Boone, Faithful Shepherd Catholic School executive director. Eagan police Chief Jim McDonald said few problems have been reported related to the event. Police received about 30 noise complaints in 2008 that were resolved by repositioning the stage to face away from the lone residential development in the primarily industrial area. In 2009, a 27-year-old Apple Valley woman was arrested after she and two others began pushing and dumping beer on each other in the crowd near center-stage, according to an Eagan police report. In conjunction with the All Saints gala, people are invited to pay the church $25 per-person to attend themed parties hosted at parishioners’ homes. All Saints advertises party themes that include “Oktoberfest!” with “plenty of

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has headed the All Saints Church and school, he said there have been no complaints about alcohol or gambling at the events the church hosts. He said they will review fundraising activities once complete, but anticipates no changes to continue their fundraising traditions or party boards. “It’s a custom they’ve had for a long time,” he said.

Other churches

Catholic denominations are not the only churches that serve alcohol and/or allow gambling at churchsponsored events. At Nativity Episcopal Church, Burnsville, an annual adults-only gala that in 2011 was themed “Island in the Sun” included a bar and raffle. Items auctioned at that event included wine and beer. Saints Martha and Mary Episcopal Church, Eagan, offers wine and beer at its “Oktoberfest” event, said Warden John Waedell. He said they do not consider alcohol taboo, noting, “There was wine served at the Last Supper.” He added that alcohol and gambling are not activities their church events emphasize. “We have families who bring teenagers,” he said. “Everyone is expected to be on their best behavior and have a good time.” Several churches limit the number of alcoholic beverages served per-person at their events. Shepherd of the Valley Lutheran Church in Apple Valley held an “Oktoberfest” worship and dinner service in October that included a beverage ticket for one serving of wine or beer, as is church policy, according to Jennifer Maxwell, operations director. She added the church does not allow gambling. Laurel Gaard, business See churches, 11A


Sun Thisweek April 20, 2012

Trumpeter’s idol doesn’t disappoint

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Burnsville graduate Mark Bobnick toured with Doc Severinsen

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by John Gessner Sun Thisweek

Edward Wallin

John H. Harmer

Edward Wallin, age 54, passed away unexpectedly at his home on March 18, 2012. He is preceded in death by his parents, Edward D. and Ruth (Ecklund) Wallin and brother Mark Wallin. Ed was survived by his brother, David J. Wallin; who recently passed on April 13th, 2012; sister, Sheryl Wallin; nephew, David A. Wallin. Uncles, aunts, cousins and many friends. A funeral service was held 11 AM Thursday, March 22, 2012 at St. John's Lutheran Church, 20165 Heath Ave., Lakeville. Interment was at Lakeville Grove Cemetery.

Age 60 of Chanhassen, formerly of Farmington/Lakeville area. John went to be with his Lord and Savior on April 9th, 2012 after a very courageous battle with brain cancer. Preceded in death by father James Edwin and father-in-law Harry Walter. Survived by wife, Carol, daughters, Tanya (Aaron) Golle, KC Harmer and step-daughter Stacey (Dan) Vanella and their mother JoEllen, mother Austa, sister Holly (Doug) Jorgenson, brother Jim (Kathy) Harmer, niece Wendy (Dan) Kooda and her family, nephews Adam (Amy) Harmer, Bart (Nicole) Harmer, Rob (Julie) Jorgenson, Chad (Jessie) Harmer and their families. Also survived by extended family; mother-in-law Marian Walter, sisters-in-law Janet (David Wanner) Walter, Mary (Richard) Strand and brother-in-law Mike (Jennifer) Walter and their families. As well as many other relatives, many, many dear friends and last, but not least, his beloved Lab, Jessie. A special thank you to Dr. Trusheim and his entire staff at Abbott Northwestern Hospital, our girls in the Infusion Center and Allina Hospice for all of the care they provided to not only Dad, but our entire family. A celebration of John's life will be held on Sunday, May 6 at 1pm at the Harmer farm in Lakeville.

Thomas G. Hammang Age 78, of Burnsville passed away on April 14, 2012. Survived by loving wife Mary, children Tom (Faith) Hammang, Bradley (Patti) Hammang, Renee (Rich) Capuzzi, David (Renee) Hammang, and Daniel Hammang. Step Children Nicole (Dan) Smith and Jason (Lindsay) Phillips. 11 Grandchildren, 5 Great Grandchildren. Funeral Service was held 11AM Wednesday, April 18, 2012 at St. James Lutheran Church, 3650 Williams Dr. Burnsville, MN. Visitation was 5-8pm Tuesday, April 17 at White Funeral Home, 12804 Nicollet Ave. S. and also one hour prior to service at church. Interment, Acacia Park Cemetery, Mendota Heights, MN. White Funeral Home Burnsville 952-894-5080 www.whitefuneralhomes.com

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Sieleni - Malecha Christine Elizabeth Sieleni and Justin Joseph Malecha were married November 5, 2011. Christine is the daughter of Thomas and Gretchen Sieleni of Inver Grove Heights, MN. A 2004 graduate of Simley High School and earned a degree in Hotel, Restaurant and Tourism Management from the University of Wisconsin-Stout. She is employed by Golden Valley Golf and Country Club as a Catering and Sales Manager. Justin is the son of Dennis and Pauline Malecha of Lakeville, MN. A 2004 graduate of Lakeville High School and earned a bachelor’s degree in business from the University of Wisconsin-Stout. He is co-owner of “Outdoor Innovations” (landscapes/lawn maintenance/snow removal). The wedding was held at All Saints Catholic Church in Lakeville, Mn., followed by a reception and dance at the Mendakota Country Club in Mendota Heights, MN. The couple honeymooned near Superior Shores, MN, followed by a trip to Hawaii.

Today’s The Day Stop Smoking

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Eldon G. “Gary” Burdick Age 87, of Burnsville, passed away on April 15, 2012. Eldon is preceded in death by his wife, Patricia; son, David; siblings, William, Louise and Millie. He is survived by his loving daughters, Susan (Matthew) Hedge and Dawn Burdick; grandchildren, Benjamin, Nicholas and Isabelle; siblings, Virginia ‘Ginny’ Moore and Robert (Dodie) Burdick. A graveside service will be held on Friday, April 27, 2012 at 1:45 PM at Fort Snelling National Cemetery, please meet in assembly area # 5 at 1:30 PM. White Funeral Home Burnsville 952 894 5080 www.whitefuneralhomes.com

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Bruneau Phillips Phil and Kelly Bruneau of Lakeville are pleased to announce the upcoming wedding of their daughter Marlow to Andrew Phillips, son of Janet and the late William Phillips of Darnestown, Maryland. Marlow, a 2005 graduate of Lakeville High School, received her BSN at the University of Virginia and is presently a nurse at Duke Hospital in Durham, NC. Andrew graduated from Stanford University with a major in the Classics and is presently working on a Masters of Commerce at the University of Virginia. The couple plans to reside in San Francisco after their July wedding.

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Mark Bobnick listened to Doc Severinsen constantly while growing up in Burnsville. Bobnick’s father kept the legendary trumpeter and “Tonight Show” bandleader in frequent rotation on the family turntable. At 34, Bobnick is old enough to have watched the final years of “The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson.” He idolized Severinsen while learning trumpet himself and becoming a star of the Burnsville High School band department. Now, fresh off a 10-state concert tour as a member of Severinsen’s band, Bobnick is happy to report that proximity to the 84-year-old legend only enhanced his regard. “He stayed in all the same hotels as us, rode the same buses as us,” said Bobnick, the son of Dick and Hilery Bobnick of Burnsville. “He was with us 24/7. He was one of the nicest men I’ve ever met.” Bobnick was part of a Twin Cities-based crew – four trumpet players, three trombonists and a pianist – that backed Severinsen on his “Once More With Feeling” big-band tour in February and March. Bobnick said he did 14 concerts with Doc and the band over 17 days. The two will be reunited on April 22 at Orchestra Hall in Minneapolis, where Bobnick will rejoin alumni from the Minnesota Youth Symphonies at their 40th anniversary concert. Severinsen is on the bill as guest artist. “Given the fact that he’s churches, from 10A administrator at Easter Lutheran Church, Eagan, said they do not oppose adults enjoying moderate gambling and alcohol consumption, but do not offer those activities at church functions in part because of liability concerns. “We would be quite concerned about repercussions to the congregation,” she said. Gaard added that no alcohol is allowed on church premises except for Communion wine and Easter Lutheran does not hold any type of fundraisers at the church. “We’ve never done an event with gambling, and I can’t imagine we would,” she said. Rosemount United Methodist Church has a policy against any alcohol on its property, and serves grape juice for Communion, said Tami Luckhardt, operations director with the church. She said the Methodist Church has an official policy prohibiting gambling in its churches.

one of the top classical and jazz trumpet players of all time and he’s basically a living legend, spending 17 days with him was just amazing,” Bobnick said. Bobnick has turned some heads himself in his music career. He played in the prestigious Minnesota Youth Symphonies for five years after auditioning in 1991. The 1996 Burnsville High graduate won the band department’s Louis Armstrong and John Philip Sousa awards and made the All-State band program his junior and senior years. He earned his bachelor’s degree in music education at the University of Minnesota and his master’s in jazz at the Eastman School of Music in Rochester, N.Y. Next came a detour to West Point, where Bobnick served not as an Army cadet but as a trumpeter with the West Point Band’s Jazz Knights ensemble. “There was an opening,” said Bobnick, who served as an Army staff sergeant from June 2003 to October 2007. “It’s a premier jazz ensemble, one of the Army’s premier bands. You audition and go to basic training. They paid my entire student loan amounts. It was a great experience, being in New York and traveling.” After returning to the Twin Cities, Bobnick taught high school at the St. Paul Conservatory for Performing Artists from 2008 to 2011. He taught classroom music, music theory, music history and jazz history while also directing small student groups that included a jazz combo. Many of the churches that fundraise with parties that include alcohol are also locations where alcohol addiction recovery groups meet. Anna Ostenso, director of faith formation at Nativity Episcopal Church, said she sees no conflict that the recovery groups rent their building for meetings. “We don’t think it’s bad at all,” she said. “ I think we should model responsible behavior.” She added that the

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Trumpeter Mark Bobnick, right, was photographed while on tour with his idol, Doc Severinsen. “One of the joys of that was we won the Eau Claire Jazz Festival in 2011 and 2010,” Bobnick said. These days he’s working as assistant store manager and The Trumpet Shop manager at Schmitt Music in Brooklyn Center. Bobnick and his wife, Tina, live in Mounds View with their 17-month-old daughter Olivia and daughter Regan, who was born this month. Bobnick can be seen around town playing with the Power of 10 band and others. His credits include the Chanhassen Dinner Theater Orchestra, the Jazz MN Big Band, the Cedar Avenue Big Band and the Wolverines Big Band. Bobnick is so connected and respected, the Severinsen gig fell into his lap. “Doc has had a very strong relationship with musicians in the Twin Cities for a very long time,” Bobnick explained. Severinsen

knows Michael Nelson, a member of the Hornheads horn section – which has recorded and toured with Prince – and a top regional booking agent. When Severinsen asked Nelson to assemble a brass section for his tour, one of the players Nelson called was Bobnick. “He (Severinsen) said it was one of the greatest bands he’s ever played with,” Bobnick said. “The night he said that, I’ll never forget it.” The “Once More With Feeling” tour was indeed portrayed as Severinsen’s farewell to the road, Bobnick said. “It supposedly is,” he said. “But he said numerous times, ‘Why don’t we do this again, and I’ll call you all next year?’ ”

church responsibly locks up all alcohol when there is not an event. Mike Swecker, pastor at Hosanna! Church, Lakeville, also oversees the church’s Prayer and Freedom Ministries, and expressed concern about church activities that include alcohol and gambling. “I help people avoid such entrapments,” Swecker said. He said he regularly sees families torn apart and losing their homes because of gambling and addiction.

“That impacts the community, because now we have a displaced family … the kids need some kind of placement,” he said.

John Gessner can be reached at john.gessner@ecm-inc.com or facebook.com/sunthisweek.

Laura Adelmann is at laura. adelmann@ecm-inc.com or facebook.com/sunthisweek.

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12A

April 20, 2012 Sun Thisweek

Thisweekend Young dancer enters the spotlight Apple Valley eighth-grader to play lead role in Minnesota Dance Festival children’s ballet ing role in “The Ballet School,” one of the featured Dancing since the age productions at the Minnesoof 3, Maggie Selner is step- ta Dance Festival May 4-5 at ping into the spotlight this the Fitzgerald Theater in St. Paul. month. The Apple Valley eighth- It will be Selner’s third grader has landed the lead- time performing with her by Andrew Miller Sun Thisweek

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peers from Classical Ballet Academy at the annual dance festival, but it’s her first starring role there. And she’s been logging long hours for her role in “The Ballet School,” part of a trilogy written and choreographed by her Classical Ballet Academy instructor Andrew Rist. Leading up to the festival she’s been putting in 20-hour weeks in the studio. “I love the rehearsals with

my friends. It’s a challenging part to learn, but that doesn’t bother me,” said the 13-year-old homeschooler, who plans to attend high school at Chesterton Academy in Edina starting in the fall and hopes to one day become a ballet instructor. The success Selner has found on the stage has been a decade in the making. She started taking ballet classes 10 years ago at a now-defunct dance studio in Burns-

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Thirteen-year-old Maggie Selner of Apple Valley will be making her third appearance at the annual Minnesota Dance Festival next month when she stars in “The Ballet School.” role. “It’s a lot of endurance. ville. “She took to it right away If you can do that part, you and loved to perform,” Sel- can do anything.” ner’s mom, Brenda, said of To catch Selner in “The her first dance classes at age Ballet School” or for in3. “Half the kids were cry- formation about other Minnesota Dance Festival ing, but she loved it.” Selner scored her first big performances, visit www. part last December, when summerdancecamp.com. she played Clara in “The Nutcracker” at St. Paul’s Andrew Miller can be reached O’Shaughnessy Theater. at andrew.miller@ecm-inc. “You’re pretty much com or facebook.com/sunon stage the entire perfor- thisweek. mance,” she said of the Clara

theater and arts calendar To submit items for the Arts Calendar, email: darcy. odden@ecm-inc.com.

Camps The Allegro Choral Academy is now accepting registrations for its “Pitch Perfect” Summer Singing Camp June 18-21 at St. John’s in Lakeville for children ages 6 to 11. Find information and registration materials at www.allegroca.org or (952) 8468585, artisticdirector@allegroca. org. Comedy Adam Norwest with special guest Linda Aarons at 8:30 p.m. Friday, April 20, and Saturday, April 21, at MinneHAHA Comedy Club, 1583 E. First Ave., Shakopee (lower level of Dangerfield’s), (612) 860-9388, www. minnehahacomedyclub.com. Tickets: $13. Concerts The Minnesota Valley Men’s and Women’s Chorales will “Sing into Spring” with their concerts at 7:30 p.m. Friday, April 20, at St. Joseph Catholic Church in Rosemount, and Saturday, April 21, at Grace Lutheran Church in Apple Valley. Tickets are avail-

able at the door or from any chorale member for $5. Three local handbell ensembles will present “Bell Fantasia” at 7:30 p.m. Friday, April 27, at the Burnsville Performing Arts Center, 12600 Nicollet Ave. Bells of the Lakes, the St. Olaf Handbell Choir and the Northern Lights Ringers will perform. Tickets range from $15 to $25 and can be purchased at the box office, at Ticketmaster.com or by calling (800) 982-2787. South Metro Chorale will present “All Creation Sings” at 7:30 p.m. Saturday, April 28, at St. John the Baptist Catholic Church, 4625 W. 125th St., Savage, and at 4 p.m. Sunday, April 29, at St. John’s Lutheran Church, 20165 Heath Ave., Lakeville. Tickets are $10 for adults, $8 for students and seniors. Purchase tickets by phone at (612) 386­-4636 or email tickets@southmetrochorale.org. Information: www.southmetrochorale.org. Violin concert by Chad Hoopes, Minnesota Public Radio’s Artist in Residence, 7 p.m. Saturday, April 29, at the Lakeville Area Arts Center, 20965 Holyoke Ave. Tickets range from $24 to $29 and are available at the arts center and online at www.lakevillemn.gov. Lorie Line’s “Live In The Sunshine” performance, 7:30 p.m. Tuesday, May 8, at Lakeville Area Arts Center, 20965 Holyoke Ave. Tickets are $39 and are available at the arts center or by calling (952) 985-4640. Exhibits An exhibit of oil paintings by artist Holly Stone is on display through April 17 at the Lakeville Area Arts Center, 20965 Holyoke Ave. Information: (952) 9854640. Poetry In celebration of National Poetry Month, Caponi Art Park and Learning Center is hosting a poetry performance workshop, “Frankenstein: Bring Your Words to Life,” on Monday, April 30, from 4 to 6 p.m. at the Wescott Library, 1340 Wescott Road, Eagan. Call (651) 4549412 to register. Theater The Chameleon Theatre Circle will present “True Love” at 7:30 p.m. April 20-21, 23, 2728 and at 2 p.m. April 29 at the Burnsville Performing Arts Center, 12600 Nicollet Ave. General admission tickets are $20 ($17 for seniors, students, audio description and ASL patrons) in person at the box office, via Ticketmaster at (800) 982-2787 or www.ticketmaster.com. Expressions Community Theater will present “Mama Won’t Fly” at 7:30 p.m. April 20-21 and at 2 p.m. April 22 at the Lakeville Area Arts Centers, 20965 Holyoke Ave. Tickets are $12 and can be purchased by calling (952) 985-4640. Burnsville High School Theatre Guild will present “Willy Wonka” at 7:30 p.m. April 19-21 and 26-28 and at 2 p.m. April 22 at Mraz Center, Burnsville High School, 600 E. Highway 13, Burnsville. Tickets are $8 for students, $9 for seniors, and $10 for adults. Tickets can be reserved

See CALENDAR, 14A


Sun Thisweek April 20, 2012

13A

Thisweekend theater and arts briefs Comedy for Caring is at BPAC The Second City Laugh Out Loud Tour will provide entertainment during Comedy for Caring, the Burnsville Rotary’s annual community fundraising event, to be held at 8 p.m. Saturday, April 28, at Burnsville Performing Arts Center, 12600 Nicollet Ave. S. Tickets are $36 orchestra and balcony; $75 VIP meet and greet. Tickets are available at the box office, ticketmaster.com or (800) 982-2787. In addition, an online auction will run April 1427 atwww.BiddingForGood.com/BurnsvilleRotary.

‘Wizard of Oz The Ballet’ is May 11-13 Twin Cities Ballet will perform “Wizard of Oz The Ballet” May 11-13 at Burnsville Performing Arts Center, 12600

Nicollet Ave. S. Tickets range from $12 to $26 and are available at the box office, via Ticketmaster at (800) 982-2787 or ticketmaster.com. Group discounts are also available. Performances will be 7 p.m. Friday, May 11; 2 and 7 p.m. Saturday, May 12; and 2 p.m. Sunday, May 13. Visit www.TwinCitiesBallet.org or call (952) 452-3163 for more information.

Chorales to perform two concerts The Minnesota Valley Men’s Chorale and the Minnesota Valley Women’s Chorale will perform spring concerts Friday, April 20, at St. Joseph Catholic Church, 13900 Biscayne Ave. W., Rosemount, and Saturday, April 21, at Grace Lutheran Church, 7800 W. County Road 42, Apple Valley. Both concerts are at 7:30 p.m. Singers in The Minnesota Valley Men’s Cho-

Music in the Zoo returns

Author-musician Eric Manos will be at Barnes & Noble, 1291 Promenade Place, Eagan, at 3 p.m. Sunday, April 22, to read from and sign copies of his recent book for children, “The Little Guitar.”

will include mural painting, a snaking community sculpture, and craft scavenger hunt. Caponi Art Park celebrates 20 years of art and nature in 2012. This year’s open house will also serve as an informal celebration of the 20th anniversary. Cake will be served and an exhibition of images from the art park’s history will be on display. In the event of severe weather, the event will be canceled. Weather-related announcements will be made via the park’s website (www.caponiartpark. org), e-newsletter, and Facebook page. The art park is open Tuesday through Sunday, May through October.

Caponi Art Park reopens May 1

‘Kara, Lost’ up for book award

rale High School Festival will also perform at the Saturday evening concert. Admission is a suggested donation of $5. Tickets are available at the door. For more information, visit www.mvmcsings.org or www.mvwcsings.org.

‘The Little Guitar’ book signing Eagan

To celebrate its seasonal reopening, Caponi Art Park will hold a free, family-friendly open house from 1 to 4 p.m. Saturday, May 5. Children’s art activities

Eagan author Susan Niz’s debut novel “Kara, Lost” has been named a finalist in the 2011 Midwest Book Awards for Literary Fiction. The winners will be announced May 9.

Photo submitted

Now in its 20th year, Music in the Zoo returns this summer with three months of concerts in the Minnesota Zoo’s outdoor amphitheater. Canadian indie rocker Feist (above) opens the concert series on June 2; also among the 30 or so acts booked this summer are Rufus Wainwright, David Gray, Barenaked Ladies and the B-52s. The full schedule can be found online at www.suemcclean.com/zoo. Tickets, ranging in price from $24 to $67, go on sale April 30 at all Ticketmaster locations.


April 20, 2012 Sun Thisweek

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CALENDAR, from 12A online at www.MrazCenterTickets.com or purchased at the door. Easter Community Theatre will present “Godspell” at 7:30 p.m. April 19-21 and at 1 p.m. April 22 at Easter Lutheran Church - On the Hill, 4200 Pilot Knob Road, Eagan. Tickets are $8 for adults, $6 for students and seniors and are available at easter.org/godspell or by calling (651) 452-3680. Lakeville South High School will present “The Wizard of Oz” at 7 p.m. April 20-21, 26-28 and at 2 p.m. April 28 in the school auditorium. Tickets are $10 for adults and $5 for students/seniors. Ticket sales begin April 16 from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the LSHS Commons, 21135 Jacquard Ave. Information: (952) 232-3322. “Ole & Lena’s 50th Wedding Anniversary and Vow Renewal” performances will be at 7:30 p.m. Friday, May 11, and Saturday, May 12, at the Lakeville Area Arts Center, 20965 Holyoke Ave. Tickets are $15. Call (952) 985-4640 for information.

Workshops/classes Music Together in the Valley offers classes for parents and their infant, toddler and preschool children in Rosemount, Farmington, Lakeville and Apple Valley. Information: www.musictogetherclasses.com or (651) 439-4219. The Eagan Art House offers classes for all ages. For a complete listing go to www.eaganarthouse.org or call (651) 675-5521. Dan Petrov Art Studio in Burnsville offers oil painting classes for beginners, intermediate and advanced skill level painters, www.danpetrovart.com, (763) 843-2734. Teens Express Yourself

with Paint, 5 to 7 p.m. Mondays at Brushworks School of Art in Burnsville, www.BrushworksSchoolofArt.com, (651) 214-4732. Drama/theater classes for ages 4 and up at River Ridge Arts Building, Burnsville, (952) 736-3644. Special needs theater program (autism-DCD), ages 5 and older, Burnsville, (952) 736-3644. Join other 55-plus adults at the Eagan Art House to create beaded jewelry. The Jewelry Club meets on the third Friday of each month from 1 to 3 p.m. Fee is $3 and includes all supplies. Bring any old jewelry you would like to re-make. 3981 Lexington Ave. S., (651) 675-5500. Savage Art Studios, 4735 W. 123rd St., Suite 200, Savage, offers classes/workshops for all ages. Information: www. savageartstudios.com or (952) 895-0375. Soy candle making classes held weekly in Eagan near 55 and Yankee Doodle. Call Jamie at (651) 315-4849 for dates and times. $10 per person. Presented by Making Scents in Minnesota. Country line dance classes held for intermediates Mondays 1:30 to 3:30 p.m. at Rambling River Center, 325 Oak St., Farmington, $5/class. Call Marilyn (651) 463-7833. Beginner country line dance classes on Wednesdays, 5:30-7:30 p.m., at the Lakeville VFW, 8790 Upper 208th St. $5/ class. Call Marilyn (651) 4637833. Country line dance classes on Wednesdays at the Lakeville Senior Center, 20732 Holt Ave. Beginners, 9-10 a.m.; Intermediate, 10 a.m.-noon. $5/class. Call Marilyn (651) 463-7833. The Lakeville Area Arts Center offers arts classes for all ages, www.lakevillemn.gov, (952) 985-4640.

family calendar

To submit items for the Family Calendar, email: darcy.odden@ ecm-inc.com.

Friday, April 20 Kids consignment sale by From Yours To Mine from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. at Ames Arena, 19900 Ipava Ave., Lakeville. Admission: $2 (free admission with donation of nonperishable food item). Saturday, April 21 Seventh annual pancake breakfast by Boy Scout Troop 455 from 8 a.m. to noon at the Rosemount American Legion, 14590 Burma Ave. W. Menu: all-you-caneat pancakes, sausage, juice and coffee. Tickets are $5 at the door. Children age 5 and younger eat free. There will also be a bake sale and prize raffle. Patrick Eagan Park cleanup by the Friends of the Eagan Core Greenway from 10 a.m. to noon. Meet in the main parking lot behind the Eagan Art House, 3981 Lexington Ave. Children are welcome. Bring gloves. Garbage bags provided. Refreshments will be served afterward. Information: (651) 6867006, www.eagancoregreenway. org. Kids consignment sale by From Yours To Mine from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. at Ames Arena, 19900 Ipava Ave., Lakeville. Many items half off. April Extravaganza Fundraiser by Sobriety High School of Burnsville from 2 to 5 p.m., 12156 Nicollet Ave S., Burnsville. Silent auction ends at 4:30 p.m., live auction from 4:30 to 5 p.m. Includes games and food as well as student performance and involvement. Free admission. Information: Judi Hanson at (612) 328-3973. Steak and shrimp feed by the Rosemount Knights of Columbus at 6 p.m. at St. Joseph’s Church Social Hall, 13900 Biscayne Ave. W., Rosemount. Freewill offering accepted. Sunday, April 22 DIY Bridal Workshop from 1 to 4 p.m. Sunday, April 22, at The Garden of River Ridge, 190 S. River Ridge Circle, Burnsville. A number of do-it-yourself ideas for weddings will be demonstrated at the free event. Information: (612) 788-7575. Tuesday, April 24 Senior Housing Options program by the Lakeville Senior Resource Coalition from 6 to 7:30 p.m. at Dakota County Heritage Library, 20085 Heritage Drive, Lakeville. Learn about the current levels of senior care, including less expensive care options, financing possibilities, enlisting support for caregiving duties and how to get paid for your services. Free and open to the public. Wednesday, April 25 Third annual Sexual Assault Awareness Walk by 360 Communities at the Lewis House, 4345 Nicols Road, Eagan. Open house at 7 p.m., walk at 8 p.m. Bring a candle and a flashlight for back-up in case of rain or wind. Thursday, May 3 Lakeville National Day of Prayer from noon to 1 p.m. at Lakeville City Hall, 20195 Holyoke Ave. Saturday, May 5 Spring Fling family fundraiser from 11:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Primrose School of Lakeville North, 9711 163rd St. W., Lakeville. Families attending can enjoy food, bouncers, pony rides, petting zoo, face painting, crafts, silent auction, and carnival games. Proceeds will support local charities. Information: www.primroselakeville.com or (952) 435-8885.

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Saturday, May 12 Plant sale by the Eagan Garden Club from 8:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. at Holz Farm Park, 4669 Manor Drive, Eagan. Perennials, annuals, and hanging baskets will be on sale. Proceeds benefit gardens at Trapp Farm Park, Cedar Pond Park, Wescott Library, and Holz Farm. Saturday, May 19 Dakota Gardeners perennial sale from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. at Community of Christ Church, 5990 134th St. Court, Apple Valley. Blood drives – The American Red Cross will hold the following blood drives. Call 1-800-RED CROSS (1-800-733-2767) or visit redcrossblood.org to make an appointment or for more information. • May 1, 12:30 to 6:30 p.m., Messiah Lutheran Church, 16725 Highview Ave., Lakeville.

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merrick, from 1A soccer coach Mark Obarski mentioned the opening in the boys program and said it was something Merrick might want to consider. “I agreed with him,” Merrick said. “I thought it would be good to try it.” He also is coach of the University of Minnesota men’s club team, which has several players from the southern suburbs. He coached the Minnesota Strikers indoor and outdoor teams in the 1980s. Merrick has been director of soccer development at the National Sports Center in Blaine and has worked with a number of local clubs, including the Lakeville Soccer Association. He continues to run his own soccer training company, called Kicks Best. Merrick, who was named to the Eagan position last week, was scheduled to meet with Wildcats players and parents on Wednesday. He has not yet hired a staff

because he is still talking with last year’s assistant coaches. “I’m new to the program,” he said. “I have not seen Eagan’s players play. I have to learn about the players, and they have to learn about me. But I’m coming in with no preconceived notions.” He said his basic soccer philosophy is “attack with four and defend with six.” Beyond that, the Eagan players’ abilities will dictate the style of play. Because he was a defender during his playing career, Merrick said he understands that some will assume that he will coach a rigid, conservative style. He said he hopes to prove that assumption to be incorrect. “I believe offense comes from good defense, and I want us to play some exciting soccer because I think that should be an integral part of the high school game,” he said. As he started his coaching career, Merrick made

tapes of games he pulled in from all over the world on an old satellite dish. He said he still has them and refers to them frequently. “They were games from England, Germany, South America,” he said. “As I watched them, I saw how great players tried to score goals, and I’ll try to bring that to our high school players. I think we can show them aspects of the game they haven’t seen before.” Merrick played three games for England’s Under-17 national team in 1968, then played on two professional clubs before joining the Kicks. Merrick played for the Kicks from 1976 to 1979, and again for 12 games in 1981. The team was runner-up in the North American Soccer League in 1976. During the Kicks’ heyday in the late 1970s, the team drew large crowds to Metropolitan Stadium for home games. The league also gained a high profile as top players came to the

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��������� ��� ������� ��������� �� ���� ��������� ������ ������� ��� ��� �������� ��� ��� �� ��������� �� ��� ������� ����� ������� ��� ���� �������� ��������� ������ ��� ������ ��� �� ������� �� � ��������� ������ ���� ��� �� ������ ���� ���� ���������� ���� ����� ����� �� �������� �������� ��� ��� ������ ���������� ��� �������� ����� �� ��� �������� ������ ����� �� ��� ��������� ��� ���� ��� ��� ������ �� ��� ������� ����� �� ��� ������� ��������� ��� ��� ���� �� ���� ����������� ����� ��� �� �������� ������ ����� �� ��� �������� �� ��� ��������� ��������� ������� �� ��� ��� ���� ��������� �������� �������� ��� ��� ���� �� �������� �� ��� ������ ������ ��� ��� ���� �� ���������� �� ��������� ������ �������� ���� ������� ����������� �������� ������������������

United States to play in the summer (the NASL season coincided with the off-season for many of the world’s best leagues). Merrick wanted to see what it was like. He moved into an Eagan apartment building that housed a number of Kicks players. Before long, he decided he wanted to stay. “I was coming over for three months and had no intention of staying in the U.S.,” he said. “I came over with two children, ages 3 and 1. It was going to be a vacation for my family and a working holiday for me. “After six weeks, I called my agent and told him I was going to stay in America. I called my real estate agent and told him to sell my house.” He’s spread his soccer knowledge in Minnesota ever since. Mike Shaughnessy is at mike. shaughnessy@ecm-inc.com or facebook.com/sunthisweek.

Sun Thisweek April 20, 2012

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April 20, 2012 Sun Thisweek

Legal Notices ________________________________________________________________________________

PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING ON PROPOSED ASSESSMENT ROLLS IN THE CITY OF APPLE VALLEY, DAKOTA COUNTY, MINNESOTA  NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the City Council of the City of Apple Valley will meet at the Municipal Center, 7100 147th Street W., on the 10th of May, 2012, at 7:00 o’clock p.m., or as soon thereafter as possible, to hear and pass upon all objections, if any, to the proposed assessments for delinquent utility account charges as hereinafter described.   The proposed assessment roll is on file with the Clerk and open to public inspection by all persons interested therein. The assessments against each piece of property will be payable, unless prepaid, in one installment as hereinafter described. The installment is to be payable with the general taxes collectible during the year 2013. Interest shall be added at the per annum rate specified on the entire assessment from the date of the resolution levying the assessment until December 31, 2013.   The assessment may be prepaid to the Apple Valley City Clerk, without interest within thirty (30) days following the date of adoption. Roll 610 – One (1) Installment at 8.0% 01 02400 020 90 UNPLATTED 01 10330 010 30 ACADEMY PLACE 01 10330 010 70 ACADEMY PLACE 01 10350 020 80 ACADEMY VILLAGE 01 10350 021 10 ACADEMY VILLAGE 01 10350 021 30 ACADEMY VILLAGE 01 10350 021 30 ACADEMY VILLAGE 01 10350 021 30 ACADEMY VILLAGE 01 10350 021 70 ACADEMY VILLAGE 01 10350 021 70 ACADEMY VILLAGE 01 10350 031 20 ACADEMY VILLAGE 01 10350 031 40 ACADEMY VILLAGE 01 10350 200 03 ACADEMY VILLAGE 01 10350 350 01 ACADEMY VILLAGE 01 10350 350 02 ACADEMY VILLAGE 01 10350 400 01 ACADEMY VILLAGE 01 10350 400 02 ACADEMY VILLAGE 01 10350 400 03 ACADEMY VILLAGE 01 10350 400 04 ACADEMY VILLAGE 01 10350 400 05 ACADEMY VILLAGE 01 10350 400 06 ACADEMY VILLAGE 01 10350 400 07 ACADEMY VILLAGE 01 10350 804 44 ACADEMY VILLAGE 01 10352 010 20 ACADEMY VILLAGE 3RD 01 11650 010 20 APPLE PONDS 01 11650 011 20 APPLE PONDS 01 11650 030 60 APPLE PONDS 01 11650 032 10 APPLE PONDS 01 11651 010 10 APPLE PONDS 2ND 01 11651 040 40 APPLE PONDS 2ND 01 11652 010 50 APPLE PONDS 3RD 01 11652 021 00 APPLE PONDS 3RD 01 11652 030 10 APPLE PONDS 3RD 01 11653 020 20 APPLE PONDS 4TH 01 11653 023 20 APPLE PONDS 4TH 01 11700 010 40 APPLE VALLEY 01 11700 011 50 APPLE VALLEY 01 11700 020 90 APPLE VALLEY 01 11700 022 90 APPLE VALLEY 01 11700 023 00 APPLE VALLEY 01 11700 040 60 APPLE VALLEY 01 11701 010 10 APPLE VALLEY 2ND 01 11701 031 90 APPLE VALLEY 2ND 01 11701 032 40 APPLE VALLEY 2ND 01 11701 032 50 APPLE VALLEY 2ND 01 11701 032 70 APPLE VALLEY 2ND 01 11701 042 00 APPLE VALLEY 2ND 01 11701 042 20 APPLE VALLEY 2ND 01 11701 042 70 APPLE VALLEY 2ND 01 11702 030 20 APPLE VALLEY 3RD 01 11702 062 10 APPLE VALLEY 3RD 01 11702 073 20 APPLE VALLEY 3RD 01 11702 080 80 APPLE VALLEY 3RD 01 11702 081 70 APPLE VALLEY 3RD 01 11702 090 80 APPLE VALLEY 3RD 01 11702 100 50 APPLE VALLEY 3RD 01 11702 111 10 APPLE VALLEY 3RD 01 11702 111 40 APPLE VALLEY 3RD 01 11702 120 80 APPLE VALLEY 3RD 01 11702 121 20 APPLE VALLEY 3RD 01 11703 010 60 APPLE VALLEY 4TH 01 11703 021 40 APPLE VALLEY 4TH 01 11703 030 70 APPLE VALLEY 4TH 01 11703 040 30 APPLE VALLEY 4TH 01 11703 041 30 APPLE VALLEY 4TH 01 11703 060 90 APPLE VALLEY 4TH 01 11703 070 90 APPLE VALLEY 4TH 01 11703 071 00 APPLE VALLEY 4TH 01 11703 071 10 APPLE VALLEY 4TH 01 11703 101 70 APPLE VALLEY 4TH 01 11705 021 00 APPLE VALLEY 6TH 01 11705 050 70 APPLE VALLEY 6TH 01 11705 051 10 APPLE VALLEY 6TH 01 11705 060 50 APPLE VALLEY 6TH 01 11705 060 70 APPLE VALLEY 6TH 01 11706 010 30 APPLE VALLEY 7TH 01 11706 011 10 APPLE VALLEY 7TH 01 11706 040 10 APPLE VALLEY 7TH 01 11706 052 50 APPLE VALLEY 7TH 01 11706 070 70 APPLE VALLEY 7TH 01 11706 081 10 APPLE VALLEY 7TH 01 11707 020 10 APPLE VALLEY 8TH 01 11707 060 90 APPLE VALLEY 8TH 01 11707 070 10 APPLE VALLEY 8TH 01 11707 100 30 APPLE VALLEY 8TH 01 11707 150 70 APPLE VALLEY 8TH 01 11708 020 70 APPLE VALLEY 8TH 01 11709 010 20 APPLE VALLEY 10TH 01 11709 010 40 APPLE VALLEY 10TH 01 11709 011 70 APPLE VALLEY 10TH 01 11709 031 40 APPLE VALLEY 10TH 01 11709 040 80 APPLE VALLEY 10TH 01 11709 050 80 APPLE VALLEY 10TH 01 11710 010 80 APPLE VALLEY 11TH 01 11710 011 00 APPLE VALLEY 11TH 01 11710 011 90 APPLE VALLEY 11TH 01 11710 013 50 APPLE VALLEY 11TH 01 11710 020 70 APPLE VALLEY 11TH 01 11710 031 90 APPLE VALLEY 11TH 01 11711 031 20 APPLE VALLEY 12TH 01 11711 051 20 APPLE VALLEY 12TH 01 11711 072 10 APPLE VALLEY 12TH 01 11711 073 50 APPLE VALLEY 12TH 01 11711 080 72 APPLE VALLEY 12TH 01 11712 020 10 APPLE VALLEY 13TH 01 11712 020 30 APPLE VALLEY 13TH 01 11750 010 70 APPLE VALLEY EAST 01 11750 021 50 APPLE VALLEY EAST 01 11750 041 10 APPLE VALLEY EAST 01 11751 040 30 APPLE VALLEY EAST 2ND 01 11751 050 60 APPLE VALLEY EAST 2ND 01 11752 010 70 APPLE VALLEY EAST 3RD 01 11752 020 20 APPLE VALLEY EAST 3RD 01 11754 010 50 APPLE VALLEY EAST 5TH 01 11755 010 80 APPLE VALLEY EAST 6TH 01 11755 011 10 APPLE VALLEY EAST 6TH 01 11755 011 50 APPLE VALLEY EAST 6TH 01 11755 012 00 APPLE VALLEY EAST 6TH 01 11763 010 30 AV INDUS PARK 2ND ADDN REPLAT 01 11781 010 10 APPLE VALLEY SQUARE 2ND 01 11782 010 10 APPLE VALLEY SQUARE 3RD 01 11901 010 20 AVSUR ACRES 2ND 01 14700 010 80 BOB’S GARDEN VIEW 01 14700 011 30 BOB’S GARDEN VIEW 01 14700 011 90 BOB’S GARDEN VIEW 01 14700 021 20 BOB’S GARDEN VIEW 01 14701 030 10 BOB’S GARDEN VIEW 01 14702 030 50 BOB’S GARDEN VIEW 3RD 01 14702 031 50 BOB’S GARDEN VIEW 3RD 01 14702 031 60 BOB’S GARDEN VIEW 3RD 01 14703 020 50 BOB’S GARDEN VIEW 4TH 01 14703 030 50 BOB’S GARDEN VIEW 4TH 01 15200 030 10 BRIAR OAKS OF AV 01 15201 010 70 BRIAR OAKS OF AV 2ND 01 15201 032 20 BRIAR OAKS OF AV 2ND 01 15201 050 30 BRIAR OAKS OF AV 2ND 01 16301 010 70 BRIAR OAKS OF AV 2ND 01 16301 011 20 CARROLLTON ESTATES 2ND 01 16301 031 30 CARROLLTON ESTATES 2ND 01 16303 010 80 CARROLLTON ESTATES 4TH 01 16303 010 90 CARROLLTON ESTATES 4TH 01 16303 021 00 CARROLLTON ESTATES 4TH 01 16304 020 30 CARROLLTON ESTATES 5TH 01 16304 020 80 CARROLLTON ESTATES 5TH 01 16400 020 10 CARROLLWOOD VILLAGE 1ST 01 16401 020 40 CARROLLWOOD VILLAGE 2ND 01 16401 020 70 CARROLLWOOD VILLAGE 2ND 01 16402 010 81 CARROLLWOOD VILLAGE 3RD 01 16404 012 50 CARROLLWOOD VILLAGE 5TH 01 16404 012 80 CARROLLWOOD VILLAGE 5TH 01 16407 010 10 CARROLLWOOD VILLAGE 8TH 01 16500 010 50 CEDAR ISLE COUNTRYHOMES 01 16580 080 80 CEDAR ISLE ESTATES 01 16581 020 90 CEDAR ISLE ESTATES 2ND 01 16581 021 30 CEDAR ISLE ESTATES 2ND 01 16581 022 20 CEDAR ISLE ESTATES 2ND 01 16583 020 90 CEDAR ISLE ESTATES 4TH 01 16585 031 40 CEDAR ISLE ESTATES 6TH 01 16590 030 80 CEDAR ISLE VILLAGE HOMES 01 16591 011 10 CEDAR ISLE VILLAGE HOMES 2ND 01 17150 010 20 CHERRY OAK ESTATES 01 17150 011 20 CHERRY OAK ESTATES 01 17152 010 20 CHERRY OAK ESTATES 3RD 01 18050 020 20 COBBLESTONE LAKE 01 18050 070 30 COBBLESTONE LAKE 01 18053 030 10 COBBLESTONE LAKE 4TH 01 18060 100 10 COBBLESTONE LAKE SOUTH SHORE 01 18062 040 10 COBBLESTONE LAKE SOUTH SHORE 3RD 01 18062 060 70 COBBLESTONE LAKE SOUTH SHORE 3RD 01 18062 070 90 COBBLESTONE LAKE SOUTH SHORE 3RD 01 18075 010 20 COBBLESTONE MANOR 01 18075 021 10 COBBLESTONE MANOR 01 18077 010 20 COBBLESTONE MANOR 3RD 01 18151 010 10 COBBLESTONES I REPLAT 01 19900 020 50 DELANEY PARK 1ST 01 19900 021 00 DELANEY PARK 1ST 01 19902 010 40 DELANEY PARK 3RD 01 19902 010 50 DELANEY PARK 3RD

$ 923.09 $ 226.22 $ 223.88 $ 125.92 $ 142.95 $ 247.62 $ 139.65 $ 225.69 $ 540.82 $ 220.02 $ 229.00 $ 217.38 $ 200.49 $ 217.05 $ 122.53 $ 162.13 $ 342.43 $ 290.78 $ 246.70 $ 373.87 $ 190.30 $ 266.46 $ 179.15 $ 315.54 $ 407.77 $ 140.74 $ 241.96 $ 149.68 $ 309.89 $ 217.50 $ 96.58 $ 276.34 $ 291.18 $ 288.76 $ 428.43 $ 175.95 $ 178.77 $ 281.98 $ 310.04 $ 700.86 $ 232.59 $ 276.69 $ 904.87 $ 319.19 $ 140.74 $ 265.55 $ 253.46 $ 196.26 $ 499.63 $ 232.40 $ 218.43 $ 256.87 $ 138.52 $ 201.58 $ 272.04 $ 279.35 $ 255.66 $ 168.89 $ 263.14 $ 296.22 $ 130.20 $ 266.91 $ 352.48 $ 75.95 $ 289.66 $ 283.93 $ 174.13 $ 202.52 $ 290.65 $ 345.17 $ 267.87 $ 348.51 $ 200.47 $ 317.79 $ 77.75 $ 347.79 $ 245.77 $ 385.29 $ 271.65 $ 331.64 $ 338.43 $ 278.83 $ 359.11 $ 260.47 $ 280.87 $ 257.05 $ 291.83 $ 263.66 $ 165.48 $ 201.73 $ 357.49 $ 274.70 $ 369.87 $ 68.49 $ 312.23 $ 255.94 $ 476.98 $ 203.43 $ 307.68 $ 257.34 $ 131.81 $ 412.62 $ 243.42 $ 350.49 $ 291.45 $ 431.69 $ 265.43 $ 112.72 $ 355.69 $ 277.67 $ 262.51 $ 144.33 $ 416.24 $ 337.06 $ 260.78 $ 278.71 $ 393.75 $ 159.96 $ 474.31 $ 75.97 $2,719.79 $ 325.54 $ 281.24 $ 239.66 $ 115.32 $ 435.62 $ 241.18 $ 218.18 $ 350.82 $ 286.66 $ 191.04 $ 382.32 $ 388.16 $1,247.30 $ 416.04 $ 480.37 $ 287.83 $ 327.61 $ 189.30 $ 278.75 $ 369.15 $ 326.05 $ 66.29 $ 150.83 $ 287.89 $ 936.77 $ 113.28 $ 304.61 $ 247.99 $ 338.66 $ 181.14 $ 119.02 $ 230.77 $ 278.75 $ 545.48 $ 254.65 $ 180.21 $ 535.40 $ 150.00 $ 553.97 $ 463.02 $ 488.68 $ 571.17 $ 362.93 $ 373.26 $ 178.24 $ 147.99 $ 349.69 $ 710.89 $ 356.68 $ 152.03 $ 109.75 $ 401.35 $ 122.85 $ 599.00 $ 160.99 $ 314.82 $ 953.55

01 20500 010 50 DIAMOND PATH 01 20500 020 70 DIAMOND PATH 01 20500 022 50 DIAMOND PATH 01 20500 031 80 DIAMOND PATH 01 20500 032 80 DIAMOND PATH 01 20500 033 20 DIAMOND PATH 01 20500 041 10 DIAMOND PATH 01 20502 012 10 DIAMOND PATH 3RD 01 20502 021 70 DIAMOND PATH 3RD 01 20502 070 40 DIAMOND PATH 3RD 01 20503 010 40 DIAMOND PATH 4TH 01 20503 011 40 DIAMOND PATH 4TH 01 20503 020 80 DIAMOND PATH 4TH 01 20503 021 20 DIAMOND PATH 4TH 01 20503 022 10 DIAMOND PATH 4TH 01 20503 022 30 DIAMOND PATH 4TH 01 20504 012 70 DIAMOND PATH 5TH 01 20504 021 50 DIAMOND PATH 5TH 01 20504 022 50 DIAMOND PATH 5TH 01 20505 010 21 DIAMOND PATH 6TH 01 20505 010 25 DIAMOND PATH 6TH 01 20505 010 68 DIAMOND PATH 6TH 01 20505 010 68 DIAMOND PATH 6TH 01 20505 010 69 DIAMOND PATH 6TH 01 20505 010 85 DIAMOND PATH 6TH 01 20505 010 88 DIAMOND PATH 6TH 01 20505 011 11 DIAMOND PATH 6TH 01 20505 011 12 DIAMOND PATH 6TH 01 20505 011 26 DIAMOND PATH 6TH 01 20505 011 32 DIAMOND PATH 6TH 01 20505 011 45 DIAMOND PATH 6TH 01 20506 012 30 DIAMOND PATH 7TH 01 20506 012 50 DIAMOND PATH 7TH 01 20506 020 40 DIAMOND PATH 7TH 01 20508 011 60 DIAMOND PATH 9TH 01 20508 020 20 DIAMOND PATH 9TH 01 20509 010 20 DIAMOND PATH 10TH 01 20540 010 60 DIAMOND PATH TOWNHOMES 01 20575 020 40 DIAMOND VALLEY ESTATES 01 22425 020 70 EAGLE POND 1ST 01 23200 010 20 EASTWOOD RIDGE 01 23201 010 20 EASTWOOD RIDGE 2ND 01 23201 011 00 EASTWOOD RIDGE 2ND 01 23700 010 90 EMERALD POINT 01 23700 014 10 EMERALD POINT 01 23702 010 60 EMERALD POINT 3RD 01 23702 010 90 EMERALD POINT 3RD 01 23702 012 40 EMERALD POINT 3RD 01 25650 030 70 FARQUAR HILLS 01 25650 050 20 FARQUAR HILLS 01 27503 010 10 FOREST PARK ESTATES 4TH 01 27550 010 90 FOREST POINT 01 28875 060 20 GARDEN OAKS TERRACE TWNHMS 01 28950 012 60 GARDENVIEW PLACE 01 28951 010 90 GARDENVIEW PLACE 2ND 01 31000 051 10 GREENLEAF 01 31000 051 50 GREENLEAF 01 31000 060 50 GREENLEAF 01 31000 070 50 GREENLEAF 01 31000 071 80 GREENLEAF 01 31001 030 10 GREENLEAF 2ND 01 31001 061 00 GREENLEAF 2ND 01 31001 061 20 GREENLEAF 2ND 01 31001 061 80 GREENLEAF 2ND 01 31001 070 80 GREENLEAF 2ND 01 31001 071 00 GREENLEAF 2ND 01 31001 080 10 GREENLEAF 2ND 01 31001 090 40 GREENLEAF 2ND 01 31001 101 30 GREENLEAF 2ND 01 31003 010 20 GREENLEAF 4TH 01 31003 010 50 GREENLEAF 4TH 01 31003 060 20 GREENLEAF 4TH 01 31003 082 20 GREENLEAF 4TH 01 31003 111 10 GREENLEAF 4TH 01 31003 150 80 GREENLEAF 4TH 01 31004 010 10 GREENLEAF 5TH 01 31004 011 20 GREENLEAF 5TH 01 31004 030 20 GREENLEAF 5TH 01 31004 041 50 GREENLEAF 5TH 01 31004 042 10 GREENLEAF 5TH 01 31004 050 80 GREENLEAF 5TH 01 31004 051 80 GREENLEAF 5TH 01 31004 053 40 GREENLEAF 5TH 01 31004 053 70 GREENLEAF 5TH 01 31005 070 10 GREENLEAF 6TH 01 31005 110 30 GREENLEAF 6TH 01 31006 060 80 GREENLEAF 7TH 01 31006 061 30 GREENLEAF 7TH 01 31006 070 30 GREENLEAF 7TH 01 31007 020 50 GREENLEAF 8TH 01 31007 051 40 GREENLEAF 8TH 01 31008 011 00 GREENLEAF 9TH 01 31008 081 10 GREENLEAF 9TH 01 31008 100 60 GREENLEAF 9TH 01 31010 013 20 GREENLEAF 9TH 01 31010 013 40 GREENLEAF 9TH 01 31010 020 60 GREENLEAF 9TH 01 31010 031 80 GREENLEAF 9TH 01 31010 032 00 GREENLEAF 9TH 01 31010 050 50 GREENLEAF 9TH 01 31011 030 50 GREENLEAF 12TH 01 31011 030 60 GREENLEAF 12TH 01 31011 050 30 GREENLEAF 12TH 01 31011 053 40 GREENLEAF 12TH 01 31012 010 10 GREENLEAF 13TH 01 31100 030 50 GREENLEAF TOWNHOUSES 01 31100 040 10 GREENLEAF TOWNHOUSES 01 31100 040 20 GREENLEAF TOWNHOUSES 01 31100 040 50 GREENLEAF TOWNHOUSES 01 31100 050 40 GREENLEAF TOWNHOUSES 01 31101 010 60 GREENLEAF TOWNHOUSES 2ND 01 31101 010 60 GREENLEAF TOWNHOUSES 2ND 01 31101 020 70 GREENLEAF TOWNHOUSES 2ND 01 31101 030 20 GREENLEAF TOWNHOUSES 2ND 01 31101 050 10 GREENLEAF TOWNHOUSES 2ND 01 31101 050 40 GREENLEAF TOWNHOUSES 2ND 01 31102 010 40 GREENLEAF TOWNHOUSES 3RD 01 31102 030 20 GREENLEAF TOWNHOUSES 3RD 01 31102 030 40 GREENLEAF TOWNHOUSES 3RD 01 31102 090 10 GREENLEAF TOWNHOUSES 3RD 01 31102 090 20 GREENLEAF TOWNHOUSES 3RD 01 31105 030 50 GREENLEAF TOWNHOUSES 6TH 01 31105 040 30 GREENLEAF TOWNHOUSES 6TH 01 31105 050 10 GREENLEAF TOWNHOUSES 6TH 01 31105 070 20 GREENLEAF TOWNHOUSES 6TH 01 31105 070 60 GREENLEAF TOWNHOUSES 6TH 01 31800 021 40 HALLWOOD HIGHLANDS 01 32150 010 24 HAWTHORNE 01 32150 010 39 HAWTHORNE 01 32150 010 42 HAWTHORNE 01 32150 010 45 HAWTHORNE 01 32150 010 50 HAWTHORNE 01 32150 010 72 HAWTHORNE 01 32150 011 04 HAWTHORNE 01 32150 011 66 HAWTHORNE 01 32151 010 10 HAWTHORNE 2ND 01 32151 010 57 HAWTHORNE 2ND 01 32151 010 69 HAWTHORNE 2ND 01 32151 010 82 HAWTHORNE 2ND 01 32151 010 89 HAWTHORNE 2ND 01 32151 010 97 HAWTHORNE 2ND 01 32200 010 60 HAZELWOOD ESTATES 01 32404 010 20 HERITAGE HILLS 5TH 01 32405 010 30 HERITAGE HILLS 6TH 01 32800 020 60 HIDDEN PONDS 01 32801 010 70 HIDDEN PONDS 2ND 01 32801 010 80 HIDDEN PONDS 2ND 01 33902 010 20 HUNTERS WOOD 3RD 01 33903 010 30 HUNTERS WOOD 4TH 01 34000 010 60 HUNTERS WOOD TWNHMS 01 34001 010 10 HUNTERS WOOD TWNHMS 2ND 01 34150 011 00 HUNTINGTON 01 34150 011 20 HUNTINGTON 01 34153 010 90 HUNTINGTON 4TH 01 34154 011 30 HUNTINGTON 5TH 01 34154 020 10 HUNTINGTON 5TH 01 34154 050 70 HUNTINGTON 5TH 01 34154 050 90 HUNTINGTON 5TH 01 40950 010 30 K & G 1ST ADDN 01 40950 010 40 K & G 1ST ADDN 01 40950 010 90 K & G 1ST ADDN 01 41700 010 50 KERRY ADDN 01 42500 013 50 KNOB RIDGE 01 44202 041 20 LAC LAVON SHORES 3RD 01 44901 010 10 LEVINE SUBDIVISION 2 01 45800 031 80 LONGRIDGE 01 45800 032 70 LONGRIDGE 01 45800 040 50 LONGRIDGE 01 45800 050 10 LONGRIDGE 01 45800 051 90 LONGRIDGE 01 45801 010 10 LONGRIDGE 2ND 01 45801 020 70 LONGRIDGE 2ND 01 45801 033 60 LONGRIDGE 2ND 01 45801 060 10 LONGRIDGE 2ND 01 45801 061 30 LONGRIDGE 2ND 01 45801 081 30 LONGRIDGE 2ND 01 48200 021 80 MEADOWLARK GLEN 01 48845 090 40 MISTWOOD 01 49100 021 80 MORNINGVIEW 01 49101 050 40 MORNINGVIEW 2ND 01 49101 120 30 MORNINGVIEW 2ND 01 49101 120 40 MORNINGVIEW 2ND 01 49101 130 30 MORNINGVIEW 2ND 01 49101 170 30 MORNINGVIEW 2ND 01 49101 170 40 MORNINGVIEW 2ND 01 49101 180 40 MORNINGVIEW 2ND 01 49101 190 30 MORNINGVIEW 2ND 01 49101 200 30 MORNINGVIEW 2ND 01 49101 210 40 MORNINGVIEW 2ND 01 49101 230 10 MORNINGVIEW 2ND 01 49101 230 40 MORNINGVIEW 2ND 01 49102 070 20 MORNINGVIEW 3RD 01 49102 210 30 MORNINGVIEW 3RD 01 49103 050 10 MORNINGVIEW 4TH 01 49103 080 20 MORNINGVIEW 4TH 01 49103 090 10 MORNINGVIEW 4TH 01 49103 090 20 MORNINGVIEW 4TH 01 49103 090 40 MORNINGVIEW 4TH 01 49103 100 40 MORNINGVIEW 4TH 01 49103 130 20 MORNINGVIEW 4TH

$ 353.15 $ 681.76 $ 369.11 $ 389.15 $ 79.07 $ 880.29 $ 136.34 $ 254.13 $ 284.56 $ 291.61 $ 412.71 $ 407.17 $ 111.49 $ 396.14 $ 390.03 $ 307.05 $ 217.96 $ 290.66 $ 232.48 $ 284.63 $ 245.62 $ 90.47 $ 109.75 $ 233.21 $ 315.25 $ 139.42 $ 243.89 $ 253.21 $ 105.14 $ 209.89 $ 236.37 $ 157.44 $ 181.37 $ 114.79 $ 176.23 $ 212.98 $ 174.86 $ 101.47 $ 640.28 $ 758.90 $ 287.49 $ 450.99 $ 824.00 $ 277.01 $ 860.94 $ 312.99 $ 358.04 $ 520.49 $ 433.66 $ 293.36 $ 443.05 $ 267.49 $ 256.88 $ 186.83 $ 327.21 $ 355.72 $ 345.69 $ 317.73 $ 349.30 $ 300.96 $ 334.86 $ 236.40 $ 419.16 $ 264.89 $ 134.42 $ 179.34 $ 396.19 $ 441.63 $ 445.30 $ 108.31 $ 576.40 $ 360.30 $ 505.25 $ 394.38 $ 253.05 $ 307.14 $ 135.73 $ 436.47 $ 344.53 $ 337.64 $1,096.89 $ 239.15 $ 318.90 $ 359.03 $ 439.16 $ 503.17 $ 644.29 $ 408.47 $ 241.82 $ 398.19 $ 431.55 $ 167.47 $ 408.75 $ 459.88 $ 345.32 $ 198.31 $ 355.46 $ 248.32 $ 323.41 $ 276.66 $ 116.81 $ 450.78 $ 191.07 $ 132.51 $ 321.51 $ 628.75 $ 98.17 $ 302.00 $ 269.11 $ 327.42 $ 65.91 $ 195.87 $ 356.87 $ 242.82 $ 299.32 $ 414.83 $ 95.90 $ 515.57 $ 349.42 $ 212.29 $ 392.60 $ 349.01 $ 173.43 $ 224.23 $ 493.68 $ 355.82 $ 160.70 $ 156.58 $ 191.74 $ 108.02 $ 270.15 $ 177.35 $ 349.56 $ 284.79 $ 255.65 $ 155.17 $ 352.92 $ 198.52 $ 326.70 $ 365.69 $ 352.81 $ 458.84 $ 215.83 $ 311.34 $ 138.95 $ 274.36 $ 237.17 $ 367.01 $ 191.68 $ 297.28 $ 279.85 $ 137.11 $ 355.97 $ 607.03 $ 305.26 $ 228.60 $ 203.67 $ 404.41 $ 261.39 $ 492.28 $ 376.74 $ 195.91 $ 262.82 $ 559.12 $ 101.29 $ 403.00 $ 258.06 $ 285.70 $ 203.64 $ 402.65 $ 101.59 $ 334.53 $ 104.00 $ 245.86 $ 443.33 $ 266.53 $ 271.76 $ 80.00 $ 285.11 $ 271.41 $ 206.69 $ 222.97 $ 356.53 $ 302.12 $ 435.29 $ 278.69 $ 276.98 $ 282.37 $1,134.89 $ 133.20 $ 463.34 $ 284.94 $ 216.31 $ 163.18 $ 155.75 $ 167.13 $ 218.51 $ 222.50 $ 236.43 $ 206.51

01 49103 160 20 MORNINGVIEW 4TH 01 49104 030 30 MORNINGVIEW 5TH 01 49104 030 40 MORNINGVIEW 5TH 01 49106 011 10 MORNINGVIEW 7TH 01 49106 014 70 MORNINGVIEW 7TH 01 49106 015 00 MORNINGVIEW 7TH 01 49106 022 50 MORNINGVIEW 7TH 01 52000 020 10 NORDIC WOODS 01 52000 030 40 NORDIC WOODS 01 52001 010 40 NORDIC WOODS 2ND 01 52001 010 40 NORDIC WOODS 2ND 01 52001 010 90 NORDIC WOODS 2ND 01 52001 011 60 NORDIC WOODS 2ND 01 52004 040 50 NORDIC WOODS 5TH 01 52005 021 10 NORDIC WOODS 6TH 01 52006 010 20 NORDIC WOODS 7TH 01 52014 010 30 NORDIC WOODS 15TH 01 53500 010 20 OAK RIDGE PARK 01 53500 020 10 OAK RIDGE PARK 01 53500 040 10 OAK RIDGE PARK 01 53500 040 20 OAK RIDGE PARK 01 53500 050 10 OAK RIDGE PARK 01 53500 050 70 OAK RIDGE PARK 01 53500 060 80 OAK RIDGE PARK 01 56501 090 20 PALOMINO CLIFFS 2ND 01 56600 010 30 PALOMINO HILLS 01 56600 012 10 PALOMINO HILLS 01 56600 020 41 PALOMINO HILLS 01 56602 021 00 PALOMINO HILLS 3RD 01 56602 030 80 PALOMINO HILLS 3RD 01 56603 011 20 PALOMINO HILLS 4TH 01 56603 011 40 PALOMINO HILLS 4TH 01 56603 012 00 PALOMINO HILLS 4TH 01 56603 012 20 PALOMINO HILLS 4TH 01 56603 030 60 PALOMINO HILLS 4TH 01 56603 031 10 PALOMINO HILLS 4TH 01 56603 031 90 PALOMINO HILLS 4TH 01 56603 032 40 PALOMINO HILLS 4TH 01 56603 032 70 PALOMINO HILLS 4TH 01 56603 061 60 PALOMINO HILLS 4TH 01 56603 070 80 PALOMINO HILLS 4TH 01 56650 010 20 PALOMINO HILLS LAKESHORE 01 56650 050 80 PALOMINO HILLS LAKESHORE 01 56700 010 10 PALOMINO HILLS REPLAT 01 56700 010 70 PALOMINO HILLS REPLAT 01 56722 010 20 PALOMINO LAKESIDE MEADOWS 3RD 01 56722 010 20 PALOMINO LAKESIDE MEADOWS 3RD 01 56722 010 40 PALOMINO LAKESIDE MEADOWS 3RD 01 56722 010 40 PALOMINO LAKESIDE MEADOWS 3RD 01 56775 022 20 PALOMINO WOODS 01 56775 030 40 PALOMINO WOODS 01 56775 031 50 PALOMINO WOODS 01 56775 041 00 PALOMINO WOODS 01 56775 050 70 PALOMINO WOODS 01 56775 051 40 PALOMINO WOODS 01 56775 063 60 PALOMINO WOODS 01 56775 070 50 PALOMINO WOODS 01 56775 082 30 PALOMINO WOODS 01 56775 101 10 PALOMINO WOODS 01 56775 111 20 PALOMINO WOODS 01 56775 111 50 PALOMINO WOODS 01 57050 010 90 PENNOCK SHORES 01 57500 011 00 PILOT KNOB ESTATES 01 57500 012 00 PILOT KNOB ESTATES 01 57503 010 20 PENNOCK SHORES 4TH 01 57503 020 50 PENNOCK SHORES 4TH 01 57504 010 30 PENNOCK SHORES 5TH 01 57506 020 40 PENNOCK SHORES 7TH 01 57506 021 30 PENNOCK SHORES 7TH 01 57506 021 70 PENNOCK SHORES 7TH 01 57506 022 40 PENNOCK SHORES 7TH 01 57507 010 10 PENNOCK SHORES 8TH 01 57507 014 20 PENNOCK SHORES 8TH 01 57508 010 10 PENNOCK SHORES 9TH 01 57508 012 00 PENNOCK SHORES 9TH 01 57651 020 70 PINECREST 2ND 01 57675 010 70 PINECREST TOWNHOMES 01 57675 011 60 PINECREST TOWNHOMES 01 57675 011 60 PINECREST TOWNHOMES 01 57675 013 00 PINECREST TOWNHOMES 01 57675 013 10 PINECREST TOWNHOMES 01 57675 013 20 PINECREST TOWNHOMES 01 62800 010 20 RADCLIFF TOWNHOMES 01 62800 013 00 RADCLIFF TOWNHOMES 01 62800 013 40 RADCLIFF TOWNHOMES 01 63300 020 10 PALOMINO HILLS 6TH 01 63400 032 70 REGATTA 01 63400 033 10 REGATTA 01 63400 033 60 REGATTA 01 63400 160 20 REGATTA 01 63400 201 20 REGATTA 01 63401 010 10 REGATTA 2ND 01 63401 010 30 REGATTA 2ND 01 63401 210 30 REGATTA 2ND 01 63401 280 60 REGATTA 2ND 01 63401 290 30 REGATTA 2ND 01 63401 291 10 REGATTA 2ND 01 63401 292 00 REGATTA 2ND 01 63402 030 30 REGATTA 3RD 01 63402 080 40 REGATTA 3RD 01 63402 180 30 REGATTA 3RD 01 63402 210 20 REGATTA 3RD 01 63402 230 30 REGATTA 3RD 01 63402 330 20 REGATTA 3RD 01 64600 020 60 ROLLING RIDGE 01 66200 010 10 SALEM WOODS 01 66200 010 70 SALEM WOODS 01 66200 011 20 SALEM WOODS 01 66500 030 70 SCOTT HIGHLANDS 01 66500 040 20 SCOTT HIGHLANDS 01 66500 040 70 SCOTT HIGHLANDS 01 66500 041 00 SCOTT HIGHLANDS 01 66500 041 30 SCOTT HIGHLANDS 01 66500 041 60 SCOTT HIGHLANDS 01 66501 010 10 SCOTT HIGHLANDS 2ND 01 66501 020 10 SCOTT HIGHLANDS 2ND 01 66501 022 90 SCOTT HIGHLANDS 2ND 01 66502 060 70 SCOTT HIGHLANDS 3RD 01 66502 060 80 SCOTT HIGHLANDS 3RD 01 66502 120 10 SCOTT HIGHLANDS 3RD 01 66503 021 40 SCOTT HIGHLANDS 4TH 01 66503 030 90 SCOTT HIGHLANDS 4TH 01 66503 031 70 SCOTT HIGHLANDS 4TH 01 66503 031 80 SCOTT HIGHLANDS 4TH 01 66503 041 60 SCOTT HIGHLANDS 4TH 01 66503 060 30 SCOTT HIGHLANDS 4TH 01 66503 061 80 SCOTT HIGHLANDS 4TH 01 66503 070 70 SCOTT HIGHLANDS 4TH 01 66700 020 70 SCOTTSBRIAR 01 66700 041 00 SCOTTSBRIAR 01 66700 051 90 SCOTTSBRIAR 01 66700 052 10 SCOTTSBRIAR 01 66700 052 40 SCOTTSBRIAR 01 66700 052 70 SCOTTSBRIAR 01 66700 060 20 SCOTTSBRIAR 01 66700 061 10 SCOTTSBRIAR 01 66700 080 30 SCOTTSBRIAR 01 66701 010 90 SCOTTSBRIAR 2ND 01 66701 021 30 SCOTTSBRIAR 2ND 01 66701 030 40 SCOTTSBRIAR 2ND 01 66701 031 70 SCOTTSBRIAR 2ND 01 66701 040 90 SCOTTSBRIAR 2ND 01 66900 011 00 SEASONS ON THE PARK 01 67100 010 10 SCOTTSBRIAR 2ND 01 67500 010 80 SHADOW ESTATES 01 73100 010 50 SUMMERFIELD 01 73150 010 10 SUNSET PLACE 01 73200 031 60 SUNSHINES ESTATES 01 73200 050 90 SUNSHINES ESTATES 01 75850 030 70 THE HIGHLANDS 01 75950 010 70 THE OAKS OF APPLE VALLEY 01 75950 020 10 THE OAKS OF APPLE VALLEY 01 75951 040 80 THE OAKS OF APPLE VALLEY II 01 75952 030 30 THE OAKS OF APPLE VALLEY III 01 75952 030 60 THE OAKS OF APPLE VALLEY III 01 75952 031 40 THE OAKS OF APPLE VALLEY III 01 75952 031 50 THE OAKS OF APPLE VALLEY III 01 75952 040 10 THE OAKS OF APPLE VALLEY III 01 75956 010 10 THE OAKS OF APPLE VALLEY IV 01 76150 010 30 THE SUMMIT 01 76200 030 40 THE WOODWINDS 01 76200 030 50 THE WOODWINDS 01 76201 020 60 THE WOODWINDS 2ND 01 76500 010 60 TIMBERWICK 01 76503 010 30 TIMBERWICK 4TH 01 76503 011 10 TIMBERWICK 4TH 01 76508 020 50 TIMBERWICK 9TH 01 76900 012 20 TOUSIGNANTS PRAIRIE CROSSING 01 76900 052 80 TOUSIGNANTS PRAIRIE CROSSING 01 76900 054 00 TOUSIGNANTS PRAIRIE CROSSING 01 76900 054 10 TOUSIGNANTS PRAIRIE CROSSING 01 77000 070 20 TOWNHOUSE 4TH ADDN 01 77000 070 30 TOWNHOUSE 4TH ADDN 01 77000 070 60 TOWNHOUSE 4TH ADDN 01 77000 080 60 TOWNHOUSE 4TH ADDN 01 77000 090 30 TOWNHOUSE 4TH ADDN 01 77000 090 50 TOWNHOUSE 4TH ADDN 01 77000 110 50 TOWNHOUSE 4TH ADDN 01 81200 030 10 VALLEY COMMERCIAL PARK 1ST 01 81320 011 80 VALLEY OAKS TOWNHOMES 01 81320 021 00 VALLEY OAKS TOWNHOMES 01 81400 010 50 VALLEY SOUTH 01 81400 021 20 VALLEY SOUTH 01 81454 010 70 VALLEY WAY VILLAGE 5TH 01 81454 010 80 VALLEY WAY VILLAGE 5TH 01 81454 013 00 VALLEY WAY VILLAGE 5TH 01 81454 013 20 VALLEY WAY VILLAGE 5TH 01 81456 010 40 VALLEY WAY VILLAGE 7TH 01 81456 012 30 VALLEY WAY VILLAGE 7TH 01 81457 011 60 VALLEY WAY VILLAGE 8TH 01 83251 010 60 WATERFORD VILLAGE 2ND 01 83276 010 20 WATERFORD VILLAGE TWNHMS 2ND 01 84190 010 10 WILDWOOD 01 84190 020 10 WILDWOOD 01 84190 020 70 WILDWOOD 01 84190 040 60 WILDWOOD 01 84191 010 30 WILDWOOD 2ND 01 84191 040 20 WILDWOOD 2ND 01 84192 030 10 WILDWOOD 3RD 01 84193 030 10 WILDWOOD 4TH

$ 353.32 $ 354.26 $ 146.80 $ 142.95 $ 260.79 $ 209.45 $ 268.06 $ 268.32 $ 71.01 $ 390.80 $ 368.33 $ 453.20 $ 459.37 $ 284.93 $ 123.69 $ 231.35 $ 239.19 $ 273.83 $ 183.53 $ 163.75 $ 423.84 $ 259.20 $ 497.18 $ 312.74 $ 296.47 $ 221.02 $ 224.27 $ 318.41 $ 289.08 $ 232.82 $ 331.31 $ 263.38 $ 362.84 $ 366.30 $ 367.82 $ 364.01 $ 401.05 $ 284.00 $ 317.62 $ 799.70 $ 122.11 $ 152.82 $ 251.87 $ 228.63 $ 264.85 $ 291.17 $ 266.28 $ 424.87 $ 294.39 $ 116.19 $ 123.27 $ 341.88 $ 436.76 $ 426.34 $ 202.38 $ 158.92 $ 200.66 $ 357.70 $ 285.26 $ 291.93 $ 278.10 $ 278.10 $ 353.61 $ 288.71 $ 464.74 $ 667.05 $ 320.62 $ 158.26 $ 180.57 $ 158.63 $ 113.02 $ 262.36 $ 159.58 $ 253.81 $ 142.03 $ 170.50 $ 127.67 $ 226.19 $ 202.58 $ 302.11 $ 166.88 $ 296.43 $ 294.45 $ 62.93 $ 115.35 $ 120.99 $ 233.85 $ 172.02 $ 362.72 $ 127.76 $ 941.35 $1,039.08 $1,520.47 $ 221.55 $ 335.88 $ 116.47 $ 123.81 $ 332.37 $ 104.06 $ 240.39 $ 318.43 $ 253.52 $ 260.01 $ 212.61 $ 439.47 $ 234.37 $ 156.84 $ 630.20 $ 444.63 $ 503.50 $ 123.39 $ 245.03 $ 189.71 $ 316.90 $ 177.41 $ 171.61 $ 628.53 $ 276.47 $ 539.11 $ 335.14 $ 158.36 $ 500.84 $ 183.31 $ 281.32 $ 347.33 $ 286.51 $ 132.51 $ 390.62 $ 226.45 $ 184.39 $ 142.18 $ 243.65 $ 318.12 $ 423.05 $ 334.71 $ 210.67 $ 333.90 $ 443.47 $ 398.22 $ 216.65 $ 338.93 $ 363.64 $ 440.85 $ 490.28 $ 409.30 $ 487.95 $ 353.25 $ 287.08 $ 201.13 $ 458.57 $ 349.94 $ 300.16 $ 334.34 $ 262.89 $ 693.56 $ 519.81 $ 316.06 $ 172.08 $ 296.90 $ 133.44 $ 321.20 $ 217.21 $ 145.99 $ 412.01 $ 300.75 $ 121.02 $ 669.77 $ 305.04 $ 151.56 $ 366.27 $ 255.60 $ 163.80 $ 209.93 $ 202.23 $ 232.26 $ 178.77 $ 66.62 $ 207.17 $ 505.42 $ 280.91 $ 225.89 $ 344.41 $ 411.24 $ 80.27 $ 285.52 $ 101.65 $ 303.07 $ 116.19 $ 474.56 $ 260.60 $ 288.21 $ 209.97 $ 260.39 $ 205.96 $ 159.95 $ 200.75 $ 285.89 $ 148.94 $ 186.90 $ 235.13


Sun Thisweek April 20, 2012

����� ������� 01 84193 030 20 WILDWOOD 4TH 01 84194 010 10 WILDWOOD 5TH 01 84194 020 10 WILDWOOD 5TH 01 84195 020 10 WILDWOOD 6TH 01 84351 021 30 WILLIAMSBURG 2ND 01 85283 010 60 WYNDEMERE 4TH TOTAL ASSESSMENT

$ 215.20 $ 136.42 $ 220.23 $ 101.12 $ 193.38 $ 194.50 $177,614.46

 Written or oral objections will be considered. No appeal may be taken as to the amount of any assessment unless written objection, signed by the affected property owner, is filed with the City Clerk prior to the hearing or presented to the presiding officer at the hearing. An owner may appeal an assessment to the district court pursuant to M.S.A. 429.081 by serving notice of the appeal upon the Mayor or Clerk of the City of Apple Valley within thirty (30) days after the adoption of the assessment and filing such notice with the District Court of Dakota County within ten (10) days after service upon the Mayor or Clerk.

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  DATED this 12th day of April, 2012.

17A

/s/ Pamela J. Gackstetter Pamela J. Gackstetter, City Clerk City of Apple Valley 7100 147th Street W. Apple Valley, MN 55124

2980051

PUBLIC NOTICE

CITY OF APPLE VALLEY ORDINANCE NO. 930 AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF APPLE VALLEY, MINNESOTA, AMENDING TITLE XV: LAND USAGE, CHAPTER 152 OF THE CITY CODE ENTITLED NATURAL RESOURCES MANAGEMENT BY AMENDING SECTION 152.45(B) REGULATING SHADE TREE DISEASE AND PEST CONTROL The City Council of Apple Valley ordains: Section 1. Section 152 of the Apple Valley City Code is hereby amended by changing Section 152.45(B) to read as follows: (B) Insect and disease control program. It is the intention of the Council to establish a program of plant pest and disease control pursuant to the authority granted by M.S. § 18G.13, as amended. The program is directed specifically at the control and elimination of the emerald ash borer, Dutch elm disease fungus, elm bark beetles and oak wilt fungus, and is undertaken at the recommendation of and guidelines from the Minnesota Department of Agriculture, the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources and the University of Minnesota Extension. Section 2. Effective date. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage and publication. PASSED by the City Council this 12th day of April, 2012. /s/ Mary Hamman-Roland Mary Hamann-Roland, Mayor ATTEST: /s/ Pamela J. Gackstetter Pamela J. Gackstetter, City Clerk 2979880 4/20/12

4/20/12

PUBLIC NOTICE

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING PROPOSED AMENDMENTS TO THE APPLE VALLEY BUSINESS SUBSIDY POLICY IN THE CITY OF APPLE VALLEY, DAKOTA COUNTY, MINNESOTA NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Apple Valley Economic Development Authority will meet at the Municipal Center, 7100 147th Street W., on Thursday, April 26, 2012, at 6:00 p.m., or as soon thereafter as possible. The purpose of the meeting is to hold a public hearing on proposed amendments to the Business Subsidy Policy pursuant to Minnesota Statutes 116J.993 to 116J.995. The proposed amendments clarify the purpose of the policy, eligible uses for the receipt of business assistance, project approval criteria, project evaluation criteria, assistance agreement criteria. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that these proceedings are instituted by action of the A p p l e V al l e y E c o n o m i c D e v e l o p m e n t Authority. All interested parties will be given an opportunity to be heard at said time and place. DATED this 16th day of April, 2012. /s/ Pamela J. Gackstetter Pamela J. Gackstetter, Secretary Economic Development Authority 2979926 4/20/12

PUBLIC NOTICE INDEPENDENT SCHOOL DISTRICT 196 Rosemount-Apple Valley-Eagan Public Schools Educating our students to reach their full potential ROSEMOUNT MIDDLE SCHOOL UNDERGROUND PIPING REPLACEMENT Notice is hereby given that sealed bids will be received for the Rosemount Middle School Underground Piping Replacement by Independent School District 196, at the Facilities and Grounds Office located at 14445 Diamond Path West, Rosemount, MN 55068, until 10:00 a.m., May 4, 2012, at which time and place bids will be publicly opened and read aloud. This project includes: Replace existing underground heating piping. Complete instructions on how to obtain Bidding Documents can be found at: http://www.district196.org/District/LegalNotices/ index.cfm. If you should have any questions regarding this bid you may contact the Facilities Department at (651) 423-7706. Joel Albright, Board Clerk Independent School District 196 2979902 4/20-4/27/12

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April 20, 2012 Sun Thisweek


Sun Thisweek April 20, 2012

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April 20, 2012 Sun Thisweek


Sun Thisweek April 20, 2012

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Traffic stop District 196 students win all but one spot at state speech qualifier turns up Students representing April 10 at East Ridge 21, at Chanhassen High the Rosemount-Apple High School. School. drugs Valley-Eagan School Dis- These students will be Eastview High School

Keep up the good work Photo by Rick Orndorf

Seven District 196 employees were recognized with Outstanding Service awards at this year’s Partners in Education banquet held April 12 at Eagan High School. They are, back row from left: Scott Gjesdahl, purchasing and receiving supervisor;  Elaine Barthelemy, Gifted and Talented/Young Scholars teacher, Oak Ridge Elementary;  Dick Rischmiller, building chief, Echo Park Elementary;  Candace Ruckdashel, Gifted and Talented/ Young Scholars teacher, Highland Elementary; front row from left: Linda Brown, secretary to the assistant principal, Eagan High School;  Sally Soliday, principal, Echo Park Elementary; and  Deb Runkle, student systems support specialist, District Office. Seventy-nine district employees who have retired within the last year or will retire at the end of this school year were also recognized at the banquet.

Apple Valley woman charged with identity theft An Apple Valley woman who was employed as a temp at a financial marketing company is accused of stealing a client’s credit card information to make a payment on her car loan. Rhonda M. Mitchell, 39, has been charged in Dakota County District Court with identity theft and credit card fraud, both felonies. According to the criminal complaint, Mitchell worked in December 2011 as a collections representative at a financial marketing company in Eagan, and on Dec. 21 took a credit card payment over the phone from a man living outside Minnesota during which she was given his credit card number, expiration date and security code. On Jan. 6, the man’s credit card was used to make a $905.50 car loan payment through Security Auto Loan in New Hope, Minn.

Security Auto Loan confirmed with police the car loan payment was made by Mitchell. Under questioning, Mitchell admitted she was a couple of months behind in her car loan payments, but denied using the victim’s credit card information, claiming instead that the $905.50 payment was made by a friend, the complaint said. Mitchell was unable to provide investigators with a last name or address for the friend, according to the complaint, and though she persisted in denying that she used the victim’s credit card, she agreed to make restitution. If convicted of both charges, Mitchell faces a maximum penalty of 10 years in prison and $20,000 in fines. —Andrew Miller

Criminal charges have been filed after a traffic stop in Rosemount, which police say turned up cocaine, marijuana and drug paraphernalia. According to the criminal complaint, the Rosemount police officer who pulled over 24-year-old Raymond M. Hessler of Inver Grove Heights on Feb. 23 smelled a strong odor of marijuana coming from the vehicle, and after another officer arrived on the scene the vehicle was searched. Officers found three baggies containing about 40 grams of marijuana behind the center console and under a cup holder, along with a digital scale and a marijuana pipe, the complaint states. Police say crime lab testing revealed a mixture of cocaine and THC, the psychoactive component in marijuana, on the digital scale. Hessler has been charged with a fifth-degree controlled substance crime for the cocaine allegedly found on the scale. If convicted of that felony-level charge, he faces a maximum of 10 years in prison and a $20,000 fine. He’s also been charged with possession of marijuana in a motor vehicle and failure to produce proof of insurance, both misdemeanors, as well as possession of drug paraphernalia, a petty misdemeanor. —Andrew Miller

trict captured 38 of the 39 state tournament qualifying spots at the Section 3AA tournament held

competing for medals at the State Speech Tournament for Class AA schools to be held Saturday, April

was named Section 3AA team champion and Eagan High School placed second.

Rosemount, Empire greenway plans open for comment Rosemount area residents can review and comment on draft master plans for two new greenway corridors – the Rosemount and Vermillion Highlands greenways – at an open house from 6-8 p.m., Wednesday, April 25, at the Rosemount Community Center, 13885 South Robert Trail. This is the final open house in the planning process. The plans address alignment, design character, trailheads and other access points, habitat res-

toration and interpretive themes of the greenways. The Vermillion Highlands greenway will run from Lebanon Hills Regional Park to the Vermillion River and the Rosemount greenway will run from Lebanon Hills Regional Park to Spring Lake Park Reserve and the Mississippi River Regional Trail. The two greenways are part of a planned 200mile countywide greenway network. When complete, they will connect residents to

regional and local destinations such as parks, commercial areas and schools. Dakota County, according to its press release, is leading a national movement to transform simple trails into multifunctional corridors that provide recreation, nonmotorized transportation, habitat value, and water quality improvement. The draft master plans are also available for review and comment at www.hkgi.com/projects/ dakota.

Dakota Electric celebrates 75 years

Dakota Electric Association’s 75-year history was celebrated at the Farmington-based cooperative’s annual meeting April 12 at which four incumbent directors and one new director were elected. The meeting held in St. Michael’s Church social hall saw the re-election of

Jerry Pittman, District 1; Clay Van De Bogart, District 2; Ken Danner, District 3, and Judy Kimmes, District 4, to three-year terms. An open seat in District 1, due to the retirement of longtime board member Carl Potter, was filled by David Jones of Lakeville. As a cooperative

owned by those it serves, Dakota Electric holds director elections and an annual meeting each year. Dakota Electric provides electricity to more than 100,000 members throughout Dakota County and portions of Goodhue, Rice and Scott counties.

National Day of Prayer events The 61st annual National Day of Prayer is scheduled for Thursday, May 3. Events are organized by individuals who plan prayer times according to their faith. A full listing of events can be found at www.nationaldayofprayer.org. • State Capitol event on the steps of the State Capitol, 75 Dr. Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd., St. Paul. Worship led by “Heart of the City” begins at 11:30 a.m. Program with welcome from the governor begins at noon. There will be prayers by leaders

and individuals in small groups. Information: auldrich@ndpminnesota. org. • Lakeville City Hall event, noon to 1 p.m., 20195 Holyoke Ave. Presentation of the colors by the Lakeville VFW. National Day of Prayer proclamation by Mayor Mark Bellows Information: k.l.cooper@charter.net. • Berean Baptist Church Prayer Walk, 6 to 7 p.m., Concert of Prayer, 7 to 8 p.m., 309 E. County Road 42, Burnsville. Information: paule@bereanbaptist.com.

• South of the River Family Friendly Informal NDP, 6:30 to 7:30 p.m., Falcon Ridge Middle School Cafeteria, 12900 Johnny Cake Ridge Road, Apple Valley. Families and small groups will pray seated at tables in the cafeteria. Information: homerin@charter.net. • Community of Joy Evening NDP Concert of Prayer, 7 to 8:15 p.m., 4015 Northview Terrace, Eagan. Information: bkilene@mac.com.

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April 20, 2012 Sun Thisweek

News Briefs Arbor Day tree, shrub sale The city of Apple Valley is sponsoring a tree and shrub sale for residents in recognition of Arbor Day. Trees and shrubs are available on a pre-ordered and pre-paid basis. All trees and shrubs are bare root and will be packaged and ready for pickup on Saturday, April 28, at the Central Maintenance Facility, 6442 140th St. Trees are 6 to 8 feet tall with the following species available: crab apple, Japanese tree lilac, river birch (clump form), hackberry, honeylocust, sugar maple, and swamp white oak. Shrubs are 2 to 3 feet tall with the following available: American hazelnut, black chokeberry, gray dogwood, and nannyberry. Order forms are available at the Apple Valley Municipal Center, the Central Maintenance Facility, and posted on the city website: www.cityofapplevalley.org. Quantities are limited and surplus stock will be sold first-come, first-served on April 28. Call the Natural Resources Division at (952) 953-2460.

Book sale is April 19-21 The second annual Friends of Robert Trail Library book sale will be held April 19-21 at the library. Friday and Saturday, April 20 and 21, the sale will be open 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Hard cover books will sell for $1 each. Paperbacks will be priced at 50 cents each. CDs and DVDs will be $2. VHS tapes will be $1 each. A “bag sale” will be held the last two hours of the sale on Saturday. The cost for a bag of books will be $3.

Arbor Day celebration Rosemount Parks and Recreation will observe the city’s 20th annual Arbor Day Celebration and Tree Giveaway at 10 a.m. Saturday, May 5, in Central Park. The event is cosponsored by Dakota Electric Association. Six- to 8-foot trees will be given away to the first 180 Rosemount residents who have proof of residency. There is a limit of one tree per household. Due to the sensitive nature of bare root trees, they will need to be planted within 24 hours of the giveaway. Remember to call “Gopher State One Call” 72 hours in advance at (651) 454-0002 before digging. Call (651) 322-6000 with questions.

Register for city-wide sale Rosemount Parks and Recreation is once again coordinating the City-Wide Garage Sale. A fee of $10 per Rosemount address is charged to be included on the sale map that will be published county-wide in the SunThisweek newspaper and made available at local businesses. Forms can be found in the Summer Activities Brochure or online at www.ci.rosemount. mn.us/parks. The registration deadline is Friday, April 27.

Parks & rec programs Rosemount Parks and Recreation offers the following programs. To register or for more information, visit www.ci.rosemount.mn.us or call (651) 322-6000. • Pre-School Sports – Summer programs available for T-ball, Soccer and Sports of All Sorts. The cost of each program is $42, which includes a T-shirt and trophy. For a full listing of class offerings and program details, go to www.ci.rosemount. mn.us/parks. • Community Tennis Block Party, 10 a.m. to noon Saturday, May 12, at the Rosemount High School tennis courts. The party is hosted by Rosemount High School Tennis, RAAA InHouse and Traveling Tennis, and Rosemount Parks

and Recreation. Representatives from each organization will be on hand to answer questions regarding their tennis programs and the opportunities available for tennis in Rosemount. Players from RAAA and Rosemount High School will be on hand for drills and fun tennis activities for kids. No experience is necessary. Free. Weather-related information line: (651) 322-6020, No. 6. • Kid N’ Play, ages 2-1/2

house on Law Day, Tuesday, May 1, from noon to 2 p.m. in room L139 of the Western Service Center, 14955 Galaxie Ave., Apple Valley. The open house will include refreshments and drawings to win legal guides written for the general public. Dakota County judges will be available to talk with the public from noon to 1:30 p.m. This year’s Law Day The Dakota County Law theme is “No Courts, No Library will host an open Justice, No Freedom.” For

to 5, 9:30 to noon Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays, April 30 to May 25, at Rosemount Community Center. The curriculum is designed to develop motor skills, balance and social skills. Children must be potty trained to participate. Cost is $79.

Law Day open house

more information, call Liz year’s sale will include heirReppe, Law Library man- loom tomatoes, certified ager, at (651) 438-8244. organic compost and aged horse manure. Also look for sturdy tomato cages. Clay pot “people,” a fun and educational project for children, The Dakota County will be for sale. There also Master Gardener plant sale will be time-tested sun and will be 9 a.m. to noon Satur- shade perennials, fruits, vegday, May 12, at the Univer- etables, herbs, shrubs and sity of Minnesota Outreach, trees grown primarily in the Research and Education gardens of Dakota County Park (UMore), 1605 W. Master Gardeners. 160th St., Rosemount. This

Plant sale set May 12


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