Page 1

EDUCATION TODAY Thisweek Newspapers Advertising Supplement August 5, 2011

     

   ďż˝                                              

    

!""

 ďż˝ 

  ďż˝

ďż˝ 


2B

August 5, 2011 THISWEEK NEWSPAPERS ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT

Bullying prevention is a must, but how do you do it? by Aaron Vehling THISWEEK NEWSPAPERS

Society generally sees bullying as something that everyone endures. It takes it for granted that it builds character and prepares children to be tougher adults. But for Dakota County Attorney James Backstrom, this whole idea is just plain wrong. “The sad reality is that 80 percent of parents in society don’t see it as a concern,” Backstrom said. “It should be an issue of concern for every parent.” Backstrom said, “bullying can escalate. It’s an early form of aggressive, violent behavior.” Backstrom is at the forefront of this as the Dakota County Attorney. He considers his presentations on bullying with elementary school kids to be one of the most important parts of his job. Backstrom has spoken

Photo by Rick Orndorf

Schools aim to create welcoming atmospheres in their buildings where bullying is the last thing on their students minds. to more than 15,000 young is not just professional, it’s elementary school. people in Dakota County personal. “I didn’t have a lot of in the past seven years. He “I was a very shy young friends growing up. I walked usually talks to students in man growing up,” he said. home from school by myself fourth and fifth grades. Partially because of that, for six blocks. Bullies would Backstrom says the issue he was bullied throughout knock my books out of my

hands or push me down. It’s scary when you can’t walk home safely.” Backstrom said because he was shy he could not muster up the courage to talk about the bullying with anyone, particularly teachers. If one Jim were to Backstrom transpose these acts onto adults, they would be criminal offenses. This underscores some of Backstrom’s points. He said studies have shown 60 percent of bullies have a criminal record by the time they are 20 years old. “Bullying happens to 75 percent of kids at one point in their lives,” Backstrom said. “The problem is pervasive. “It is estimated that near-

ly one in every six middle school students is regularly harassed or attacked by a bully. As many as 160,000 children miss school every day in America out of fear of bullying.”

Set on fire Heather Rogers is a 2011 graduate of the Lakeville Area Public Schools’ Area Learning Center, and her grandfather, Larry Elfring, talked about her experience with bullying at a recent school board meeting. Fear, assault and stress comprised the bulk of her time at John F. Kennedy Elementary and moved on to McGuire Middle School. “I was set on fire outside of school because I had short hair,” Rogers said. “The bullying was horrific.” Rogers had also been bullied at schools she attended in Nevada and in Texas, Elfring said. “We thought it would

�


THISWEEK NEWSPAPERS ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT August 5, 2011

ďż˝     

 



"  

more physical in their negative behavior, girls who bully others cause significant trauma as well.� The bullying is often not as violent as with boys, he said, but the effect has its own implications. “With girls, the harm is often done through more covert forms of aggression, such as social exclusion or ostracization, manipulation and rumor spreading,� Backstrom said. “These negative actions can be very hurtful to young women.�

ďż˝   



 ��

         ďż˝             ďż˝  

        !" # 



 

 

   

 

   ďż˝

   ďż˝    

((( ďż˝ $  ďż˝ 

   ďż˝  ďż˝ ) * ďż˝)) +  (, #' ďż˝    ďż˝ ďż˝ ďż˝ ďż˝    

  ďż˝

 ďż˝

 !  ďż˝ 

   

   

    

       

       

 ! 

        

     

     

  

   

      

    ! �� 

 ďż˝

  

     

  

  ! " #$ % &$   #' " #$ % &$

 ďż˝   ďż˝    ďż˝

 

  

   

 

       

Online harassment Bullying has traditionally been an in-person affair, but the rapidly expanding social media environment has provided not only an efficient way to communicate across boundaries, it has also opened the floodgates for bullying along those same channels. “Someone may not say something to someone in person,� Backstrom said, “but they’ll put it in writSee Bullying, 4B

$%&  #' ()( ) *  +*,, *&-(%(.

 

selves that bullying just didn’t happen.� Elfring noticed this as well. He said John Cates and Sue Zapf, two teachers at the ALC, along with ALC Director Cliff Skagan helped ensure a safe environment. “Some girl came from one of the other schools and started in on Heather,� Elfring said. “Cliff put an end to it. If John, Sue and Cliff can do it, why can’t the rest of (the staff in the district)?� When summing up her experiences, Rogers’ message to the school board was simple: “Don’t think that this (bullying) doesn’t exist, because it really does and it’s terrible.� Rogers experienced bullying with boys and girls, which demonstrates the complex dynamics at play in these situations. “We often think of bullies as mean and aggressive boys,� Backstrom said, “and while boys who bully may outnumber girls and be

ďż˝ 

end when we moved back to Minnesota,� he said. After the bullying became too much - in addition to more violent acts such as the fire, Rogers endured name-calling and pushing and shoving as well - McGuire administration recommended Rogers attend the ALC. Rogers and Elfring were quite unsure about Rogers attending the ALC, given the “island of misfit toys� stigma attached to those type of schools. But the decision turned out to mean personal and academic success for Rogers and some piece of mind for Elfring. “(The teachers at the ALC) helped me get back on track,� Rogers said. “I learned I can be someone - I was going to be who I wanted to be.� Some of the trick, Rogers said, was that at the ALC there simply was no tolerance for bullying. “Bullying just didn’t happen,� she said. “People were so comfortable with them-

3B

�� 

�  � � ��       �  �          


4B

August 5, 2011 THISWEEK NEWSPAPERS ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT '  " ./ )( #$ % ! ďż˝ ' #' & " 0 *$( ' "# (! + ( $" (, %" (' ( 1((

 

    

      

          

    ďż˝                       ďż˝    ďż˝ 

���

ďż˝

    ďż˝ ďż˝       ďż˝    ďż˝    ďż˝! "   #ďż˝   $ďż˝ % &' (())*

 ďż˝        

             

             

      

      

   

   ��  

ďż˝ 

Bullying/from 3B ing and press the ‘send’ button.� This could manifest as someone posting something crude on someone else’s Facebook wall. Or maybe one person sends another a series of threatening text messages. The Journal of the American Medical Association has reported that nearly 20 percent of students in the United States is bullied per semester. Further shattering the stereotype of bullying as primarily a realm for boys, the Cyberbullying Research Center has indicated that girls are more likely to bully or do the bullying online. They are also more likely to bully for longer periods of time. What makes “cyberbullying� even more sinister is the cloak of relative anonymity the internet provides offenders. “These threats can be

crimes,� Backstrom said. “It can be harassment to send repeated unwanted messages to someone.� It is estimated that 42 percent of kids have been bullied online, Backstrom said. Adding to that, an estimated 35 percent of kids have been threatened while online, if not outright bullied on a consistent basis.

Protection Bullying in all its forms has captured the attention of the Minnesota Legislature. A few years ago it passed a law requiring school districts to “adopt a written policy prohibiting intimidation and bullying of any student.� While the Legislature requires a policy on bullying, it does not actually define bullying, according to Rosemount-Apple Valley-Eagan School District lawyer Jill Coyle. It also does not give any guidance about the jurisdiction of the district when it comes to bullying.

“As for the definition of bullying, it seems to be something of a ‘you know it when you see it’ sort of phenomenon,� Coyle said. District 196’s policy is broad enough to capture all the different types of bullying - from verbal to physical to that of the cyber variety. “For example, our policy prohibits ‘verbal abuse,’ which specifically prohibits language that is ‘discriminatory, abusive, bullying, threatening or obscene,’� Coyle said. Moving further on the bullying spectrum, the district’s policy also prohibits “fighting, assault, harassment, damage of property, theft, hazing, terroristic threats and technology-related misconduct.� Using its criteria, District 196 staff are able to help attempt put a stop to bullying when they learn about it. In turn, Coyle said, all staff members carry the responsibility to report serious forms of student mis-

 



  

 

ďż˝ ďż˝ ďż˝ ďż˝ 

 ďż˝    ďż˝

 

  ďż˝  



  

     

 

 ďż˝ ďż˝   ďż˝  

ďż˝  

 ďż˝    

     �� 

ďż˝  

         ďż˝    ďż˝ ďż˝  ďż˝ 

      ďż˝ 

  ďż˝           

ďż˝ ďż˝  ďż˝       

                        !  "# $

%&'%&"'()() *'+##', -.,


THISWEEK NEWSPAPERS ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT August 5, 2011

conduct to the administra- children to fight back. tion. “Some adults, particularly fathers, tell kids if Solutions you want to stop a bully With legal protections, you have to punch him in districts policies and law the face,� Backstrom said. enforcement officials rec- “That is terrible advice to ognize bullying leading to give to a child. In all likelisociety-corrupting crimes, hood they are putting their what can people do to help? son or daughter in a situBackstrom said it all ation where they will get starts with people having hurt.� the courage to talk about it. Backstrom, like RogIf a kid is being bullied, ers, implores those who he said, he or she needs to take care of children to not tell a trusted authority fig- brush off the issue of bullyure. ing. “I tell the kids I talk to “We have to start taking that they need to make sure this issue seriously,� Backto tell someone about it strom said. “It’s not some(bullying),� he said. “Don’t thing we can ignore as a sokeep it inside.� ciety.� If they witness other kids getting bullied, Backstrom Aaron Vehling is at aaron.vehsaid he tells his student au- ling@ecm-inc.com and www. diences, then “they need to facebook.com/thisweeklive. stand up and do the right thing. I tell them if other The full version of this stokids are being picked on it’s ry appears in the quarterly our responsibility as a soci- magazine “Focus,� a Twin ety to report that to teach- Cities South of the River ers or the principal.� lifestyle journal, which is on Backstrom discourages newsstands. parents from telling their

5B

Getting to know them

Photo by Rick Orndorf

In just a few weeks, students from across Dakota County will be heading back to school for the 2011-12 year. Students Greenleaf Elementary School in Apple Valley (above) toured the offices at the school last year during the first day of school, while students at Oak Hills Elementary School in Lakeville (left) unload from the bus upon arriving for the first day of school in 2010.

       

 

  ďż˝

         

                 

 

&'(#" ) * ) +,, ) #!  ) -" -# & . /$ ) & #! /$ 0" ) 1%$# 2 "! 2#%""# ) $"3 ) "3"3 4% & 5# 1"3  .  ) ("# ) 6"     ! " #$  $     %     " &  '   (%    & )    "    ďż˝    %%    *  

4 # # 5# 2 &3""3  

7468 *7*89 -9:7 ; #*  ;��;�� (

          ! " * "  (  "  " %  +  , "     %       %   ' 

  ďż˝   

1197/&04 7*4 = ďż˝  

        

 ďż˝    ďż˝   !"#$#%

 ďż˝  


6B

August 5, 2011 THISWEEK NEWSPAPERS ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT   

 ďż˝  

�   ��  � �  �      ! � �  

"#$�$ �� ��   %$�& ! �$ & $  "

$ $��  �#��  %  &' $�&#!�& '  � $ $� $  !  � & �  � ��

 

   !""  #!""   ďż˝  ďż˝ ((()$$)

 ďż˝  ďż˝ !*+$$)  ďż˝ 

ďż˝ 

  

   ďż˝ ďż˝    ďż˝    ďż˝ 

                     

  ďż˝     !

"#$ % !#     &

"#$ % !#

      ďż˝

  ďż˝   ďż˝  ďż˝        ďż˝ 

Families that have school-age children new to the district or have a kindergarten student to enroll can do so at the District 196 school that they will attend. An attendance area search tool is online at www. district196.org/District/EducationSchools/ EnrollingYourchild.cfm along with a district telephone directory.

Kindergarten eligibility Children are eligible for kindergarten if they will be 5 years old on or before Sept. 1 of the year they begin school. Information about early entrance follows. State law requires all students to complete Early Childhood Screening before they enter kindergarten.

Early Entrance

tend a different school within the district (intradistrict transfer) or to attend a school in a different district (interdistrict transfer).

Intradistrict Transfers In order to balance enrollment among schools, the district limits transfers to any particular school based on current and projected enrollment compared with building capacity. Schools where enrollment exceeds or is projected to exceed building capacity by at least 5 percent are closed to most transfer requests. Intradistrict secondary transfer applications are due between Nov. 15 and Jan. 1 the year before the school year for which the transfer is requested. For more information, see the District’s website or contact your child’s school or the district’s Student Information Office at (651) 423-7640.

In rare instances, children are allowed early entrance to kindergarten. Only a small number of children qualify for early entrance. Early entrance qualification testing is available in June each year (fee charged; Interdistrict Transfers limited financial assistance available). For Students who want to transfer into Dismore information, call Elementary Educa- trict 196 must complete the State Enrolltion at (651) 423-7782. Pre-registration is ment Options Program application by Jan. required. 15 for enrollment in the following school year. Information about student transfers Elementary Enrollment is available in District Policy 502, Student Information about the 18 elementary Transfers and in Administrative Regulaschools is available in the Guide to Elemen- tion 502.4.1AR, Student Transfers: State tary Schools (Spanish) at the website listed Enrollment Options Program. If a student wants to transfer out of District 196, conin the first paragraph. tact the school district the student would Kindergarten Plus like to attend. Kindergarten Plus is an optional, feebased, extended day program that comple- Student Records If you are transferring to District 196 ments traditional free morning kindergarten. from another school district, your child’s Magnet School Option educational records will be transferred District 196 has three elementary mag- from their previous school to their new net schools: Cedar Park Elementary: Sci- school in District 196. ence, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) School; Diamond Path Elemen- Immunization Requirements State law requires all students to meet tary- School of International Studies; and Glacier Hills Elementary- School of Arts specific immunization requirements at and Science. Any district resident has the different grade levels before they attend school. Please review immunization reoption to apply for these schools. quirements and make sure your child has Student Transfer Options met them. District 196 students may apply to at-

L 

ve  Horses?  Year  Round  Quality   Riding   Lessons   for  Youth  & ďż˝ Ladies   A ďż˝ week  long  “Hands

  On�  Summer  Program  with   riding,   games  and  crafts  ~  rain  or  shine!  

952.469.4640 !"#$% #$%$& www.GoldenRidgeStables.com #'

  () #

��  8/5•2689650R•ET

             ďż˝

Students welcome in District 196


THISWEEK NEWSPAPERS ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT August 5, 2011

District 192 has kindergarten options Because of limited space, a random drawing is used to fill Kinder Journey slots. District 192 residents are given first priority and application forms are accepted starting on Kindergarten Round-Up day. Call (651) 460-3209 for more Kinder Journey information. District 192 offers Kindergarten Complement, an extention of the half-day kindergarten program. It is a tuition-based, half-day

program that allows children to stay in the same school for the entire day. Learn more about Kindergarten Complement by downloading the brochure at the district’s website www.rschooltoday.com/se3bin/clientschool.cgi. All students must have completed a Pre-School Screening before entering kindergarten. Call (651) 460-3205 to schedule a screening time.

District 194 prepares for students to return Elementary

Aug. 12: LNHS Grade 9 Student/Parent Welcome, 6 p.m. Aug. 16: LNHS Grade 9 Student Orientation/Registration, 9 a.m. ro 2 p.m. Aug. 18: CMS Jump Start and School Pictures Grade 6, 8:30 to 11:30 a.m. Secondary LSHS Gr 9 Orientation and Aug. 11: LNHS Grade Pictures, time NA. 9 Student/Parent Welcome, Aug. 23: CMS Jump 9 a.m. to noon. LSHS Gr 9 Start and School Pictures Orientation, time NA. Grade 6, from 1 to 3:30 p.m.

ďż˝ 

Open House dates and times for all District 194 elementary schools occur at the respective school from 4 to 6 p.m. Aug. 31, except for Orchard Lake which runs from 4 to 5:30 p.m.

Aug. 29: CMS Grade 7 Orientation, time NA. Aug. 30: CMS Grade 6 Orientation, time NA. KTMS Back to School Night Grade 6, 6 to 7:30 p.m. Aug. 31: CMS Orientation Gr 8, time NA. KTMS Back to School Night, Grade 8 5 to 6:30 p.m., Grade 7, 6:45 to 8:15 p.m.

 ďż˝      ďż˝

                   ďż˝     ďż˝    

                  ďż˝        ďż˝              

  

 ďż˝   

ďż˝ 

Kindergarten classes are part of the elementary school program in Farmington Area Public Schools. Along with traditional half-day, every-day kindergarten classes, District 192 also offers an all-day, everyday option called Kinder Journey. This is an optional, fee-based program run in cooperation with District 192 Community Education. The cost for 2011-12 is $3,300 for the year.

7B

'&)' '*+* +,- *./ 0,+1 .. 2. . ,+* , 3

"# $%"&

  !

  

      

&&ďż˝  /0 1 )   2 3- -

                 ! " #  $ %  &

  

 

'"(&



   

            

     



 ��

 

          ! "! ## $ # % &'()* )) +  ,-       !  $ #" % &'()*

   !"

4"%#(��#1%5,


8B

August 5, 2011 THISWEEK NEWSPAPERS ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT

Higher Education Following is a listing of Dakota County’s Concordia University institutions of higher learning in the cities of Address: 200 W. Burnsville Pkwy., Apple Valley, Burnsville, Eagan, Farmington, Burnsville, Diamondhead Education CenLakeville and Rosemount. For more informater tion, contact the schools. Phone: Concordia School of Continuing Studies (651) 603-6268 or (651) 641Argosy University 8888 Address: 1515 Central Parkway; EaWeb site: www.csp.edu gan A full range of higher education options Phone: 800-377-0617 offered in partnership with Concordia UniWeb site: http://www.argosy.edu/ versity, St. Paul, Dakota County Technical Its coursework emphasizes interpersonal College, and the Burnsville-Eagan-Savage skills and academic learning. Many pro- Independent School District 191. grams are available in flexible learning Academic offerings at Diamondhead formats — such as evening and weekend Education Center include: classes and online courses. Variety of student • General Education - bachelor of arts services help support academic, career, and and associate of arts personal needs. • Bachelor of Arts in Business The 90,000-square-foot campus located • Master of Business Administration in Eagan offers the following program ar- (MBA) eas: • Master of Arts in Education • Psychology Undergraduate Accelerated Degree • Marriage & Family Therapy Programs • Organizational Leadership • Associate of Arts • Education • Child Development • Business • Criminal Justice • Health Sciences • Family Life Education • Criminal Justice • Human Resource Management • Liberal Arts • Information Technology Management

• Marketing & Innovation Management • Organizational Management & Leadership • Public Safety & Security Graduate Programs of Study (masters) • Business Administration • Christian Outreach • Criminal Justice Leadership • Education • Family Life Education • Organizational Management • Human Resource Management • Sports Management

Address: 1300 145th St. E., Rosemount Phone: (651) 423-8301 or toll-free (877) 937-3282 Web site: www.dctc.mnscu.edu The member of the Minnesota State Colleges & Universities System aims to provide collegiate-level education for employment that will empower individuals to enhance their opportunities for career advancement and success in a global economy. The college includes the following academic departments:

    

             �� 

          

   

                            

      ! ďż˝  #                      

ďż˝ ďż˝  

�   �   ��   � �     �

    ďż˝  !" ##$

�� �

 

��

            -   "%       

  ďż˝ 

��

     ďż˝         ďż˝

                         ! "# $      %  &       $

.(�� /,,

 ďż˝   ! "ďż˝#"ďż˝ "$ %  "#"ďż˝"&!

    ďż˝   

/0  +   " %"   .(��    / "% % %  %  

" $"  %$  % ! ďż˝"ďż˝" ďż˝"  % '% ("ďż˝

$%% & ďż˝ 

ďż˝

    

Address: 17685 Juniper Path, Lakeville Phone: (952) 892-9000 Web site: www.msbcollege.edu/ The college offers the resources and traditions of a large, established institution and a suburban location. It offers practical college degree programs in: Business • Accounting, Management, Administration • Cosmetology • Media • Sales and Marketing • Legal Science • Criminal justice • Legal administrative assistant

ďż˝



   ďż˝ ďż˝     

 

        

        

Globe University/ Minnesota School of Business

Dakota County Technical College

�� � � �

    

• Business and Information Systems • Business and Management • Design • Health and Human Services • Technical Careers • Transportation • General Education • Continuing Education and Training (Non-credit, short-term)

12% & *34�3    +  5 67   #  0

'( )*')*(*(

+# " ,+#  ')(%

ďż˝    

    !"#



   ďż˝    



       


THISWEEK NEWSPAPERS ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT August 5, 2011

9B

Higher Education • • • • • • •

Paralegal Health Science Health Care Massage Therapy Medical Administrative Assistant Medical Assistant Information Technology

Minnesota School of Beauty Address: 20186 Heritage Drive, Lakeville. Phone: Admissions (952) 469-9825, main (952) 469-4545 Web site: www.mnschoolofbeauty.com Minnesota School of Beauty provides small class sizes, talented team of instructors, career placement counseling, and financial assistance to those who qualify. Areas of study are Cosmetology, Nail Technology, Cosmetology Refresher, Manicurist Refresher, Esthetician Refresher, Cosmetology Reactivation, Manicurist Reactivation, and Esthetician Reactivation.

Partners in Higher Education Partners in Higher Education campus in Apple Valley features three colleges at one location. It offers a variety of programs that

allow working adults to earn their degree fast on a seamless track. Admissions and financial aid representatives can help with career or life goals. Faculty members are available to discuss academic options, including two-year, fouryear and graduate degrees. Partners in Higher Education programs include: Dakota County Technical College • Business • Business Entrepreneur • Certified Manager • Industrial Distribution • Management for Technical Professionals • Marketing • Meeting and Event Management • Real Estate/Property Management • Supervisory Management • Travel and Tourism Inver Hills Community College • ASAP (Adult Success through Accelerated Programs) courses that apply to the: Associate in Science, Business; Associate in Science, Individualized Professional Studies; Associate in Arts • Personalized educational planning • Accelerated 8-week classes

ďż˝    

* $&

               ďż˝      ďż˝      

       !"#$#$%  %$& ďż˝ ďż˝ 

$% &"$ # " " ďż˝ 

ďż˝        

ďż˝!!

     

        



   !" # $ %& " '(&)

*()) $+$

  ďż˝

' "  #$ %$& () *) ) $ $ +  $    !"#$#$ ,--#" $ .  #/ #*$ () $ (              

ďż˝  

 ďż˝

'() * )  &"$  +, -&)&  . ďż˝ ďż˝ ďż˝ ďż˝ ďż˝  / ďż˝ ďż˝ ďż˝ ďż˝ ďż˝

ďż˝

  "  "    " &   !

+#( 

            ďż˝     ! 

"#$%" &

Address: 3500 Federal Drive Phone: (888) 549-6755 Web site: www.rasmussen.edu/ Rasmussen College’s Eagan campus has degree programs in a variety of in demand fields. Students can earn a degree, certificate or diploma from one of Rasmussen College’s various schools: • School of Allied Health • School of Business • School of Education • School of Justice Studies • School of Nursing • School of Technology and Design To learn more about degree programs, call (888) 549-6755 and speak with an admissions representative.

ďż˝

'$ (

Rasmussen College

  

0 %     $#(  2 $ (

 ( $ &  % # % $#  1   ## %( $   &  %" % $ ( %  & # %% "   %   $  3 ! 3 # ) #

• Educational Administration (with administrative licensure preparation options) • K-12 Principals.

ďż˝

ďż˝  ďż˝        ďż˝ ďż˝  ďż˝  

," '$ ( #$%"   # $ - ./01) #  &

#   #$    

 ďż˝       

         

• Credit for prior learning • Center for Professional and Workforce Development • Network Technology and Security • IP Telephony • Six Sigma & Lean Manufacturing • Microsoft training classes • Emergency Medical Services • Medical Office • Supervision and Management Saint Mary’s University Bachelor of Science Completion Programs • Business • Human Resource Management • Human Services • Marketing • Police Science • Sales & Marketing Master’s degree programs • Education • Literacy Education • Management • Business Administration • Project Management • Teaching and Learning Graduate certificate • Project Management • Specialist degree



     ! " #  $%!&ďż˝ " (&  (ďż˝$( " ()   *)  )$+   "    (*  ,      -

     (%.%ďż˝ "  ďż˝ /01233 #)*$.&*$%(*&   " *)   


10B

August 5, 2011 THISWEEK NEWSPAPERS ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT

Area Schools Burnsville-Eagan-Savage School District 191 District 191 is the 12th largest school district in the state with 10,018 students in kindergarten through 12th grade and 1,500 employees, making the district the largest employer in Burnsville. It was founded 52 years ago. It has 10 elementary schools (grades K-6), three junior high schools (7-9), one high school (10-12), and one alternative program. For more information, call (952) 7072020 or go online at www.isd191.org. District 191 Administrative Services Center, 100 River Ridge Court, Burnsville, MN 55337

Rosemount-Apple Valley-Eagan School District 196 District 196 serves approximately 28,000 students in early childhood programs through 12th grade and is Minnesota’s fourth largest school district. The 110-square-mile district boundary includes all or part of seven cities – Rosemount, Apple Valley, Eagan, Burnsville, Coates, Inver Grove Heights and Lakeville

– and rural Empire and Vermillion townships. District 196 has 18 elementary schools (grades K-5), including three elementary magnet schools that focus on arts and science, international studies, and STEM (science, technology, engineering and math); six middle schools (grades 6-8); four high schools (grades 9-12); an optional School of Environmental Studies at the Minnesota Zoo for juniors and seniors; an Area Learning Center alternative high school for those more successful in a non-traditional setting; a K-12 special education school for students with emotional and behavioral disabilities (Dakota Ridge), and a special education school serving young adults ages 18-21 (Transition Plus and Pathway). District Office, 3455 153rd St. W., Rosemount, MN 55068; Phone: (651) 4237700; Web site: www.district196.org.

Farmington Area School District 192 District 192 includes all of the city of Farmington, as well as a portion of Lakeville and several surrounding townships. Total population within the district has

  ďż˝    ďż˝  ďż˝ ďż˝  ďż˝

                 

reached 30,000. Student population is more than 6,400 and is expected to grow to 8,000 students within 10 years. Farmington Public Schools employs nearly 750 people, including more than 400 licensed teachers. The superintendent’s office and most District 192 services are located at the District Services Center, 421 Walnut St., in downtown Farmington; phone: (651) 4635000; e-mail: district@farmington.k12. mn.us; Web site www.farmington.k12. mn.us.

Lakeville Area School District 194 The Lakeville Area Public School District serves approximately 11,200 students in the suburban south-metro area of the Twin Cities. The district serves students in the city of Lakeville, a portion of the cities of Burnsville and Elko New Market, as well as Credit River, Eureka, and New Market townships. District 194 serves students in Dakota County and Scott County, and covers 86 square miles. Student population has doubled in the past decade, to over 11,100 students, and is expected to approach 15,000 over the next 20 years. There are nine elementary schools (K-

 �  � �     �    �   �     ��     �

ďż˝  ďż˝  ďż˝

 

   

Paideia Academy is a K-8 charter public school serving the southern suburbs. As a public school, there is no tuition and enrollment is open to all. The mission of Paideia Academy is to challenge and inspire learners by providing a rigorous, content-rich, classical education incorporating languages, music, and the arts while nurturing positive character development. For more information visit www.paideiaacademy.org or call (952) 953-6200.

              

                        

!"#$!#%

"%

+ & !+  ďż˝ 

    ��  �  

    

  !!    " #             ďż˝  

      ďż˝           !  ďż˝  " # # $   #

#ďż˝  ďż˝ % 

 

   ďż˝ 

                  

ďż˝ 

Paideia Academy

&  '  ( ) *+ ,

ďż˝   

  ďż˝ ďż˝  

5), three middle schools (6-8) and two high schools (9-12). The district’s second high school, Lakeville South High School, opened in the 2005-6 school year. The ninth elementary school (Oak Hills Elementary) and third junior high (Century Junior High) were opened for the 19992000 school year. The district offers preschool, ECFE, before and after school care, and general youth and adult classes through Community Education. Lakeville Area Public Schools, Central Offices, 8670 210th St. W., Lakeville, MN 55044; phone (952) 232-2000; Web site: www.isd194.k12.mn.us.

ďż˝ 

                 

         



    


THISWEEK NEWSPAPERS ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT August 5, 2011

  �  

   

       

   

  

   

     

 

 

   

    

   

    



         

      



         

  

    



   

!" #  $% # &'  $#% (#)""%"  "  *+ 

    

           

 � �      � 

                                                                          

                                                                                ! "          #  #   $                     %   

     &                            '  "                        &                  ()*                                

         

�� �� ��    � 

11B


12B

August 5, 2011 THISWEEK NEWSPAPERS ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT

Welcome back Students Highland Elementary School in Apple Valley are welcomed back during an orientation session last year. School orientation times can be found at various district websites as they are posted. When Thisweek Newspapers receives the information, the times and dates will be included at www.ThisweekLive.com.

  ďż˝         ďż˝  ďż˝ 

Photo by Rick Orndorf

   

Meal applications can now be done online Parents/guardians can fill out applications online for free and reduced-price meals in Burnsville-EaganSavage School District 191 for the 2011-12 school year. “The process is safe, secure, private and available 24/7 from anywhere,� said Roxanne Williams, the district’s director of food ser-

vices. “People can log in from home, work, the public library, or from any internet connection.� Applying online is convenient and also paperless which is good for the environment, she added. To apply, go to www. schoollunchapp.com and select your state as Minne-

sota and your school district as Burnsville-EaganSavage. Follow instructions to enter student and household information and then click “Apply� to submit the application. Families will be contacted by mail when the application is approved or denied.

             !"   #       

  �  � ��  �       

 ďż˝



$ %$$& '( ) *+ ,),",,, -+ )"

+    ďż˝   ďż˝ 

    !" # $%

  &$'  (    "   &$ )  )

& !$  )  * ( &$ +"   )   &'   +",     $& -$+' .  + /   (  (( $    "( "  ( *""  *    ( + +  +$ + + "  ,  "!" 0 1  #  +" .    ("   2 ( 3   +" 2& , 4$ "!" 0   ( .  +  "!"  "" 5   -"   & +" ,

  ďż˝

��        � ���

�� 

))), . +,+

2011 Education Today  
2011 Education Today  

Thisweek Newspapers special section Education Today 2011

Advertisement