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EVENTS • LOCAL LORE • TOWN AND REGIONAL MAPS THIS IS VERMONT: Bennington – Manchester

Bennington – Manchester

GUIDE TO GUIDE TO

“Fall” In Love With The Shires

FALL/ WINTER 2016

See story on page 3

Discover the places where memories are made!

Northshire Bookstore story pg. 3

Snowshoe at Equinox story pg. 17

Women Artist Exhibit story pg. 12

Monument 125 th Birthday story pg. 12

Hildene Holidays story pg. 13

Covered Bridge Guide story pg. 16

SCAN and READ online

The Insider Guide to Shopping, Dining, Lodging, Attractions, Events, Outdoor Recreation & Lore

www.thisisvermont.com • Guide to The Shires of VT


Spend the weekend in The Shires!

Fly fishing at the Henry Bridge in Bennington. One of five covered bridges in The Shires of Vermont. See covered bridge guide on page 14.

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his beautiful region nestled between the Taconic and Green Mountains is know as The Shires of Vermont. It has the singular distinction of having two shire towns, Manchester and Bennington, historically referred to as county seats and includes 15 Vermont towns and villages. Recently, the region was recognized as the 15th most culturally vibrant region in the United States with a population under one million by the National Center for Arts Research. Surrounded by mountains and enriched by the waters of the famous Battenkill that runs through the valley, The Shires has historically been a popular four season destination for those seeking the authentic Ver-

In This Issue:

Stories Skydiving . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .pg. 3 Northshire Bookstore . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .pg. 3 Bennington Trails . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .pg. 8 Artreach Project Exhbit . . . . . . . . . . . . . .pg. 8 Shires Parks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .pg. 8 Monument 125th Birthday . . . . . . . . . . . .pg. 12 Women Artist Exhibit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .pg. 12 Arthur Miller Tribute . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .pg. 12 Hildene Holidays . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .pg. 13 Bennington Museum . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .pg. 13 Vermont “Firsts” . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .pg. 14 Covered Bridge Guide . . . . . . . . . . . . . .pg. 16 Northshire Bookstore (cont.) . . . . . . . . .pg. 16 Equinox Preservation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .pg. 17 Manchester Hot Glass . . . . . . . . . . . . . .pg. 17 One World Conservation Center . . . . . .pg. 17 Published by Spectrum Design www.thisisvermont.com Fall/Winter 2016 Our 33rd year!

The Bennington Battle Monument with statue of Seth Warner in the foreground. The Battlefield is located several miles to the west on Route 67. See center map for locations.

mont experience. It is within a 4 hour drive from New York City, Hartford, Boston, Northern New Jersey and Canada and is just across the border from the neighboring Berkshires. The Shires boast a proud agricultural heritage and a robust entrepreneurial spirit. The region is set against the backdrop of Vermont’s famous pastoral landscape, complete with red covered bridges, barns and sugarhouses, corn rows, apple orchards and farmer’s markets in season. Its many scenic towns and villages are both vibrant and engaging. Quite simply they are quintessential Vermont. Those in pursuit of history will discover The Museums of The Shires, seven cultural

Fall foliage graces the approach to the Wilburton Inn, located in Manchester.

heritage sites that cover periods of American History from pre-Revolutionary War to present day. For outdoor enthusiasts recreational opportunities abound, from alpine and Nordic skiing, snowshoeing and snowmobiling to hiking, biking, fishing, kayaking and golf. Some of the nation’s best professional theater can be found here as well as regional music festivals and wonderful fine art museums and galleries. And if shopping is one’s passion, there’s antiquing, exquisite handcrafts, specialty shops and fashion designer outlets aplenty. The people of The Shires invite you to visit their region soon. It is... So Vermont. So near!

Equinox Valley Nursery . . . . . . . . . . . . .pg. 17 Skyline Drive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .pg. 19

Towns - Town Maps Bennington . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .pg. 4 Downtown Bennington . . . . . . . . . . . . . .pg. 6 Shaftsbury . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .pg. 15 Arlington . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .pg. 15 Sunderland . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .pg. 15 Manchester . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .pg. 19

Regional & Recreation Map Centerfold . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .pg. 10-11 Itineraries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .pg. 14 Event Listings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .pg. 9 For advertising information contact Jonah Spivak 802-447-1778 or email thisisvermont@gmail.com 262 North Street, Bennington, VT 05201

The Shires of Vermont Byway

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he Shires of Vermont Byway is named for the scenic region it passes through from Vermont’s southern border with Massachusetts to its northern point where it intersects with the Stone Valley Byway in the heart of Manchester. This ribbon of road, US Route 7 from Pownal to Bennington, and VT Historic Route 7A from Bennington to Manchester, is the historic stretch that has connected the communities of the north shire and south shire for centuries. Historically, a “shire town” was a county seat otherwise known as the governmental center of the county. Created in 2010, The Shires of Vermont Byway

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links the existing Molly Start Byway (Route 9, in the Southshire) and the Stone Valley Byway (Route 30, in the Northshire), to afford travelers a complete route through our region and is part of an almost complete circuit of byways across the entire state. The Shires of Vermont Byway winds its way from south to north through the towns of Pownal,Bennington, North Bennington Village, Shaftsbury, Arlington, Sunderland, Manchester Village and Manchester Center for approximately 75 miles including side trips. For more information about Vermont Byways, visit www.vermontvacation.com/byways

This Is Vermont: Guide to The Shires of Vermont – www.thisisvermont.com – Fall/Winter 2016


“Fall” In Love With The Shires

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on’t be surprised if you look up and see people jumping out of planes this year. Green Mountain Skydiving has come to Bennington. Officially open at the Morse State Airport in Bennington, VT, Green Mountain Skydiving offers Tandem Skydiving, (AFF) Instruction, and fun jumps for licensed skydivers from early April through November. From altitude we enjoy incredible views of Vermont, New York and Massachusetts including the Green Mountains, Taconics, and Adirondacks spreading to the horizons. It’s an incredibly beautiful place to skydive. Jumpers must be at least 18 years of age and be in relatively good health. Over the years we’ve jumped with individuals aged 18 to 89 from every walk of life and background. In the air we’re all the same: big smiles, lots of screaming and of course an unspoken common guilt of, “what the heck is wrong with me” to want to jump out of a plane. Following a picturesque twenty minute plane ride, participants jump from nearly two miles above the ground. First timers jump securely attached to an experienced instructor who stays with them every step of the way. You basically jump, free-fall for 40- 50 seconds, open the parachute and fly gently under canopy for 5-7 minutes before landing in a 400,000 square foot grass field next to the runway.

Jumper and instructor leaving the plane.

Green Mountain Skydiving specializes in first time and infrequent skydivers allowing us to cater to the individual needs and desires of each and every guest. Some visitors are looking to merely check skydiving off their bucket list and prefer a nice steady jump. Others, however, are looking for the wildest adventure possible and prefer flips out of the plane and spins under canopy. For the most part, whatever you want, we can make happen, although, you cannot jump naked through a lightning storm strapped to someone wearing a wing-suit carrying your iPhone so you can get it all on film. Sounds like a great video but there are limits to what we can do! What we can do is take you out of a plane at 120 mph, and after the parachute opens, give you the toggles and let you fly until 1,000’ above the ground. After that, your instructor takes over to land the parachute safely. The euphoria lasts a few hours, the grin, a couple days, and the sense of achievement and bragging rights, a lifetime. Skydiving has come a long way from the first sketches by da Vinci as far back as 1495 and further still from the military rounds of a mere 25 years ago. Today, jumpers use steerable canopies that allow them to fly and land safely in a spot of their choosing. Mod-

ern equipment includes not only main and backup parachutes, but, an automatic activation device that electronically deploys the reserve parachute in the event of an emergency. We have a blast every day, but safety is always our number one priority. Green Mountain Skydiving uses only the latest in technology and techniques, the best gear available and only highly experienced instructors. The owner/operator of GMS has done more than 4,800 skydives, safely introducing thousands of individuals to the adventure of skydiving. Even after thousands of jumps, I’m still a little nervous every time I get to the door of the plane. Frankly, that’s what makes it fun, but more than that it keeps us safe. We are open for appointments Wednesday through Monday, April through early November. Come out to make a skydive, watch, or just say hello: we love meeting people and sharing our joy of skydiving with anyone who will listen. Once you have jumped out of a plane the world is never the same. You realize you can conquer any fear and there’s a little Hollywood action hero in all of us. Find us at GreenMountainSkydiving.com, on Facebook, YouTube, Instagram, Google +, or any other social media under Green Mountain Skydiving.

shire Bank in Manchester Center. This building housed not only Northshire Bookstore, but also the Morrow’s home. Once open the Manchester community quickly embraced their new bookstore, making it a popular destination for area book lovers. Just one year later in 1977, the Morrows decided they needed more hands on deck and hired five staff members. The one area of the store that they found to be the most popular was the children’s department. It quickly became obvious that they were way under-inventoried in this area so they maximized every inch of space available to house more children’s merchandise. This, coupled with the fact that they had no space for back stock gradually led to an ever decreasing living space for the Morrow family.

In 1982, the old Coburn House which had been sitting unoccupied for nearly 2 years, went up for auction and Ed and Barbara agreed to buy it. In 1986, Northshire Bookstore reopened in the newly renovated Colburn House space allowing for a more spacious store and living space. A short number of years after this move, the retail industry began rapidly changing with the explosion of malls across the U.S. as well as the emergence of some major retail box bookstores which all housed cafes. Although the Morrow’s business had changed and grown rapidly over a relatively short period of time they knew based on customer feedback that they either had to continue this growth or risk becoming stagnant. It was also at this time that Chris Morrow had returned home after studying overseas. Having made the decision to eventually take over the family business, Chris and his parents chose, once again, to expand the bookstore. In 2003 the bookstore more than doubled to 10,000 square feet with a brand new addition that included a proper shipping and receiving department, an entire floor dedicated to children, many unique gifts, clothing, jewelry, spaces carved out specifically for author events and the addition of The Spiral Press Café. In addition to a great assortment of books and gifts available the Northshire Bookstore also hosts several author events. According to Barbara Morrow; “Our author events have always played an important role in the success of the Northshire, connecting the role of the author to our love of the book. We have been extremely fortunate in being able to bring a wide range of nationally known authors, as well as - just as importantly - Vermont authors to share their work and experience, as writers.  Our very first author event was in the “old” store next to the Factory Point Bank, with beloved author John Gardner. He was incredibly generous in connecting with his audience, and that also made him such a great teacher.  

Northshire Bookstore Turns 40

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Jumper and instructor mid-air Euphoria.

n September of this year, Northshire Bookstore, one of the Manchester’s most beloved independently owned businesses, celebrates its 40th anniversary. Northshire Bookstore was established in 1976 by Ed and Barbara Morrow after they moved here from Westchester with their two young sons, Chris and Andy. They knew they were ready for a change so they left their jobs, and decided to embark upon their passion of owning their own bookstore. Complete novices to business ownership the Morrow’s had no idea what to expect, but the one thing they committed to right from the beginning was great customer service above all else. The first store location occupied what was then the old Kimball/Martin Real Estate Building, and is now the Berk-

Green Mountain Skydiving

Northshire Bookstore in Manchester.

This Is Vermont: Guide to The Shires of Vermont – www.thisisvermont.com – Fall/Winter 2016

Continued on page 16

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Plus the villages of North Bennington, Old Bennington, Shaftsbury & Pownal

Bennington ~ Incorporated 1749 • Population 15,473 ~

Bennington A rea Chamber of Commerce - 802-447-3311 • www.bennington.com Bennington Town Office - 802-442-1037 • w ww.bennington.c om/town Map not to scale. Not all roads shown.

HISTORIC ROUTE

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Get Outdoors!

See our center map for hiking trails, swimming holes, fishing spots, and paddling.

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See centermap for numerical advertiser index.

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BENNINGTON

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Eastbound into Vermont: TURN RIG HT at blinking yellow light to avoid 279 and follow VT RT. 9 for Bennington, North Bennington, Pownal, Wilmington and Mount Snow.

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Vermont’s first town, named after Benning Wentworth, the New Hampshire Governor who chartered the town despite the fact that the area in question was also claimed by New York. The Green Mountain Boys of Revolutionary fame started as settlers defending their claims from New York officials.

Lake Shaftsbury

SHAFTSBURY

NORTH BENNINGTON

Vermont started with Bennington!

US

ad

Did you know?

Pownal was the site of Vermont’s only witch trial... the Widow Kriegger was dumped in the Hoosic River on the theory that if she was innocent she would sink, and if she floated it was due to the support of the Devil and would be guilty. Legend has it that the Widow Kriegger sank like a stone, and it was with difficulty that she was fished back out to enjoy her aquittal.

To Williamstown, MA

This Is Vermont: Guide to The Shires of Vermont – www.thisisvermont.com – Fall/Winter 2016

VT

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Jensen’s

Family Style Restaurant Since 1961

Breakfast, Lunch & Dinner 7 Days 7:00 a.m. - 8:00 p.m. Bus Tours Welcome • Beer - Wine To-Go Orders Welcomed 14

332 North Street (Rt 7 North) • Bennington, VT (802) 442-3333 • www.jensensfamilyrestaurant.com

SECOND HAND ROSE New and gently used clothing and accessories for the entire family.

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17

18 Bowling Lanes Food Counter & Bar Open For Parties

High Definition Golf Simulator

219 Northside Dr. Bennington | (802)447-7100 | benningtonlanes.com

THE HARWOOD HILL 18

Explore Vermont’s largest antique center. Antique and vintage treasures galore, as well as over 5,000 sf of antique and vintage furniture. An eclectic assortment of antique and vintage collectibles. Come and learn about our direct connection to the Titanic.

Route 9, Bennington, VT 05201 GPS "66 Colgate Heights" (1/2 Mile West of Bennington Museum)

Open 7 Days 9:30 to 5:30 • Open Year Round

(802) 447-0039

Please send us an e-mail camelot1@sover.net

802.447.1563 New - Local Artisan’s Corner

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Yankee Magazine Editor’s Pick Bennington Banner Readers’ Choice Award for best Antiquing

303 Depot Street • Bennington, Vermont 05201 Open 7 days a week Located across om Tractor Supply Co.

Where the Arts Meet Hospitality

www.secondhandrosevt.com

864 Harwood Hill Road Bennington, Vermont • 802-442-6278

Open 7 Days 9:30 to 5:30 • Year Round

www.theharwoodhill.com • reservations@theharwoodhill.com

Extraordinary selection of jewelry and fine gifts

jewelry • pottery • glass • wood accessories • bags • toys

See our ad on 12 back page!

.net

craftsmarket & gallery

open 7 days • free gift wrap

Vermont’s Farmstand Experience!

The Barn is packed full of your favorites: Apple Cider Donuts Home-made Fudge Our Own Orchard Apples Pick-Your-Own Berries (June - September) Vermont Maple Syrup Vermont Gifts & Souvenirs

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262 north street • bennington, vt • 802-447-0488

604 US Route 7South Bennington, VT 802-447-7780

1

8

2 mi. south of Downtown Bennington Open May to November

Johnny Appleseed says

Visit us at www.TheAppleBarn.com and find us on: Insta

FINE ARTS SALES EXHIBITIONS

44 Gypsy Lane, Bennington, VT | 802-442-7158 | www.TheBennington.org

Great Food • Great Prices • Great Atmosphere C Sin Ow hef ce ned 19 95

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46

Daily Specials Amazing Seafood Live Music Fri.& Sat.

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We are VERY Fresh. ✔Free

WiFi

802-442-0122

KevinsSportsPubAndRestaurant.com • 27 Main St., North Bennington, VT

neighborhood

deli

POWERS MARKET

16 Craft Beers On Draft! 10

Store

Growlers to go!

309 County St • Bennington, VT

the best coffee beer, wine, free wi-fi &

vermont products

9 main street

north bennington 45

vermont, 05257

802.442.6821

www.powersmarket.com

This Is Vermont: Guide to The Shires of Vermont – www.thisisvermont.com – Fall/Winter 2016

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Downtown Bennington

Walking Tours Event Information

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24

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33 34 26

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See ad page 20

Main Street

21 South St (US 7)

Come visit the Downtown Welcome Center located just south of four corners (where the clock is) on South Street (US 7).

23

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Pleasant St. Transit Center

Union Street

e Stree

22

P

20

31

Valenti n

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Pleasant Street

Silver Street

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Shops & Galleries • Restaurants • Free Parking • Bakeries & Cafés • Walking Tours

Library

39

38

Elm St

FIsh and chip shop

802-442-5059 Open 7 Days

11:30am - 8:00pm Tuesday - Saturday www.lilbritainfishandchips.com

benningtonbookshop.com

626 Main Street • Bennington, VT 05201

802-447-3794

Chakra Balancing Zero Balancing Health Coaching Body Treatments

Making Hearts Flutter 23

Vermont’s Largest Art Supply Store Art Gallery/Prints • Fine Custom Framing Vermont Products, T-Shirts and Sweatshirts Gis • Collectibles • Cards Large selection of

Quilt • Fabric • Alterations • Yarn • DMC Floss

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343 West Main Street, Bennington, VT www.thegiftgardenvt.com 802-447-7222

FEATURING:

New & Used Video Games Collectible Card Games Magic the Gathering, Pokemon

Miniatures Games

802-447-0091

457 Main Street • Bennington, VT Open Sun - Thurs 11-8pm • Fri 11-11pm • Sat 10-9pm

www.thegamersgrotto.com

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Warhammer 40,000

Dungeons & Dragons Books Retro Video Games Used DVDs Friday Night Magic Paints & Accessories

Children’s Consignment Shop

802-753-7375

From clothing, newborn to big kids 12, to baby gear, toys, books and more.

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Party Games & Board Games Free WiFi Birthday Parties Weekly Game Play & Tournaments In-Store TV Rentals for game play Table space for casual game play

28 473 Main Street Bennington, VT

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Since 1976

Unique Line of Gifts Soaps & Lotions, Candles, Sachets, Flour Sack Towels, Garden & Home Decor, Maple & Gourmet Products, Fresh and Custom Designed Permanent Arrangements, Gift Baskets and Much More

Find us on Facebook! www.jaysartshop.com 113-115 South Street • Downtown Bennington, VT 802 -447-2342 • Open Daily

burgess_scottie@hotmail.com

Manicure Pedicure Waxing Reflexology

532 Main Street 802-442-9404 www.JophielsBeauty.com

A must see store! You will be sure to find the perfect gi for anyone, or even something for yourself!

www.thescarlettcreation.com Open Tuesday - Saturday 10am to 6pm

Scarlett Burgess, owner

Hair Massage Facials Reiki

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THE SCARLETT CREATION 38

We offer a harmonious balance of techniques to help unite your senses and promote wellness for mind, body & spirit.

POTTERY

802-442-2447

20

You CAN Afford Your Health & Well Being!

116 North Street, Downtown Bennington, VT

• •

HAMMOCKS

467 Main Street Bennington, VT 05201

Eat in our 22 seat restaurant or call ahead for take out. Serving traditional British favorites including Fish and Chips, Meat Pies, Sausage Rolls and Mushy Peas, as well as American fare including chicken tenders and burgers.

31

GLASS • PEWTER • PINATAS

LIL’ BRITAIN

The Bennington 34 Bookshop

We even have maternity clothing!

www.facebook.com HereWeGrowChildrensConsignmentShop Jamie Lane-Owner

This Is Vermont: Guide to The Shires of Vermont – www.thisisvermont.com – Fall/Winter 2016


RAMUNTO’S PIZZA AND PUB

You’ve tried the Rest ... Now try the Best!

23 Beers on Tap!

519 Main Street Bennington, Vermont 05201 39

802-442-6622

Sunday 11 am-9pm Monday-Thursday 11am-10pm Friday & Saturday 11am-11pm

Tell our advertisers your saw them in The Guide to The Shires of Vermont!

21

This Is Vermont: Guide to The Shires of Vermont – www.thisisvermont.com – Fall/Winter 2016

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Mallory Rich in State Parks in The Shires Manchester V ermont State Parks offer a place to camp, play, relax, and explore! There are 52 state parks across the state, three of which are in The Shires, all offering a range of unique opportunities, such as great hiking, swimming, boat rentals, concession, vistas, wildlife viewing, and prime camp sites. Vermont State Parks’ website www.vtstateparks.com lists each park and the activities and amenities they offer as well as information on reservations, and lots photos of the parks and the people who enjoy them each year.

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Painting by Mallory Rich.

new Exhibit in VAE’s Artreach Project, Nova Scotia Series by Mallory Bratton Rich, has arrived at Taconic Spine medical center on Richville Rd. The paintings in this exhibit are the result of the artist’s time on Nova Scotia in 2015. Mallory Rich and her photographer friend, Martha Folsom, spent the month of May circumnavigating the island of Nova Scotia in search of seafood, sea air and the sound of the ocean. Rich is a self-taught artist from Sandgate, Vermont, who began painting late in life and who pursues her new passion every day. Her work has received recognition and awards throughout New England. The paintings will be on display through December 2. For more information go to www.vtartxchange.org.

Woodford State Park (in Woodford, VT) is the highest elevation campground in the state at 2400’ above sea level. With easy trails, an open lake, and a bog to explore, it’s great for all ages. Woodford has boat rentals (canoe, kayak, and rowboats) 103 campsites, and is also a popular fishing location. If you stay overnight, be prepared to be awakened by an outstanding chorus of birds which serenade visitors, especially in the spring.

Lake Shaftsbury State Park (in Shaftsbury, VT) offers visitors a great beach and picnic areas, easy hikes around the lake, and a rental cottage. Row boats, pedal Kayaking in The Shires of Vermont. Photo by Lee Krohn. boats, kayaks, and canoes are all available for rent as well as a picnic shelter for large group gatherings. For those that need to refuel, a concession stand located in the park D ay e ntry into the pa rks is $4/pe r pers on if offers yummy snacks at reasonable prices. you’re 14 or older, $2 for kids under 3-14 yrs. old and free for kids 3 yrs. old and younger. When you pay for Emerald Lake State Park (in East Dorset, VT) in- entry into one park, you can get into all other for free that cludes a small clear, clean, and cold lake where visitors can same day, so you can visit multiple parks if you’d like. rent a kayak, canoe, pedal boat or rowboat. A concession For more information or to make a reservation call stand, lakeside picnic tables, and a picnic pavilion for large our reservation center, 888-409-7579, Monday – Friday groups are also available. 104 campsites are scattered on 9am – 4pm, visit www.vtstateparks.com, or send an email the heavily wooded ridge above the lake. to parks@state.vt.us.

New Mountain Trail System

Bike, Hike, and Snowshoe

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BATS color coded trail map of Bennington.

he mountain trails of Bennington have been receiving some much needed TLC thanks to the hard work of local bikers, runners, and hikers. The Bennington Area Trail System (BATS), a new non-profit group lead by Brad DeBoer and partnered with Southern Vermont College, Mount Anthony Preservation Society, Southwestern Vermont Medical Center, Vermont Land Trust, and various private landowners was formed this past year. They have taken on the task of creating new recreational trails and maintaining existing ones, such as the many sustainable multi-use singletrack trails in the area. BATS was first conceptualized at a meeting held in spring of 2015 between Bennington County Regional Commission and others where concerns were voiced about the lack of an organized trail system in the area. "There's never been a formal, mapped mountain bike trail, or hiking system, with a dedicated group of people to maintain them," DeBoer said. The group has since become its own chapter of the Vermont Mountain Bike Association, a statewide group supporting mountain bikers and trails, receiving a sum of grant money for trail maintenance tools. The BATS members gather regularly to work on sections of the newly mapped and marked trail systems, ensuring the safety and enjoyment of trail users. Recently they partnered with Southern Vermont College (SVC) and students from the Southern Vermont Career Development Center to do some maintenance work on SVC’s existing trail systems. The trails are open for use to anyone for mountain biking, hiking, running, snowshoeing, and cross country skiing. To become a member of the Bennington Area Trail System go to vmba.org/2016-membership and select the BATS chapter. For more information email batsVT@gmail.com or visit BATSvt facebook page.

This Is Vermont: Guide to The Shires of Vermont – www.thisisvermont.com – Fall/Winter 2016


Event Listings Sep 2-18 - Bennington "The Consul, the Tramp and America’s Sweetheart" at Oldcastle Theatre. World Premiere! The Consul, the Tramp & America’s Sweetheart’s story, concerns Charles Chaplin’s film masterpiece, The Great Dictator and Germany’s attempts to prevent the movie from being made. The cast includes silent screen star, Mary Pickford, who became head of the studio she formed with Chaplin and Douglas Fairbanks, United Artists. The play contains some classic comedic pieces from Chaplin’s films and also concerns a young woman trying to make her way up the administrative ladder in Hollywood; as well as the Nazi Consul to the United States. www.oldcastletheatre.org

Sept. 10 - Manchester “Maple Leaf Half Marathon & Kotler 5k Run/Fun Walk” Vermont Classic- “A MustDo”. The course traverses truly gorgeous Vermont landscapes, running from the downtown community to picturesque village settings to country roads past farm lands back to the finish. Adding to the beauty, Vermont will be in the early stages of fall foliage.

Sept. 16-17 - Willmington and West Dover “Vermont Wine and Harvest Festival” The scale of the event is small enough to feel like a mellow get-together with friends and fellow wine lovers, but big enough to offer a preview tasting event on the first evening, followed by two full days of tastings, food, dinners, wine parties, breakfast, and live entertainment, along with opportunities for arts, shopping, sightseeing and outdoor recreation within the venues. www.thevermontfestival.com

Sept. 23 - Bennington “Stoneware Collectors Meeting” Co-Author of "The Birds of Bennington" Dr. Steven Leder talks about his passion of collecting stoneware with people and faces as the main decoration. www.benningtonmuseum.org

Sept 23-Nov 13 - Bennington "American Women Artists 2016 Annual Member Show & National Juried Exhibition at the Bennington Center for the Arts”. American Women Artists is a non-profit organization dedicated to providing professional opportunities for women working in the visual fine arts in North America. Now in its third decade, American Women Artists demonstrates its commitment to its mission, promoting the work of women artists and celebrating their achievements, producing and presenting invitational and juried exhibits in nationally recognized fine art museums and galleries and providing high-quality educational programming, workshops, and scholarship opportunities. www.americanwomenartists.org www.thebennington.org

Sept. 24 - Bennington “Artist Reception: Works on Paper Gallery” Join the Bennington Museum for an artist’s reception in the Works on Paper Gallery before going to the Ada Pareksy Center for “Photography and Reality,” a discussion with this engaging artist and speaker, Duane Michals. Talk with him about his work beginning in the 1950s and up through today. One of his most recent short films will be screened which will be followed by a Q&A. www.benningtonmuseum.org

Sept 24 - Bennington "American Women Artists 2016 Symposium on Women in the Arts" at the Bennington Center for the Arts. American Women Artists, a national non-profit arts organization dedicated to the inspiration, celebration and encouragement of women in the visual arts, presents a full slate of educational and informative

Oktoberfest is one of our signature festivals and was named a 2016 Top 10 Fall Event by the Vermont Chamber of Commerce. The Kid’s Zone is where families will find festival games like the beanbag toss, a huge bouncy house, pumpkin painting and other kidfriendly activities. While the young ones are playing, the big kids can enjoy a large selection of beers from at least 25 different German and domestic breweries as well as authentic German fare served out of Der Markeplatz in the Main Base Lodge and the sausage roast outside of Cuzzins. Plus, try your hand at games like the keg toss, yodeling contest and stein holding as well as a horseshoe tournament. www.mountsnow.com

talks and panel discussions on women in the arts, from historical to contemporary perspectives. Opening speaker Erin Coe, Director of the Hyde Collection in Glens Falls, NY, will examine the seminal influence that Lake George had on the art and life of the pioneering modernist Georgia O’Keeffe. Other speakers include Alia El Bermani, the founder of the Women Painting Women movement, a contemporary exhibit that sparked a national trend, and Rita Fucillo, publisher of Art New England, talking about the changes in the publishing and advertising industry that have been brought about by the increased use of social media and web marketing. The Symposium is free and open to the public. 9am - 1pm. Sept. 24 - Peru “Peru Fair” The Peru Fair is an old fashioned country fair, bursting with attractions fit for all the family. Held each year in the beautiful town of Peru, Vermont, this fair has been rated among the top country fares in the state and is not to be missed! Highlights of the Fair include a pig roast, art demonstrations, church exhibits of yesteryear, artisan crafts, music, dancing, and foods of all tastes. Admission is $6, kids 6 and under are free, which is directed to The Peru Scholarship Fund. www.perufair.org

Oct. 8-9 - Somerset "43rd Annual Harvest Arts & Crafts Show" at Mount Snow. Get a jump on your holiday shopping at the 43rd Annual Harvest Arts and Crafts Show featuring 50+ vendors including local artisans, specialty food makers and more. The event is conveniently located throughout the Main Base Lodge and base area. Did we mention that there is also FREE ADMISSION? Expect to see original works of art, handmade jewelry and furniture, sample homemade fudge and speak face to face with the purveyors. www.mountsnow.com

Sept. 24 - Rupert "Fall Festival at Merck" Come on up to the farm and celebrate nature's Carnivale: Fall color, games for the children, a picnic on the lawn. Lots of things to see and do. www.merckforest.org

Sept. 17 - 18 - Bennington “Bennington zz” Offering one of the best quilt shows in the northeast. Show offers new quilts, demonstrations, queen size quilt raffle, challenge quilts, special exhibits, many vendors and mouthwatering fare from the Quiltfest Cafe. Our featured quilter and lecturer is Pat Delaney, an award winning quilter from New England, specializing in color, home machine quilting, appliqué, and embroidery. Her teaching has taken her to shows in Chattanooga, Des Moines, Vermont, Minnesota, and Virginia among others. www.benningtonquiltfest.com

Oct 8-10 - Stratton "Columbus Day Weekend and Brewfest" It's the time of year when our beautiful Green Mountains transform into a symphony of fiery reds, vibrate orange and yellows. Enjoy fall colors and take in the beauty from southern Vermont's highest peak. Fill your Columbus Day Weekend with endless fun, games, live music, food and friends at Stratton. Stratton will be buzzing with plenty to do and see. Events include Brewfest, Heels to Paws 5K run, Dark Star Orchestra, and The North Face Race to the Summit. Join in on all the exciting activities we've planned this Columbus Day. www.stratton.com

Sep 24 - Windsor "Autumn Moon Festival" The annual nighttime Street Festival will take place at a new date and time with new attractions and events. Featuring the “Kids Zone” activities, Christa McAuliffe Shepard Discovery Center, Montshire Museum, VINS, Fire Dancers, American Precision Museum , Touch A Truck, Magic, Face Painting, Food Vendors, Craft Vendors, and more! With Live music from the Sayon Camara Drummers, Walter Gomex, About Gladys and the Road Trash Band. Capped off with a BANG with a brilliant Fireworks Show provided by Atlas Fireworks!

Oct. 15 - Manchester "10th Annual Pumpkin Carving Festival" at the Equinox Valley Nursery. Join us for our annual pumpkin carving festival. 11am to 4pm, a day full of games, activities, local foods, and crafts. Oh! and of course carving as many pumpkins as possible! Come enjoy wagon rides, a crazy corn maze, face painting, bouncy house, costume parade, witch’s hat decorating and more. www.equinoxvalleynursery.com

Sept 30 -Oct 1 - Weston “52th Annual Weston Antiques Show” Featuring renowned dealers from across the U.S. with American and English furniture, accessories, Americana, folk art, silver, samplers, paintings, oriental rugs, jewelry and more. www.westonantiquesshow.org

Sept. 30 - Oct. 2 - Manchester “Manchester Fall Art and Craft Festival” Formerly the Autumn Festival at Hildene, the Manchester Fall Art and Craft Festival is now located at the Practice Tee off Route 7A in Manchester. 200 Fine art and craft Exhibitors, dining and beverages, specialty foods, live music, and more. For more craft producers.com See ad on back page.

Oct. 2 - Rupert "Hike-A-Thon and Basket Bonanza" at Merck Forest. Benefit for benign brain tumor awareness hosted by Be Brave. From 10am - 2pm including live music, scavenger hunt, and silent auction. www.bebrave.life

Oct. 15 - Bennington "Community Day: Celebrating Art" at the Bennington Museum. Free admission all day. Celebrate the work created by Milton Avery during his summers in southern Vermont – 1935-1943, At 3:00 p.m.join with artist Leslie Parke in the Regional Artists Gallery for an artist’s reception celebrating her exhibition Particle/Wave, Photographs by Leslie Parke. Art activities for young and young-at-heart, and more.

Oct 7-9 - Weston “33rd Annual Weston Craft Show” The Weston Craft Show is a juried exhibit of exceptional Vermont artisans, representing works in baskets, ceramics, folk art, glass, jewelry, lighting, paper, fiber, leather, mosaics, pastels, sculpture, wearable art, and wood. www.westoncraftshow.com

Oct. 8 - Bennington “Norshaft Lions’ Oktoberfest” Come and celebrate with live music featuring the Rymanowski Brothers, german food, beer tent, vendors, childrens’ activities, and wagon rides. All proceeds benefit the community. www.norshaftlions.org

Oct 8-9 - Somerset "19th Annual Mount Snow Oktoberfest" Like most German-themed Oktoberfest events, the 19th Annual Mount Snow Oktoberfest will have plenty of beer, schnitzel and Oom-pah music; but throw in kids games, pumpkin painting, an apple sling shot and the famous “schnitzel toss” and you’ve got two days of fun for the whole family! A Columbus Day Weekend tradition since 1997, the Mount Snow

While great effort has been made to ensure accuracy, it is best to call ahead to confirm dates and times for events.

Oct. 22 - Manchester "Calling All Witches!" at Orvis Green. Gather the most witches in one place at one time! Our goal this year is 250! Please dress as a witch and bring a non-perishable food item for the Community Food Cupboard and/or a charitable contribution. Cash or checks should be made out to Community Food Cupboard. A group photo will be taken at 12:15pm. Bring your friends, kids and lots of witches! Stay in costume and go to Gringo Jack’s for lunch and buy one lunch and get one free! Offer good Oct 22 only. Also in costume, enjoy 10% off your purchases including sale items at the Orvis Flagship Store. Offer good Oct 22 only. Oct. 29 - Bennington “Fallapalooza!” It's like Mayfest, Midnight Madness, Octoberfest, and the Food festivals all wrapped up into one big celebration! Bring the kids to go Store-to Store Trick-or-Treating for gifts and games between 11am and 3pm. For more information about Fallapalooza! call 802-442-5758.

open their studios for the public to come and explore, to experience first-hand the making of our work, to understand our creative process, to hear our stories, and to purchase our unique crafts directly from us. Located four hours from New York City, two hours from Boston, an hour and a half from Albany, NY, Putney, Vermont has been called the “Craft Capital of the World”. This small town in southeastern Vermont is home to one of the highest concentrations of award winning and internationally recognized craftsmen in the country. This year, we celebrate the 38th annual Putney Craft Tour. We invite you to spend Thanksgiving weekend at our Craft, Culinary, and Stage event, meandering our back roads,, purchasing one-of-a-kind crafts, eating fabulous food, drinking local wine, and taking in a performance at one of our local theaters. Don’t miss this stunning event! www.putneycrafts.com Nov 25-Dec 30 - Bennington “The Festival Reimagining Grandma Moses” In order to gear up for the summer 2017 exhibition Grandma Moses: American Modern, the Bennington Museum celebrates the work of this iconic folk artist and present The Festival Reimagining Grandma Moses. A major part of this year’s seasonal celebration is the presentation of works by selected contemporary artists who have reimagined, reinterpreted, or responded to the work of Anna Mary Robertson “Grandma” Moses. Each piece on display in the changing galleries will be for sale by closed-bid auction through December 29. Dec. 3 - Weston "Christmas in Weston" Experience an Old Fashioned Christmas Festival: tours, horse drawn wagon rides, Santa, caroling and more. At the Vermont Country Store, the Museums, the Old Parish Church and other locations throughout Weston. 11 AM – 5 PM

Dec. 3 - Bennington "The Festival, Reimagining Grandma Moses Gala and Silent Auction" Join us at the Bennington Musuem for the highlight of the Bennington holiday season, an evening of music and conversation, festive cuisine, fine wine, delicious cocktails and, of course, the silent auction. Free babysitting on site. Gala Benefactor and Sponsorship opportunities are available. Call 802-447-1571 ext. 202 for details and reservations. Dec 3-4 - Manchester “Our House for the Holidays?” The Hildene Museum Store Welcomes Neighbors & New Friends. Dressed in holiday finery, the spirit of the season abounds in our 100 year old Carriage Barn! Apple cider, Vermont tastings & fresh cider doughnuts. The crisp fragrance of pine boughs & sounds of the season.

Dec 10 - Bennington "The Festival, Reimagining Grandma Moses Family Day" at Bennington Museum. Bring the family and enjoy a wonderful day of children's shopping, Santa, crafts, bake sale and more. $3 admission for everyone. Watch the museum's website for details. Dec 31 - Bennington "Kids' Noon Year's Eve Party" at Bennington Museum. Kids can welcome in the New Year with music, party hats, sparkling grape juice, and the countdown to Noon. $3/member, $5/not-yetmembers. Accompanying adults can party with us free of charge. (Does not include admission to the galleries.)

Dec 31 - Stratton "New Years Eve Celebration" Celebrate New Years Eve with Stratton from 7-10 pm. Enjoy fireworks, a torchlight parade, fun family activities and more! "Appetites from Around the World," music, a magician, a balloon sculptor, face painting, crafts and games!! Come to Stratton to ring in the New Year

Event listings are update d regularly on our w ebsite: www.thisisvermont.com

Nov 25-27 - Putney “Putney Craft Tour” For the third year running, the Putney Craft Tour has been voted as one of Vermont’s top ten winter events. Once each year, just in time for holiday gift giving, our local craftsmen

2

Milton Avery's Vermont

July 2 through November 6

1863 Jane Stickle Quilt

Oktoberfest

through October 30

Duane Michals:

Photographs from the Floating World

through October 30

Grandma Moses American Modern

Coming June 2017

5 ART HISTORY INNOVATION

Milton Avery (1885-1965) BlueTrees, 1945. Oil on canvas, 28 x 36 inches. Collection Neuberger Museum of Art. Purchase College, State University of NewYork. Gift of Roy Neuberger. © 2015The Milton AveryTrust / Artists Rights Society (ARS), NewYork. Photo Credit: Jim Frank

75 Main Street, Bennington, VT 802-447-1571 benningtonmuseum.org

Saturday October 8 11 am to 5 pm German Food • Beer Tent Vendors • Live Music Kids’ Activities • Wagonrides Colgate Park • Route 9 • Bennington

RAIN or SHINE 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. • $5 Admission - Children under 12 FREE All proceeds benefit our community For information: 845-641-6007 • norshaftlions.org Bennington Oktoberfest

This Is Vermont: Guide to The Shires of Vermont – www.thisisvermont.com – Fall/Winter 2016

Page 9


This Is Vermont: Guide to The Shires Of Vermont – www.thisisvermont.com – Fall/Winter 2016

North Hoosick

RT 22

Cambridge

Salem

RT 22

New York

313

ROUTE

153

ROUTE

Vermont

Bennington Battlefield

East Hebron

St on

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30

Arlington Green Bridge

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Whit e Cre ek Rd

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67

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Lake Shaftsbury

Buck Hill Rd

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EAST

Old Mill Rd.

Chiselville Bridge

11/30

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Exit 2

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US

E. M a n c

Exit 4

Exit 3

ARLINGTON

in g t o n

52

59

SHAFTSBURY

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a W

91

River R oa d

62 61

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87

7A

HISTORIC ROUTE

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St ton

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54 53

Recreation Area

ARLINGTON

Robert Frost Stone House Museum

67

60

74 70

78

56 Arlington

30

ROUTE

Dorset Mountain 3804’

SUNDERLAND

HISTORIC ROUTE

50

ROUTE

The Ball 2755’

West Mountain 2401’

ROUTE

NORTH BENNINGTON

Sporting three covered bridges, this is a very scenic river with good trout fishing to boot. For canoes, put in at the Henry Bridge to avoid dams.

Walloomsac River

August 16, 1777. This Revolutionary War battle was an American victory that led to the defeat of the British at Saratoga by reducing British forces, preventing the capture of needed supplies, and galvanizing the American forces. Located 10 miles west of it’s namesake Bennington, VT, in the town of Walloomsac.

Battle of Bennington

“Kill” is Dutch for “river.” Famous for fly fishing, the river is also popular for canoeing and tubing. Best for paddling in spring or after a rain as it can get low during drier months.

Batten Kill

Batten Kill

Red Mountain 2846’

(see coupon page 15)

Skyline Drive to top of Mt. Equinox

Mount Equinox 3852’

See detailed town map page 18

Merck Forest

DORSET

Dorset Quarry

Local favorite swimming hole. Former quarry, with deep cold water and tall cliffs. Not for small children.

MANCHESTER

315

ROUTE

Norman Rockwell moved to Arlington in 1939 where he began to paint pictures that "grew out of the everyday life of my neighbors," and painted some of his best known works including “The Four Freedoms” and “Saying Grace” using local people for models.

Rockwell Country

315

ROUTE

eV al l

ROUTE

Dorset Quarry

Rd West

Emerald Lake State Park

M

a i n St re et

Map not to scale. Not all roads shown.

Paran Rd .

Rd

The Shires of VT Byway

South Rd

rm

ter Rd h

Lye B

d.

oa d

Glen R roo

7

US

Tra il

Pick your own, on Route 7A at the top of Harwood Hill (just north of Bennington). Blueberry picking follow signs at Houghton Rd, late July early August. Apple picking is right on the corner of Historic Route 7A and Houghton Lane at Terry’s Orchard Starting September to

Glastenbury Mountain 3748’

Our main gateway to the southern section of the Green Mountain National Forest! Rebuilt in 2014 after it’s destruction during tropical storm Irene.

Kelly Stand Road

Apple Picking, Berry Picking

Ap pa lac hia n

True wilderness pond; .4 mile portage for canoes.

Lon gT rai l/

Spruce Peak 2060’

Branch Pond

Bourn Pond

Rd.

Branch Pond

kF alls

Rootville

11/30

ROUTE

Bromley Mountain 3260’

Branch Pond Access Rd

Bro ok R

Rd .

d oa

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Stratton Pond

Lovely day hike from the Kelly Stand 3.7 miles each way. Moderate hike.

Lo ng Tra il /

Ap pa lac hia n

Tra il

With good access, picnic areas, trails, and decent fishing, this is one of my favorite spots. The small mouth bass are very perky with lots of leaping out of the water, the water is very clean and cold. Mini beaches provide secluded options for swimming. A 2 mile hike will take you to the back side of Somerset Reservoir where you may hear the cry of nesting loons.

Grout Pond

Kelly Stan d

Stratton Pond

Stratton Mountain

30

ROUTE

AT/LT - Begin at parking lot on Kelly Stand road. Hike 3.3 miles to top, great views and fire tower. Challenging hike. Stratton Mountain

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Grout Pond

Stratton Pond Trail

ail idge Tr West R

Bennington Bookshop, The ....................pg. 6 Bringing You Vermont & NE Cafe..........pg. 20 The Scarlett Creation..............................pg. 6 Ramuntos Pizza ......................................pg. 7 Powers Market ......................................pg. 5 Kevin’s Restaurant and Sports Pub ..........pg. 5 Clearbrook Farm ..................................pg. 15 West Mountain Inn ..............................pg. 15 Arlington Inn ........................................pg. 15

34. 37. 38. 39. 45. 46. 48. 50. 52.

54.

Cheese House, The ..............................pg. 14

Sugar Shack, The ..................................pg. 15

Gamer’s Grotto ......................................pg. 6

33.

53.

Jophiels Beauty Salon & Wellness Loft....pg. 6

31.

Here We Grow ......................................pg. 6

26.

Knapps Toys & Music ..............................pg. 6

Jay’s Cards & Gifts ..................................pg. 6

24.

28.

The Gift Garden ....................................pg. 6

Oldcastle Theatre ..................................pg. 6

22. 23.

Cake Gallery ..........................................pg. 7

The Harwood Hill ..................................pg. 5

18.

21.

Bennington Lanes ..................................pg. 5

17.

Lil’ Britain ..............................................pg. 6

Bennington Potters ................................pg. 5

16.

20.

Jensen’s Restaurant ................................pg. 5

14.

Second Hand Rose..................................pg. 5

11.

Hawkins House Craftsmarket ........pg. 5 & 20

Catamount Tap House ............................pg. 4

10.

12.

Apple Barn, The ......................................pg. 5

9.

Mt Anthony Country Club ......................pg. 4

6.

Bennington Station, The..........................pg. 5

Bennington Museum ..............................pg. 5

5.

8.

Camelot Village Antiques........................pg. 5

3.

The Grille at Mt Anthony CC ..................pg. 4

Norshaft Lion’s Oktoberfest....................pg. 9

2.

6.

The Bennington Center for the Arts ........pg. 5

Page #

1.

Map # Business Name

NUMERICAL INDEX OF ADVERTISERS


Hoosick Falls

RT 22

New York

North Petersburg

RT 22

Hoosick

7

NY

RT 346

Paper Mill Bridge

P

This Is Vermont: Guide to The Shires Of Vermont – www.thisisvermont.com – Fall/Winter 2016

Blinking Light

? Information

3

Tick Warning:

The iconic mountain viewable from everywhere in Bennington.

So. Vermont College

St. nk

Elm S treet

Old First Church

5

Ba

6

Deer ticks are common in the Shires, and can carry Lyme Disease. Protect yourself by using regular bug repellant, and checking for ticks after being outdoors. Removing any ticks within 48 hours prevents the transmission of Lyme Disease. Note: the deer tick nymphs are even smaller than adults, not much bigger than a speck, and have six legs instead of eight. You will sometimes notice the itchiness around the tick before you actually see it.

Bus Station

Swimming Playground Hiking Biking

Picnic Area Canoeing

Fishing

Fish Hatchery

Map Key

Recreation Ctr.

Picnic Area

Library

Mount Anthony 2340’

way

OLD BENNINGTON

Open to the public

Golf Course

Nor ths 17 ide Dr i ve

Exit 1

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North Branch

Barbers Pond

ad

To Williamstown, MA

The view of the Pownal Valley with the Hoosick River is truly striking. Best viewed southbound on US 7 heading to Massachusetts.

Amazing View

d Ro Pon ers b r Ba

Good canoe access, mostly surrounded by houses, but good fishing for bass and overall a pretty pond. Barbers Pond Largest crayfish I’ve seen and pretty tasty.

Red Mill Pond

A short but challenging 1.8 mile hike. Start at Route 9. Very steep first quarter mile, then mostly VT State a ridge walk with Fish Hatchery some up and down. Great views over Bennington.

Ha rmon Hill

Woodford State Park

9

VT

Molly Stark Byway

Harmon Hill

279

Running the length of the Shires, you can access the trail at Route 9 in Bennington, or Route 11/30 in Manchester. The stretch from Route 9 to the Kelly Stand is the longest roadless section of the entire Appalachian Trail. AT/LT are white blazes. Other trails are blue blazes.

A ppalachian Trail / Long Trail

Str ee t

This extended marsh and pond is quite weedy but lots of Stream Pond wildlife and good canoe South (duck reserve) access. Fish between the lilly pads for nice pickerel and bass. Mostly pristine shoreline.

South Stream Pond / Duck Re serve

Grandview St.

Hillside Street

Pleasant Street

P

Gage Street

County Street

16

Mo

BENNINGTON

enter lower park from Performance Drive

Ba ld

NO SER VICE S

Bald Mountain 2857’

38 37 31 Main Street 22 23 28 33 34 26 39 21 24 Union Street

P

12

Deer Park

11

? Kocher Drive

Per formance

Willow Park

Main entrance off East Rd.

October. Pick your own berries at the Apple Barn on US 7 south (ad on page 5). See fruit icons on map!

Weeks St.

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8

14

7

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Bennington Vermont Welcome Center

Located on the north side of Route 346, shortly before the village of North Pownal. Owned by the Nature Conservancy, it is home to rare species of plants & flowers.It is also popular as a rappelling / climbing area and has cliffs from 30’ to 90’. Poison ivy is also abundant here, so take care! Hard to find, no signage. Cliffs visible as you approach from east, entrance just past road cut on the right.

Traffic Light

Parking

H Hospital

Post Office

Benn ingto n Battle Monument 308’ tall elevator to top

Silk Rd Bridge

18

7A

HISTORIC ROUTE

Mount A nthony

Mt. Anthony Rd.

Pownal Quarry

Enlarged to show detail. Note dime for scale.

Bennington College

Molly Stark By

1

Walloomsac R d

2

ROUTE

67A

Bennington Airport

Vail Rd.

r p hy R d .

Henry Bridge

45

Eastbound into Vermont: TURN RIGHT at blinking yellow light to avoid 279 and follow VT RT. 9 for Bennington, North Bennington, Pownal, Wilmington and Mt Snow.

9

VT

Mu

West S t.

School St

Mile Around Woods n R d.

Austin Hill Rd

Road River

S 279 ICE V ER

Vermont

To A l b any, NY

Gyps y Lan e

d.

kR

Sil

Park St.

Lake Paran

Convent Avenue

g Hou

Benmont Avenue Dewey Street

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NO

New York

Depot Street Washintgton Av e

Wal l o o m sac R iver

Houran Rd.

Vermont

North Street

South Street

et re St

Ave. Silver Street

Ca r

Valentine St.

The Shires of VT Byway

iew ir v Fa

Bradford Street Lo n

nt ume Mon t. ch S B ee Ap

gto Drive School Street

Road Stream

gT ra il /

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Ha r r i n

Branch St

South

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Battenkill Stitchery ..............................pg. 15 Skyline Drive ........................................pg. 15 Equinox Valley Nursery ........................pg. 18 Hildene, Lincoln Family Home ............pg. 18 Mother Myricks Confectionery ............pg. 18 Northshire Bookstore ..........................pg. 18 Lighting Place, The................................pg. 18 Gringo Jacks ........................................pg. 18 Manchester Hot Glass ..........................pg. 18 Fall Arts & craft Festival ........................pg. 20

59. 60. 61. 62. 70. 74. 78. 87. 91. 99.

Tell our advertisers you found them using the Guide to the Shires! —Thank you!

Christmas Days ....................................pg. 14

56.


Bennington Battle Monument Celebrates 125TH

B

Rienactors at the Bennington Battle Monument.

efore celebrating the 125th birthday of Vermont’s tallest man-made structure with some fun facts, let’s first explain why it is here. In 1777, British General John Burgoyne came down from Canada towards Saratoga to split the Colonies. Responding to Vermont’s plea for help, New Hampshire dispatched General John Stark with over 1000 militia to Vermont. Figuring that Burgoyne would run short out of supplies (e.g. food, ammunition) and try to capture the supply depot in Bennington (where the monument stands today), Stark brought his militia to Bennington to defend the supplies. From his camp in northwest Bennington, Stark engaged the British on August 16, 1777 in the Battle of Bennington. It was a resounding American victory. Of the 1000 British (primarily Germans) sent, only a

handful made it back to Burgoyne who without the supplies and loss of some of his best troops surrendered at Saratoga two months later resulting in the French entering the war on the American side. The monument was built on the spot of the supplies the British never got, and was dedicated in 1891 by President Benjamin Harrison on the 100th anniversary of the Republic of Vermont becoming the 14th State. The monument itself is 306’ 4 ½” tall, does not sway, and because it is on a hill it is higher than the Washington Monument. Abraham Lincoln’s son Robert Todd Lincoln could see the magnificent monument from his home, Hildene, 22 miles away in Manchester. The dramatic once a year changing of the aviation light on top by the site administrator MaryLou Chicote is captured on a short Youtube video (go to Youtube.com then search Bennington Battle Monument GNAT-TV). Aviator Charles Lindbergh, on his celebration tour of the US in 1927, circled the monument several times in his “Spirit of Saint Louis” single engine plane. John Stark’s statue is pointing to the west where the British were encamped not the rest rooms. Stark’s toast to the Battle of Bennington veterans “Live free or die” was adopted by NH after WWII as its motto. The Mason influence is everywhere. Stark and Green Mountain Boy Seth Warner were Masons and the cornerstone and cap stone were placed with mason ritual.

National Exhibition by the American Women Artists

T

he Bennington Center for the Arts is pleased to again be partnering with the esteemed society of American Women Artists this fall for the organization's annual exhibition and workshop series. Typically held in fine art destinations such as Santa Fe, Jackson Hole and Scottsdale, this is only the second time the show has been exhibited in the Northeast, with the first time also at the Center in 1996. This year, over 140 pieces of artwork will be on display and for sale at The Bennington beginning September 23 through November 13th. The opening festivities will begin with five separate workshops taught by Master Members Carol Arnold, Bethanne Kinsella Cople, Pam Ingalls, Nancy Boren, and Kathy Lemke Waste. The workshops, which are open to a range of skill sets, begin on either September 20th or the 21st, and go through the 22nd. Oil and watercolor techniques will be demonstrated while the instructors create works ranging from delicate portraits to brushy, plein air landscapes. On September 23rd, the art exhibitions will be open to the public. One gallery will include work that was juried into the show by the staff of The Bennington, select members of AWA and a number of additional guest jurors. The second gallery will include work created by AWA Master & Signature Members. Both shows include two and three dimensional artwork in a variety of media, such as charcoal, ceramic, watercolor, and bronze. To celebrate the opening, there will be an evening reception and awards ceremony. This will

Page 12

take place Friday, the 23rd, from 5 - 8pm. The public is welcome to attend free of charge to enjoy the art and meet artists from around the country. The Bennington is a non-profit art center located at 44 Gypsy Lane on Vermont Route 9 just West of Bennington. In addition to gallery space for traveling exhibitions the Center has additional galleries for its permanent wildlife art collection, wild bird carvings by Floyd Scholz and works by Eric Sloane. It is also home to the Covered Bridge Museum. For more information or to sign up for the AWA workshops, contact the Center at (802)442-7158 or go to www.TheBennington.org.

Elizabeth Pollie, Four Generations

The 2nd USS Bennington (a carrier) fought in the pacific in WWII and its bell is outside town hall. There is a smaller 75 foot monument at Fort Rosecrans Cemetery in San Diego honoring the first USS Bennington. The important Battle of Bennington has led to over 15 states having places named Bennington. Be sure to visit the mass grave (British and Americans) in the Old First Church cemetery. The island in front of the church is where the 700 British(German) prisoners were brought. Information can be found in a new exhibit inside the monument, at the Bennington Museum, and at the monument gift shop which is visited yearly by some 50,000 people. The monument staff is very knowledgeable about the battle and the monument. For more information go to: www.benningtonbattlemonument.com

Stark Cannon at the Vermont State House.

Celebrating Arthur Miller

Oldcastle Theatre:

‘The Ride Down Mt. Morgan’ by Arthur Miller October 7th – October 23rd 2016.

A

rthur Miller’s 100th birthday is being celebrated around the globe and Oldcastle Theatre will do its part to remind playgoers of the man’s genius with one of his last plays, “The Ride Down Mt. Morgan.” The New York Times wrote: “Any new play by Arthur Miller is an important event in American culture. One as theatrically bold and intellectually subtle as “The Ride Down Mt. Morgan” is a reason to shout for joy.” The play concerns Lyman Felt a poet turned insurance tycoon in his fifties. Driving down Mt. Morgan in the snow he crashes his car and is taken to an upstate hospital. Summoned to his bedside are his daughter and his two wives: Theo the older WASP-ish woman whom he married decades earlier and Leah, the young Jewish businesswoman who had been Lyman’s lover and insisted on becoming his wife. Now Lyman’s past, and his appetites, have caught up with him. The play was first presented in London and then became a success, first at the New York Shakespeare Festival’s Public Theatre and then on Broadway starring Patrick Stewart. It is a towering role in a play filled with juicy parts for talented actors. For more information see ad page 6.

“The Consul, the Tramp, and America’s Sweetheart” will end production at Oldcastle Theatre Spetmber 18th following a successful World Premier.

This Is Vermont: Guide to The Shires of Vermont – www.thisisvermont.com – Fall/Winter 2016


Arts, Culture, and Local Lore in The Shires of Vermont

Hildene From the Harvest to the Holidays

B

eing open year round, means that each season guests can expect something new and different from their Hildene experience. This is especially true when summer turns to fall and fall to winter. While the flowers in the estate’s abundant gardens may be preparing for their winter sleep in late September, the pace of activity across Hildene’s 412 acres, between then and the first day of winter, December 21, is anything but sleepy. Each autumn brings new reasons to celebrate the harvest, particularly as the agricultural project on the lower portion of the property, known as The Dene, continues to evolve. This, nearly 200 acre, parcel has been returned to agriculture, as it was used during the Lincoln years. The construction of a teaching greenhouse is complete and a new compost bin system for large scale composting is nearing completion as well. Both of these projects reflect only a small portion of Hildene’s greater commitment to agricultural and eco-

Hildene’s Garden in fall.

logical sustainability and education. Interaction with teachers, staff and guests, enhances the experiences of the scores of local high school students whose hands on learning, focused on agriculture, economics and food systems brings them to Dene Farm daily. Hildene guests can access Dene Farm on foot, and May through October by tram or wagon. The trams run on the hour and the wagon ride leaves from the Welcome Center at 2:00 pm daily for an additional cost of $10 per adult. Along the way the wagon makes several stops where the driver talks about the history of the Lincolns’ farming legacy, the evolution of Vermont’s landscape and Hildene’s plans for the future in this newly opened area. Fall is a time of unparalleled beauty at the Lincolns’ estate, surrounded by the Green and Taconic Mountains with scenic views at every turn on its more than 12 miles of walking trails. In addition to exploring the Dene, the visitor’s experience is not complete

without a tour of the home and Lincoln exhibit and a visit to Pullman car, Sunbeam, with its thought-provoking exhibit, Many Voices (a site on the Vermont African American Heritage Trail). The Hildene Goat Dairy and cheese-making facility, designed for public viewing, is a must see for the whole family. Most visits end where they started, back at the Welcome Center and The Museum Store for tastings and an always memorable shopping experience. Fall was also a special time of year for presidential son, Robert Lincoln and wife Mary when the Lincoln family lived at Hildene, as it marked the beginning of the festive holiday season. This year from December 1 through January 1, it is Christmas Eve 1912 again at Hildene, and The Lincoln Family Home is looking as it would have as Robert and Mary prepared for the holidays more than 100 years ago. For more information visit www.hildene.org, call 802.362.1788 or email info@hildene.org.

online catalog includes photographs by John Hubbard, Mary Sanford, Frederick D. Burt, William Hayden, and others, as well as art, historic artifacts, books in the museum’s research library, and the museum’s other notable collections.

from pencil sketches executed en plein air, fresh watercolors based on these sketches and painted while in Vermont, and many major oil paintings drawn from these sources and typically completed during the winter months in his New York studio, is celebrated in Milton Avery’s Vermont. The works in the exhibition are drawn from Milton Avery Trust; The Milton and Sally Avery Arts Foundation; National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C.; Neuberger Museum of Art, Purchase College, State University of New York; the Peabody College Collection, Vanderbilt University of Fine Arts Gallery; and private collectors who wish to remain anonymous. On view through October 30 is a remarkable photography exhibition of works by Duane Michals, known by many as one of the great photographic innovators of the last century, widely known for his work with series, multiple exposures, and text. This particular exhibition – Duane Michals: Photographs from the Floating World, features vibrant color photographs by this groundbreaking artist created in and around Cambridge, New York, during the last decade. The images reference art historical precedents, such as Japanese fan paintings and the late nineteenth-century French artists Bonnard and Vuillard, and depict emotion and universal themes like love, death, and immortality. Incorporated into his work is text which does not explain his photography, but gives voice to his ideas and thoughts about the pictures. The quilt that inspires quilters all over the world will be on its yearly display at the Bennington Museum from September 3 through October 10. The 1863 Jane Stickle Quilt is comprised of 169 five-inch blocks, each in different patterns, containing a remarkable total of 5,602 pieces surrounded by a unique scalloped border. For more information go to benningtonmuseum.org or call 802-447-1571. See ad on page 9.

New Website Offers Searchable Collection Online Bennington Museum:

O

ver six years ago, Bennington Museum initiated a plan to place the complete holdings of the collection of the museum online, making it accessible to anyone and everyone. Thanks to a grant from the Edwin S. Webster Foundation, the museum’s collection records (over 52,000 records) are now online including 5000 glass plate negatives. A new and powerful search interface for the collections accommodates searches by keyword, related people, artist, title, or one can browse by random images. Visitors to the new Bennington Museum site will also find information about upcoming programs and special events, and exhibitions currently on view as well as what is planned for the future. The design of the site is fully responsive making it mobile, and tablet, friendly Bennington was changing rapidly at the turn of the 19th century and local photographers captured the people and landscape using negatives on thin plates of glass. The Bennington Museum recently acquired nearly 2,000 glass plate negatives from this era that were held in the Weichert-Isselhardt Collection. Staff, volunteers, and interns have been scanning, cataloging and identifying the collection. Most of the negatives in this collection were taken by Madison Watson (active in Bennington 1888-1899) and Wills T. White (active in Bennington 1899-1940). When White retired he left the glass plate negatives in the attic above his former studio located in downtown Bennington. The building also housed the Bennington Banner and in 1958 the negatives were found by Robert Weichert, photographer for the Banner. Weichert started collecting historic photographs and later hired Tordis Isselhardt to help organize the collection and formed a company “Images of the Past.” After retiring, Isselhardt realized that this treasure trove of Bennington images needed to stay in the community. In addition to the Weichert-Isselhardt Collection, the

Major 2016 Exhibitions Through November 6, Bennington Museum presents Milton Avery's Vermont the first exhibition to take a focused look at the work this great American modernist created based upon his summers spent in southern Vermont, from the mid1930s through the mid-1940s. Noted for his simultaneous commitment to exploring the formal, abstract qualities of art (line, texture, composition and, especially color) and the creation of representational images drawn from his daily encounters with people and places, Avery's Vermont work vividly captures his family's summer activities and the artist's personal response to the Vermont landscape. The work that was inspired and to an extent created in Vermont,

Wills T. White, Horse Drawn Fire Engine, Safford Street, Bennington, VT , Glass Plate Negative, Bennington Museum Collection, Gift of Tordis Ilg Isselhardt from the, Wiechert-Isselhardt Collection and Museum Purchase.

This Is Vermont: Guide to The Shires of Vermont – www.thisisvermont.com – Fall/Winter 2016

Page 13


All Around The Shires

H

aving grown up in The Shires, I’ve come to appreciate just how much our region has to offer. It was not always so. Like many kids growing up, I could not wait to move away from my home town and explore the world. So I traveled around the country and around the world, and in so doing made a surprising discovery… that the place I most loved was right back where I had started. Many agree and our region has long been a destination for travelers to Vermont. Famous for it’s foliage, but not just that, I hope these suggestions will give you some ideas on how you can create your own memories of a lifetime in The Shires of Vermont!

SUGGESTED ITINERARIES Each of these suggestions represent a full day of activity. For a more relaxed pace, split over two days and include a night’s stay at a local motel or bed and breakfast. To include a show, do a half tour and then an early dinner to leave time to see a play at Oldcastle Theatre or the Dorset Theatre.

Shaftsbury • Arlington Sunderland Stop. Shop.

54

And remember to say, CHEESE! Vermont Provisions and Souvenirs ~ You’ll find it all here at the Cheese House, located on Historic Route 7A, Arlington, Vermont e Cheese House is the place to shop for Vermont Cheeses. We offer a great selection of Vermont Farmstead Cheeses.

Arts & Culture Tour #1

• Visit Hildene, The Lincoln Family Home in Manchester • Drive Route 7A (The Shires Byway) to Bennington • Lunch on Main Street and walk the downtown. • Visit “The Bennington” Center for The Arts • See a play at Oldcastle Theatre • Dinner at Pangaea in North Bennington

Arts & Culture Tour #2

• Breakfast at the Rooster Cafe in Manchester • Visit the Southern Vermont Arts Center in Manchester • Lunch on Main Street in Manchester and walk the downtown area • Drive Route 7A (The Shires Byway) to Bennington • Visit the Bennington Museum • Dinner at the Bennington Station Restaurant

Historic Figure s: Lincoln, Roc kwell, Frost

• Breakfast in Manchester at Up for Breakfast on Main Street • Visit Hildene - the Lincoln Family Home • Drive Route 7A (The Shires Byway) • Stop at the Battenkill Gallery in Arlington to see the Norman Rockwell Exhibit • Stop at Robert Frost Stone House Museum in Shaftsbury • Visit the Old First Church just down from the monument to visit Robert Frost's grave. • Dinner in Bennington at Lil' Britain (authentic British fish & chips at it’s best!)

History Tour

• Breakfast at the famous Blue Benn Diner in Bennington located on North Street (route 7) • Visit the Bennington Museum - Military Gallery and Regional History • Visit the Bennington Battle Monument • Take a walking tour of Downtown Bennington (available at Downtown Welcome ctr., see pg. 6) • Lunch in Bennington on Main Street • Drive Route 7A (The Shires Byway) to Manchester • Visit Museum of American Fly Fishing • Shop historic Main Street in Manchester • Dinner in Manchester at Gringo Jacks on the northern end of Main Street

Na ture Enthusia st (mellow)

• For the Northshire: Fill a lunch basket and walk the trails at the Equinox Preserve and have a picnic lunch at Equinox Pond. • For the Southshire: fill a lunch basket at Powers Market in North Bennington and walk the trails in the Mile-Around Woods by the Historic Park McCullough Mansion in North Bennington, or at Woodford State Park, on Route 9 east of Bennington.

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We’re more than just Cheese! Gis, Vermont Souvenirs, Sweats, Tees and Clothes!

Historic Route 7A Arlington, Vermont

Just South of Manchester

www.thevermontcheesehouse.com Open Daily 10 to 5 - Closed Tuesday’s

The Spirit of Christmas Year-Round

802-375-9033

Featuring

Heritage Village • Old World Glass Santa Collectibles • Williraye Nativity Sets • Byers Choice and more!

Southern Vermont’s Largest Christmas Shoppe!

56

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pe n

0Dai ly & Sunday 9:3

0 5:3

Bring in this ad for a FREE ornament

Vermont “Firsts” in the Nation 6279 Vermont Rte. 7A between Arlington and Manchester

The first . . . • Colonial soldier to shed British blood at the Battle of Lexington, April 19, 1775 was Solomon Brown from New Haven, Vermont, who thus fired the first effective shot in the Revolutionary War.

• Constitution to provide for a system of public school education was Vermont's in 1777.

• Stars and Stripes flag to lead American armed forces on land was the Bennington Flag used at the Battle of Bennington on August 16, 1777.

• Marble quarry was started at East Dorset in 1785 by Isaac Underhill.

802-362-2516 • www.xmasdays.com

• Copper pennies minted by a state were authorized by the Vermont General Assembly in 1785 and made by Reuben Harmon, Jr. at Rupert.

• U.S. congressman elected who had served time in jail was Matthew Lyon of Vermont (1789). Jailed under the terms of the Alien and Sedition Acts, (which were later declared unconstitutional), Lyon was re-elected to Congress while still in jail. • Constitution to outlaw slavery was Vermont's in 1777.

This Is Vermont: Guide to The Shires of Vermont – www.thisisvermont.com – Fall/Winter 2016


e Shires of Vermont Byway

(Historic Route 7A)

Shaftsbury • Arlington • Sunderland Shaftsbury Incorporated 1761 • Pop. 3,767 ~ Arlington Incorporated 1761 • Pop. 2,397 ~ Sunderland Incorporated 1761 • Pop. 850 Sunderland Town Office - 802-375-6106 • Shaftsbury Town Office - 802-442-4038 Arlington Town Office - 802-375-2332 • www.arlingtonVT.org • Capitol of Vermont 1787

60 56

SUNDERLAND Arlington Recreation Park

54 53

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in g t o n

313

ROUTE

67

802-442-4273 • ClearBrookFarm.com

rm



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SER V

7A SHAFTSBURY 48

Also at Manchester and Londonderry Farmer’s Markets

Exit 3

Bro ok R

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ROUTE

HISTORIC ROUTE

Parking located on 313 by bridge, and on 7A just north of the village.

Open Daily May-Oct • Rte. 7A in Shaftsbury

Old Mill Rd.

d Roa East

Basketball • Baseball • Canoeing • Cookouts Fishing • Fitness Circuit • 9-Hole Golf ($5 fee) Nature Trail • Playground • Putting Green Soccer • Swimming • Tennis • Tubing • Vollyball

T h e S h i r e s o f Ve r m o

The public is invited to use park facilities, without charge (exception: a $5 donation for golf is requested), on a non-reserved basis. Park facilities can be reserved for private functions and special events. Applicatoins available at the park office.

E. A rl

Plus a wide selection of other LOCAL farm and artisan food products including Fruits, Baked Goods, Cheese, Yogurt, and Vermont Organic Milk!

South Rd

Arlington Recreation Park

ARLINGTON

50

Growers of Tasty Organic Fruits and Vegetables

Chiselville Bridge

52

313 West Arlington Bridge

7

Visit our Farmstand for the freshest Tomatoes, Strawberries, Beans, Peas, Lettuce, Arugula, Spinach, Carrots, Raspberries, Broccoli, Beets & more!

ROUTE

Battenkill River

US

Hill Farm Rd

NO

To Cambridge

Map not to scale. Not all roads shown.

48

59

Rd .

To Manchester

See our center map for recreational information.

US

7

Lake Shaftsbury

'VIEXMZI2I[)RKPERH'SYRXV]'YMWMRIÂŻ*VIWL0SGEP 3VKERMG %GVIWSJ8VEMPW+EVHIRWERH0E[RWXS)RNS] 7TEGMSYW6SSQW[MXL*EFYPSYW:MI[W 50 6MZIV6SEH%VPMRKXSR:8   MRJS$;IWX1SYRXEMR-RRGSQ[[[;IWX1SYRXEMR-RRGSQ

Equinox Mountain Skyline Drive 60

Buck Hill Rd

An unforgettable drive to the summit of Mount Equinox, the highest peak in the Taconic Range.

Exit 2

Br fo ing Li r $2 in t m h ve it 1 OF is a hi p F d cl e

plus visit the Saint Bruno Scenic Viewing Center Equinox Skyline Drive To Bennington

52

802-362-1114 or 1115 www.equinoxmountain.com

e

1A Saint Bruno Drive, Arlington, VT 05250

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Just o Historic Route 7A - GPS: 6369 Skyline Drive

Quarts of our own maple syrup just $17 each with this coupon! 53

Southern Vermont’s Needlepoint Shop

59

For all your Needlepoint and Cross Stitch supplies

Be sure to visit Battenkill Stitchery 6350 Historic Route 7A, Sunderland, Vermont 05250 802-362-0654 • Email: battenkillstitchery@yahoo.com Hours: Open: Wednesday - Saturday 10am - 5pm Sunday 11am - 4pm • Closed: Monday & Tuesday

www.battenkillstitchery.com

Large Selection of our own award winning Pure Vermont Maple Syrup made on site, Vermont food products, tees & sweats, souvenirs, fresh baked pies, cookies, cider donuts and more!

“Lab Approved�

Norman Rockwell Exhibition Featuring hundreds ofexamples of Rockwell’s printed works; 15 minute ďŹ lm and Giî†? Shop featuring Rockwell prints & collectibles!

- Open Daily -

29 Sugar Shack Lane, Historic Route 7A, Arlington, VT Only 15 min. between Manchester & Bennington (one mile north of Arlington Village)

(802) 375-6747

SugarShackVT.com

This Is Vermont: Guide to The Shires of Vermont – www.thisisvermont.com – Fall/Winter 2016

E V SA

Page 15


Northshire Bookstore

Continued from page 3 “Looking back over the years, we have hosted an amazing number of authors – adult authors, children’s authors, bestselling authors, first-time authors, local authors – and we have felt incredibly enriched by these wonderful author events. Some of our favorite and most successful events in the early days were with Norman Mailer, Vermont Senator George Aiken, Gloria Steinem, Annie Proulx, Pat Conroy – who we spent a day with showing him the beauty of Vermont – and Stephen King, on his cross-country tour for Insomnia.  And there have been hundreds of others. The poetry events with Galway Kinnell, Billy Collins, Donald Hall, and Mary Oliver were some of the most memorable. Beloved children’s authors such as Tomie dePaola, Barry Moser, and Katherine Paterson made multiple visits to the bookstore. “Celebrating the Northshire Bookstore’s 40th year, and its wonderful history of books, authors, community, staff, and now the 2nd and even 3rd generation of bookselling, is a thrill and a privilege.  How many pursuits can be viewed as both vocation and avocation, being fed not only by passion, but also contributing to the enrichment of the mind.” “This business is about community which takes many forms and encompasses many spheres.” Ed Morrow explained. “There is not only the community of the Northshire staff and of other booksellers all over the world, there is the publishing industry community and an extraordinary community of authors–unknown, famous, regional, national, most underpaid, some overpaid–continuing, in the face of staggering odds and ever-changing technologies, to write tens of thousands of books each year.  “Most importantly, there is the community of readers– our patrons–which gives us our raison d’être. The only requirement for citizenship in this community is a love of books. We have become what we are because of the people who have chosen to make us part of their community over the years, and for that we are very grateful.  “Since our expansion in 2003, we have truly become a physical community center. We are the meeting place for people coming to town. A bulletin board in our entryway is for posters announcing community events. Community organizations use our conference room, adjacent to our café, free of charge. The room is constantly booked with every-

one from the local day care fundraising committee, to public speaking classes, to many writing groups. “Our events space is used by community cultural organizations for events of their own–we have had Robert Todd Lincoln’s historic estate Hildene conduct a history series here; the Vermont Beekeepers Association has held their monthly meeting here; the Green Mountain Academy for Lifelong Learning holds classes here. Local theatres hold pre-performance discussions in the Northshire Bookstore.  “We are particularly pleased that local teens have found the bookstore (and café) an accepting place to gather,

Northshire Bookstore in Manchester.

whether it is to meet after class, study for tests, do research for a paper, check email, get ideas for the one-act play festival, participate in a poetry slam or simply meet their parents. “Our events program is a community service in itself. Through it, we offer the community enriching experiences well beyond inspired author appearances. Partnering with community organizations to hold events is an important component of our events programming – for instance, we partnered with the Orton Family Foundation, a land use planning non-profit, to bring former Secretary of the Interior Bruce Babbitt to the bookstore to talk about land use in the context of the federal government. Additionally, we have been community leaders for decades–that, too, is part of the winning prescription for an independent bookstore, making Northshire Bookstore a cornerstone of the community, for residents and visitors alike. “It has been a rich and, in many ways, a magical four decades, endeavoring to interlace the world of books into

Covered Bridge Guide

See our center map and town maps for bridge locations.

Paper Mill Village Bridge

Chiselville Bridge

The Paper Mill Village Covered Bridge was built in 1889 and carries Murphy Road, spanning the Walloomsac River. It was originally named for a 1790 paper mill that was one of Vermont’s first; in fact the paper used to draft Vermont’s constitution came from this mill. The mill has provided hydroelectric power for most of the 20th century. The original dam was built at an existing falls in 1784. The present 85’ concrete dam was built in 1889. The site has had hydroelectric power since at least 1907. The hydro electric works generated power for the mill from 1907 until around 1958.

The name Chiselville Bridge comes from a former chisel factory nearby, but the bridge was previously named High Bridge and the Roaring Branch Bridge. The Chiselville Bridge s p a n s t h e Ro a r i n g Branch Brook and was built by Daniel Oatman in 1870. At that time, the cost to build this bridge was $2,307.31 including the builder’s fee. The Chiselville Bridge survived the flood of 1927, which destroyed hundreds of Vermont covered bridges. It appears that the strategic placement of this bridge allowed the flooded Roaring Branch Brook to pass harmlessly underneath.

Route 67A .5 mile west of the Silk Road Bridge (watch for sign). Dimensions: 125.5 feet long. 14.25 feet wide. 8.67 feet high at truss. 11.17 feet high at center.

Just off Route 7A in Arlington. Turn right onto East Arlington Road 1.9 miles to bridge. Dimensions 117 feet long, 11.8 feet wide, 8.7 feet high at truss, 10.9 feet high at center.

For over 50 years, the site has languished until restauranteur/visionary William Scully took up the challenge to bring the hydro electric plant back online. Due to his efforts, the old mill is now one of the first hydro electric sites approved to be redeveloped in the state in over 30 years. Now Complete, the facility provides electricity to power over 100 homes. The public is invited to visit the site which features a small informational kiosk and parking area next to the covered bridge. From there, you can access a short walking trail with views of the bridge, and a canoe access.

West Arlington Bridge This bridge spans the Battenkill River which is well known by canoeists, kayakers and fly fisherman. The Battenkill is also famous for some great swimming holes. In addition, inner tube rides along the Battenkill are popular during the summer months. The West Arlington Bridge is one of Vermont’s best loved and most photographed covered bridges. The picturesque setting includes views of a local church steeple and the former home of artist Norman Rockwell. Rockwell’s home is now known as the Inn on Covered Bridge Green and operates as a Bed & Breakfast Inn. Take a left off Route 7A in Arlington onto Route 313 west 4.4 miles on left side.

Page 16

the diurnal activities of our community - a community that has unceasingly encouraged and coached us to reach further and more artfully into the cornucopia of author creativity to inspire, excite, inform, amuse and entertain. Responding to a caring community’s thirst for deeper draughts of the mind and soul connection that is the essence of books, the Northshire took shape into what it is today: the House of Books that Manchester and the Mountain communities built. “We see this house as built of a very special brick. A brick forged in magical kilns. They are called books. But we mean books in the codex format, ink on paper. This distinction became necessary about half-way through the Northshire’s journey and has even more importance today. For, while the essence of a book is intangible–a captured set of ideas and creativity of an author blending with the creative interpretation inspired in its reader–the means of its transmission is increasingly being recognized as critically important. “The need to disconnect, to unplug; the need to rechcarge, to reconnect with our human essence; the imperative of balance, of groundedness, of thinking deeply, all speak to the human scale aspect of the book as found in the Northshire. It is my belief that our community instinctively recognizes this and will support the Northshire through another 40 years–which we hope may be curated by our granddaughters.” Chris Morrow added; “A good bookstore is part of the cultural foundation of its community. Bookstores tend to be owned and staffed by people who care about the quality of their daily lives, about the social setting in which they work, and about how they can have a positive effect on the cultural fabric of their community. Irrepressible, old-dog bookseller David Schwartz said it best. “Bookselling …is a search for a community of values which can act as an underpinning of a better world. “Ever since our opening day we have focused on exceeding our customers’ expectations. By creating a unique and inviting space, by filling it with well-chosen titles, and by having excellent booksellers, the right books land in the right set of hands at the right time. All of our efforts revolve around this simple aspiration of creating magic. So thank you to all the folks in Manchester and the Mountains, to our fellow booksellers, to publishers, to authors and to readers across the globe. Read on…”

Silk Road Bridge This bridge spans the Wallomsac River and was built about 1840 probably by Benjamin Sears. The original name for this bridge was the Locust Grove Bridge. Located just across from the entrance to Bennington College on Route 67A. Dimensions: 88 feet long, 14.25 feet wide, 10 feet high at truss, 11.9 feet high at center.

Henry Bridge This bridge received its name from Elnathan Henry who bought the land from James Breckenridge and constructed the Henry House in 1769. The Henry House operates today as a Bed and Breakfast Inn and is located directly across from the bridge. The Henry Bridge spans the Wallomsac River. The original bridge was constructed in 1840. In 1989 a complete restructuring was done by Blow and Cote, Inc. The site has off street parking and picnic areas. This is also near the site of the Breakenridge Farm Standoff, the first armed resistance to NY claims to VT lands, and start of the Green Mountain Boys. Located just off Route 67A- turn left on Murphy Road (watch for signs). Dimensions: 117 feet long, 11.8 feet wide, 8.7 feet high at center.

Covered Bridge Facts You may pass through All Five Bennington County Covered Bridges in a standard size automobile – one lane only. Bridges were covered to keep the wood dry and thereby avoid rot. This became the trend in 1805 when a bridge designed by Timothy Palmer proved most durable. Most covered bridges are painted red because iron ochre was an inexpensive pigment. The most common type of covered bridge is Town Lattice. All Bennington County Bridges are of this type.

This Is Vermont: Guide to The Shires of Vermont – www.thisisvermont.com – Fall/Winter 2016


Snowshoe at the Equinox Preservation Trust

Chiselville Covered Bridge

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he Equinox Preserve covers 914 acres of forest lands on the eastern slopes of Mount Equinox in Manchester, Vermont. It is open to the public for year-round, non-motorized recreation. Over 11 miles of marked and maintained trails provide access to these unique mountainous woodlands.

“A Must Fall Stop” —The New York Times

F

or thirty-six years, the amazing pumpkin patch at the Equinox Valley Nursery has been a favorite stop for folks during the fall harvest season. Jump on a wagon ride, explore the crazy maze, or grab your camera and check out the whimsical scarecrow displays. There is also a huge selection of mums, gourds, indian corn, straw bales, squash, and cornstalks for your fall decorating inspiration. Make sure to try Roger’s famous cider donuts too. Aptly named “The Best Pumpkin Patch” by Vermont Life Magazine, you can pick from hundreds of pumpkins of different sizes and shapes. Speaking of pumpkins, don’t miss the 10 th Annual Pumpkin Carving Harvest Festival on October 15th from 11am to 4pm, a day filled with fun activities and contests! Perfect for families with kids. There will be plenty of pumpkins to carve and paint, bouncy house, costume parade, scarecrow stuffing, and witchs’ hats to decorate. See our ad on page 18 for more information about the Equinox Valley Nursery.

The land’s owner, the Equinox Resort & Spa, first donated conservation easements on 850 acres to the Vermont Land Trust & The Nature Conservancy of Vermont in 1996. An additional 64 acres of conserved lands were placed under the protection of the Vermont Land Trust in Septem-

ber 2006. The Equinox Preservation Trust was formed in 1996 to oversee the management of these protected lands. Land and trail maintenance and educational programs in the Preserve are managed by the Equinox Preservation Trust Forest and Trails Steward.

Glass is HOT In Manchester!

F

un may not be a word you equate with glass, but at Manchester Hot Glass Art Studio & Gallery, fun should be somewhere in their name. From the brightly colored building and yarn bombed tree in the front yard, to the brilliant colored handblown glass and giant graffiti mural in the glassblowing studio, your eyes won't know where to start! When you visit, you know instantly this place is all about experiencing fine art and craft in a safe, fun, handson way. You can take one of three types of classes in glassblowing; paperweight making, blowing a glass object, and the popular Glassblowing 101. They have also expanded their class offerings into other fine crafts like jewelry, tiedye and silk dyeing. Book ahead, they can get busy! Owners Andrew & Trish Weill are both experienced fine artists and teachers in their respective fields, and offer additional services like custom orders, repairs, bridal registries, group classes and more.

A great family activity, kids and adults can work with molten glass under the careful eye of glassblower Andrew Weill during a glass making class. See ad on page 18.

Everything in the studio is made on premises, or handmade by a friend of the Weill's. Manchester Hot Glass is located on 79 Elm Street in Manchester Center, Vermont, and is open year-round. Call for reservations, 802-362-2227.

One World Conservation Center Connecting The Community To Our World

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Photo by Holly Pelczynski: Bennington Banner.

he One World Conservation Center (OWCC) is a nature center in Bennington, Vermont, and works to connect the community and visitors to our natural world. Its Norman and Selma Greenberg Conservation Reserve, located across the street from the Education Center, provides 96 acres of meadow, wetland, and wooded hillside. Trails are open to the public. One World Conservation Center education programs serve adults, families, children, and students of all ages. From natural history lectures held at our Education Center to hands-on science lessons in local classrooms to summer programs, we offer a variety of engaging experiences. For More Information Contact; 802-447-7419 or Email; info@oneworldconservationcenter.org. Located At 413 US Route 7S, Bennington, VT

This Is Vermont: Guide to The Shires of Vermont – www.thisisvermont.com – Fall/Winter 2016

Page 17


Manchester ~ Incorporated 1761 • Population 4,285 ~

www.manchestervermont.net • www.visitmanchestervt.com • Manchester Town Office - 802-362-4824 • www.manchester-vt.gov 87

74

Vermont’s Best BUTTERCRUNCH! Artisan Chocolates ~ Specialty Cakes ~ Pastries

70 4367 Main Street • Manchester Center, VT 802-362-1560 • www.mothermyricks.com

expires 12/30/16 – not available with other coupons

78

THE LIGHTING PLACE “LIFE IS COLOR AND WARMTH AND LIGHT” —J. Grenfell

A wide selection of lighting from Country to Contemporary Lamp Shades & Lamp Repairs

4919 Main Street • Manchester, Vermont 802-362-2077 ~or~ 800-799-0891 www.thelightingplace.com

Come Visit e

FAMOUS PUMPKIN PATCH A Family Harvest Tradition for 36 Years! “A Must Fall Stop” - e New York Times “Best Pumpkin Patch” - Vermont Life

Wonderful Whimsical Scarecrow Displays 61

Don’t forget your camera!

Wagon Tours & Crazy Maze

Roger’s Famous Cider Donuts - Watch them being made! Pumpkin Ice Cream & Homemade Pumpkin Bread

Huge Mums and Extraordinary Fall Decoration Gourds • Indian Corn Straw Bales • Squash Cornstalks

Equinox Valley Nursery 1158 Historic Route 7A Manchester, VT (802) 362-2610 • www.equinoxvalleynursery.com .com/Equinox-Valley-Nursery-and-Garden-Center

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Page 18

This Is Vermont: Guide to The Shires of Vermont – www.thisisvermont.com – Fall/Winter 2016

Daily 10-5 • Sunday 1-5

62


Manchester Sto ne Va l

Map not to scale. Not all roads shown.

ley

99

H Hospital

Post Office

P

Recreation Center

Traffic Light

Bus Station

w By ay

Roundabout ? Information US

7

7A

De pot Stre et

To Bondville

Highla nd Ave nu e

To Ski Areas

Spruc e St.

91

Elm St .

11 30 Exit 4 Road Richville

Glen Rd

Skyline Drive

By way

To Arlington

nt

Roo

ester Rd

E. Manches ter RD

Union Street

d Roa ene Hild

Ro ad

For hiking trails, swimming holes, and recreation info, see our center map!

h E. Manc

MANCHESTER VILLAGE

Ri ve r

62 Hildene:

Visitor Ctr.

et re St

Did you know? Charles F. Orvis began his fly fishing tackle shop in 1856. He created the first “modern” fly reel and began what is now the oldest mail order business in the United States.

7A

61

Factory Point Cemetery

American Museum of Fly Fishing

HISTORIC ROUTE

o rm Ve f o s ire Sh

ain

?

d oa

7A

M

78

t Stree Main

R ill

70

HISTORIC ROUTE

Equinox Preserve Trust Hiking Trails See story on page 17 for details.

Street Bonnet

West Road

74

Map Key

Barnumville Road

87

rH nte Ce

So. VT Arts Center

MANCHESTER

89

Dana L. Thompson Memorial Park Recreation Area

30

Picnic Area

Parking

HISTORIC ROUTE

Southern Vermont Arts Center

Library

tvill e Rd .

Prospect Rock Trail

To Dorset To Rupert To Dorset Quarry

To Rutland

For additional hiking information see centermap.

Lye Brook Falls Trail

- A view to remember

The Lincoln Family Home

See ad with coupon for $2 off Skyline Drive located on page 15.

A view from Skyline Drive.

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For locals and travelers alike... treat yourself to a drive to the top of Mount Equinox. Views are amazing! Bring a picnic and hike the summit trails. A $15 fee is charged for vehicle & driver, plus $5 per passenger. Children under 10 are free. See coupon pg. 15.

here's no better way to enjoy the splendor of the Green Mountain State and the surrounding areas of New England than from the privately owned summit of Mount Equinox and the Skyline Drive! At 3,848 feet above sea level, the summit offers breathtaking sunsets and panoramic views of the Green, White, Adirondack, Berkshire and Taconic mountain ranges. Several paved parking areas provide spectacular views, but most outstanding is the Skyline Drive itself as you drive along the crest of the mountain on your way to the summit. The Green Mountains, The Valley of Vermont and the White Mountains of New Hampshire may be seen to the east. The Adirondack Mountains of New York provide the backdrop to the west, and the Taconic and Berkshire Mountains of Massachusetts to the south. Guard rails have been installed almost the entire length of the drive making it one of the safest, best engineered, well

constructed toll roads in the country. Construction of Skyline drive began in 1941, but was suspended because of the war US until 1947, 7 when it was completed. Today it remains as the longest, privately owned, paved toll road in the United States. Begin your adventure at the Toll House on Historic Route 7A in Sunderland at an elevation of 800 feet. As Skyline Drive winds and twist its way up the mountain, it provides panoramic views of lakes, rivers and valley communities below. There are many vistas and areas for picnics along the 5.2 mile drive, which has a vertical gain of 3,248 feet to the summit. The serenity and beauty of the world famous Battenkill River may be seen meandering thru town, farm and woodland below. There is so much natural beauty that the drive to the summit is half the experience. However, the view from the summit is truly breathtaking and an experience you'll not soon forget.

This Is Vermont: Guide to The Shires of Vermont – www.thisisvermont.com – Fall/Winter 2016

Page 19


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37

The place to shop for jewelery and fine gifts! HH ad

jewelry • accessories • bags toys • pottery • glass • wood 12

craftsmarket & gallery

open 7 days a week

262 north

mon-sat 10-6 • sun 11-5:30

free gift wrapping

st • bennington, vt • 802-447-0488 • hawkinshouse.net

This is Vermont - The Guide to the Shires of Vermont Fall 2016  

This Is Vermont - The Guide to the Shires of Vermont, Fall 2016 Issue. Check out http://www.thisisvermont.com for more information and updat...

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