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Selected Titles 2012–13 A Publishing Portfolio Third Millennium Information (Australasia)


ILLUSTRATED BOOK PUBLISHING AT ITS BEST

Illustrated book publishing at its best ‘Quality is never an accident.There must be the will to produce a superior thing.’ – Ruskin

About us

Founded in London in 1999, Third Millennium Information Ltd is the leading publisher of high-quality illustrated histories and portraits of great institutions. We specialise in publishing books that define the uniqueness and excellence of institutions for their core alumni and supporter communities, who we additionally invite to participate in the projects as contributors and early-bird buyers. Over the past dozen years Third Millennium has published extensively with universities and schools. Our peerless publications with a series of Oxford and Cambridge colleges presented us with the rare opportunity to devise and publish the highly acclaimed The University of Cambridge: an 800th Anniversary Portrait – the flagship event in Cambridge’s prestigious year of celebrations. Praise for TMI’s work with the University of Cambridge: ‘An exciting and beautiful publication containing the voices of Cambridge, past and present … The challenge has been to produce an illustrated book which reflects both the essential seriousness of the subject matter, and the beauty of the place and the atmosphere of youthful excitement which linger in the memory of so many alumni. This has been brilliantly achieved.’ Professor Alison Richard, Vice-Chancellor Although our publishing portfolio is particularly renowned within the educational sector, it also includes titles for a number of regiments, cathedrals, museums, arts, sporting, corporate and charitable organisations. We are now expanding our unique publishing model internationally. We are proud to have published UCLA:The First Century in November 2011 as our first US publication and now Third Millennium Information (Australasia) Pty Ltd has been founded with one of Australia’s most experienced publishers, Oliver Freeman, as its managing director. We’re announcing our activities in Australia with books in production to celebrate the centenaries of two of our great schools,

Other Third Millennium partners listed on p.16

Trinity Grammar School in Sydney and Geelong Grammar School at Corio, and there will be many more titles to come. What makes our books so special?

TMI publications capture and distil the unique character of our client institutions in ways that resonate strongly with their alumni, core supporters and champions. Our books celebrate the best of the past, its achievements and its challenges, and create space for memory and nostalgia to play their part in the story. However, they also carry the story forward into the present day in ways that are helpful to institutions in building a case and context for support. The effect is to give alumni a clear view of the institution that they were being asked to support, and a renewed pride in their sense of belonging. The aspect of involving alumni in the creation of our books gives these projects a participative quality, which carries through into extremely strong book sales both before and following publication. How we work

Our clients tell us that they want the highest-quality book at the lowest possible price: they want to be confident that their book will sell to alumni but they don’t want the hassle of having to do the selling, and they want the whole process of creating the book to take place without key staff having to put their normal working lives on hold. All of these things are possible! Third Millennium will take charge of all aspects of the project working in close liaison with you to ensure the finished product is a perfectly formed presentation of your institution. We appoint and manage a project editor or author, develop a synopsis, manage photography and picture research, design the book and organise all necessary proofreading, indexing, printing and delivery. Additionally, Third Millennium has developed a sophisticated ‘subscription’ marketing expertise. We will market the book directly to your alumni database in advance of publication and manage all aspects of pre-publication sales right through to the packaging and shipping of books on publication.


With best wishes

Oliver Freeman, Joint Chairman & Managing Director TMI Australia

Joel Burden, Managing Director (TMI UK) & Joint Chairman TMI Australia

PS You’ll find all the contact details for TMI in Australia at the back of this catalogue.

Contents TRINITY GRAMMAR SCHOOL, SYDNEY

2

HAILEYBURY (UK)

4

CHARTERHOUSE (UK)

6

ST ANDREWS UNIVERSITY LIBRARY (UK)

7

THE UNIVERSITY OF CAMBRIDGE (UK)

8

THE CAMBRIDGE PHENOMENON (UK)

9

UCLA (USA)

10

PEPPERDINE (USA)

12

THE ROYAL MARINES

14

EUROPEAN COURT OF HUMAN RIGHTS

15

COWDRAY PARK POLO CLUB (UK)

15

OTHER TMI PARTNERS

16

CONTACTS

17

For further information, visit www.tmiltd.com/australasia or call +61 (0)2 9953 1226 during normal office hours

illustrAteD book publishiNG At its best

Your alumni will benefit from a special pre-publication price if they take up the subscription offer. Additionally, if they order before an advertised deadline they will have their name printed in a special appendix within the book, which proves hugely popular. Finally, they will be invited to contribute memories, anecdotes and memorabilia to be selected for inclusion within the book, subject to the editor’s discretion and the client’s approval. One of the key incentives for an institution to proceed with Third Millennium is the substantially reduced financial commitment required. Our aim is to finance the project as much as possible through direct sales to your alumni rather than through large payments from the institution itself. The success of our subscription promotion will depend upon the size of the alumni database and strength of alumni affinity to the institution. In principle, if alumni take-up is sufficiently strong then there may be no cost at all to the institution in publishing the book. Should you be interested in having a book published on your institution we would be delighted to discuss the many different opportunities with you.


schools (AustrAliA)

schools

2

Trinity Grammar School – Mind, Body, Spirit: A Centennial Portrait EDITED BY DR JONATHAN HARRIS

Published to celebrate this school’s 100th anniversary, TMI’s first Australian publication is a fascinating portrait of the history of the school, from George Chambers’ establishment of a small parochial school in the Sydney parish of Holy Trinity at Dulwich Hill in 1913 to the present day. The book recalls the breadth and depth of the Trinity experience in terms of ‘mind, body and spirit’, and the school’s fine record of progress and achievement through its endeavours to nurture and challenge their boys. A distinctive feature of this book is its emphasis on a community of diverse people, both past and present, who are bonded together in many different ways, experiencing the joys, tribulations and triumphs of life’s challenges in a Christian-based school setting.

ISBN: 978 0 9873178 0 3 LIST PRICE: AUS $80.00 PUBLICATION: January 2013 SPECIFICATIONS: 280 x 235mm hardcover, 192 pages ILLUSTRATIONS: approx. 400 colour and black and white illustrations TEXT: c.25,000 words

Other Third Millennium partners listed on p.16


schools (AustrAliA)

schools

Trinity Grammar School

3

1

– Part 1: A Centennial Portrait

section

the V ision GeorG e Chamb ers and sChoo l in Gramm ar for a C hurC h of s ydne y the i nner - west

Previous pages: Boys new doing their ‘prep’ in the classrooms of The Towers. Opposite: Rev. G. A. Chambers, the Founder, outside The Towers. Below: The Founder with 1913. Trinity’s first teachers, W.G. Back: Mr S.L. Dolph, Rev. Hilliard, Rev. G.O.C. Bartlett. Rev Front: Rev. M.G. Hinsby, and G.A. Chambers (Warden Founder), Mr K.T. Henderson (Head Master).

Trinity Grammar School

was founded in 1913 as a Trinity Grammar School and persuasive skills of one consequence of the vision Chambers, who had been man, George Alexander Rector of the parish of Holy since February 1911 the School was officially opened Trinity, Dulwich Hill. The by the Archbishop of Sydney, on Saturday February 1st of Hazeldene, in the grounds the in Dr. J. C. Wright, 1 and the accompanying Boulevarde, Dulwich Hill, advertisement noted that: long-felt need of a Church The School will meet the Suburbs. In addition Secondary School in the Western the boys will receive to a sound Religious training,

– Part 1: A Centennial Portrait

Section 10 / 2000s: Preparing for the Future

10 section

all subjects necessary for a thorough grounding in and Senior Public the Matriculation and Junior of Sydney… [with] Examinations of the University to Sports and Physical special attention being given 2 Development of the boys.

2000s:

report of the opening, The Sydney Diocesan Magazine’s as having spoken of a month later, quoted Chambers foundation providing an exciting vision of Trinity’s , populated western suburbs’ education for the ‘thickly and the training wherein ‘the making of character with the highest of leadership… [was] coordinated 3 attainment.’ standard of intellectual for the Rev. G. A. The nature of, and impetus School Grammar for Trinity Chamber’s founding vision today are to appreciate the requires examination if we what was established in 1913 historical significance of also Anglican clergyman. It is through the passion of one understanding of Trinity arguable that without a proper ethos, as enunciated in speeches Grammar’s foundational explain properly the and documents, one cannot for a hundred years in Sydney particular place it has held It is the intention 4 Anglicanism and NSW education. therefore, to explore Trinity of this introductory essay, vision for Christian education Grammar School’s historic and trace its development in the inner-west of Sydney, the inspired leadership of over one hundred years under the careful supervision of nine Head Masters, and under 1928. the Diocese of Sydney from for a ‘Church Grammar vision Chambers’ George broached with his Dulwich School’ had been initially

preparinG for the future

Pupils walking at iliature voluptam audandae dolorpo sanduciam re laborerita nemped ereptaquam.

Above: Reris doluptat quat facestibus dolo beribus et rerum que eum resequid.

13

12

Hill Parish Committee on 23 April 1912. By that time the thirty-four year old Chambers had taught for eight years as a pupil-teacher at Fort Street School, matriculated and taken his B.A. degree from the University of Sydney in 1900 by attending lectures in the evenings, and studied Divinity while resident at St Paul’s College within the University. At the age of twenty-three he was convinced to be “all out for the Lord of my life”, and changed vocation by entering Moore Theological College.5 He was ordained to be diaconate in December 1901, and priested at the end of 1902 while curate at the parish of St Clement and St Luke, Mosman, and still found time to complete a Master’s thesis on “The Idea of Development as Applied to Religion”. However such was the growing respect for Chambers’ pastoral and teaching abilities that he was invited back to Moore College in February 1904 as Vice-Principal under Canon Nathaniel Jones, at a salary of £200 p. a., where he was to remain for seven years, immersed in teaching Greek and Latin to a growing number of ordinands.6 Here his ability to inspire young Christian men with the mission of the Gospel flourished: a generation of Sydney evangelical clergy testified to Chamber’s influence,7 while he himself was clearly comfortable with the classic evangelical position within the Church of England held by his colleague Canon Nathaniel Jones,8 and was Acting Principal of Moore during 1908 and early 1909. The respect engendered by Chambers’ knowledge and spirituality in College, preparedness to engage in street evangelism to the poor of Ultimo, and accept many a parish preaching engagement, saw him invited to be Rector of the parish of Holy Trinity, Dulwich Hill, and inducted on February 27, 1911. It was time for Chambers to move: the new Archbishop, Dr. Wright, was about to make a new appointment of Principal given Jones’ ill-health since 1910, and the church politics of the Sydney diocese were changing.9 George Chambers seems to have possessed a remarkable facility to maintain relationships with both sides of the emerging ecclesiastical divide in Sydney between ‘moderate evangelicals’ and ‘conservative evangelicals’. Archbishop Wright appointed him in 1911 to the strategic position of Chaplain for the Lay-Readers of the diocese, and always expressed great confidence in Chambers. George Chambers’ passion for spiritual and church growth yielded an amazing harvest at Dulwich Hill. 14

George Chambers and the

Vision for a Church Grammar

School in the Inner-west

of Sydney

Left: Reris doluptat quat facestibus dolo beribus et rerum que eum resequid.

His seventeen years as Rector saw a new Church built, a Rectory and hall added, and the foundation of a parochial Grammar School, all while maintaining a full involvement in Diocesan politics and Church Missions. These extraordinary achievements are often attributed solely to Chambers’ energy as a ‘man of action’ amidst an often lethargic congregation, or his having “singlehandedly conceived, planned, funded and established a

Opposite: A science lesson at Dulwich Hill – Mr Latham teaching ‘Gases in the Atmosphere’. Below: Trinity boarders accompanied by Mr Wynn Jones and the Head Master catching the public bus from Holwood in Ashfield to Dulwich Hill, 1925.

178 Bottom right: Cover of the Souvenir Programme for the Trinity Fete, Dec 1913. Below right: Cover of the school magazine, The Triangle, first issued in 1917. Two or three issues were produced each year until 1976, when it became an annual publication.

Council; as colleague he had the local Number of State Parliament and Parish Nominator, T. J. Hoskins (father of Roy the Trinity School Captain of 1918 – 9) and J. H. Smith Esq. of ‘Endymian’, Dulwich Hill.

It is intriguing that Chambers, a School Councillor at Shore (Sydney Church of England Grammar School) since 1910, twice later claimed that he had to ‘create’ a demand for Trinity Grammar School. Reminiscing on these events some fifty years later the then Bishop

179

had been no great demand for such a school. It had to be created. The State Schools had held the sway in these for many years, and people were satisfied. Boys were being trained for business careers, but there was little or no opportunity for boys to be trained for the University or the professions except at schools connected with other churches.13 It is at this point that Chambers explains the underlying Christian philosophy behind his “venture of faith”. Not only were there the above academic imperatives, but it was essential: To have a school where the environment and atmosphere of the teaching would be that of the Church, was the vision that rose before us ten years ago, with the prospect of great possibilities for the training of Christian men who would be true citizens of the Commonwealth.14 Chambers has here taken us into the heart of a centuries old Christian ethos for excellence in education, which had been refined and refreshed at Rugby School in the United Kingdom in the 1830’s. Thomas Arnold’s essays and letters espousing the achievement of ‘godliness and good learning’ as the ideal of Christian education had proved enormously influential in the mid-Victorian era in the Greater Public Schools.15 To many this ideal had been perverted into an unhealthy preoccupation with the attainment of Christian ‘manliness’ (or muscular Christianity) as the ideal in many of the great schools by the late nineteenth century.16 In this context Chambers deliberately positions Trinity

15

For further information, visit www.tmiltd.com/australasia or call +61 (0)2 9953 1226 during normal office hours


schools (uk)

schools

4

Haileybury: A 150th Anniversary Portrait EDITED BY ROGER WOODBURN, TOBY PARKER AND CATHARINE WALSTON

As a part of the celebration of the 150th anniversary of Haileybury’s foundation, the school has commissioned a major illustrated book tracing the journey from classic Victorian boys’ public school, via extraordinary sacrifice in two world wars, to today’s vibrant, modern coeducational community with global links. As well as charting the changes, the book explores the continuities – strong traditions of public service and social responsibility are as much a part of the school’s ethos today as they were more than a century ago. Using visual and documentary material from the school archives, along with specially commissioned photography, this is a beautifully designed and produced volume for every Haileyburian to treasure.

ISBN: 978 1 906507 64 0 LIST PRICE: £45.00 PUBLICATION: September 2012 SPECIFICATIONS: 280 x 240mm hardcover, 208 pages ILLUSTRATIONS: over 300 colour and black and white illustrations TEXT: c.77,000 words

Other Third Millennium partners listed on p.16


schools (uk)

schools

5

haileybury } A 150th Anniversary Portrait

Chapter 6 } SChOOl life

menuS Through The deCadeS 2011 beef and ale Pie Mashed Potatoes / Carrots Sponge Pudding

/ Cabbage

} 1988 beef Stew and Dumplings Parsley Potatoes / Roast Parsnips Pears and Chocolate Sauce

Chapter 1

} haileybury On the Origin Of

} 1945 toad in the hole Cabbage / Mashed Potatoes Spotted Dick } 1904

What to support the scheme. The FoundaTion was no rich endowment when it opened on 23 was the support of the the first pupil to join haileybury haileybury did have, however, hoste, a fact noted with bowers, Dean of Manchester, September 1862 was george Very reverend george of father, the rector of boyton. a part in the founding pride in the diary of his who had already played at the bull inn at hoddesdon, and rossall. bowers understood after an early breakfast on Marlborough College from nothing and he son, walked to haileybury in establishing a school pitfalls the hostes, father and the first a the sure that haileybury was met with arthur butler, the foundation day and was instrumental in making george hoste remarked a proprietary one. headmaster. the reverend public school rather than of the College, but with pleasure on the architecture College (Quadrangle) the of parts that he also noticed was of haileybury College were unused. the opening invited were dignitaries no and not met with a fanfare it was merely the beginning to add lustre to the event. of the school year. opened, it was a huge When haileybury College and the school’s governing relief for arthur butler the been forced to write to Council who had twice the of the need to push back parents informing them opening date was to have opening day. the original to the amount of work needed been 9 September, but school to function as a modern get the buildings ready their members had to swallow meant that the Council for. to be properly catered pride if the pupils were was not an easy school public a of the founding and harrow slowly changed task. eton, Winchester into Dean poor the Bowers, for George Dean schools from endowed charitable of Manchester 1847–72, centuries. Wellington College bastions of privilege over credited as a founder of doors to but finally opened its and was founded in 1853 Marlborough College and haileybury was founded of Rossall School, he was pupils in 1859, while of the nine months. the speed also a founding member opened in the space of considering that there of Haileybury’s College enterprise was breathtaking Council.

The Memorial Dining Hall, with its gong made from a First World War Howitzer shell casing.

the officials that he would start sending 200 pupils a day to have lunch at the College arms hotel. needless to say, the response was rapid and the rations enlarged. n the first days of the school’s existence the Steward, who had only organised catering for the worldly students of the east india College, served e up pickles with all the meals and found that a month’s supply vanished in a matter of days. benjamin Jones’s error was not repeated again and even in 1973 the caterer was claiming that vinegar was too expensive to be served with chips in h hall. n 1988 it was decided by Council that the Dining all should adopt a cafeteria style and in 2004 the present system of multiple stations was adopted, offering a choice of food to suit all tastes. Toby Parker War-time food was adequate if uninspiring. reputedly it provided a balanced diet, devised and presided over by a lady dietician, Miss howard Mercer, who h no

anthony harper (K 1960.1)

doubt did a good job in difficult circumstances. She often appeared at mealtimes and was wont to stress the benefits of extra meat ration if a foreign body was found in the cabbage. Some monotony in the menus was demonstrated by a petition signed by nearly half the school and received by me when head of School in 1945; the original heading, crossed out but still legible, was, ‘the following suggest that less stew be served for lunch’. it must have been realised that this was open to misinterpretation, for the wording was changed to ‘the following suggest that fewer stews be served for lunch’. i hope some improvement resulted. John Brock (a 1941.1)

Steak Pie Potatoes greens treacle Pudding

i remember the horror i felt at my first Kipling dormitory fire drill, which involved having to climb down a rope (not a rope ladder) suspended from the ceiling which went down through a hole in our floor and then down into the batten dormitory below and onto its floor. the thought of 50 of us making that escape with a fire raging doesn’t bear thinking about. i don’t think anyone worried about health and safety in those days. i also remember one Corps field Day where i was responsible for defending an area of a wood with my platoon. i put everyone in their positions and told them to make themselves invisible and not to move. i think the day went well and eventually we all went back to hall for tea. after a couple of hours i realised that one of my platoon wasn’t having tea and we all wondered where he was. i suddenly had an awful feeling, rushed back to where i had placed him in the wood many hours earlier, and found him. i apologised profusely for having forgotten him but he was very good about it. naturally, i congratulated him on following his orders to the letter.

Food petition, 1945.

109

9

8

haileybury } A 150th Anniversary Portrait

Chapter 1 } On the Origin Of haileybury

Cormell PriCe, uSC and The KiPling ConneCTion ‘

C

rom’ Price was perhaps one of the most important and dynamic masters who ever taught at haileybury. he was the first housemaster of Colvin, bestowing on it the yellow and black colours of his old college, brasenose. Price was the founder and innovator of the Modern Side at haileybury, and the first headmaster of the united Services College (uSC) in 1874, but his fame stemmed from his role of mentor, friend and headmaster to rudyard Kipling. Cormell Price was born in birmingham into a family of industrialists and educated at King edward Vi’s School. While there he made friends with edward burne-Jones and henry MacDonald, whose four sisters went on to marry lockwood Kipling, edward Poynter, edward burne-Jones and alfred baldwin. When Price went up to Oxford, burne-Jones went with him and he soon became a close friend of the group which became known as the Pre-raphaelites.

28

inest: Cormell Price, founding headmaster of United Services College at Westward Ho! When Cormell Price left Haileybury for USC, rumour had it that his decision was prompted by anticlericalism and a legend grew up that if ever a headmaster of USC took holy orders, the school would be doomed. The headmaster at the time of the school’s failure was indeed a cleric, Rev. Nagel. When USC became ISC, its first headmaster was E.G. Beckwith, a layman who died in post in 1935. His successor was another clergyman, Rev. Tollymache, and it was under him that ISC was to merge with Haileybury in 1942.

Price became a good friend to William Morris and helped him, with others, to paint the ceiling of the Oxford union. Price had wanted to become a doctor but after witnessing dissections he realised that he did not have the stomach for the profession. Medicine was then replaced by education and he became a tutor for a princely family, the Davidoffs, in russia. the russian experience greatly affected him and the poverty and massive inequality of the empire strengthened his already liberal political stance. in 1862, shortly after the school opened, arthur butler identified Price as the man to set up the Modern Side and offer a wider educational experience at haileybury. butler was proved right in his assessment of Price and they became lifelong friends. as head of the Modern Side and housemaster of Colvin, Price supported his pupils with a level of care and devotion that few haileyburians ever forgot. his innovations on the Modern Side allowed boys to pass directly into Woolwich and Sandhurst, instead of spending vast sums of parental money supporting them through military crammers. the huge amount of correspondence from old pupils that Crom Price kept up with was a testament to their love for him, and vice versa. it is strange to think that Crom Price, educator of hundreds of doughty defenders of the empire, slipped away from the spartan regime of haileybury to enjoy

The USC magazine, edited and signed by Rudyard Kipling.

The Kipling Memorial Plaque, or Jungle Book Relief Panel, by Benno Elkan, which was commissioned by the Kipling Memorial Fund Council and installed on the south front of the Rudyard Kipling Memorial Building built at the ISC, Windsor, in 1939.

boat parties with William Morris, helping to sober up algernon Swinburn after a bender, and coming across a ‘red-haired stunner’ in his railway carriage. Price was certainly not a dusty Mr Chips figure. in 1874 Price was offered a headmastership, something he did not expect, not having been ordained. the appointment was to set up the united Services College at Westward ho! and he took with him twelve boys from haileybury. his new school did not have a Classical Side and it offered a different style of education compared with the public schools at that time. the young rudyard Kipling was put into Price’s care in 1878 and so began a relationship that was to last until Price’s death. it was Koji, as Kipling’s family called Price, who set rudyard on his career path as a journalist and writer. Price made Kipling editor of the USC Chronicle between 1881 and 1882 and allowed him to go to bideford to learn how to set type with the printers.

the first fifteen of the twenty years that Price was headmaster of the uSC were exciting and successful; the school became justly famous for turning difficult young men into pillars of the empire. however, it was the educational success that he enjoyed that was ultimately to be the cause of his school’s decline. Other public schools such as haileybury and Wellington looked at Price’s approach to preparing boys for the army and copied his ideas. the restructuring of the haileybury Modern Side and similar changes in other public schools meant that parents were able to send their children to mainstream institutions again rather than to remote Westward ho!. by 1890 Price was left with falling pupil numbers and too many debts to settle and in 1894 he retired, his health damaged and in terrible financial straits. he died sixteen years later, still beloved by his boys, feted for his connections with the Pre-raphaelites and remembered by both haileybury and uSC as a great schoolmaster.

29

For further information, visit www.tmiltd.com/australasia or call +61 (0)2 9953 1226 during normal office hours


schools (uk)

schools

6

Charterhouse: A 400th anniversary portrait EDITED BY ERNST ZILLEKENS

This book presents a personal overview of the school’s history through the eyes of former pupils, past and present teachers and archivists. It brings to life the rich history of Charterhouse through broad overviews, entertaining anecdotes and personal memories from Old Carthusians, which are illustrated through archival material and many vivid modern photographs by Roger Smeeton. This beautiful volume will be enjoyed by all those who have a close connection with the school, and also by those wishing to gain an insight into the development and achievements of a unique institution. ‘I think it’s a marvellous achievement – beautifully designed and produced and will, without doubt, be treasured by Carthusians, and for years to come. I am enormously grateful to you and your team for making it all a very enjoyable process.’ The Revd John Witheridge Headmaster

ISBN: 978 1 906507 14 5 LIST PRICE: £45.00 PUBLICATION: November 2010 SPECIFICATIONS: 280 x 240mm hardcover, 208 pages ILLUSTRATIONS: over 150 colour and 50 black and white illustrations TEXT: 75,000 words

Other Third Millennium partners listed on p.16


speciAl collectioNs

7

speciAl collectioNs

Treasures of St Andrews University Library EDITED BY NORMAN H. REID WITH MARC BOULAY, RACHEL HART, ELIZABETH HENDERSON, MOIRA MACKENZIE AND MAIA SHERIDAN

The collections which have gathered within St Andrews University Library are outstanding. They include books from the dawn of European printing to contemporary fine imprints, including the fruits of over a century’s status as a Copyright Deposit Library; manuscripts representing the breadth of human activity from the dawn of Christendom to modern times; an astonishing photographic archive, based on the position of St Andrews as one of the crucibles of early photographic development; and the university’s own institutional archive. This volume presents 50 selected items from across the collections, each accompanied by a short explanatory essay by an expert in the field. It also features an introductory essay outlining the history of St Andrews University Library, from its beginnings in a few mediaeval cathedral book presses, to the modern hub of learning within an institution of international academic reputation. ‘Scholars, staff and students at the University of St Andrews are extraordinarily privileged to have such precious resources to draw on as we make our own contributions to our academic community here in Scotland and beyond. I hope that this book will, in its turn, prove a source of inspiration and delight to its readers.’ Louise Richardson Principal and Vice-Chancellor

ISBN: 978 1 906507 15 2 LIST PRICE: £15.00 PUBLICATION: September 2010 SPECIFICATIONS: 250 x 210mm softcover, 160 pages ILLUSTRATIONS: 136 illustrations TEXT: 25,000 words

For further information, visit www.tmiltd.com/australasia or call +61 (0)2 9953 1226 during normal office hours


uNiversities

uNiversities

8

The University of Cambridge: an 800th Anniversary Portrait EDITED BY PETER PAGNAMENTA

To celebrate its 800th anniversary year, the University of Cambridge worked with us to produce this special commemorative publication. Edited by Peter Pagnamenta, one of Britain’s most distinguished documentary producers, this lavishly illustrated, beautifully designed and produced hardback volume traces the University’s growth and development from its small beginnings to tomorrow’s aspirations. • published as the official volume to accompany the 800th anniversary celebrations in 2009 • features expert, informative and entertaining contributions from leading Cambridge figures of every generation • takes in every part of extra-curricular life – from rowing and rugby, political involvement and the Union, to writing, acting and directing • illustrated throughout with specially commissioned photography alongside a rich selection of images from the University archives ‘This compendium of low living and high thinking, of student press and Nobel Prizemen … will enjoy a wide readership.’ The Times Literary Supplement

ISBN: 978 1 903942 65 9 LIST PRICE: £50 SPECIFICATIONS: 280 x 240 mm hardcover, 352 pages ILLUSTRATIONS: over 600 illustrations TEXT: 150,000 words

Other Third Millennium partners listed on p.16


corporAte histories

9

corporAte histories

The Cambridge Phenomenon: 50 Years of Innovation and Expertise BY KATE KIRK AND CHARLES COTTON, WITH A FOREWORD BY BILL GATES KBE

Recognised as a ‘phenomenon of considerable significance to British Industry’ by the Financial Times back in 1980, Cambridge is home to an experienced, resourceful and successful community of entrepreneurs and is known around the world for its innovative companies. The Cambridge Phenomenon: 50 Years of Innovation and Expertise covers the remarkable history of this community. Richly illustrated with photographs, cameos and anecdotes, this fine hardcover book tells the inside story of the companies and the people behind them. Many members of the Cambridge business community took the opportunity to get behind the project as supporters, patrons and sponsors by ordering copies in advance, having their logos printed in the book and receiving fully customised dust jackets.

ISBN: 978 1 906507 52 7 LIST PRICE: £50 SPECIFICATIONS: 280 x 240 mm hardcover, 224 pages

‘It’s an honour to be invited to participate in this book celebrating the remarkable history of innovation and enterprise around Cambridge.’ Bill Gates KBE Cambridge ideas Change

Cambridge ideas Chan

ge the World

g en o

m iC s

1977 Fred Sanger* First genome sequenced

ie s

1989 Greg Winter and David Chiswell founded Cambridge Antibody Technology (CAT)

1986 humanised Greg Winter invented first monoclonal antibody

2003

2011 ARM – World’s leading 1978–86 Nigel Searle and Clive Sinclair Sinclair Research

1978–98 Hermann Hauser and Chris Curry

1937 Alan Turing

sof

t Wa r e

The Cambridge Phenomen

**Bayes matriculated at the University of Edinburgh

Cambridge. While most industry clusters tend to get stuck in one specialism, the Cambridge

part of the cluster.

11

products. Market cap $12 B

Theoretical computing machine

1700s Thomas Bayes** Bayes Theorem

ne way of describing the Cambridge Phenomenon is as a cluster of technology companies. A closer look reveals that a vast range of different technologies are represented in the companies around

by the continued breadth of the research taking place in the universities and institutes that form an integral

1990– Robin Saxby and Warren East ARM

1946 Maurice Wilkes EDSAC 1800s Charles Babbage Difference Engine

Co

O

innovation establishment’s ability to adapt business models from one technology to another, but also sustained

Humira launched

no

o m p u ting

m

10

Clusters, COnstellatiOns and ClOuds

Phenomenon is one of the very few multi-sectoral clusters in the world. This is partly the result of the CAT – Developed the first fully human monoclonal antibody blockbuster drug, Humira. Acquired by AstraZeneca in 2006 for $1.3 B

C lo

n a l a n ti b o d

1975 George Köhler* and César Milstein* monoclonal antibodies

the World

2004 John West, new CEO of Solexa

1953 Francis Crick* and James Watson* discovered structure of DNA * Nobel prizes winners

TEXT: 70,000 words

2006 Solexa – Fast, low-cost gene sequencing. Acquired by Illumina in 2006 for $650 M

1998 Shankar Balasubramanian and John Berriman founded Solexa

1997 At a beer summit at the Panton ian Arms, Shankar Balasubraman a and David Klenerman devised new approach to DNA sequencing

ILLUSTRATIONS: over 200 illustrations

on 50 years of innovation

and enterprise

1996 Mike Lynch co-founded Autonomy

WhaT are The seCreTs

Bayes Theorem in neon in Autonomy’s office in Cambridge

WhaT are The seCreTs of The Cambridge Phen omen

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on’s suCCess?

Looking at how the Cambridge phenomenon has grown over Many people say that the half a century, from a few, prevailing attitude in enterprising engineers working Cambridge University prior out of garages, back rooms to the 1970s could be and garden sheds to multi-billionencapsulated in the phrase, pound businesses in state-of-the-ar ‘How dare you want to make t premises, it is clear that money’. When Michael Cole a lot has changed. among set up Metals research and these are culture shifts, the rise Malcolm Boston set up torvac of networking, the growth in the late 1950s – both of the technology consultancies, a had worked in the Cavendish developing infrastructure and Laboratory – they were most the substantial body of evidence definitely going against the that innovation and enterprise grain. even after the science are the path to personal and park was established at the beginning national success, however of the 1970s and spin-out that success is measured. companies gradually began there have been two cultural to appear – Laser-scan, the changes that have proved first tenant on the science park, essential to the growth of was also set up by a group the Cambridge phenomenon. out of the Cavendish Laboratory – one was a shift in the response there were plenty of academics of Cambridge University to who disapproved. ‘commerce’, and the other, in people’s attitude towards failure. examples of successes helped Culture change within Cambridge accelerate the change in University was important attitude, but the unintended for two reasons, firstly because consequence was that academics it allowed researchers to thought they could do it all pursue non-academic goals, – invent the technology and and secondly because it led grow to the the business. there are very setting up of the science park, few people who can actually the st John’s innovation Centre do this, so the culture shift was and a number of other institutions only completed when academic that have helped start-up entrepreneurs realised that businesses in a variety of ways. they needed to bring business brains into their new companies as well.

of The Cambridge Phenomen

on’s suCCess?

Right: Chris Lowe, speaking at the Cambridge Phenomenon 50th Anniversary conference, 2010.

the innate British belief that failure is something to be ashamed of also had to change. setting up a business,

especially one based on novel technology, is an inherently risky proposition. While the success stories inspired other people to start companies, the converse was that failures highlighted the risks involved.

The early companies were based on engineering and instrumentation. Electronics, computer hardware and software came to prominence in the 1970s and 1980s, and the 1990s were marked by explosive growth in two new areas, biotechnology and telecommunications. Wireless communication has been a growth sector for the 2000s, and cleantech, energy, nanotechnology and medtech look promising for the future. But it is increasingly difficult to pigeonhole companies into one industry sector or another. Speaking at the Cambridge Phenomenon 50th anniversary conference in October 2010, Professor Chris Lowe, director of the Institute of Biotechnology in the University of Cambridge, highlighted one very practical example where technologies are converging: in healthcare. Lowe described the potential for a contact lens that transmits information about blood sugar levels in the tear fluid, to help doctors monitor and manage conditions such as Type 2 diabetes. These devices will combine expertise not only in bioscience, but also in materials and ICT, bringing together what might have been considered completely separate sectors 20 or 30 years ago. This section highlights a few of the sectors and activities that have stood out as the Cambridge Phenomenon has evolved. Some companies fall under more than one category, but where repetition is inevitable, this simply serves to demonstrate how interconnected the Phenomenon companies have become. There are clearly exciting times ahead as more technologies converge and head off in totally new directions.

subside rather than crash. this tended to minimise the knock-on effects on the surrounding community, meaning that suppliers got paid and the sustainability of the cluster was preserved.

a particular feature of the overall cultural shift is what people refer to as the ‘Cambridge spirit’, something they have not observed elsewhere. the What constituted failure also Cambridge spirit is described shifted. people began to as an attitude where people distinguish between failure willingly help others without due to external events outside an expecting anything in return. entrepreneur’s control – for in the biotechnology sector, instance the bursting of the this dot com altruistic environment was bubble and its effects on funding evident from the early days, where and ipos – and internal factors helping each other out was such as mistakes, which could the norm, as all the companies be learned from, or bad decisionwere ‘in the same boat’ at making. as confidence and the beginning. for many of experience grew, there were the many other technology sectors, this more instances of people who altruistic environment is a ‘had another go’ when their more recent development – first attempt failed. sometimes perhaps marked by the first there might be a gap between time one of the technology consultancies losing one business and starting invited members of the another, but with plenty of other consultancies to a summer opportunities for employment event in the late 1990s – but in similar businesses, the time remarked on by many. newcomers was spent learning how to in particular say they find do better the next time round. it easy to meet people and in addition, the ‘soft start’ model, create connections. the sense in which many companies is that help freely given contributes started out by offering consulting, to the overall success of the allowed failing companies to cluster, which is ultimately good for everyone.

201

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North AmericA

North AmericA

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UCLA: The First Century MARINA DUNDJERSKI

From impassioned efforts by Angelenos to create a public university in Southern California to an unparalleled ‘First to 100’ NCAA championship run, to the heralding of a new medical center for the 21st century, this book captures the compelling history of this dynamic university. UCLA’s ascent from a small two-year branch of the University of California on the grounds of a normal school to an internationally renowned research university is one of the most remarkable success stories in American higher education. Author Marina Dundjerski has masterfully woven together a century of socio-political events into a rich chronicle of the people who forged a dream to build Southern California’s premier institute of higher learning. Illustrated with more than 900 images, many previously unpublished, UCLA:The First Century is also a stunning pictorial representation of the era. ‘100 years of UCLA on your coffee table.’ Los Angeles Times

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North AmericA

North AmericA

11

the chAlleNGe

To create a stunningly illustrated, beautifully designed and produced volume truly worthy of UCLA’s outstanding achievements over a century of progress. the proJect

Encapsulating the work of the UCLA History Project over eight years, UCLA:The First Century is a 360-page full-colour definitive history combining a lively narrative style and dynamic Bruin tales. ISBN: 978 1 906507 37 4 LIST PRICE: $75.00 PUBLICATION: November 2011 SPECIFICATIONS: 9½'' x 11'' hardcover, 360 pages ILLUSTRATIONS: Text is intertwined with more than 900 photographs TEXT: 150,000 words

‘The book is indeed beautiful.Thank you so much for all the work that went into it.’ Rhea Turletaub Vice-Chancellor, UCLA External Affairs ‘Yes I have seen the publication and it is absolutely beautiful! To a person, they see the product, their eyes widen and they say “Oh my goodness, it’s beautiful!”We are so proud and pleased with the product and can thank you and your talented team for helping to bring our dream to life.You folks are truly amazing.’ Ralph E. Amos CEO and Assistant Vice-Chancellor UCLA Alumni Association and Alumni Relations ‘We really appreciate the work of TMI on this. I haven’t said this along the way, but our partnership with your company really helped us to meet the high expectations of our varied constituents and we couldn’t have done it without you.’ J.C. Schnabl MBA CSPG Executive Director, Finance and Administration UCLA Alumni Association

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North AmericA

North AmericA

12

A Portrait of Pepperdine: Life at an Extraordinary University FEATURING PHOTOGRAPHY BY JULIAN ANDREWS

As George Pepperdine said at the opening dedication ceremony of the college he founded in 1937, ‘There are many good colleges and universities which can give you standard academic training, but if our school does not give you more than that, it really has no reason to exist.’ The purpose of this book, which arrives during the 75th anniversary of that founding day, is to identify and highlight the ways in which Pepperdine University continues to bring life to this idea.

ISBN: 978 1 906507 70 1 LIST PRICE: $50.00

In order to do this, photographer Julian Andrews was asked to follow the people that make up Pepperdine today – the students, the professors, the administrators, the athletes, the coaches – as they went about their daily business of learning, sharing, inspiring, or just relaxing. Armed with his stunning images (which are complemented by photographic treasures from the University archives), we present you with this singular version of Pepperdine life, rounded at the edges but bursting at the seams with that particular sense of community, excellence, and uniqueness that this university engenders. ‘Just got the books today – beautiful! There’s nothing like seeing the actual thing.’ Michael J. Menichetti Pepperdine University Public Affairs

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PUBLICATION: February 2012 SPECIFICATIONS: 11'' x 9.45'' hardcover, 176 pages ILLUSTRATIONS: over 250 photographs in colour and black and white TEXT: 15,000 words


North AmericA

North AmericA

13

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militAry

militAry

14

Nothing Impossible: A Portrait of The Royal Marines GENERAL EDITOR: LIEUTENANT COLONEL EWEN-SOUTHBY TAILYOUR OBE ROYAL MARINES

A birthday celebrating 350 long, rough and glorious years is a very special one that needs marking in the most distinguished manner possible. This book, offering selected snapshots from many of those years, is such a commemoration. The first official portrait of the Royal Marines for over 20 years, this stunning new hardback volume captures the life, activities, capabilities and ethos of the Corps. Personal and expert accounts address in detail the history, service and training of the Royal Marines, and are accompanied throughout by wide-ranging archive images and exceptional new special photography, all reproduced to the highest quality. ‘It is a wonderful book thanks to your patience and your remarkable team’s ability to pull such a diverse selection of pictures and essays together in such a balanced and cohesive manner.’ Lieutenant Colonel Ewen-Southby Tailyour

ISBN: 978 1 906507 23 7 LIST PRICE: £45.00 PUBLICATION: October 2010 SPECIFICATIONS: 305 x 254mm hardcover, 192 pages ILLUSTRATIONS: over 200 colour and

‘This book is a fitting tribute to the achievements of all who have served in the Corps.’ Major General G.S. Robinson

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black and white illustrations TEXT: 75,000 words


other titles

15

other titles

The Conscience of Europe: 50 Years of the European Court of Human Rights GENERAL EDITOR: JONATHAN SHARPE

This book, published in English and French editions, and designed to mark the Court’s fiftieth anniversary in 2009 and the Convention’s sixtieth in 2010, does not purport to be a full and complete history of the institution. Nor is it a treatise on the Court’s procedure and case-law, on which many publications already exist. (English edition)

Rather, being for the general reader wishing to increase his or her knowledge of the Court as an institution, it steers a course between an academic commentary and a purely introductory guide. It groups a variety of individual contributions, on topics generally selected by the authors themselves, round a skeleton retracing the main relevant events over the last half-century. This publication has been made possible by a generous contribution from the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Grand Duchy of Luxembourg.

ISBN: 978 1 906507 45 9 (English edition); 978 1 906507 59 6 (French edition) LIST PRICE: £41.50 / €50.00 PUBLICATION: January 2011 SPECIFICATIONS: 280 x 240mm hardcover, 224 pages ILLUSTRATIONS: over 200 illustrations TEXT: 90,000 words

Cowdray Park Polo Club: The Centenary CLARE MILFORD HAVEN, ROGER CHATTERTON-NEWMAN AND VANESSA TAYLOR

For the last century, Cowdray Park has been at the forefront of polo, both professional and amateur, in the British Isles – indeed, in the Western World. Founded in 1910 as a small country club, where the Pearson family and their friends could enjoy summer games after the London season was over, the club progressed to become the home of the British Open Championship for the Gold Cup which, after the Argentine Open, is the most coveted tournament in international polo. This limited edition book tells the fascinating story of the club from 1910 to the present day. Extensively illustrated, with photographs old and new, that story is vividly brought to life through the reminiscences of players, staff and friends of the club, past and present. Cowdray Park Polo Club:The Centenary includes a CD of Tournament Winners 1910–2010, and Forewords by HRH The Duke of Edinburgh, HRH The Prince of Wales and The Viscount Cowdray.

ISBN: 978 1 906507 56 5 LIST PRICE: £100 PUBLICATION: July 2011 SPECIFICATIONS: 300 x 294mm

‘… a treasure for anyone connected with polo and illuminating for anyone who is not.’ Country Life

hardcover, 256 pages ILLUSTRATIONS: over 800 illustrations

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Other Third Millennium partners

Other Third Millennium partners

16

Other Third Millennium partners INCLUDE: Schools • Aldenham • Badminton School • Blackrock College, Dublin • Bryanston School • Clayesmore School • Clifton College • Downe House • Durham High School for Girls • Elizabeth College, Guernsey • Eton College • Felsted School • Foyle College • Framlingham College • Geelong Grammar School (Australia) • Gordonstoun • Harrow School • London Oratory School • Monmouth School • Oundle School • Pocklington School • Portsmouth Grammar School • Repton School • Rugby School • The Lady Eleanor Holles School • The Oratory School • Tonbridge School • Wellington College • Wells Cathedral School • Westminster School • Wolverhampton Grammar School Universities • Coventry University • Durham University • Edge Hill University • Goodenough College • University of Manchester • Newcastle University • Sheffield University • School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS) • Worcester University OXFORD & CAMBRIDGE • Christ Church, Oxford • Clare College, Cambridge • Corpus Christi College, Cambridge

• Darwin College, Cambridge • Exeter College, Oxford • Fitzwilliam College, Cambridge • Girton College, Cambridge • Gonville and Caius College, Cambridge • Hughes Hall, Cambridge • Keble College, Oxford • King’s College, Cambridge • Mansfield College, Oxford • Merton College, Oxford • New College, Oxford • Oxford v Cambridge Boat Race • Pembroke College, Cambridge • St Catherine’s College, Oxford • St John’s College, Cambridge • Trinity Hall, Cambridge • Wadham College, Oxford • Worcester College, Oxford Corporate Histories • Austin Reed plc • BP International Ltd • Cheltenham & Gloucester • Grosvenor House Hotel • JCB Ltd • Johnson & Johnson • Norwich Union plc • Pfizer Ltd • Rathbone’s Bank • Ridgeons • Samworth Brothers • Scottish & Newcastle plc • Southern Water plc • Warburton’s Ltd • Warren House Military AND RELATED • Army Museums Ogilby Trust • Royal Military Academy, Sandhurst • The Brigade of Gurkhas • The Cavalry and Guards Club • The Grenadier Guards • The Household Division (The Guards) • The Light Infantry • The Royal Artillery • The Royal Green Jackets • The Royal Hospital Chelsea

Legal & Historical • Lincoln’s Inn • The Houses of Parliament • The Inner Temple • The Landmark Trust • Westminster Hall Special collections • Durham Cathedral Library • Durham University Library • The National Library of Scotland • The Oriental Museum, Durham University • The Phillips Collection, Washington, D. C. RELIGIOUS • Durham Cathedral • Holy Trinity Church, Stratford-upon-Avon • Lincoln Cathedral • The Sovereign Military Order of Malta • Westminster Abbey • York Minster Arts, Sports & Theatre • Corcoran Gallery of Art, Washington, D. C. • Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth • Santa Barbara Museum of Art, California • The Bush Theatre, London • The Library of Congress, Washington, D. C. • The Phillips Museum, Washington, D. C. • The Reeves Center, Washington and Lee University • Walters Art Museum, Baltimore CHARITIES • Barnardo’s • Commonwealth Education Trust • Leonard Cheshire Disability • Nordoff-Robbins • York Merchant Adventurers

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contacts

contacts

17

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Geelong Grammar (VIC) to be published Spring 2014.

iii

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TMI Australasia mini-catalogue