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REPORT

ANNUAL

2013

THINKtogether.org Follow and like us at:

SCAN THIS CODE TO SEE A DIGITAL VERSION OF THE ANNUAL REPOR T.

A Symphony of Collaboration

2101-A East Fourth Street, Santa Ana CA 92705 888.485.THINK

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Randy’s Book and a Look Ahead

By the Numbers

Our Leadership

Our Investors

Focus on Health and Wellness

Region Snapshots

THINK Together’s Statewide Scale

THINK Together Ecosystem

THINK Together Spotlights

Programs and Results

Alumni Stories: The Best and Brightest

Board Chair and CEO Message

Vision and Mission

Contents

2 3 4 6 8-12 13 14 16 22 23 26 27 28 On the Cover: Students in the Santa Ana Strings demonstrate a symphony of collaboration at a recent outdoor concert. The Santa Ana Strings is made possible through a partnership with the Santa Ana Unified School District, Pacific Symphony and THINK Together. It is a prime example of where individual contributions and collaborative efforts benefit students.

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At a time when state government no longer can fund public schools at the level required to prepare future generations for an advanced economy, THINK Together is a model of community entrepreneurship making a difference in the lives of students.

— DONALD BREN,

ANNUAL REPORT

I RV I N E C O . C H A I R M A N

THINK TOGETHER

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Vision

Mission

All children will receive the support they

To provide, high-quality, academic

need from family, school and community to

support programs for students

enable them to reach their full potential and

regardless of race, creed, or

become productive adults and responsible,

socioeconomic status.

contributing members of the community. 2 142167.AnnualReport.2013_Shingle.GS.indd 2

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Board Chair & CEO Message T

In low-income communities, parents often lack the resources and/or the successful experience with the education system to guide their children. Also missing is a complete support system and safety net around their children. This safety net starts with access to health care, safe homes and neighborhoods, parents that read and engage in dialogue with them, provide access to enrichment opportunities in sports, the arts, sciences, private tutoring and everything else that middle income students enjoy. To help parents, the schools and the community support system need to be that much stronger. In California, about 30 percent of children we serve live in poverty. This affects their academic achievement and the quality of the state’s workforce. According to State Superintendent of Public Instruction, Tom Torlakson’s Blueprint for Education, California’s workforce over the age of 50 is the most educated in the world, while the workforce under the age of 35 is the least educated in the developed world.

ANNUAL REPORT

he Santa Ana Strings performance represents the essence of THINK Together’s vision. Alone, they are soloists, but together they work in concert toward a common goal. This kind of strategic collaboration is what it takes to create the systemic changes necessary for underserved children to reach their full potential in numbers large enough to have an effect on society. At THINK Together, we believe it takes collaboration among the parents, the school, and the community working together to provide the same kind of support system that exists in uppermiddle-class families and communities.

20 13 THINK TOGETHER

The picture on the cover of this annual report is of students playing the violin in the Santa Ana Strings program. Santa Ana Strings is a collaboration between the Santa Ana Unified School District, Pacific Symphony and THINK Together, with special funding support from the Getty Foundation and THINK Together board member Leona AronoffSadacca. The Strings program benefits from Santa Ana Unified School District music teachers and professionals from Pacific Symphony, who teach more than 200 Santa Ana students how to play the violin. The program is coordinated by THINK Together, which manages the Extended Learning Time programs – afterschool and in summer – for Santa Ana Unified.

Strategic Collaboration THINK Together has built a scaffolding of support around schools in communities across California to help create an upper-middle-class support system around low-income schools. What we have built with help from partners and donors offers a great platform to layer on more opportunities for children to learn and grow. The results so far are encouraging. In addition to continuing to grow this work so more kids benefit, we also need to invest to make this system sustainable. All of this is a work-in-progress. The pages of this annual report contain vignettes that highlight strategic collaborations that help to build this ecosystem of support. Hopefully these stories will inspire you to think about how your school, your organization, your company or your family can join our symphony of collaboration to expand and improve these systems of support around our schools. Our communities, our state and our nation have a lot riding on this. Unfortunately, there is not enough space in this report to highlight THINK Together’s multitude of partners on this journey, but please know that we thank each and everyone of you from the bottom of our hearts for helping us build one of the most dynamic nonprofit organizations to come along in the last 40 years. If you are new to us, we encourage you to collaborate strategically so that more students will reach their full potential. Together, we can do this!

Eric Boden, Board Chair

Randy Barth, Founder and CEO

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ANNUAL REPORT

Alumni Stories: The Best

THINK TOGETHER

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Career Goals: Currently Producer for NBC affiliate station, KCRA3 Education: Majored in Political Science, Minored in Journalism THINK Together Experience: Graduated 2005

Career Goals: Psychologist Education: Currently attending Mount San Antonio College, Goal to transfer and graduate with a degree in Psychology from UCLA THINK Together Experience: Graduated 2013

And the Emmy goes to … America Arias!

Making the impossible possible through extended learning.

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ver five years ago, America Arias set her sights on winning an Emmy. Five months ago, she did just that.

In 2000, America, now a morning news producer for NBC’s affiliate station KCRA3 in Sacramento, began to attend THINK Together’s Shalimar Teen Center in the city of Costa Mesa. She did it because she needed a quiet place to study and get help with homework. She realized the afterschool program offered more than just peace and quiet and homework help. The tutors came in the form of college students, who not only helped her understand her classwork but opened her eyes to what else life has to offer after high school – college. These college students talked about their dreams and aspirations. The more they talked about their college life, and the more America saw each one graduate and go on to be successful, the more America began to believe she could do the same. So she took advantage of the Scholar Dollar program that paid students for their grades and worked harder to get better grades and earn more money. America soon became one of the growing number from her neighborhood to graduate and go on to college. She went on to attend California State University, Fullerton and majored in political science with a minor in journalism. While in school, she received the distinction of being named as one of the top 100 journalism students in the country and took an internship for a CBS affiliate in Washington DC, followed by another internship at CNN. After graduation, she began to work for KABCTV LA as a news assistant that led to a position as a morning news producer for the ABC affiliate channel in the city of Fresno, California. It was here that America and her former team at KFSN-TV abc30 won a Daytime Emmy for Best Daytime Newscast.

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arisa Venegas is a recent graduate of Azusa High School. She is now attending Mt. San Antonio College pursuing a degree in psychology. Four years ago, she wouldn’t have believed this was possible.

Education was not really a priority for her family and the cost made it even further out of reach. Something changed for her in ninth grade. Marisa, along with her friends, decided to join the school’s hip hop class provided by THINK Together. Marisa thought of THINK Together as a “babysitting program” only offered in elementary and middle school. After becoming an integral part of the hip hop class, Marisa became more involved and joined other clubs and activities that THINK Together offered even though her friends had already dropped out of the program. Marisa stayed, not only because the clubs were fun and interesting, but because she found the staff really cared about her progress in school, as well as her personal well-being. She discovered she had a multitude of interests and the THINK Together staff really encouraged her to uncover her skills and her potential in these new areas. She even applied and received an internship with THINK Together, which allowed her to discover how much joy she received by working with the elementary students and helping them through their own struggles. It was during one of her conversations with a THINK Together staff member about this topic that she learned that there is a career where she can further develop this passion. Next, Marisa wants to transfer to UCLA to make her dreams of becoming a psychologist a reality.

America sees herself as a storyteller. Little did she know the most inspirational story she would share is her own.

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40%

60%

PLAN TO CONTINUE FULL-TIME EDUCATION

ACCEPTED INTO A 4-YEAR UNIVERSITY

FIRST IN THEIR FAMILY TO ATTEND COLLEGE

Career Goals: Chief People Officer Education: Bachelor’s degree in Business Administration with a concentration in Human Resources THINK Together Experience: Graduated 2009

Career Goals: Neurosurgeon Education: Transfer to UCLA to pursue Bachelor’s degree in Biology, then Medical School THINK Together Experience: Graduated 2012

Monica Gallardo now teaches others the lessons she learned.

Working ‘together’ is the No. 1 lesson

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onica graduated in 2009 from THINK Together’s Shalimar Teen Center. Today, she not only volunteers for that same afterschool program, but she also serves as an ambassador for THINK Together, speaking to a wide array of groups involved with the organization. Monica speaks to THINK Together’s current students to encourage them to take the next step in their education in the same way that the staff and volunteers at Shalimar Teen Center did for her not too long ago. She also presents to THINK Together’s corporate partners to share with them first hand the effect of their contribution and support. It was the THINK Together staff and key volunteers who helped and encouraged Monica to apply, get accepted and leave her comfort zone to attend Sage Hill School in Newport Coast, a co-ed college preparatory day school. Monica learned a lot about herself through the process and discovered that working with an organization, and most importantly the people who make up the organization, is where she would like to devote her career. Earlier this year, Monica graduated from the University of La Verne with a degree in business administration and a concentration in human resources. Similar to a majority of THINK Together’s students, Monica was the first person in her immediate family and second in her extended family to go to college. THINK Together became the academic support her parents couldn’t provide for her. When presenting to other students, she reminds them to take advantage of the opportunities of applying for and attending college, to keep pushing forward and know the volunteers and staff will always be there to help.

ANNUAL REPORT

and Brightest

80%

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or THINK Together alum Jorge Ibarra, life goes by fast but the lesson of teamwork is a lasting one.

“The memories of childhood stay with you for the long haul,” he says. “But the help you gave to someone, and the learning you got from it, will stay in both of you for the rest of your lives.”

THINK TOGETHER

2013 Graduating Seniors:

Jorge graduated from THINK Together’s program at Gladstone High School in the city of Azusa two years ago. Today, when Jorge is not attending classes at Citrus College, he can still be found on the college campus tutoring other students. It’s a role he knows well. While in high school, he was also the president of THINK Together’s extended learning time program, where he gained valuable experience in leadership and management. Jorge led club activities and helped other students with their design and promotion of projects and events. He helped by tutoring and fulfilling numerous roles. Jorge said the most valuable lesson he learned as a president was that a leader was only as good as his team. Through experience, he has seen that a group of people working together always produces better results than someone working alone. “The sweetest thing that the THINK Together program has taught me is that choosing the right people to work with you is important, but choosing the right people that are eager to work with you will literally change the world.”

Taking care of those around her is indeed built into Monica’s future.

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THINK Together Programs Accelerating Academic Achievement Through Extended Learning Time

ENGLISH 4 YEARS +19.5

T

HINK Together partners with more than 40 school districts throughout the state to deliver high-quality extended learning time programs to students after school. Students in grades 3 through 8, who regularly attended the programs for 2, 3 or 4 years, experienced statistically significant higher growth rates on their 2012 California Standards Test in both English Language Arts and Math when compared to students who did not attend THINK Together.

MATH 3 YEARS +18.0

ENGLISH 3 YEARS +6.6

ENGLISH 2 YEARS +6.5

MATH 2 YEARS +13.6

DIFFERENCE IN GROWTH OF SCALED POINTS BETWEEN PARTICIPANTS AND NON-PARTICIPANTS

: AM GR

4

TE RA

CY

&

MA

TH

PR O

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YEARS

ANNUAL REPORT

MATH 4 YEARS +11.3

EA R

LY

LI

+47% 2 15-WEEK SESSIONS

+27% 1 15-WEEK SESSION

Fostering School Readiness Skills Through Early Learning

P

re-Kindergarten students who attended the Children and Families Commission of Orange County and THINK Together’s Early Literacy and Math Program experienced statistically significant growth in scores when assessed on skills considered to be foundational in preparing students to be successful in school such as: identifying letters, colors, basic shapes, patterning, motor skills, basic math and counting.

GROWTH RATES FROM PRE TO POST

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Collaboration =Results 13 DISTRICTS + 109 LOCATIONS SCHOOL DISTRICT

16,965 STUDENTS

In collaboration with the National Summer Learning Association (NSLA) and Walmart, 3,143 of these students received enhanced middle school programming that resulted in improved school engagement and relationships after just four weeks.

+

3,,14 3,143 3 43 MIDDLE M MI MIDD I DD D D LE L E SCHOOLERS S CH C H OOL OO O O SUR SU SURV RV V EY E E ED D SURVEYED

RESULTS STUDENTS DEMONSTRATED A STATISTICALLY SIGNIFICANT LEVEL OF GROWTH IN SCHOOL BONDING AS WELL AS THEIR RELATIONSHIPS WITH ADULTS AND PEERS. THIS IS IMPORTANT BECAUSE RESEARCH HAS SHOWN THAT THESE TWO OUTCOMES ARE LINKED TO POSITIVE IMPACTS ON LEARNING AND SCHOOL ENGAGEMENT. *PEAR (Program in Education and Afterschool) in conjunction with NSLA tested participants using the Holistic Student Assessment (HSA) self-report tool with 3,143 middle school students

ANNUAL REPORT

I

n partnership with 13 school districts throughout the state, THINK Together’s 2013 Summer Learning Program served a total of 16,965 students at 109 locations.

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Strengthening Relationships Through Summer Learning

Engaging Student Success Through High-Quality Programs THINK TOGETHER SURVEYED MORE THAN

believe that they will graduate high school

believe that their THINK Together teachers care about their success

believe that their THINK Together teachers are strong leaders

10,000

3RD THROUGH 8TH GRADE YOUTH

88%

90%

80%

82%

81%

84%

report understanding more about eating healthy and exercising

report understanding more about Science, Math and Technology

believe that it is important for them to make the community a better place

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Parent and Student Spotlight

ANNUAL REPORT

THINK Together wins parental approval

THINK TOGETHER

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Sisters Alicia a and Lydia Chavez first THINK Together when their encountered T mother Gina was searching for options that would give her time My wife works hard to keep to focus on her job search. our girls on track and the

afterschool program greatly enhances her efforts.

ulio and Gina have been THINK Together parents for three years now and they are really starting — J U L I O , FAT H E R O F A L I C I A A N D L Y D I A to see results. “Not only is the academic support they get helpful but so is the nutritional component of the afterschool program in the Baldwin Park Unified School District,” Julio says. “It has really affected our lifestyle. Our daughters understand that junk food is not good for them, which makes meals much easier for us to prepare.”

Julio and Gina like most parents want their children to have more opportunities than they had. “My wife works hard to keep our girls on track and the afterschool program greatly enhances her efforts,” Julio says. “Alicia is one of six students at her school to receive a perfect score on the state exams and she’s already learning how to be a teacher through the afterschool program. When she’s done with her schoolwork she visits younger students and helps them with their homework and academics.”

Did You Know? 89%

89%

OF PARENTS STRONGLY BELIEVE THAT THINK TOGETHER HELPS THEIR CHILD DO BETTER IN SCHOOL.

OF ELEMENTARY AND MIDDLE SCHOOL STUDENTS SAY THAT THE PROGRAM HELPS THEM DO BETTER IN SCHOOL.

66% OF STUDENTS SAY THE PROGRAM HELPED THEM LEARN HOW TO DO HOMEWORK ON THEIR OWN.

I

n the beginning, reading was difficult for Emely, a student at Lake Marie Elementary in the South Whittier School District. Because of those reading difficulties, she was also having a hard time with other subjects. With the support of THINK Together and the school day staff at Lake Marie, Emely quickly built her reading skills and within one academic school year she was fully literate.

Now as a fourth grader, when she is asked about her favorite activity she has a quick answer. “Reading books, especially fun and silly stories!” she says.

An exciting new chapter opens up for THINK Together student Being a single mother and working long hours, Emely Rojas’s mother sought out THINK Together’s afterschool program to provide her daughter with a safe place that could also support her academically.

Emely also enjoys the friendships she has at THINK Together. “It’s cool that I still get to see and talk to my friends that used to be in my class last year,” says Emely. When Emely grows up she wants to be an eye doctor. “I think it’s cool to help people see clearly,” said Emely. The destiny of Emely and her mother has been changed forever by THINK Together and our partners in the South Whittier School District. With advice from THINK Together staff, they spend more time together in which Emely reads to her mother who is a Spanish speaker. With support from her mother, school and community, Emely will no doubt reach her full potential and is already a responsible, contributing member of the community.

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Volunteer Spotlight An officer and a volunteer Helping students pursue the right path

Feeling a connection, Eduardo was inspired to pursue his childhood dream of becoming a police officer and become a positive role model to his community. He worked his way back to his regular high school, and managed to graduate

with his class. He went on to pursue higher education and attended Santa Ana College, where he received his associate degree in liberal arts and then transferred to Cal State Fullerton. In 2011, he received his bachelor’s degree in criminal justice, again making him the first in his family to receive a college degree. That same year, he saw an opening for a Program Leader position at THINK Together’s Highland Teen Center in the city of Orange. He loved the idea of working with students who faced the same obstacles as he did. He wanted to be a positive influence and prove to the students that anyone can become something, no matter the circumstances or the environment. After six months at Highland Teen Center, Eduardo was given the opportunity to pursue his dream to become a police officer. After months of training, he was sworn in as a police officer for the Los Angeles Police Department. While he felt quite fortunate to have his dream job, his passion for making a difference with the youth lingered on.

ANNUAL REPORT

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e didn’t like school because he struggled academically. The wrong people influenced him until he found himself at Richland Continuation High School. One day he came across the book “Two Badges” by Mona Ruiz. It was a story about the author and how she became a police officer, regardless of the many obstacles she faced in her life.

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Eduardo Munoz’s story began when his parents immigrated to the United States from Mexico. Eduardo was the first in his family to be born here. Growing up, Eduardo didn’t have many mentors and the path wasn’t always so clear.

So Eduardo returned to Highland Teen Center and became one of 6,000 THINK Together volunteers. Every time he comes, he makes a lasting impression on our students as a volunteer tutor; influencing them to do well, to do what’s right and to pursue their dreams.

Did You Know? 22%

23%

VOLUNTEERED FOR MORE THAN 30 HOURS A MONTH.

VOLUNTEERED FOR 20 TO 30 HOURS A MONTH.

88% TUTORED DURING HOMEWORK TIME.

76%

60%

WERE EXTREMELY SATISFIED WITH THEIR VOLUNTEER WORK.

VOLUNTEERED FOR ACADEMIC ENRICHMENT ACTIVITIES.

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ANNUAL REPORT

School Partner Spotlight

THINK TOGETHER

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I was pretty impressed with THINK Together’s proposal. It was in sync with my vision for afterschool.

— ELLEN LEE,

Did You Know?

93%

OF SCHOOL PRINCIPALS REPORT THERE IS A STRONG PARTNERSHIP BETWEEN THINK TOGETHER AND THE SCHOOL.

P R I N C I PA L O F

W I L L I A M L A N D E L E M E N TA RY

89%

OF PRINCIPALS REPORTED THAT THINK TOGETHER CURRICULUM AND INSTRUCTION REINFORCES CONCEPTS TAUGHT DURING THE SCHOOL DAY.

It’s the principal that matters William Land Elementary in the Sacramento City Unified School District has expanded its THINK Together partnership with a language immersion program for Mandarinspeaking children and through a new afterschool program for kindergarteners. The result is 240 total students who attend extended learning time after school.

E

llen Lee, the principal of William Land Elementary, was approached by the district’s superintendent three years ago about starting a language immersion program. The first year, the school ran its own program, then in the second year, it looked at using the services of extended learning time providers like THINK Together. “I was pretty impressed with THINK Together’s proposal,” she said. “It was in sync with my vision for afterschool because it was a seamless transition for kids from regular day to afterschool.” Soon after, she also began a pilot afterschool kindergarten program. That program, managed by THINK Together, has grown from 20 students in year one to 60 students this year thanks to positive parent feedback. Ellen appreciates the collaboration that THINK Together provides. She likes the team’s hands on approach, constant communication and willingness to work with her. She notes that she had a role in the selection process for the Site Coordinator. Her expectation is that all staff at William Land be part of the general school culture and the THINK Together team is no exception. THINK Together staff often pitch in and help with school-wide events, they take part in school-wide professional development, staff and curriculum meetings. They also get feedback from teachers on which students need additional academic enrichment. The approach is working well. “We have a shared vision,” she said.

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Investor Spotlight Since 2010, the Children and Families Commission of Orange County has partnered with THINK Together to deliver early literacy and math programs to thousands of children countywide.

L

ast year, the Commission provided THINK Together with a one-time, $5 million allocation of catalytic funding that will ensure the continuation of early literacy and math programs to the underserved children in the county for the next 10 years. THINK Together used the $5 million investment to acquire a 52,600-square-foot office complex at 2101 East Fourth Street in Santa Ana. The new buildings will house the THINK Together Home Office and OC Region staff and will accommodate the organization’s future growth. By purchasing the property and moving into one complex, THINK Together will save $750,000 in rent annually. The savings will be used to direct funds to critically needed early learning programs for at least a decade.

By purchasing the property for cash, THINK Together is able to reinvest the money it would have otherwise paid in rent in countywide literacy and math programs for preschool-age children. Studies have shown how vitally important early literacy and math skills are to a child’s long-term academic success.

The Children and Families Commission contracts with THINK Together to provide early learning programs countywide. Last year, more than 16,000 young children benefited from early learning programs at schools and clinics in Orange County. Throughout its history, the Commission has supported numerous early learning programs, including Reach Out and Read, Raising A Reader, Math is Everywhere and Read for the Record, to name a few. The programs target children ages 0 to 5 along with their parents and use highly cost-effective, evidence-based tools to ensure children have basic literacy, vocabulary and math skills to prepare them for kindergarten. THINK Together’s program also includes physical activities (CATCH for Preschool) and science activities to encourage curiosity and critical thinking.

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Dr. Michael Riley, chair of the Children and Families Commission of Orange County, and THINK Together CEO Randy Barth pay a visit to the Early Literacy and Math Program at Veeh Elementary in Tustin.

ANNUAL REPORT

Building a bright future for early learners

Did You Know?

ABC

Less than half OF ORANGE COUNTY’S UNDERSERVED CHILDREN HAVE ACCESS TO QUALITY, EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION.

One in three CHILDREN ENTERS KINDERGARTEN LACKING BASIC PRE-READING AND MATH SKILLS.

The THINKPLEX will house the THINK Together home office and Orange County region employees, saving the organization $750,000 a year in rent.

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Collaborator Spotlight

ANNUAL REPORT

What three-partner harmony sounds like

THINK TOGETHER

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Beginning in 2012, hundreds of elementary school children in the Santa Ana Unified School District have been provided with the opportunity to join the Santa Ana Strings, a collaborative effort between the district, Pacific Symphony and THINK Together to provide music enrichment activities and build parental support of school music programs.

Parents Said: 80%

98%

WERE ABLE TO FOCUS ON WORK AND EDUCATION.

WILL ENCOURAGE PARTICIPATION AGAIN IN THE SUMMER.

100% WOULD RECOMMEND TO ANOTHER PARENT.

Students Said: 71%

65%

KNOW MORE ABOUT MUSIC NOW THAN BEFORE THIS PROGRAM.

IMPROVED PROBLEM SOLVING SKILLS WITH THE HELP OF MY PEERS.

82% SHARED WHAT I LEARNED WITH OTHERS.

A

s part of the Santa Ana Strings, these young children learn how to play the violin and perform to large crowds during extended learning time activities that take place afterschool and in the summer. They have performed at the Orange County Great Park, the Rene and Henry Segerstrom Concert Hall and other mini concerts for their families and friends. As members of the Santa Ana Strings, the students are not only taught the joy of making music but also develop teamwork and creative skills, self-esteem, perseverance and discipline. The hope is the success of the Santa Ana Strings will encourage more students to enter school music programs and develop a love and appreciation for performing arts. THINK Together is honored and fortunate to have great partners like Santa Ana Unified School District and Pacific Symphony, who believe true collaboration can ultimately change the lives and destinies of our students and their families.

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Ecosystem of Support

U

pper-middle-income children have highquality health care, are read to early and often, have access to high-performing preschool and K-12 schools, youth sports, arts and music lessons. They are exposed to multiple enrichment offerings throughout their childhood and youth so that they can have different learning opportunities and discover their passions. In contrast, the lower-income children served by THINK Together’s programs rarely have those systems of support. THINK Together believes through collaborative efforts with school district partners, donors and community volunteers, we can build a robust community of support for children by leveraging public funding for early childhood and extended learning time programs.

Extended Learning Time Programs THINK Together works with school partners across the state to deliver daily comprehensive school programs that consist of academic and enrichment elements and a healthy living component that includes physical fitness, character education and nutrition education. Elementary, middle school and high school students attend from the time the school day ends until 6 p.m. THINK Together’s standards-based curriculum intentionally aligns with core day instruction and extends learning time in a safe, adultsupervised environment. We help close the achievement gap with a broad array of engaging learning activities, enabling student choice and accommodating local interest.

SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY ENGINEERING MATH (STEM)

HEALTH AND WELLNESS

SUMMER PROGRAMS

EARLY LITERACY PROGRAMS

A BC

Summer Learning Programs THINK Together partners with major institutions like the Walmart Foundation, the Packard Foundation and the National Summer Learning Association to avoid the summer learning loss that causes low-income students to lag behind their higher-income peers. Low-income students can lose as much as two months of learning through inactive summers. THINK Together’s summer programs offer project-based, hands-on learning focused on English language arts, and STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math), supplemented with enrichment in music, dance, physical fitness and theme-based field trips. Each summer season offers a targeted learning theme with accompanying interactive learning opportunities.

Early Literacy and Math THINK Together manages the Early Literacy and Math program for the Children and Families Commission of Orange County, which serves some 16,000 children countywide. The program assists parents and other caretakers of young children (0-5 years) in developing regular reading routines, and providing guidance in using other learning tools to increase their child’s vocabulary, so that he/she enters kindergarten with basic literacy and math skills. THINK Together’s program also includes physical activities (CATCH for Preschool) and science activities to

STEM On the National Assessment of Educational Progress, less than one-third of U.S. eighth graders show proficiency in mathematics and science and a large achievement gap among African Americans, Latinos, Native Americans and women exists in many Science Technology Engineering Math (STEM) fields. At the same time, there is increasing demand for these skills in the workplace. The result is a mismatch between the skills of the labor force and the needs of employers. To face this challenge, THINK Together collaborates with funding partners and school districts to provide youth with high-quality STEM programs. High quality extended learning programs offer an ideal setting for nurturing the potential scientist in every student as well as reinforcing the science lessons taught during the regular school day. THINK Together has implemented various curricula focused on nurturing inquiry and creating opportunity for hands on project-based learning.

ANNUAL REPORT

THINK Together believes lowincome kids need the same support system common among uppermiddle-class families.

encourage curiosity and critical thinking. THINK Together is looking to expand these vital programs to other counties as opportunities emerge.

EXTENDED LEARNING TIME PROGRAMS

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THINK Together’s Ecosystem of Support

Health and Wellness America has a childhood obesity crisis. Extended learning provides a platform to help address this devastating issue. To contribute toward a solution, THINK Together established a Wellness Committee, reached out to some of the leading thinkers in the field to begin to create a strategy that will help make our communities healthier. THINK Together employs a four-pronged approach to healthy living that includes: the Coordinated Approach to Children’s Health (CATCH) curriculum which promotes daily physical activity; nutrition education through Harvest of the Month and the Dairy Council that helps children and their families develop healthier eating habits; federal nutrition lessons; development of conflict resolution strategies through People Smart; and character education that aligns with school day programs or centers on key character traits such as respect and responsibility.

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Closing The Achievement Gap With

INNOVATIVE, SCALABLE SOLUTIONS WE SERVE

94

10

NATOMAS USD

SITES

VICTOR ELEMENTARY SD

SITES

+120K

SITES

AZUSA USD RIALTO USD

ELK GROVE USD

DUARTE USD

STUDENTS

COVINA VALLEY USD

REDLANDS USD BASSETT USD

MOUNTAIN VIEW SD

EL RANCHO USD LOS NIETOS SD EAST WHITTIER SD SOUTH WHITTIER LYNWOOD SD USD LITTLE LAKE CITY SD

MONTEBELLO USD

SACRAMENTO COUNTY

SANTA ANA USD

433

ALAMEDA COUNTY NEWARK USD

ANNUAL REPORT

COLTON JOINT USD

ONTARIO-MONTCLAIR SD

MORENO VALLEY USD

JURUPA USD

VAL VERDE USD

ORANGE USD

NUVIEW UNION ELEMENTARY SD PERRIS UNION HIGH SD

TUSTIN USD

PERRIS ESD

RIVERSIDE COUNTY

SITES

132

LAKE ELSINORE USD

SITES

SAN JOSE USD

ALUM ROCK UNION ELEMENTARY SD

91

TEMECULA VALLEY USD

SITES

ORANGE COUNTY SANTA CLARA COUNTY

IN

* Includes potential ACE Charter sites

40

DISTRICTS

NUMBER OF STUDENTS SERVED

DISTRICTS SITES

LOS A NG ELES COUNT Y

13

94

OR A NGE COUNT Y

3

63

O.C. CO M MUNIT Y LE A RNING CENTERS

N/A

5

O.C. E A RLY LITER ACY A ND M ATH

N/A

64

RIVERSIDE A ND SA N DIEGO

10

91

SA N DIEGO SUM M ER

1

8

SACR A M ENTO

3

10

BAY A RE A

4

20

SA N BERN A RDINO

6

78

15 GROWTH YEARS

THINK TOGETHER

20

*

ACE CHARTER NETWORK

SITES

20 13

SAN BERNARDINO COUNTY

CUCAMONGA SD

BALDWIN PARK USD

AT

78

LOS ANGELES COUNTY

SACRAMENTO CITY USD

SAN DIEGO COUNTY OCEANSIDE USD

ESCONDIDO UNION SD

SAN DIEGO USD

OF CONSISTENT

Thanks to our partnerships with school, donors and community leaders, THINK Together has seen tremendous growth in the number of students served.

120k

120K

90k 60k 30k

800

0 1998 99

00

01

02

03

04

05

06

07

08

09

10

11

12

2013

YE AR

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African 44% ofAmericans

Of those who graduate from high school

Latino 48% ofStudents

Only 18% pursue a higher education

BEYOND AFTERSCHOOL

Scan this code to see a digital version of the Annual Report. >

We collaborate with others to drive statewide change.

IMPROVING QUALITY

COMMON CORE IMPLEMENTATION

Three THINK Together staff members were honored to serve as representatives on the California Department of Education’s Afterschool Division Strategic Planning Initiative during the past year. Afterschool educators and supporters from all over California helped to inform decisions around raising the quality of extended learning time programs in California.

Implementing Common Core State standards is changing the face of kindergarten through 12th grade education and THINK Together is working side-by-side with school districts to infuse these standards in after school. Beyond basic training in the Common Core, THINK Together piloted a Common Core Guild in Santa Ana Unified School District to build both the competency and capacity of frontline staff. In 2014, this model will be scaled organization-wide.

STEM

BOOK BANK

THINK Together, through the OC STEM initiative, is partnering with the California Afterschool Network and school districts to provide hands-on and minds-on Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) experiences for youth. These experiences promote active, collaborative and rigorous learning, crucial to developing critical thinking skills.

Through a partnership with the Children and Families Commission of Orange County and the Orange County Fair, we have collected and distributed more than 120,000 books to be used in the Early Literacy and Math Program that THINK Together manages countywide. Parents, as well as pediatric clinics throughout the county, other nonprofits and schools.

ANNUAL REPORT

CRISIS

HIGH SCHOOL DROP-OUT RATES

20 13 THINK TOGETHER

EDUCATION IS FACING A

SUCCESS STORIES

BALDWIN PARK UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT Baldwin Park is one of the top districts in California in closing the achievement gap. THINK Together runs extended time learning programs after school in Baldwin Park at both elementary and middle schools, as well as summer programs for middle school students.

SHALIMAR LEARNING CENTER LA84 FOUNDATION THINK Together's original community center on Shalimar Drive has transformed this troubled neighborhood. Since 1994, 100 percent of the students who regularly attended the program graduated high school, and 300 of them have gone on to college. Some of the noted graduates have gone on to become TV news producers, architects, teachers, executives, engineers and medical school students.

Through an innovative partnership with THINK Together, the LA84 Foundation has contributed some $400,000 to fund sports programs for middle school students for the last five years. Thanks to this generous contribution, students in our extended learning time programs in Santa Ana, Los Angeles and Riverside stay healthy and fit by participating in soccer, basketball, flag football and volleyball.

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Introducing the Bay Area

ANNUAL REPORT

The most intimate form of collaboration is when two organizations merge as one. That happened this summer when the Bay Area After-School All-Stars board announced it was ending its affiliation with the national organization and joining THINK Together, strengthening extended learning time education for students and families served in the South San Francisco Bay Area.

THINK TOGETHER

20 Partner Spotlight: 13 The gift to kids that keeps on giving

T

One of John’s passions is giving back to those who are underserved. —MARIO VARGAS, T H I N K T O G E T H E R B AY A R E A EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

he Kirkorian Family Foundation h has as been a staunch supporter of exten extended nded learning time programs in the S San an Jose area, providing more than $50 $500,000 00,000 in funding over the last several years years.

The Foundation’s chief, John Kirkorian, has served on the board of the Bay Area afterschool organization. “One of John’s passions is giving back to those who are underserved and that has extended into his continued sponsorship and participation in our annual celebration event,” said THINK Together Bay Area Executive Director Mario Vargas. “We are so grateful for his support of the children we serve.” John and Monica Kirkorian continue to be strong supporters of Bay Area extended learning time programs and their support and generous gifts have gone directly to the classroom as well as help the sports league in Alum Rock and San Jose unified districts and local charter schools.

Bay Area Strategic Partners City of San Jose Mayor’s Gang Task Force Leland High School - Debate Team North Side Youth Sports Region V After School Partnerships San Francisco Jr. Giants Community Foundation San Jose State University Santa Clara University Santa Clara County Office of Education Santa Clara County After School Collaborative (SCCASC) Second Harvest Food Bank Silicon Valley OST Collaborative Tech Bridge Tech Museum TRUE Spark United States Tennis Association (USTA) YMCA of Silicon Valley Bay Area Donors ($5,000 and above) Ben Boyer Bud Davis, Co Ed Davis eBay Foundation Intero Foundation Kirkorian Family Foundation Lankford, Crawford, Moreno & Ostertag LLP Lee Family Foundation metroPCS Paula Moreno Packard Foundation Dr. Robert Perez Petrinovich, Pugh & Company Poch Family Rusciano Construction Silicon Valley OST Collaborative - Sand Hill Foundation, Sobrato Foundation, Packard Foundation, SV2 Foundation Smith Family Sobrato Foundation Morteza Tajally Bill Tamblyn Tenaya Capital Ray and Amy Trinidad USTA Vargas Family Western Digital Foundation World of Sports Memorabilia

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Orange County Snapshot Higher Growth Rates

Partner Spotlight: Santa Ana schools investment pays dividends

2012

F

ive years ago, the Irvine Company awarded THINK Together and Santa Ana Unified School District a five-year, $8.5 million gift. This investment, which brought the total giving of the Irvine Company and its Chairman Donald Bren to more than $10 million, served as a catalyst to expand THINK Together afterschool programs across Santa Ana Unified. Today, 47 schools serving nearly 30,000 students benefit from THINK Together programs. Currently all Santa Ana Unified K-8 schools and two high schools have Extended Learning Time programs.

Quality education opens the door to a lifetime of opportunity.

— D O N A L D B R E N , I RV I N E C O . C H A I R M A N

“It is truly rewarding to see the difference thi this iinvestment t th has made d iin th the li lives off so many students,” Mr. Bren said. “Quality education opens the door to a lifetime of opportunity, and, based on data and heartfelt student and family feedback, THINK Together has had a remarkable impact on Santa Ana’s communities.”

Building on the Irvine Company’s investment, THINK Together has built a collaborative model with Santa Ana Unified that allows for alignment of extended learning programs with the district’s curriculum. “We thank the Irvine Company and Mr. Bren for their continued support of THINK Together,” said Randy Barth, Founder and CEO. “Mr. Bren’s one-year, $1.7 million extension grant earlier this year saved us from what would have been a devastating setback with the loss of more than $3 million in federal funding. Thank you for seeing the vision that allowed us to make the catalytic transformation that is changing the destinies of our children and families in Santa Ana.”

Orange County Strategic Partners Active Learning Albertsons Allergan Boys & Girls Club of Santa Ana Brandman U. (all regions) Cal State University Fullerton California State Parks - Crystal Cove Career Colleges of California Chapman University Courtyard Apartments DeVry University Discovery Science Center Everest College Festival of Children GE Google Heritage Museum of Orange County Network for Healthy California SAUSD OC Fair OneOC Orange County Council Boy Scouts of America Orange County Science and Engineering Fair Orange Courier Pacific Symphony ResCare Santa Ana Chamber of Commerce Santa Ana Community College Santa Ana Library Santa Ana Police Department Santiago Canyon College South Coast Plaza St. John’s Lutheran Church Toyama Karate Do Trinity United Presbyterian Church Tustin Community Foundation UC Irvine University of Phoenix (all regions) Vanguard University

20 13 THINK TOGETHER

SINCE THE IRVINE CO. INVESTMENT FIVE YEARS AGO, STUDENTS IN GRADES 3 THROUGH 8 WHO REGULARLY ATTENDED THINK TOGETHER’S AFTERSCHOOL PROGRAM FOR 4 YEARS EXPERIENCED STATISTICALLY SIGNIFICANT HIGHER GROWTH RATES ON THEIR 2012 CALIFORNIA STANDARDS TEST IN BOTH ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS AND MATH WHEN COMPARED TO STUDENTS WHO DID NOT ATTEND THINK TOGETHER.

ANNUAL REPORT

$8.5 Million Gift

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Los Angeles Snapshot Students Said: 68% GET EXCITED ABOUT LEARNING SCIENCE.

LIKE TO PARTICIPATE IN SCIENCE PROJECTS.

Providing our students with STEM-based instruction is incredibly vital to the future of our state’s workforce and economy. We are so grateful for this partnership with the W.M. Keck Foundation.

ANNUAL REPORT

— DR. CYNDEE ZANDES, THINK TOGETHER’S CHIEF PROGRAM OFFICER

ring tomorrow’s s 20 Partner Spotlight: Inspiring 13 scientists today THINK TOGETHER

76%

T

his year, the W.M. Keck Foundation awarded THINK Together a $200,000 grant over two years. With this generous gift, THINK Together will add instructional and investigative STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) activities as part of its extended learning time programs at 81 elementary and middle schools in nine school districts in the San Gabriel Valley. More than 5,000 students will participate in afterschool hands-on STEM and digital learning activities that align with the new Common Core State Standards and provide a bridge with the school day. Goals include improving students’ knowledge and attitudes about STEM and STEM-based careers, and contributing toward participants’ academic growth in the areas of science and math. “Providing our students with STEM-based instruction is incredibly vital to the future of our state’s workforce and economy,” said Dr. CynDee Zandes, THINK Together’s Chief Program Officer. “We are so grateful for this partnership with the W.M. Keck Foundation.”

Los Angeles Strategic Partners Azusa City Library Azusa Pacific University Baldwin Park Teen Center Brandman University California Gang Reduction and Intervention Program Partners in the City of Duarte Cal Poly Pomona Cal State University Dominguez Hills Cal State University Long Beach Cal State University Los Angeles Center for Collaborative Solutions Cerritos College Chivas USA City of Whittier Police Chief’s Advisory Committee DeVry University Discovery Science Center Direct TV Azusa Technician Team El Monte Coordinating Council Five Star Gourmet Foods Healthy Azusa Collaborative Kaiser Permanente Baldwin Park Los Angeles Chamber of Commerce Los Angeles County Health Department Los Angeles County Office of Education Methodist Hospital of Southern California Metropolitan Water District Neighborhood Homework House New Futuro Parents as Partners for Planning for Student Academic Success Pico Rivera Chamber of Commerce Plaza de la Raza Powerplay! Champions for Change San Gabriel Valley Economic Partnership Santa Fe Springs Chamber of Commerce South Bay Center for Community Development SPIRITT Family Service Sysco Foods Los Angeles The Music Center University of Phoenix Upper San Gabriel Valley Municipal Water District Waste Management, Inc. YMCA of Greater Long Beach

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San Bernardino Snapshot Students Said: 84%

KNOW HOW TO MAKE HEALTHY FOOD CHOICES.

KNOW HOW TO PREPARE A HEALTHY SNACK OR MEAL.

90% KNOW IT IS IMPORTANT TO EAT HEALTHY.

ANNUAL REPORT

81%

Partner Spotlight: Cooking up recipes for health and wellness success

THINK TOGETHER

20 13

T

HINK Together’s extended learning time program in the Redlands Unified School District is fortunate to have Chef Lee Burton lead food preparation activities with students after school. Burton uses what he refers to as “real food,” comprised of fruits, veggies, and herbs that can be purchased at a local farmers market or farm. Burton wasn’t always a chef; he was a marketing executive for 20 years and dabbled in catering. His career transition was fueled by two passions, volunteerism and educating his local community about real food. “When teaching the afterschool students I don’t use the word ‘healthy’ with them, I use ‘real food’ instead,” Burton says. The word healthy doesn’t always go over well with kids. Chef Lee expresses that it’s our job to help kids view what adults call “healthy food” simply as food. Burton understands many of the students’ families have busy lifestyles that may not allow them enough time to prepare nourishing meals. That’s why he always uses no more than five ingredients and five steps to make his dishes. “You can actually be more efficient and economical when preparing meals with real food, it just takes more planning,” Burton explains.

If students are involved in the preparation rat a io on process they are more likely to try new ew w fo foods oods and flavors. “Giving back in this capacity apac citty leaves me feeling very enriched every very time I leave the program for the day,” ay,” Burton says. “Kids are the easiest to o teach cooking to. They love it.”

Kids are the easiest to teach cooking to. They love it. — CHEF LEE BURTON

Everyone has their own skill set and Burton uses his to give back in a way that also enriches his own life. He encourages others in his community to do the same.

San Bernardino Strategic Partners Arrowhead United Way Brandman University Building Industry Association, Baldy View Chapter Cal State University San Bernardino County of San Bernardino Children’s Network Inland Action Inland Empire PAL Center Inland Empire United Way Innovation Economy Corporation Lewis Corporation Loma Linda University Children’s Hospital Loma Linda University Medical Center NBC News Radio KCAA AM 1050 Ontario Chamber of Commerce Parent Institution for Quality Education Ralph Lauren Riverside Chamber of Commerce San Bernardino County Alliance for Education San Bernardino Valley College The Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim UC Riverside University of Phoenix University of Redlands Victor Valley Community College

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Riverside/San Diego Snapshot Higher Growth Rates

4 Riverside County Y EARS

CSTS: STUDENTS IN GRADES 3 THROUGH 8 WHO REGULARLY ATTENDED THINK TOGETHER’S AFTERSCHOOL PROGRAM FOR 4 YEARS EXPERIENCED STATISTICALLY SIGNIFICANT HIGHER GROWTH RATES ON THEIR 2012 CALIFORNIA STANDARDS TEST IN MATH WHEN COMPARED TO STUDENTS WHO DID NOT ATTEND THINK TOGETHER.

ANNUAL REPORT

2012

THINK TOGETHER

20 Partner Spotlight: 13 Runner’s lifelong legacy for learning endures

S

usan Gimbel was an ultramarathon runner who loved the outdoors and passionately supported education, the arts and cancer research. Sadly, Susan lost her battle with ovarian cancer in 2006. However, her legacy lives on through her foundation, the S.L. Gimbel Advised Fund at The Community Foundation.

And it was through The Community Foundation that THINK Together was selected to apply for the S.L. Gimbel grant. That generous gift funded the mathematics programs at THINK Together’s elementary and middle schools and reading programs for kindergarten to fifth-grade students in both San Bernardino and Riverside Counties over the past two years for a total of $50,000. THINK Together purchased Math Blast and Versatile Kits, highly effective curriculum that taught nearly 30,000 students mathematics in a fun and engaging manner using games. THINK Together’s focus on early literacy has also been further strengthened with S.L. Gimbel and The Community Foundation’s recent grant, which will provide 12 school districts in the Inland Empire with THINK Together Literacy Kits that will help students age two to 12-years old build and strengthen their fluency and comprehension. The Community Foundation Serving the Counties of Riverside and San Bernardino was founded in 1941 and since 1990, when records were computerized, has dispensed more than $42.9 million in grants and scholarships to the region.

Riverside and San Diego Strategic Partners Argosy University Brandman University GAIN Program of Riverside County Inland Action Innovation Economy Corporation Lewis Corporation Loma Linda University Children’s Hospital Loma Linda University Medical Center Moreno Valley College NBC News Radio KCAA AM 1050 Ontario Chamber of Commerce Perris Youth Opportunity Center Riverside Chamber of Commerce ROP of Riverside County UC Riverside University of Phoenix

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Sacramento Snapshot Students Said: 80%

KNOW WHY IT IS IMPORTANT TO STAY ACTIVE AND EXERCISE.

KNOW EXAMPLES OF FOODS THAT ARE NOT NUTRITIOUS.

82% KNOW EXAMPLES OF NUTRITIOUS FOODS.

ANNUAL REPORT

88%

Partner Spotlight: Giving kids a HOST of reasons to stay fit

THINK TOGETHER

20 13

H

ealth and Wellness is one of THINK Together’s most important initiatives. In Sacramento, we have had great success partnering with the Healthy Out-of-School Time initiative or HOST, which has created a science-based framework that creates environments where youth are encouraged to eat healthier and move more. HOST staffers decided to partner with THINK Together because of the organization’s great statewide reputation in delivering high-quality extended learning time programs. “They are great to work with,” says DeShannus Gray, HOST Manager, Sacramento acramento eart County, Alliance for a Healthier Generation Founded by the American Heart Association and The Clinton Foundation. “Our goal is to partner and collaborate with youth-driven organizations who are working to reduce childhood obesity. It’s a perfect fit.”

HOST, which is an offshoot of the nationwide Alliance for a Healthier Generation, works to support staff, families, and youth at sites around the county in their efforts to help young people make healthy life choices. “We are so grateful for the partnership with HOST,” says Esther Rosario, the Director of Regional Operations for THINK Together’s Sacramento region. “Their support contributes to our organization-wide goal of helping our children make better nutritional and wellness choices.”

Our goal is to partner and collaborate with youthdriven organizations who are working to reduce childhood obesity. It’s a perfect fit. —

D E S H A N N U S G R AY , H O S T M A N A G E R

Sacramento Strategic Partners Federal Work Study Program Harkness Elementary School Hilton Garden Inn Home Depot Sacramento County Office of Education Sacramento Employment Agency Sacramento State University Tome Leche – Got Milk Reading Campaign UC Davis Workforce Investment Board

” 21

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Health and Wellness For Mind and Body The Middle Ground

ANNUAL REPORT

MIDDLE SCHOOL STUDENTS WHO ATTENDED THE LA84 SPORTS PROGRAMS AT THINK TOGETHER ATTENDED PROGRAM AT A 44% HIGHER RATE THAN THOSE KIDS WHO DIDN’T TAKE PART IN SPORTS. THOSE WHO ATTEND PROGRAM REGULARLY TEND TO HAVE STRONGER ACADEMIC GROWTH.

Keeping kids in school MIDDLE SCHOOL STUDENTS WHO PARTICIPATED IN THE LA84 PROGRAM HAD HIGHER SCHOOL DAY ATTENDANCE RATES THAN NON-LA84 STUDENTS.

THINK TOGETHER

20 13 Scoring a goal for childhood health Like many of their peers, children enrolled in THINK Together’s extended learning time programs are battling a growing epidemic of obesity and poor health that has a direct effect on their academic achievement. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, obesity increased in children aged 6–11 years in the United States from 7% in 1980 to nearly 20% in 2008.

R

esearch shows physical activity can improve academic performance. We recognize the lower-income families served by THINK Together may have fewer resources to address the issue of obesity, including poor access to healthy, affordable foods or safe places for physical activity, which can improve academic performance. The physical activity and nutritional profiles of children and adolescents are strongly influenced by the school day and afterschool setting. One third of elementary school youth do not have recess on a regular basis, one in four children do not participate in any freetime physical activity and youth today eat on average 8% more calories than they did 30 years ago. To answer this problem, THINK Together established

44%

HIGHER R AT E

5%

HIGHER R AT E

a Wellness Committee and rolled out an organization-wide wellness program to help our children become healthier and therefore increase their chances in the classroom. The Committee helps us articulate the vision and goals for increased physical activity and improved nutrition and provides opportunities for partnerships. One of those recent partnerships occurred between THINK Together and Loma Linda University. Top researchers and doctors at Loma Linda are working with us to bring a holistic approach to our children and help them develop a healthier lifestyle. In addition to Loma Linda University, THINK Together would like to thank the LA84 Foundation, U.S. Soccer Foundation, Kaiser Permanente, Aetna, Cigna, St. Joseph Health Systems, Ralphs/Food 4 Less Foundation, Majestic Realty and others for working with us to develop healthy lifestyles for children and close the statewide achievement gap.

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Multi-Year Investors 2008-13

The Irvine Company The Walmart Foundation Children and Families Commission of Orange County The Donald Bren Foundation

$250,000 - $999,999 Bill Holmes Edison International LA84 Foundation Leona Aronoff-Sadacca Orange County United Way The David and Lucile Packard Foundation The Rose Hills Foundation Ueberroth Family Foundation United Way of Greater Los Angeles Weingart Foundation

$100,000 - $249,999 Anonymous Anonymous Bank of America California Community Foundation The California Endowment Charles Abbott Memorial Foundation Draper Family Foundation JP Morgan Chase & Co. W.M. Keck Foundation David Kim Marion Knott Majestic Realty Foundation John and Patricia D. O’Donnell Ralphs/Food 4 Less Foundation Randy Raykovich St. Joseph Health System The Ralph M. Parsons Foundation Women of Vision

$50,000 - $99,999 Sam and Susan Anderson AT&T Foundation Eric and Connie Boden Broadcom Corporation

Church of the Messiah Donald Crevier The Croul Family Foundation Dwight Stuart Youth Fund The Eisner Foundation Fluor Foundation Tony French The Green Foundation Bill and Sue Gross The James Irvine Foundation Bill and Pat Podlich Target Bart and Deborah Thomsen Western Digital

$25,000 - $49,999 Aetna Anonymous Randy and Mary Barth Tom Beeghly California Milk Processor Board Jay and Kris Carnahan Children’s Fund, Inc. City of Santa Ana Jerry and Bobbi Dauderman DevTo Support Foundation Edwards Lifesciences Sempra Energy Foundation Bruce May Michael Mugel O.L. Halsell Foundation OneOC Pacific Life Foundation ORION Property Partners, Inc. Stater Bros. Charities Tarsadia Foundation S.L. Gimbel Foundation at The Community Foundation Serving the Counties of Riverside and San Bernardino University of Phoenix

$10,000 - $24,999 Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics Foundation Doug Antone Barry Aronoff

Barney & Barney Foundation Kari Bloom BNSF Foundation Mark and Bridget Bogh CarMax Foundation Chevron Bill and Mary Lynn Coffee Rabbi Hillel and Rita Cohn Beccie Dawson Chris P. Dialynas General Mills Foundation Henry L. Guenther Foundation Kevin and Jenny Hayes, II Headlands Reserve LLC Henkel of America John Herklotz Hindu Matiya Patidar Samaj Inc Innovate Partners, Inc. Kaiser Permanente Baldwin Park Medical Center Kaiser Permanente Riverside Medical Center Michael and Kari Kerr Joanne Corday Kozberg Kenneth Lester Family Foundation Rod and Laura McDermott Ray and Toni Mendoza National Charity League, Inc., Newport Chapter Jim and Martha Newkirk The Nikols Company Nossaman LLP The O’Donnell Group, Inc. Steven and Angela Perryman Alan Pettis Barbara Roberts Roripaugh Family Foundation San Manuel Band of Mission Indians Sprint Foundation St. Andrews Presbyterian Church Taco Bell Donald and Betsy Tarbell Union Pacific Foundation United Way Bruce and Nancy Varner Warne Family Charitable Foundation Wells Fargo Foundation William and Jean Wenke

20 13 THINK TOGETHER

$3 Million - $10 Million

ANNUAL REPORT

Multi-year investors provide the financial base for the organization, enabling us to leverage tens of millions of dollars in public support, which makes all the work we do together possible.

Valued Partners We value our strategic partners who enable our success and help us to advance our mission.

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2012-13

Donors $500 - $999

$1 Million - $3 Million Children and Families Commission of Orange County The Donald Bren Foundation Walmart Foundation

$100k - $250k The California Endowment W.M. Keck Foundation The David and Lucile Packard Foundation The Ralph M. Parsons Foundation The Rose Hills Foundation Ueberroth Family Foundation

ANNUAL REPORT

$50,000 - $99,999

THINK TOGETHER

20 13

Bill and Sue Gross Bill Holmes JP Morgan Chase & Co. LA84 Foundation Orange County United Way Bill and Pat Podlich Target United Way of Greater Los Angeles

$25,000 - $49,999 Aetna The Bank of America Charitable Foundation, Inc. Randy and Mary Barth Eric & Connie Boden Broadcom Foundation California Community Foundation California Milk Processor Board Crevier Family Fund DevTo Support Foundation Majestic Realty Foundation OneOC Ralphs/Food 4 Less Foundation RR Medical Services, Inc. Southern California Edison Stuart Kane, LLP, Bruce May* United States Soccer Federation Foundation, Inc. Women of Vision

$10,000 - $24,999 Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics Sam and Susan Anderson Doug Antone Charles Abbott Memorial Foundation Chevron Rabbi Hillel and Rita Cohn The Croul Family Foundation Ranney and Priscilla Draper Dwight Stuart Youth Fund Edwards Lifesciences Fluor Foundation General Mills Foundation Kaiser Permanente Riverside Medical Center Anonymous ORION Property Partners, Inc. The Roripaugh Family Foundation San Manuel Band of Mission Indians Sempra Energy Foundation Stater Bros. Charities Bart and Deborah Thomsen Western Digital

$1,000 - $9,999 Henkel of America Jakob and Marlene Ackermann Kareem Ahmed Anonymous Leona Aronoff-Sadacca

24

David and Marseilla Barth Bergman Family Foundation Steve Bilt BNSF Foundation Tom Brickley Jay and Kris Carnahan The Cashion Foundation Church of the Messiah Cigna Foundation Bill and Mary Lynn Coffee The Community Foundation Community Foundation of Western Nevada Donald J. Crevier Ryan Faulkner Tony French Fredrick and Betty Gleason Lori Goodrich Great American Insurance Company Dan and Sue Guggenheim H&R Block Kevin Hayes Donald and Mary Hendricks Howard Building Corporation Glenn and Joyce Howard IBM Employee Service Center Fran Inman Robert and Michelle Kargenian Keenan & Associates Don and Linda Kelly Kohl’s Joanne Corday Kozberg Lewis Operating Corp. Randall Lewis Livingston Family Foundation Loma Linda University Medical Center Margolis Family Foundation McDermott & Bull Executive Search Rod and Laura McDermott Ray and Toni Mendoza National Charity League, Inc., Newport Chapter National Charity League, Orange Villa Park Chapter National Christian Foundation New Futuro Jim and Martha Newkirk Donald and Carrie Nikols O.L. Halsell Foundation Ted and Suzanne Paulson Barbara Roberts Rose Hills Company Santa Ana Rotary Foundation Foundation Andrew and Elisabeth Schutz Mike and Marja Selna Edward and Helen Shanbrom Family Fund Tim and Denise Shaw Starbucks Coffee Company Taco Bell Foundation Satoru Tamaribuchi Donald and Betsy Tarbell Thagard Foundation The PIMCO Foundation Trinity United Presbyterian Church Truist Union Pacific Foundation United Way Silicon Valley Bruce and Nancy Varner Vehicle Donation Processing Center, Inc. Barbara Wachsman Jeffrey Wahba Wells Fargo Westfield Mainplace Tod and Linda White

Susan Abbott Steven Barth and Amy Luskey-Barth Richard and Jondra Bjorkman Bobbi Blase Cal State San Bernardino, University Enterprises Corporation Celeste Cantu Karen Kay Carlson Central County United Way Beccie Dawson Fidelity Charitable Gift Fund Luis and Monica Florian Julie Gersten Golden Eagle Insurance Chris and Laura Hite Don Knabe Knobbe, Martens, Olsen & Bear LLP Michael and Cristine LeBlanc Timothy and Margaret Leyden Thomas and Connie Linnert John and Elizabeth Middleton Henry and Janet Miedema NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory Joseph Richard Negro Eric Nelson Nossaman LLP John and Cynthia Olivier Overture Young Professionals Michelle Pelliccino Beverly Peters Donna Phebus Kalpana Ramakrishnan Troy and Jeanne Roe, Esq. Rotary Club of Orange James and Anastasia Sellas Paul and Susan Shimoff John and Mary Ellen Simon Gerry and Maclyn Somers Judith Valles Revocable Trust

$1 - $499 Farrokh and Neda Abolfathi Pete Aguilar Stephen and Kathleen Allison Anonymous John and Fran Applegate Mitchel and Heather Ashwill Don and Carol Averill Wallace and Debbie Bain Tiffany Barberie Janet Barkawi Natalie Bates Frank and Mary Beard Ebert Beasley Inc Jaime and Eva Becerra Gary and Joyce Bedrosian Tom Beeghly Jeanne Behling Kathy Behrens George Beltz Jeff and Lisa Bennett Tracy Bennett James and Judy Bergman Carole Beswick Richard Blanco Kathleen Blank Nancy Paroli Blank Kurt and Michelle Blodgett Gordon and Carol Bowley Michael Brand Jody Anne Brennan Erin Brinker Vaughn and Ann Bryan David and Cheryl Bui Claire Burt Marcos and Lupita Calderon

* In-kind contribution to THINK Together

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Martin Pedroza and Evelyn Cordova Valerie Peister Charles and Madeline Peters Lynn Petersen David and Felicia Petrie Amanda Pivovaroff Mark and Rochelle Pollard Becky Pollock Steve PonTell John Prentice Sara Price Primarily Promotions Coral Quijada Luz Quinnell Jean Ralphs George and Jacqueline Raluy Timothy Randall Raising A Reader Sean Redfern Joan Rehnborg Maria Reichel Bernard and Francine Reizner Edmund Michael and Jill Rendl Fernando Reyes Susan Rice Annika Riphagen Rose Roberts Gabriel and Arcelia Robles Carlos Rodriguez Kimberly Rohn Frank and Martha Rutherford Richard Rutledge and Tehnaz Daruwala-Rutledge Maria Sandoval Salas Maria Sanchez Beatrice Sandoval Norma Santillan Shaquawn Schasa Kathy Schmachtenberger Carrie Schmidt Leon and Penny Schwartz George Searcy Shelly Sennikoff Mary Sexton Edward Simon Jerold and Phyllis Siperstein Liza Slaughter Robert and Beryl Smith Center for Collaborative Solutions Lisa Soria Daniel Sosa Pat Spafford Eric and Polly Stanbridge Jeff and Lourdes Stanfield James Stanley Joseph Stapleton Kathleen Stauffer Ross Szabo Robert and Penny Taube Regina Taylor Virginia Taylor Technical Works, Inc. Ju-Hsien and Bini Teng Karl and Katherine Tipre Lois Tolles Martin Torres Michael and Theresa Triay Christopher Trudeau Bill Turpit United Way California Capital Region United Way of Metropolitan Dallas, Inc. United Way of Metropolitan Atlanta, Inc. David Upshaw US Lines LLC Enrique Valenzuela and Guadalupe Valdez Yvonne Valenzuela Robert Van Hyning Troy Vander Hulst Frank and Ly Villaescusa Tamara Wagner Robert and Marilyn Whiton Roxanne Williams William and Anna Williamson Ann Wilson Tabetha Wittenmyer Andrew Wong Harry and Mary Woodward Douglas and Gretchen Wride Sandy Yeh Monica Younger CynDee Zandes

ANNUAL REPORT

Robin Harbor Ariana Haro Patricia Haro Deborah Dean Harold Anna Harris Scott and Cathleen Harris Steven and Chendra Harris Gloria Harrison Susan Harrison Headsets.com, Inc. Joanne Hopkins Inland Commercial Flooring, Inc. Gordon and Wilma Jackson Jamba Juice G. Thomas and Cynthia Johns Alec and Olivia Johnson Erick Kadison Viki Kane Stacey and Leslie Kato Ina Katz Lynette Kellum Steve Kenagy Gerald Kenny Lena Kent Bill and Pat Kessler George Khakis Lowell King Gail Kiralla-Orr Robert and Marisa Kiss James Knapp Kevin and Lynne Kodzis ValerieKos Beth Kristensen Andrew Krongold Robert and Lisa Kuhel Lambda Sigma Gamma Sorority Inc. Justin and Jodie Lanza Steven Lazarr Walter and Gwen Lazicki April Leal Tanya Lee Monalisa Lee-Johnson Hal and Nora Lehman Michael and Sajee Lekawa Kristia Lengyel-Leahu Paolo Leon Donald M. Callahan and Susan Levine Ralph E. and Alice Linnert Mark and Cathy Louchheim David and Elaine Ludwin Alicia Maciel Colleen Manchester Nydia Marrufo April Martinez Joseph Martinez Steve Martinez Gene and Maricela Mason Jill Mc Whertor Gary and Kathy McBride Lori McConnell Anne McCormack Rod McGlothlin Larry McKenney Raegene McMahon Gerald and Mary Mcruer Annel Medina Felix Metoyer, III Heather Metoyer Barbara Mickelson Kathryn Miller Robert Miranda Bryant Mork Patrick and Sally Morris Jack John Moskal Karen Munroe Helen Nieto Hayim Ninyo Donna Nolan Dean and Daniela O’Dell Patricia Odlum Uriel and Lorena Ojeda John and Karen Oliver Pamela Ong Orange Coast Unitarian Universalist Church Virdiana Oregel Dandelion Otero Ronald and Irene Ozaki P&R Paper Supply Company, Inc. Ashlee Jean Panozzo Scott and Elizabeth Paulsen Pamela Paxson

20 13 THINK TOGETHER

John Campbell Virginia Campos Leonard and Barbara Caraccio Maynard and Sherri Carkhuff Stephanie Carnes Daisy Carretero Antonio Casillas Jr. Fernando and Alicia Cazares Katherine Cecalamara Susan Straubel Champion Jung and Tsae Chang Stephanie Chiavatti Children’s Fund, Inc. Chiu & Wang, Inc. Clever Crazes for Kids Jim and Valerie Coffee Jeff and Christi Colby Brian Cole Xavier Colombi Southern California Gas Company Leonard and Mona Corbett Alex and Carleen Corrales Mark and Amy Cousineau Nicholas and Christina Coussoulis John and Judith Coyne Richard and Kim Crawford Gregory and Honour Del Crognale Charlie Cutler Tom Cutler Bill Cvengros Rod and Nancy Daley John-Joshua and Anne Davis Janisheia DeCuir Jorge and Amy Delgado Linda Dempsay Susan Denniston Miguel and Maria Diaz Roger and Jocelyn Distor Gregg and Valerie Dixon Anthony Do Lucky Do Joan Donahue David and Leigh Donaldson Molly Doughty Elaine Dove Gary and Patricia Dreyfus Joyce Dunigan Tia Dwyer Joel and Angela Eddins Employee Community Fund of Boeing CA Yvette Curiel Escalette Maria Luisa Espinosa Debbie Ewing John and Sharon Fairborn Josephine Ferris John Ferronato Derek Fitch Salina Fitzpatrick Nadia Flores Arnold and Marie Forde Eric and Kathleen Freed Aimee French Michael and Katherine Frobenius Winston and Carlita Fuller, Jr. Michael Furuta Art Gallardo Deborah Gangi-Hall Lupe Garcia Bob Gardner Laurel Peniche Gartman Sharon Gentry Andrew and Catharina Gerken Kevin and Carrie Gilbreth Donald and Stacy Gillett Larry and Marilyn Glick Beckie Gomez Victoria and Roberta Gonzales Danny Vega and Denise Gonzalez Heather Greene William Griffin Lawrence Gustafson Art and Claudia Gutierrez Bruce Haas and Cynthia Woelfel Paul Hadley Paul and Marlene Hagen Scott and Lori Ann Haigh Richard and Elinor Jane Hall Bill and Dana Halle John Hamilton James and Joqueta Caryl Handy John Hanson

25 142167.AnnualReport.2013_Shingle.GS.indd 25

1/22/14 9:38 AM


Our Leadership Board of Directors Executive Committee Chair Eric Boden

Community Leader

Judith Valles

Tammy Gaw

College President (Ret.) and Former Mayor

President and CEO, Omnis Risk Insurance Solutions

Wellness Committee

John Kirkorian

Ken Salgado

Secretary Darrel Anderson

Sat Tamaribuchi

Attorney and CPA

Chair Barbara Wachsman

Cassidy Turley BT Commercial

Bill Tamblyn

Corporate Director, Benefits Program and Strategy, The Walt Disney Company

Gloria Bañuelos

Partner, Lankford Crawford Moreno & Ostertag LLP

Community Leader

Julie Vennewitz-Pierce Senior Manager, Philanthropy, eBay Foundation

Leona Aronoff-Sadacca

Board of Advisors

Founder, Aronoff Capital

Kathy Braun-Lewis President (Ret.), Western Digital

Mary Lynn Coffee Attorney at Law, Nossaman LLP

Fran Inman Senior Vice President, Majestic Realty Co.

Jeffery Wahba Co-CEO (Ret.), Farmer Brothers Company

Sam Anderson

Jen Pitzen

Board Member Emeritus

Ranney Draper

Dora Barilla, M.D.

CEO, Bluestone Communities

Marion Knott

Steve Bilt

Don Moe

President & CEO, Smile Brands Group Inc.

Board Member Emeritus

Brigitte Bren

Hon. Frances Munoz (Ret.) Judge, Harbor Municipal Court

John O’Donnell

Executive Director, Center for Health policy and Leadership, Loma Linda University Medical Center and Children’s Hospital

Richard Chinnock, M.D. Chair of Pediatrics, Loma Linda School of Medicine, Loma Linda University Medical Center and Children’s Hospital

Donnie Crevier Owner, Crevier Classic Cars

Rebecca Cupp Pharmacy Merchandiser, Ralphs

General Manager, Santa Ana Watershed Project Authority

The O’Donnell Group, Inc.

Reyna del Haro

Steven Perryman

Donnie Crevier

Board Member Emeritus

Area Director of Public Affairs, Kaiser Permanente Baldwin Park

Owner, Crevier Classic Cars

Jerry Dauderman Investor & Philanthropist

Kendra Doyel Group V.P. Public Relations & Governmental Affairs, Ralphs Grocery Company

Ryan Faulkner

William F. Podlich Co-Founder, CEO (Ret.) PIMCO Advisors

Inland Empire Leadership Council Chair Leona Aronoff-Sadacca Founder, Aronoff Capital

Vice President of Human Capital, Optum

Mark Abbott Tony French

Director, Charles Abbott Foundation

Philanthropist

Pete Aguilar

Ryan Faulkner Amy Hathaway Fran Inman Senior Vice President, Majestic Realty Company

Steve James Joanne Kozberg

Cheryl Vargo

Chief Administrative Officer, Metropolitan Water District of Southern California

Rabbi Hillel Cohn Rabbi Emeritus, Congregation Emanu El

Sr. Community Benefit Health Specialist, Kaiser Permanente Orange County

Paolo Leon

Amy Cousineau,

Karen E. Scott

Angela Eddins

Paula Moreno

LaRonda Fisher Rogers

Partner, Lankford Crawford Moreno & Ostertag LLP

Jayne Muñoz

Education Consultant Vice President,Senior Relationship Manager, Union Bank

Carrie Gilbreth

English Instructor, Santa Ana College

Executive Vice President, Westbound Communications

Eric Nelson

Steve Kenagy

Vice President, Red Mountain Retail Group, Inc.

John Poch Deputy Director of Athletics/External Operations, San Jose State University Athletics

26 142167.AnnualReport.2013_Shingle.GS.indd 26

Vice President/Senior Relationship Manager, City National Bank

Gloria Macias Harrison President (Ret.), Crafton Hills College

Steven Robertson Senior Director, Financial Planning and Analysis, Silicon Image

Jason Rodriguez Emeritus, Hewlett Packard

Charles Rusciano CEO/Owner, Rusciano Construction, Inc.

James Shore Attorney, Sideman & Bancroft LLP

John Southwell Vice President of Hotel Operations, DiNapoli Capital Partners

Martin Ucovich Account Manager, United Mechanical, Inc.

Julie Vennewitz-Pierce Senior Manager, Philanthropy, ebay Foundation

Community Advisory Council Chair Ernesto Morales Principal, North Star Alliances

Javier Angulo

Andrea Avila

Senior Vice President, Community Health, St. Joseph Medical Group

Managing Director, McDermott & Bull Executive Search

Emeritus, (Ret.) Applied Materials

Director of Government, Public, Community Affairs, Wal-Mart

Carole Beswick

Rod McDermott

Marti Remmell

Partner, California Strategies

Azhar Qureshi, M.D.

Executive Director, Children’s Network of San Bernardino County

Deputy Director of Athletics/External Operations, San Jose State University Athletics

Executive Director, Got Milk?

Mayor, City of Redlands

MVE and Partners

John Poch

Health Promotion Manager, Cigna Healthcare

Sr. Vice President-Southern California, Lincoln Property Company

Gilbert Ivey

Community Leader

Vice President of Human Capital, Optum

Kevin Hayes, II

CEO, Inland Action

Dr. Robert Perez Program Chair, (Ret.) SJUSD Administrator

Founder & CEO, Molina Foundation Executive VP, Research and Innovation, Molina Health Care

Michael Kerr

Paula Moreno

Grant Officer, Loma Linda University Medical Center and Children’s Hospital

Bobbi Dauderman

Chairman, Spring Creek Investors

Ron Miller

Michael Bautista

Martha Bernadett

Philanthropist

Celeste Cantú

Sr. Community Benefits Healthy Specialist, Kaiser Permanente Baldwin Park

Board Member Emeritus

Board Members

Attorney/Education Advocate

Emeritus, Kirkorian Enterprises, LLC

Retired VP of Environmental Affairs The Irvine Company

President& CEO (Ret.), Networks In Motion, Inc.

Doug Antone

ANNUAL REPORT

Charles Faas

Educator

Assurance Partner, PricewaterhouseCoopers

Treasurer Glenn Howard

THINK TOGETHER

Susan Shimoff

Senior Director, Financial Planning and Analysis, Silicon Image

Chairman & CEO (Ret.), HireRight

President (Ret.), Knott Anderson Enterprises

20 13

Steven Robertson

Executive Director, First 5 San Bernardino

Joanna Fawzy Morales, Esq.

Deputy, Los Angeles County Supervisor Don Knabe

Cheryl Baptiste Human Resources, Wurth Louis and Company

Hector Galvan Regional Multicultural Marketing Manager, Sprint

Patty Juarez

Principal, North Star Alliances

Senior Vice President, Regional Vice President, Wells Fargo Commercial Banking Group

Jane Gates

LaRonda Fisher Rogers

Wellness Programs Director, Aetna

2013 Bay Area OST Council Chair Bill Tamblyn

Vice President, Senior Relationship Manager, Union Bank

Joanne Kozberg

Partner, California Strategies, LLC

Community Leader

Gilbert Ivey

Ben Boyer

Chief Administrative Officer, Metropolitan Water Distict of Southern California

Partner, Tenaya Capital

Edward A. Davis

Partner, Petronivich, Pugh & Co., LLP

Lupe Valdez

Director Public Policy & Community Affairs Corporate Relations, Union Pacific Railroad

1/23/14 9:20 AM


Revenues and Expenses THINK Together Statement of Activities __________

0%

2012-2013 __________

School Age Care

Revenues ASES/21st CCLC (K-12)** Supplemental Education Services (K-12) Early Childhood Literacy and Math (0-5) School Age Care (K-5) Philanthropy Other Total Revenues

$ 59,180,517 $ 534,221 $ 750,000 $ 65,423 $ 5,205,293 $__________ 421,469

8%

0%

Philanthropy

Other

57%

1%

Program Services State

Supplemental Educational Services (K-12)

2013

$ 66,156,923

ANNUAL REPORT

For Fiscal Year Ended June 30, 2013

Revenues

$66.2 M

Expenses

Total Program Services

23% $ 58,095,175 $ 562,405 $ 1,100,756 $ 43,345 $__________ 824,111

Program Services In-Kind

10%

$ 60,625,792

Fundraising General & Administrative

$ 1,436,469 $__________ 3,719,283

Total Expenses

$ 65,781,544

Net Income

__________ $__________ 375,379 __________

Ending Net Assets

__________ $__________ 1,952,616 __________

20 13 THINK TOGETHER

Program Services ASES/21st CCLC (K-12)** Supplemental Education Services (K-12) Early Childhood Literacy and Math (0-5) School Age Care (K-5) Community Sites (K-12)

Program Services Federal

Expenses 6% General & Administrative

2% Fundraising

** Includes recognition of In-Kind program services, such as THINK-recruited volunteer time and facility and snack costs contributed by school district partners.

History of Revenues & Expenses

2013

80,000,000

$65.8 M

70,000,000 60,000,000 50,000,000 40,000,000

REVENUES EXPENSES

30,000,000

92% Program Services

20,000,000 10,000,000

2006-2007** 2007-2008** 2008-2009** 2009-2010** 2010-2011** 2011-20012** 2012-2013** 2013-2014** Projected

27 142167.AnnualReport.2013_Shingle.GS.indd 27

1/22/14 9:38 AM


Randy Barth’s new book coming soon THINK Together: Helping to Build the Next-Generation of the American Dream

There are two achievement gaps in American education that have the potential to cripple American competitiveness in the 21st century global economy.

ANNUAL REPORT

T

THINK TOGETHER

20 13

he first gap is between Asian and white students and their African-American and Latino peers. The average 18-year-old African American or Latino student achieves at the level of the average 13-year-old Asian or white student. In California, 57% of students today are African American or Latino. In addition to this gap, even Asian and white students are falling behind their peers globally. Together, these present a significant challenge to America’s global competitiveness. In 1994, Randy Barth, then a Newport Beach stockbroker, read about a gang shooting in a tough neighborhood in Southern California. The mothers in that neighborhood organized to take the community back from the gang. Working through several churches, Randy pitched in to help them by establishing an afterschool learning center in an apartment in the neighborhood. This launched an amazing personal journey as well as one of America’s most promising education organizations: THINK Together. THINK Together now partners with more than 440 schools across 42 California school districts from San Diego to Sacramento to close the achievement gaps. Along the way, Randy gained a unique perspective about what is working and not working in American schools. Contrary to popular belief, there are good things happening in America’s public schools, even some of its lowest-income schools. However, there is very little visibility around these pockets of success. The challenge before our nation today is to figure out how to replicate and scale what is working so that we can begin to close the achievement gap and ensure that America remains a great nation.

This book moves the education conversation in America forward in three important ways. First, it challenges some of the conventional thinking behind both the traditionalist perspective and the reform perspective on some of the hot topics in education including choice, accountability, merit pay and standards. Second, it identifies and describes six elements of the education gauntlet that need to be navigated to replicate and scale what works. These are: federal and state policy and funding systems; higher education teacher and administrator preparatory systems; local school boards; school district leadership; the classroom (curriculum and instruction); parents and the community. Third, the book outlines a systems change road map so that society can replicate and scale the good things happening in our schools. Teaching, Helping, Inspiring and Nurturing Kids is what we do, and Together is how we do it. THINK Together has brought disparate parts of the community together to help build the next generation of the American Dream. In a deeply divided nation, Randy Barth teaches us how to come together around our children so we can build a more hopeful future, for them and for us.

Coming Soon!

Top: The original apartment complex in the Shalimar Drive neighborhood in Costa Mesa that was transformed to a learning center. Middle: The mothers who helped start the Shalimar learning center, Eva Marin on the left, Paty Madueno on the right and Maria Alvarez top. Bottom: Randy Barth, center, poses with Shalimar alumni Paolo Leon, Nadia Flores, America Arias and Gilberto Cardenas at the Hispanic Education Endowment Fund 20th Anniversary celebration.

28 142167.AnnualReport.2013_Shingle.GS.indd 28

1/22/14 9:38 AM


Randy Barth’s new book coming soon THINK Together: Helping to Build the Next-Generation of the American Dream

There are two achievement gaps in American education that have the potential to cripple American competitiveness in the 21st century global economy.

ANNUAL REPORT

T

THINK TOGETHER

20 13

he first gap is between Asian and white students and their African-American and Latino peers. The average 18-year-old African American or Latino student achieves at the level of the average 13-year-old Asian or white student. In California, 57% of students today are African American or Latino. In addition to this gap, even Asian and white students are falling behind their peers globally. Together, these present a significant challenge to America’s global competitiveness. In 1994, Randy Barth, then a Newport Beach stockbroker, read about a gang shooting in a tough neighborhood in Southern California. The mothers in that neighborhood organized to take the community back from the gang. Working through several churches, Randy pitched in to help them by establishing an afterschool learning center in an apartment in the neighborhood. This launched an amazing personal journey as well as one of America’s most promising education organizations: THINK Together. THINK Together now partners with more than 440 schools across 42 California school districts from San Diego to Sacramento to close the achievement gaps. Along the way, Randy gained a unique perspective about what is working and not working in American schools. Contrary to popular belief, there are good things happening in America’s public schools, even some of its lowest-income schools. However, there is very little visibility around these pockets of success. The challenge before our nation today is to figure out how to replicate and scale what is working so that we can begin to close the achievement gap and ensure that America remains a great nation.

28

This book moves the education conversation in America forward in three important ways. First, it challenges some of the conventional thinking behind both the traditionalist perspective and the reform perspective on some of the hot topics in education including choice, accountability, merit pay and standards. Second, it identifies and describes six elements of the education gauntlet that need to be navigated to replicate and scale what works. These are: federal and state policy and funding systems; higher education teacher and administrator preparatory systems; local school boards; school district leadership; the classroom (curriculum and instruction); parents and the community. Third, the book outlines a systems change road map so that society can replicate and scale the good things happening in our schools. Teaching, Helping, Inspiring and Nurturing Kids is what we do, and Together is how we do it. THINK Together has brought disparate parts of the community together to help build the next generation of the American Dream. In a deeply divided nation, Randy Barth teaches us how to come together around our children so we can build a more hopeful future, for them and for us.

Coming Soon!

Top: The original apartment complex in the Shalimar Drive neighborhood in Costa Mesa that was transformed to a learning center. Middle: The mothers who helped start the Shalimar learning center, Eva Marin on the left, Paty Madueno on the right and Maria Alvarez top. Bottom: Randy Barth, center, poses with Shalimar alumni Paolo Leon, Nadia Flores, America Arias and Gilberto Cardenas at the Hispanic Education Endowment Fund 20th Anniversary celebration.

THINKtogether.org 2101-A East Fourth Street, Santa Ana CA 92705 888.485.THINK


REPORT

ANNUAL

2013

THINKtogether.org Follow and like us at:

SCAN THIS CODE TO SEE A DIGITAL VERSION OF THE ANNUAL REPOR T.

A Symphony of Collaboration

2101-A East Fourth Street, Santa Ana CA 92705 888.485.THINK

THINKtogether.org 142167.AnnualReport.2013.PocketFldr.indd 1

1/23/14 10:01 AM


THINK Together 2013 Annual Report