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2020 ANNUAL REVIEW

BEST ANNUAL REPORT IOIC Scotland Awards 2019

WINNER 2021 Short-term partnership

SHORTLISTED: BEST ANNUAL REPORT


A YEAR LIKE NO OTHER Over the past 12 months we have had big hurdles to overcome to continue our fight to protect whales and dolphins

As you can imagine, this has not been the 12 months that we were planning for! During the past year we have had to adapt and find ways to continue to protect whales and dolphins. Covid has meant new working practices, events cancelled, colleagues working remotely and teams unable to carry out their plans. As an organisation that works around the globe to protect whales and dolphins, these changes presented us with some big hurdles to overcome. However, we have taken them in our stride and have been able to make strong progress across all of our programmes due to the hard work of our staff, sustained brilliantly by our partners and our loyal supporters. Together we have been able to work towards increasing the numbers of protected areas in the Ocean, more facilities holding whales and dolphins captive have decided they will no longer do so, whaling continues to wane in Iceland and, working with our fantastic partner the SEA LIFE Trust, two former captive belugas swam in the ocean for the first time in 10 years in the world’s first whale sanctuary.

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While we have been locked in, whales and dolphins have been enjoying reclaiming some of their wild spaces. I hope that one lesson we have all learned as we emerge into the post-lockdown light is the increasing value we place on nature and its role in helping our shared planet to mitigate the climate crisis. When it comes to the battle against climate change, whales and dolphins are our allies. As such, planning for ocean recovery through the protection of these amazing creatures will continue to be a focus for WDC and, now more than ever, we need your support to achieve this. Some of the threats whales and dolphins face daily may have paused during the pandemic, but they haven’t gone away. However, I’m optimistic for the future and confident that we can, together, achieve our shared aim to see a world where every whale and dolphin is safe and free.

CONTENTS Stop whaling Creating healthy seas Preventing death in nets End captivity Whale and dolphin culture Partnerships and collaborations It’s all thanks to you

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Financial review Thank you Contacts

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WITH THANKS

CHRIS BUTLER-STROUD, WDC CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER

30 YEARS OF PROTECTING WHALES AND DOLPHINS

CONSULTANT TO GUINNESS WORLD RECORDS

2020 WDC ANNUAL REVIEW


WDC is the leading global charity dedicated to the conservation and protection of whales and dolphins

SHUTTERSTOCK/ALAMY

Most of us don’t come into direct contact with the perils whales and dolphins face. That is why WDC is so important – to bring these issues to our attention and to show us what we can do to help DEBORAH MEADEN, BUSINESSWOMAN, STAR OF DRAGON’S DEN AND WDC SUPPORTER

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OUR VALUES PASSION

We care deeply about whales and dolphins, and we share this passion with our supporters

INTEGRITY Our work is backed by robust research, science and philosophy. We are the authority on whales and dolphins and the threats they face

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INCLUSIVENESS WDC does not work alone. Our supporters are at the heart of what we do. We also work with other NGOs, communities and governments to achieve real protection for whales and dolphins

COURAGE

V MIGNON

We are not afraid to take on big business, governments or industries whose actions harm whales and dolphins

2020 WDC ANNUAL REVIEW

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STOP WHALING Working to end this pointless trade

Whaling is devastatingly cruel and completely unnecessary

Minke whales are no longer hunted in Iceland

Even though commercial whaling was banned in 1986, Japan, Norway and Iceland have slaughtered nearly 40,000 large whales since then. Around a thousand whales continue to be killed every year in an attempt to make a profit from the meat and body parts, despite falling demand. There is huge government financial support to keep the industry afloat. During the Covid pandemic, some whalers were even treated as key workers.

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OUR AIM We are working to bring whaling to an end by reducing the number of countries that still allow whaling and so lessen the number of whales and dolphins killed.

OUR ACTIONS  To bring an end to whaling we fund groundbreaking research, while working with local communities and governments to promote alternatives to whale hunting, such as responsible whale watching.  By developing strong links with anti-whaling groups within whaling nations, such as Japan and Norway, we can also create better, more effective campaigns to reduce domestic support for it.  We also continue to work at international meetings, advising allies and countering moves by whaling nations to weaken protections for whales and dolphins.

OUR IMPACT

Minke whale hunts end

Cans of whale meat

After years of work to stop whaling in Iceland, our campaign received a massive boost during 2020 with the news that minke whale hunting would no longer take place there. Pressure on Iceland’s last minke whaling company helped reduce profits from the hunts and its managing director announced it would be ‘stopping for good’.

No fin whaling in Iceland in 2020

2020 WDC ANNUAL REVIEW

WDC

In 2020 Iceland’s fin whaling vessels remained in port after Kristian Loftsson, the owner of Iceland’s only fin whaling company, Hvalur hf, announced that the fin whale hunt season would not take place. This was tremendous news for our long-running campaign against fin whalers and for our wider strategy within the country that includes promoting responsible whale watching there.

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CREATING HEALTHY SEAS Reclaiming their spaces during our lockdown For most of us, 2020 was spent in lockdown for large periods of time. While we were shut in, whales and dolphins had the opportunity to reclaim some of their wild spaces. With less boat traffic, less underwater noise interfering with their communication, breeding and feeding habits, and potentially less pollution as a result too, for a while the sea must have been a nicer place for them. We should learn from this. To protect whales and dolphins we must protect their homes. This is a big task that requires many different approaches. Reducing plastic pollution, vessel collisions with whales and dolphins, underwater noise pollution and damage from fishing requires areas of the ocean to be protected. Under 10% of it currently is. We need more ‘nature reserves’ at sea to protect whales and dolphins from these threats.

Surfing dolphins

OUR AIM

We are working to protect the places most important for whales, dolphins and porpoises.

OUR ACTIONS

 We are continuing to work to create marine protected areas (MPAs) where human impact on whales and dolphins can be reduced.  Much is still unknown about places that are vital to whales and dolphins. So we

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are also working to establish Important marine mammal areas (IMMAs) – places where they gather to feed, breed and socialise, or through which they migrate.  We are lobbying governments to secure vessel speed restrictions in certain areas.  Our fight against plastic pollution continues. WDC’s urban beach cleans are still taking place at various locations to remove plastic waste from the streets that may otherwise end up in the ocean.


OUR IMPACT Campaign victory!

Campaigning for MPAs in Scotland

Our long campaign to get further protection for whales and dolphins in designated areas off the coast of Scotland received a huge boost in 2020, when the Scottish government announced the creation of three marine protected areas that WDC has been

seeking for several years. The news represents a huge victory for all our supporters who signed our petition, and our volunteers who helped gather important research data on the minke whale and Risso’s dolphin populations that will now be protected as a result.

Marine mammals in Mozambique

Saving orcas in America

We continued our IMMA Bay for future protection work in 2020 in Mozambique, of endangered Indian working with the International Ocean humpback dolphins, Union for Conservation of humpback whales and Nature’s Marine Mammal dugong. As a result, oil and Protected Areas Task gas exploration in Force to help local the region was Clean and authorities pinpoint withdrawn vibrant waters the Bazaruto by South Archipelago African energy to Inhambane company Sasol.

Our ongoing work in the source, Chinook salmon. US to save an endangered A two-year effort to population of orcas (the incorporate the nutritional Southern Residents) needs of the Southern was boosted by a Resident orcas into new agreement to salmon management remove four dams decisions resulted in Saving orcas on the Klamath new measures that River that reduce will be triggered the orcas’ if salmon primary food returns are low.

2020 WDC ANNUAL

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ROB LOTT / CHRISTOPHER SWANN / LUKE PENKETH

Our important campaign victory will help to protect Risso’s dolphins off the coast of Scotland


PREVENTING DEATH IN NETS A massive problem – but we know the solutions

Original illustration by richardpalmer.com, edited for republication

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We are working to implement solutions that will reduce the number of whales, dolphins and porpoises killed or injured through accidental entanglement in fishing lines and nets.

OUR ACTIONS

 We will tackle the issue by working with the world’s leading experts on bycatch to find the most effective and quickest ways to reduce it, and to find solutions to end it.

EVERY YEAR, hundreds of thousands of whales, dolphins and porpoises are accidentally killed in fishing nets and gear. This threat (also known as bycatch) is bigger than any other single issue. The suffering they endure is terrible, yet we know how to stop this. This is why our work on this issue is a priority.

 We will continue to campaign for improved protection in places like New Zealand for Māui and Hector’s dolphins.  We will maintain pressure for strong government policies and prevention measures to reduce bycatch in UK waters.  We will work to encourage supermarkets to consider whale and dolphin bycatch in their purchasing decisions.

OUR IMPACT Significant victory in our fight to save world’s smallest dolphins Following our long-running campaign, the New Zealand government released a plan in 2020 that includes better protection for Māui and Hector’s dolphins. With the help of our supporters (and more than 51,000 signatories to our petitions), we achieved a ban on set nets in one sensitive area, and an extension to the areas where both set nets and trawling is banned along the coast of the Taranaki Bight in the North Island. These measures are a significant improvement on the previous situation and we will continue to push for greater protection for these small but precious dolphins.

A tragic ending

THE SUFFERING THEY ENDURE IS TERRIBLE 2020 WDC ANNUAL REVIEW

CSIP / ZSL

EU minister action on net deaths

With your support, we’ve been campaigning hard to prevent deaths in nets in EU waters and our efforts have received a welcome boost following intervention by the EU minister for environment, oceans and fisheries. He highlighted his concerns about the number of dolphins dying in nets around the Bay of Biscay to the environment ministers of 22 EU nations and has now urged countries to take action, stating that EU legislation must be upheld and enforced.

Legal action against EU nations Much of our work takes place behind the scenes at the highest levels, where decisions are made. We submitted a formal complaint to the European Commission, calling for it to take legal action against a number of governments that were failing to take the required steps to prevent bycatch. Our formal complaint to the European Commission helped kick-start EU legal action against France, Spain and Sweden.

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EAST LOTHIAN RANGER SERVICE

OUR AIM


END CAPTIVITY An existence where lockdown never ends…

GAVIN BRAY

IN LOCKDOWN

The pandemic has given many of us a taste of what it is like to be locked in. But while we were confined to our homes, it also gave those whales and dolphins in the wild a respite from human activity and more chances to reclaim their spaces. The exceptions are the 3,000+ held in captivity. Their ‘lockdown’ is a pretty tragic existence. No family around them, no possibility of being able to go out for

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their daily exercise, where they might travel up to 100 miles in one day, no sign of nature around them, and no choice when it comes to food. Despite being stuck at home during the pandemic, we still have some freedoms, some things to look forward to. Whales and dolphins in captivity don’t. This is the reason why captivity has to end. It is a prison-like existence.


We are working to reduce the numbers held in captivity and to develop sanctuaries or release programmes for those held.

OUR ACTIONS   We will look to do this by supporting natural ocean sanctuaries such as the one opened successfully in Iceland in partnership with The SEA LIFE Trust. We will continue our campaign to grow public awareness of whale and dolphin captivity.   We will continue our work internationally to secure legislation that

restricts the keeping of whales and dolphins in captivity.   We will work with partner organisations in China to counter the alarming growth of whale and dolphin captivity in that region.

OUR IMPACT Belugas take ‘Little Steps’ into the ocean sanctuary Our ongoing project with The SEA LIFE Trust to move two beluga whales, Little Grey and Little White, from captivity in China to an ocean sanctuary in Iceland took significant steps forward.

Carefully monitored by the whales’ expert care team, Little Grey and Little White were released for the first time in September to explore the wider ocean sanctuary at Klettsvik Bay off the south coast of Iceland. These two whales, who were taken from the wild as infants, were finally able to feel the ocean on their skin, catch prey, and experience the wild ocean for the first time in more than 10 years! This amazing world first is a pathway to ending captivity shows and is all thanks to our team, our fantastic supporters and our partners, Merlin Entertainments and The SEA LIFE Trust.

IN CAPTIVITY ESTIMATED CAPTIVE WHALES AND DOLPHINS WORLDWIDE

Little White and Little Grey take their first swim in the wild sea sanctuary in Iceland, featured in a TV documentary presented by John Bishop (pictured above)

3,029 DOLPHINS

366 BELUGAS

60 ORCAS

100+ OTHERS

2020 WDC ANNUAL REVIEW

Captivity to be phased out in France

Ban on wild orca captures in Russia

Years of campaigning by WDC, through our partner coalition with Dolphinaria Free Europe, have paid off following the French government’s announcement in 2020 that legislation to phase out captivity in the country will now be brought in. Orcas and bottlenose dolphins are held in two facilities in France and WDC will be pushing the government there to explore sanctuary options for them all.

The scientific results of a project backed by WDC have helped protect wild orcas from capture in Russia. The Russian federal government agreed with our proposal to approve the inclusion of mammal-eating orcas into the Russian Red Book of Endangered Species, which now makes it illegal to capture them for sale to theme parks.

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AARON CHOWN THE SEA LIFE TRUST

OUR AIM


OUR VISION

A world where every whale and dolphin is safe and free

Whales and dolphins inspire us to remember how incredible nature is. Protecting them is crucial not only for their survival, but also for the health of our shared planet. That’s why I support WDC KT TUNSTALL, MUSICIAN AND WDC SUPPORTER

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IRFANVIEW

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UNDERWATER CULTURE

Whales and dolphins are intelligent beings capable of experiencing pleasure and suffering pain. And, like us, they have culture and societies all of their own. All of this needs to be taken into account when we consider how best to protect them

BEHAVIOUR:

COMPLEX FORAGING BY BOTTLENOSE DOLPHINS WHAT IT INVOLVES

Research has identified a group of dolphins in Western Australia that use foraging techniques, including collecting sponges and putting them on their lower jaw to enable them to catch prey in tight spaces (the sponges protect their skin).

WHY IT’S IMPORTANT

This example of tool use seems mostly to be passed down from mothers to their offspring. These socially learned foraging techniques may help buffer against environmental events such as marine heatwaves.

BEHAVIOUR:

HUMPBACK WHALE SONG WHAT IT INVOLVES

Probably the best known example of culture in whales and dolphins is the song of humpback whales. The discovery that they have a form of communication that we can recognise as a musical song took the world by storm.

WHY IT’S IMPORTANT

We can now study how humpback whale song develops and changes over time and even moves between distinct social groups and humpback populations – like pop songs in our own cultures.

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There is now enough research and evidence to make a compelling case for integrating the social learning and culture of whales and dolphins into decisions over their conservation and future survival.

Over time, learned behaviour can create differences between groups of whales or dolphins that reflect their different cultures and which shape how they forage for food, migrate or communicate. We are only now beginning to appreciate just how important these aspects are to a species’ resilience

and yet they are rarely ever considered in wildlife conservation planning. This is a game changer for our understanding of just how important the rich social lives and unique cultures are to whales and dolphins.

PROTECTION WDC believe whales and dolphins should have special recognition, and deserve the kind of protection that only comes with legal rights

BEHAVIOUR

‘BUBBLE-FEEDING’ WHALES WHAT IT INVOLVES

Bubble-feeding is a cooperative foraging strategy which results in the creation of an underwater bubble net that encircles large schools of fish.

WHY IT’S IMPORTANT

This complex behaviour requires cooperation, anticipation of the action of others, social learning, understanding acoustic cues and probably a good deal of patience while the technique is learnt and perfected.

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PARTNERSHIPS & Working together through tough times 2020 was a year like no other. With major restrictions on our conservation work, travel and our daily operations, our efforts to protect whales and dolphins from the many threats they continued to face were even more challenging.

At a time when many of our vital fundraising activities had to be paused, our incredible partners stepped in (even though they were facing their own challenges) to ensure WDC’s important work to keep every whale and dolphin safe and free could continue.

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SHUTTERSTOCK/CAROLINE WEIR/GINES DIAZ

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ICELAND

NEW ZEALAND

SPAIN

WEST AFRICA

USA

In 2020, Jasmine Alexander, a highly respected jewellery designer, launched a collection of stacking rings inspired by and celebrating Little White and Little Grey’s epic journey from a captive facility in China to their new sanctuary home in Iceland (helping fund their ongoing care).

Our generous support from New Zealand winery Waipapa Bay continued in 2020 with the launch of its hugely popular wine in the UK. Featuring a majestic whale’s tail on the bottle, sales have helped support vital efforts to protect whales in North America.

International wetsuit brand Orca chose to shun the traditional sales of November’s ‘Black Friday’ and, instead of offering customers savings, gave them the opportunity to support a range of causes with their purchases. Hundreds of generous Orca customers chose WDC as their cause.

Our long-term partner The Yogscast supported our urgent efforts to save the endangered Atlantic humpback dolphin from extinction through its annual Jingle Jam event in December 2020 – raising a staggering £195,000.

We were selected by Dynamite Entertainment, makers of comic book series The Boys (now a major TV show), as the charity partner for a special sale through Humble Bundle, raising $65k. Part of this funding was directed to support our urgent work to prevent vessel strikes.


COLLABORATIONS 1

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CANADA

UK

ARGENTINA

SWEDEN

We celebrated a fundraising milestone in 2020 with our long-term partner, Vancouver-based video games studio Relic Entertainment. Its special Company of Heroes tank pattern packs have raised over $60,000 for WDC to help our work keeping orcas safe and free.

In spite of the huge pressure on retailers in the UK, many of our UK-based retail partners generously continued to support WDC through these difficult times, including high-street store GAME, which donated £17,000 to WDC.

Software company Skylum chose WDC for its Luminar 4 Humble Bundle sale, which proved hugely popular. It raised $76,000 for WDC, including providing funds for vital fieldwork off the coast of Argentina to investigate the effect of noise from oil and gas drilling on whales and dolphins.

CHPO launched a special limited edition pair of WDC sunglasses in 2020, made from recycled plastic and with 100% of profits going to support WDC’s vital conservation work and campaigns. The ‘Risso’ glasses proved so popular they sold out in just two weeks!

2020 WDC ANNUAL REVIEW

We really appreciate the help of our partners, who found ways to continue to support WDC’s work in such difficult circumstances. Thank you for sharing our vision of a world where every whale and dolphin is safe and free, and for all that you do to help us in our vital work to make that vision a reality.

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WHY WE NEED WHALES Whales help contribute to oxygen production and to the removal of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere

After feeding at the bottom of the ocean, whales come to the surface to breathe. Here, their poo fertilises tiny plants called phytoplankton.

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Phytoplankton absorb massive amounts of carbon dioxide and produce a huge amount of the planet’s oxygen.

More whale poo means more phytoplankton, which means more carbon dioxide is absorbed from the atmosphere.


SHUTTERSTOCK

HUMANS CAN HELP MITIGATE THE DAMAGE WE CAUSE TO THE ENVIRONMENT BY PROTECTING WHALE POPULATIONS

2020 WDC ANNUAL REVIEW

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THANKS TO ALL OUR HOME HEROES We’re always astonished and inspired by your passion, creativity and commitment, but in 2020 you showed it in bucketloads with your lockdown fundraising

Cancelled, postponed, cancelled. Slowly but surely our fundraising calendar emptied and, like many charities and businesses, we were worried. But fortunately for whales and dolphins our supporters are an incredible bunch of people, demonstrating passion for these amazing creatures by donating, adopting, playing our raffle, collecting loose change and taking on some truly inventive fundraising. For the London Marathon’s nationwide 2.6 Challenge,

Ruth Robinson learned all the capital cities of the world, Martin and Judy Faulkner cycled 2.6 miles every day for 10 days and Daniella Johnson almost went square-eyed during her 26-hour sponsored read-a-thon. You also walked 2.6 or 26 miles, danced for 26 hours, did yoga, ran relays, somersaulted a dizzying 26 times on a trampoline and donated £2.60 or £26. We’re so grateful and whales and dolphins are lucky to have you on their side.

Hannah in orca costume

TAKING ACTION

Brady Wilson

Brady Wilson from British Columbia, Canada, ran 100km, raising a fantastic CA$135 to help protect orcas. Brady said: ‘I did this because I wanted to make a difference. I was tired of saying I should do something and then not doing anything, so this time I took action.’

HAPPY BIRTHDAY

Katherine Jones has adopted a dolphin since she was 10 and this year donated her birthday, raising a brilliant £121.75. A qualified architect and talented artist, Katherine has also created a range of exquisite whale and dolphin cards and prints for WDC.

Katherine Jones

ENDLESS LOCKDOWN Running a marathon up and down Brighton seafront wasn’t enough of a challenge for Hannah – she did it dressed as an orca! Hannah said: ‘During lockdown we were cooped up, staring at the same few walls, only exercising once a day. Split from our families and isolated, our freedoms were taken away. Thankfully this has only been temporary, but for captive whales and dolphins this is their reality every day.’ Hannah has raised more than £700 to help us end captivity.


GETTING CRAFTY

A whaley big thank you to Madeleine Brasier from Tasmania, who has been knitting and selling colourful whalethemed beanies. To date, Maddie has raised a fantastic AUS$500 to support our work. Madeleine said: ‘It’s been fun to have a project inspired by whales that also supports their conservation. If you can knit or crochet, get crafting for whales and dolphins.’

Maddie in a beautiful beanie

Gary B

BEST FOOT FORWARD

HAIR-RAISING FUN

Bashkim was fed up with jokes about his lockdown hair during dive club Zoom calls, so he pledged to shave his head at the next meeting if donations to WDC reached £500. The live shave caused much hilarity and raised £720. Thankfully for Bash, he didn’t have to shave his eyebrows, which he pledged to do if his JustGiving page hit £1,000!

BEFORE

Imran and Emin

2020 WDC ANNUAL REVIEW

AFTER

JUST THE TICKET Imran Khan won a runner-up prize in our summer raffle. He said: ‘It was a lovely surprise to find I had won after sponsoring Bend the orca for nearly three years! My five-year-old son, Emin, is so passionate about his favourite whale.’

Our Great Migration was the perfect fundraising event for getting your lockdown exercise and you enjoyed the fresh air while raising vital funds. First to complete was Gary B, who walked 412 miles over a month, around one-tenth of the longest recorded blue whale migration. Jai Burton migrated 100km, taking in the stunning Jurassic Coast scenery. Katie Cunningham challenged herself and her spaniels, Jai Bur ton Bella and Flint, to a 500-mile walkies, covering at least eight and a half miles a day for two months and raising a phenomenal £1,000. Isla & Arlen Isla and Arlen raised a magnificent £166 migrating 786 miles between them. Zoe Ransome migrated 70.8 miles and smashed her £100 target, raising an incredible £500, and Hollie Tweedie walked 100 miles and raised a truly spectacular £1,026. Hollie and Busby

Zoe

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KEEPING IT SOCIAL

FACEBOOK

We use a diverse range of channels to keep our followers up to date and share important messages to help protect dolphins and whales

248,426 ANNUAL REACH

171,888 FOLLOWERS

TWITTER

12,498,000

TOTAL FOLLOWERS ACROSS UK SOCIAL MEDIA

56,180

13,131,872

ANNUAL IMPRESSIONS

FOLLOWERS

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272,869 ANNUAL REACH* FOR UK FACEBOOK, INSTAGRAM AND TWITTER


INSTAGRAM

385,446 ANNUAL REACH

29,581 FOLLOWERS

LINKEDIN

11,030 FOLLOWERS

4,190 FOLLOWERS

*April 2020-2021 – based on monthly average reach

2020 WDC ANNUAL REVIEW

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SHUTTERSTOCK

YOUTUBE


FINANCIAL REVIEW 2020 has been a year of global uncertainty

Despite the uncertainties that Covid has brought to our sector – and indeed, the world – for the year ended 30 September 2020, we are reporting an increase in income of £348,551 to £4,263,100 (compared to a decrease of £1,213,623 in 2019). Although our Trading income decreased, our income from donations and legacies increased by £509,398, despite the uncertain times. Regular giving continues to be our main source of income, but income from partnerships has stabilised at around 19% of total donations, excluding legacies. Trust income has increased slightly and we expect this upward trend to continue as we continue our Theory of Change approach and are able to more fully demonstrate our impact to philanthropists and grant makers. Charitable expenditure in the year amounted to £3,269,412 (2019: £3,378,364). This decrease of 3.2% reflects the effect of Covid uncertainly. In order to protect the long-term viability of the charity, all nonessential expenditure was stopped in March 2020. After that point, Covid did restrict our ability to complete some of our work, for example fieldwork ceased in most cases, but we

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were as flexible as possible with constant oversight of our actual and expected year end financial position. All spend continues to be matched to budgeted regular donation income expected during the year. The cost of generating funds has decreased by 16% from £969,947 to £820,724. We took a cautious approach to expenditure on our membership and adoption programmes, ensuring we continued to communicate with our supporters but did not launch any new products in this area. The US subsidiary is showing net income of £154,204 in the year. Income increases came from legacies and individual giving. Expenditure was less than last year, with a sizable amount having to be postponed due to Covid. This has resulted in restricted assets being 32% greater than last year, as these funds are earmarked to be spent in areas that were curtailed due to Covid. The German subsidiary had net income of £74,033. Income from individuals was higher than budget, with some new products tested last year continuing to be attractive to our supporters.

In addition, corporate partnerships were an important source of income, contributing just under 7% of total income. The Trading company was hit hard by Covid restrictions but still was able to produce net income of £7,267 (2019: £63,259). Although out of our control, this was disappointing as the 2019 season had been the first year we had extended opening hours at the Scottish Dolphin Centre, and we were excited to be building on this success. However, Covid meant we had to shut the Centre, it’s shop and cafe, in mid-March. We reopened in line with guidelines in late July as a takeaway but the shop could not open as social distancing requirements could not have been met. As ever, the Trustees regularly review the activities of the Trading company and consider that it is useful to the charity – as it allows important activities to be undertaken which benefit the charitable objectives but may not be undertaken by a charity. A copy of the full audited accounts can be found on our website, through the Charity Commission website, or you can request one by contacting us at info@whales.org

I support WDC because their work to protect whales and dolphins for future generations is crucial MONTY HALLS, TV PRESENTER, FILMMAKER AND WDC PATRON


SPENDING

68p 17p 6p Conservation and campaigns

Fundraising costs

Membership and adoption programmes

3p

5p

1p

Merchandise, raffle and magazine costs

Information and education

Governance costs

Unrestricted funds

Restricted funds

Total funds

Total funds for 2019

£2,433,836

£322,338

£2,756,174

£2,795,277

Membership and adoption

£257,279

£257,279

£339,296

Information and education

£206,460

£206,460

£203,125

£49,499

£49,499

£40,666

£3,269,412

£3,378,364

CHARITABLE ACTIVITIES Conservation and campaigns

Governance costs Charitable expenditure

2020 WDC ANNUAL REVIEW

£2,947,074

£322,338

MAIN CREDIT N/K?/ALAMY

This is how each £ is used...

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THANK YOU OUR PARTNERS, FUNDERS AND CORPORATE SUPPORTERS

We’d also like to express our heartfelt thanks to our fantastic patrons, ambassadors and celebrity supporters who continue to support our conservation work and campaigns, and help spread the word about WDC and our 4 goals UK & INTERNATIONAL • Delphis Eco Trusts and Grants WDC Germany (DE) • Mack & Schühle free during the most through their advocacy.

Corporate partners and supporters

• Dynamite

• The Daniell Trust

Affiliate and

• ORCA Affairs

Entertainment

• Focused on Nature

corporate partners

• PASSION4IT

• 4Ocean

• EQ Entertainment

• J & JR Wilson Trust

2020

• PlastikKunstDING

Patrons

• BRITA UK

• Maya Higa

• Joan Cullen

• AlpinoCat

• Rittmeyers

• Jerome Flynn

• Humble Bundle

• Miniclip

• Animal Friends Pet

• Orca

Insurance

• Paradox Interactive

• Elite Ecologistics

• Paralune LLC

• eBay.co.uk

• Redbar

• PayPal Giving Fund

• Skylum

• Ethical Superstore

• Women’s Tennis

• Relic Entertainment

Association

Charitable Trust • Joyce Cater

• Baron de Sel • BRITA Benelux

besondere Raffinessen

Krestovnikoff

Charitable Trust

• BRITA China

• RTL

• Michaela Strachan

• Kilverstone Wildlife

• BRITA DACH

• Sigikid

• John Craven

(Deutschland,

• Southern Shores

• Julia Bradbury

Österreich, Schweiz)

• Telescope Animation

• Monty Halls

Charitable Trust • Maud Beattie Murchie Charitable

• BRITA France

Trust

• BRITA GmbH

Medienvertrieb

Ambassadors

• BRITA Italy

• Trends for Kids

• Philip Hoare

• Cetacea

• Whaletrips

• Andrew Sutton

• Tripwire Interactive • Waipapa Bay

• Auroch Digital

• Yak & Co

• National Lottery

• Christoball

• Whaley.nice.art

• James Schall

• Codename

• RSM

Heritage Fund

• Denk-Trade

• Windströöm

• Stephen Chapman

• Arcticus

• NatureScot

• Designarmada

• Conran Design

• Walter Guinness

• Dressgoat

Trusts and Grants

• Gaia Concept Store

• Merck Finck Stiftung

• Gentleman Scholar

• Radlmayr Stiftung

Entertainment • Perfect World Entertainment

Group

• Millennium

• Tessloff

• The Yogscast

• Unknown Worlds

Oak Trust

Charitable Trust

• Mark Whelan (Havas)

• SEGA Europe

• Sarah Chapman • Peter Hall High profile and influential

Thank you to all of

• Giacomini

our other individual

• GOT BAG

PATRONS,

supporters

• Mercury Learning

Affiliate and

and small business

• Greenglam

AMBASSADORS

• Charlotte Crosby

and Information

artisan partners

partners, and

• Gretas Schwester

AND CELEBRITY

• Katharine Hamnett

• The Varsity Matches

• Aquatic Creatures

all the generous

• Harald Fischer

• GAME

• Big Wild Thought

individuals and

• Polar Latitudes

• Gemma Carter Art

• Jasmine Alexander

• Katherine M Jones

• Dock & Bay

• Welsh Sisters Gin

Shop with a

• Imperium42

• Amazon Smile

Partner and

• Oris

• Car Take Back

Lifestyle

• 39 Pictures

• Easyfundraising

Giving pages.

• The Cheeky Panda

• The Recycling

• Deloitte • CHPO

Factory

SUPPORTERS

• Melissa Hemsley

Verlag

We’d like to say a

• Joanna Lumley

small businesses

• Heuer

huge ‘thank you’

• Anais Gallagher

featured on our

• International Ocean

to our patrons,

• Kevin Anderson

ambassadors

• Julia Goerges

and celebrity

• Donna Vekic

supporters who

• Lucie Safarova

Film Tour • i+m naturkosmetik Berlin • Imkerei Bienwerk

have continued to

• Junglück

support our efforts

• kivanta

to keep whales and

• KTN

dolphins safe and

We are also proud to have been granted charity membership of Ukie – The Association for UK Interactive Entertainment.

SHUTTERSTOCK

• Miranda

• 11 bit studios

Entertainment

28

challenging of years.


I SUPPORT WDC BECAUSE OUR OCEAN AND MARINE LIFE ARE ESSENTIAL TO OUR VERY SURVIVAL JULIA BRADBURY, TV PRESENTER AND WDC PATRON

2020 WDC ANNUAL REVIEW

29


GET IN TOUCH WHALE AND DOLPHIN CONSERVATION Brookfield House, 38 St Paul Street, Chippenham SN15 1LJ, United Kingdom T +44 (0)1249 449500 E info@whales.org whales.org WDC NORTH AMERICA 7 Nelson Street, Plymouth Massachusetts 02360, United States T +1 888 699 4253 E contact@whales.org WDC DEUTSCHLAND Implerstr. 55, D81371 Munich, Germany T +49 89 6100 2393 E kontakt@whales.org WDC AUSTRALASIA PO Box 720, Port Adelaide Business Centre, Port Adelaide, South Australia 5015, Australia T +61 (0)401 866 633 E info.au@whales.org WDC SCOTTISH DOLPHIN CENTRE Spey Bay, Moray IV32 7PJ United Kingdom T +44 (0)1343 820339 E dolphincentre @whales.org WDC LATIN AMERICA Cap. Justo G. Bermúdez 2634 B1636EMX Olivos, Buenos Aires, Argentina T +54 11 4790 0918 E info.la@whales.org

COVER PHOTO: SHUTTERSTOCK Other images by WDC unless credited

Profile for Think Publishing

WDC 2020 Annual Review  

WDC 2020 Annual Review  

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