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INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS TODAY

AUTUMN 2017

NETHERLANDS THE GATEWAY TO EUROPE


Export House Level 2, 22 Pitt Street Sydney NSW 2000 Toll free: 1300 361 526 Phone: 02 8243 7400 E-mail: info@export.org.au Fax: 02 9251 6492

PUBLISHED BY

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Publisher & National Marketing Manager Julie Fletcher

CONTENTS

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS TODAY AUTUMN 2017

ASEAN CONNECTED..................  5-6 Export opportunities on our doorstep

FROM THE MINISTER 2

IT Manager Rob Fearn

All rights reserved © 2016 No part of this work covered by the publisher’s copyright may be reproduced in any form by any means, graphic, electronic, or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, taping, or information storage and retrieval, without the written permission of the publisher. Any unauthorised use of this publication will result in immediate legal proceedings. Publisher’s note: Although every care has been taken to ensure the accuracy of the information contained within this publication, neither the publishers, authors nor their employers can be held liable for any inaccuracies, errors or omissions.

Why Australia needs more companies like ANCA

SPECIAL FEATURE................. 10-17 Netherlands - Gateway to Europe

CEO’S REPORT 3

DOING BUSINESS  IN MYANMAR........................  18-19 Vibrant hub for business opportunities and link to ASEAN

EDITOR'S LETTER 4

POSTCARD FROM  YANGON..............................  20-21 Must see places to visit

TRUSTED TRADER  PROGRAM............................  22-23

Editor Tim Michael Production Baris Celik

FEATURE.................................  7-9

Have you got what it takes?

CALENDAR OF EVENTS 32

FEATURE.............................  24-25 The elusive quest for inclusive growth

Q&A....................................  26-28 How OpenLearning disrupted the online education world

TIM HARCOURT.........................  29 Your guide to doing business in Asia

FEATURE..................................  30 Maintaining an open trading economy is the only pathway forward

ECA COURSES............................31


FROM THE MINISTER

Export opportunities on Australia’s doorstep

G

THE HON STEVEN CIOBO MP

reater market access is critical to successful international trade and investment, but personal connections and experience in overseas markets is also essential for success. Travelling in markets overseas is one of the best steps an exporter or investor can take to grow their business. It enables exporters, and future exporters, to better understand those markets and develop a network of useful contacts in the private sector and government. In recent years, the Australian Government has created new export and investment opportunities by opening North Asia’s biggest markets to our goods and services. Our trade agreements with Korea, Japan and China have created unprecedented opportunities for Australian business. We are already seeing the benefits in terms of increased exports to these markets which is, in turn, boosting employment and living standards here in Australia. In addition to creating new export opportunities through trade

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Minister for Trade, Investment and Tourism agreements, the Government has run practical business missions that put our business people in touch with new markets, people and ideas in China, India, Europe, the US and other important markets. Earlier this month I lead a business mission to Indonesia to participate in the second IndonesiaAustralia Business Week (IABW). Indonesia is South East Asia’s largest economy with a population of more than 250 million people and growth forecast at around 5.5 per cent per annum to 2020. With Australia’s overall trade in goods and services with Indonesia worth more than $14 billion in 2015-16, there is significant potential to expand our trade and investment relationship. To that end, Australia and Indonesia are now engaged in negotiations to conclude a Comprehensive Economic Partnership Agreement (IACEPA) that would ease trade and investment barriers and provide Indonesia’s growing consumer class with better access to Australian goods and services. IA-CEPA represents a major

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opportunity for Australian firms to supply what Indonesia needs to develop its economy. It also presents real opportunities for Australian business to partner with Indonesian business, building on our respective comparative advantages, to sell into the broader North Asian market and beyond. In 2017, IABW is focused on sectors which marry Australia’s strengths with demand in Indonesia – vocational education and training, tourism, financial services and technology, agribusiness and water security and urban design. Members of the IABW 2017 mission will have the opportunity to network with potential partners and customers, hear from senior business and government representatives about new opportunities and challenges and participate in site visits across Indonesia.

For more information: www.austrade.gov.au/iabw2017 or email: iabw2017@austrade.gov.au


CEO'S REPORT

Health, happiness and global success in 2017 LISA MCAULEY CEO Export Council of Australia

n behalf of all of us at the ECA I wish you a Happy New Year and a very Happy Chinese New Year. May the Year of the Rooster bring you Health, Wealth, Happiness and Success! In the next month, the ECA will be launching our 2017 Trade Policy recommendations. Given the current global trade environment, the ECA will focus on four key important messages: 1. Australian jobs are best created and protected over the long term through an open and competitive economic system. Further, increasing our international trade and investment opportunities will be crucial to unlocking our country’s future economic potential. 2. As Australian firms enjoy more overseas opportunities than ever before, the challenge for Australia is to maximise the benefits gained and to reinforce our competitive position. 3. To meet this challenge, Australia must encourage more trade and investment-capable

companies to engage with the global opportunity. 4. Realising the benefits of increasing trade is the shared responsibility of government, businesses involved in import and export, and the services businesses which support them. Building this "trade ecosystem" requires investment and representation from all parties. As the voice for small and medium sized enterprises involved in global trade, we recognise how important SME’s are in producing and supplying new products and services to the global market. Given the capacity of SMEs to drive economic development and job creation, as well as their ability to drive innovation, continuing to assist SME’s to expand through global trade will be the ECA's number on priority this year. However, we do understand that navigating the complexity of doing business globally and maintaining a competitive edge requires up-todate skills and knowledge. SMEs and individuals engaged in global trade need to develop the

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management skills to enable them to access necessary information and contacts, as well as the legal and commercial intelligence to navigate regulatory regimes in global markets. The availability of quality skills development programs and I believe the importance of international certification is key to assisting SMEs access global opportunities. Watch this space for an exciting development later this year. Specific training and education can increase the ability to respond to changing conditions in export markets, and to remain competitive. Should you wish to find out more about any of our new plans for education programs this year, please feel free to contact my colleague Collins Rex who is heading up the Skills Development team at the ECA this year and would be delighted to talk to you. Finally, please let us all work together this year to remain positive for the future and for SME's in general.

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EDITOR'S LETTER

Opportunities abound for Aussie exporters in 2017 TIM MICHAEL Editor

elcome to the autumn edition of International Business Today – our first for 2017. In this edition we explore the Netherlands: the gateway to Europe. So dust off those old wooden clogs and break out the crackers and Dutch Gouda as Niels Strazdins gives you a special insight into this tiny powerhouse, strategically located between Europe’s two biggest continental economies. Niels explains why the Netherlands is now one of the hottest start-up hubs in Europe – and identifies opportunities for Australian exporters. The country provides an ideal place for Australian entrepreneurs and start-ups to begin their international journey. Closer to home, Niels looks at the growing trade opportunities with the 10 nations that make up the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) – collectively

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one of the fastest-growing regions of the world. And although Australia now enjoys a strong trading relationship with our neighbours to the north, there is still plenty of scope to expand. The region is home to over 600 million people and a fast-growing middle class that is predicted to more than double in under a decade. Also in this issue, our Postcard series focuses on Myanmar and identifies new opportunities for exporters in this emerging market. Readers are given a guided tour of Yangon, the former capital of Myanmar, with tips on the best places to visit if you can find some spare time between business meetings. Another good news story in this edition is on the Australian Trusted Trader program. We review the program since its launch in July last year and the results may surprise you.

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And if you like Australian export success stories, this one is also a MUST read. See how Sydney based start-up OpenLearning has disrupted the online education world. In an exclusive interview, OpenLearning CEO and cofounder Adam Brimo reveals the secret to the company’s outstanding global success. Enjoy.


ASEAN CONNECTED

OUTSTANDING TRADE OPPORTUNITIES ON AUSTRALIA’S DOORSTEP BY NIELS STRAZDINS

W

ith growing middle classes, favourable demographics and integral positions in regional value chains, the 10 nations that make up the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) are collectively one of the fastest-growing regions of the world. Despite sitting on Australia’s doorstep, and though we are strong trading partners, there is plenty of scope to expand our trading relationship with our neighbours to the north. Nearly 70% of Australian exports are destined for just six markets: the three East Asian giants of China, Japan and South Korea, as well as India, the USA and New Zealand. Of the ten ASEAN economies,

Head of Research Export Council of Australia

only Singapore and Malaysia are among Australia’s top ten export destinations. Leveraging a growing and integrating ASEAN offers an excellent and highly accessible opportunity to both grow and diversify Australia’s export profile. The region is home to over 600 million people and a fast-growing middle class that is creating new customers every day for the goods and services that Australia excels at providing – whether that be financial

services or quality agricultural produce. This growing middle class will more than double in under a decade to encompass 400 million consumers by 2020, thanks to average annual income gains of around 5%. GDP per capita has grown faster in ASEAN than in any other region of the world over the past four decades. Meanwhile, long-running regional integration efforts have transformed ASEAN into Asia’s third-largest combined market and the world’s

‘There is plenty of scope to expand our trading relationship with our neighbours’ AUTUMN 2017

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ASEAN CONNECTED third largest trading bloc, after the European Union and North America. For Australian companies, market access to this bloc is greatly simplified by an extensive array of free trade agreements (FTAs). This FTA network leaves Australia better positioned than our Western counterparts from Europe or North America – who for the most part lack their own ASEAN FTAs – to leverage Southeast Asia’s growth story to fuel our own prosperity. Bilateral FTAs are in place between Australia and Malaysia (MAFTA), Singapore SAFTA) and Thailand (TAFTA). These agreements have lifted most or all tariffs on Australian trade with these three countries, while liberalising market access for Australian service providers, increasing foreign equity limits for Australian investment in certain sectors, and easing visa and residency procedures for Australian professionals, among other benefits. In addition to this trio, Australian companies can also leverage AANZFTA, an ASEAN-wide FTA that also includes New Zealand, to access regional opportunity. AANZFTA is a unique agreement. It is the most comprehensive FTA ASEAN has ever negotiated and covers not only goods and services, but investment and intellectual property as well. By 2020, the agreement will have eliminated tariffs on 96% of all product lines.

‘Trade with ASEAN is strong but we cannot be complacent’ On the intra-regional front, initiatives such as the ASEAN Economic Community are further integrating the diverse economies of Southeast Asia, with the ultimate goal of creating a single ASEAN market for goods, services and investment. Understanding these various connectivity initiatives and agreements is crucial to maximising their benefit to your businesses. Recognising this, the ECA, in collaboration with HSBC Bank Australia, has developed a range of tools and guides to assist Australian businesses navigate the ASEAN opportunity. Launched in late 2016, our ASEAN Connected report focuses on the six largest ASEAN economies – who also happen to be Australia’s six largest ASEAN trading partners – to highlight specific opportunities Australian companies can leverage in each. Going forward, we have developed a series of toolkits to assist businesses in navigating the four AustraliaASEAN FTAs noted above, highlighting

AANZFTA also offers unique benefits such as regional rules of origin, which allows Australian companies to better integrate into the extensive regional value chains that criss-cross the ASEAN region, as well as increasing protection for Australian investment in ASEAN.

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their benefits and how to practically take advantage of them. Australia’s trade with ASEAN is strong but we cannot be complacent. Despite the breezes of protectionism beginning to blow in many Western economies, Asia remains focused on an open trading future and is sure to attract increasing attention from companies around the world seeking growth opportunities. Australian companies are better positioned than many potential competitors to take advantage of the opportunities that await, but it is up to companies themselves to seize the initiative.

Australian companies can learn more about the ASEAN opportunity by downloading the ECA’s report, ASEAN Connected, developed with the support of HSBC Bank Australia, www.export.org.au/publications/ asean-connected


WHY AUSTRALIA NEEDS MORE

COMPANIES LIKE ANCA

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rade and investment is vital for Australia’s economy – our long-term prosperity depends on it.

The benefits that flow from the export sector are often taken for granted – and many of our international success stories are often overlooked. It is vital for Governments to support businesses with the drive and nous to take their products and services to the world. Late last year Australia's trade balance returned to surplus for the

BY TIM MICHAEL first time in almost three years. Bureau of Statistics figures show a trade surplus of $1.24 billion for November.

records for sales and production. In 2014-15, revenues were nearly $200 million – with nearly 99 percent of its sales from exports.

But we can’t afford to rest on our laurels. Every effort must be made to keep driving and growing our export sector.

The advanced manufacturer has been recognised with a string of awards for its many achievements in the export sector.

One company that has been a shining light for Australian exporters is ANCA, a global leader in CNC tool grinding machines and technology.

ANCA was named Australian Exporter of the Year in 1995 and again in 2015 and last year became only the 11th company to be inducted into the prestigious Export Awards Hall of Fame.

ANCA services a wide range of industries, including the aerospace, automotive, electronics, medical and woodworking sectors. For 2015, the company achieved

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The company was established in 1974 by Pat Boland and Pat McCluskey, who worked together at a government munitions factory.

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THE IMPORTANCE OF TRADE The two Pats initially made just CNC control systems, but soon realised there was a limited market in Australia – so they decided to cast the net wider and chase export markets for machine tools. The rest is history, as they say. Demand for these systems has soared and the company has grown from strength to strength. “It was a niche area, recalls Pat Boland. “Australia was just too small. To succeed we had to compete on a global scale. “So right from the early stages we were thinking of ourselves as having to be a global company. “The first machine or control system we exported was to Japan.” Mr Boland says the company then moved its focus to the US followed by Europe, the UK and eventually China. Asia is now the biggest market closely followed by the US and Europe. Ironically, Germany, Switzerland and the US have long enjoyed a reputation as world leaders in machine tools, but ANCA has beaten them at their own game. “Our greatest achievement has been becoming a significant player in the machine tool field,” Mr Boland says modestly. “We are recognised around the world as a significant player, particularly in area of CNC precision grinding machines. “We don’t just work with technology, we create technology.” The company has certainly come a long way since its early days selling CNC control systems.

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It now employs 400 staff at its Bayswater complex in Victoria (many of whom are engineers) and a further 500 personnel overseas.

‘We don’t just work with technology, we create technology’ ANCA manufactures in Germany, US, the UK and Taiwan. Just recently it opened a new state-of-the-art manufacturing facility in Thailand. The company also has offices in Brazil, China, India, Japan and Mexico.

“We created a business model in the United States where we wanted to appear like a local company – without losing our Australian identity. “We offer full pre-sales and after sales support as good as any American company and this philosophy has worked. “At the same time, we have never hidden the fact we are an Australian company.” Mr Boland says the company uses the same model for its operations in Asia (particularly Japan and China) and throughout Europe. Now is an “enormously opportunistic time” for Australian companies to explore overseas markets, he says.

“Back in the 70s the tyranny of distance was probably the biggest challenge for exporters,” says Mr Boland.

The weaker Australian dollar, a relatively strong world economy and the signing of major new Free Trade Agreements mean the barriers to entry are much lower.

“There was no Internet of course and we had to rely on fax machines.

Mr Boland believes more Australian companies – particularly in advanced

“It’s a lot easier now (for exporters) – the world is much smaller now with the rise of the Internet and the cost of freight and airfares is more affordable. “Everything is vastly less expensive than it was.” Mr Boland says one of the keys to ANCA’s success has been its strong customer service.

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‘Now is an enormously opportunistic time for Australian companies to explore overseas markets’ intense manufacturing industries in Australia. “We need a balanced economy with manufacturing, mining, agriculture and services all playing a part.” Exports are a big driver of jobs and job creation – particularly higher paying jobs, he says.

manufacturing – should look overseas.

And governments – both state and federal – should be doing more to encourage and assist Australian exporters.

“It’s much easier when you look at business from a global perspective,” he says.

“Rather than having blanket company tax reductions, it should be more targeted,” he suggests.

In the global market place businesses can now specialise and find a niche to become far more competitive.

For example, companies that invest in capital equipment should get accelerated depreciation.

“When you compete on the global scene you have access to a much bigger audience.” Mr Boland agrees exports are important to maintain a healthy Australian economy. “Australia now imports most of its consumer goods and consumable items. “When you go to store like Bunnings (hardware) you can see the number of products manufactured in Australia is very small.” He cites the automotive industry as an example of the demise of labour

And tax rates should be lowered for businesses who are trying to grow their businesses off-shore.

Mr Boland says state governments could also assist exporters by offering payroll tax exemptions. He remains optimistic about his company’s global future. “All being well in the world economy, there is still room to grow. “The past year we had 12 months of relatively slow business in China and that has now seemed to have changed. “Also, the Korean and Japanese markets have been very strong and we are hopeful of more business in Indonesia and Vietnam. “The US is still a strong market and Europe is stable.” Maintaining a global focus has helped ANCA remain competitive, says Mr Boland. The company is the perfect example of what Australian manufacturers have to do to succeed on the world stage. “ANCA is proof that an Australian company can successfully compete and prosper in a global market,” Mr Boland says.


The

Netherlands:

GATEWAY TO EUROPE

S

trategically located between Europe’s two biggest continental economies, and sitting across the English Channel from the United Kingdom (UK), the Netherlands has long been a commercial gateway to the European market. The UK has traditionally played this

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BY NIELS STRAZDINS Head of Research Export Council of Australia role for Australian companies with European interests, though signs pointing toward a “hard” rather than “soft” Brexit – meaning a departure from the European Union’s (EU) single market – mean Australian companies may need to find an alternative one. The Netherlands is perfectly placed to take up this mantle. “Many investors that come to the Netherlands, come for the European market,” says Netherlands

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Foreign Investment Agency (NFIA)’s Commissioner Mr Jeroen Nijland. He notes several reasons for this, including both hard factors – like the Netherland’s excellent infrastructure physically and digitally linking it with the rest of the continent – and soft factors, like the country’s multilingual workforce and business-oriented approach to both commerce and government. “If you add it all up, geographical


NETHERLANDS GATEWAY position, infrastructure like airports and seaports, the attitudes of business and government – I think this is a convincing list for many investors,” Mr Nijland says. Digging deeper uncovers further inducements for Australian businesses eyeing a European gateway, such as a positive fiscal climate and the tech-savvy nature of the Dutch people.

‘The Netherlands is the most connected economy in the world’ Connected, stable and multilingual The Netherlands is the most connected economy in the world, according to global logistics firm DHL’s annual rankings. Its central location, bordering Germany and Belgium, and a stone’s throw from the UK and France, places nearly 170 million customers within a 500km radius of the country.

Netherlands Royal Visit to Sydney (Source: Netherlands Foreign Investment Agency)

Stability is an increasing concern for foreign investors, and the Netherlands is politically stable. “We always end up with coalition governments,” Mr Nijland points out. “That means whatever happens at the ballot boxes, policy swings are always quite moderate, lending a certain predictability to Dutch politics.” “Investors take a long-term horizon view in their decision making”, he rightly notes. “Go-to-market decisions involve millions or billions of dollars, and for that matter, predictability is very important.”

Netherlands Foreign Investment Agency Commissioner Jeroen Nijland

Adding to this attractive geography and stable politics, the welleducated, multilingual and pragmatic Dutch workforce is the icing on the cake. Around 90% of Dutch are English-speaking, besting all their continental European counterparts and contributing to the ease of doing business and communication in the country. This pragmatism and business orientation extends to government policies and institutions as well. “When it comes to using the Netherlands as a hub for the European market, customs authorities are for example very important,” Mr Nijland notes. “Dutch customs authorities are very business-minded and very cooperative. This is the feedback we get from businesses themselves, but this also shows up when customs organisations around the world are compared – the Netherlands always ranks at the top.” The sum of these soft strengths makes the Netherlands an ideal location in which to base a regional headquarters, or to base continental sales and marketing functions. These are two of the top

(Source: Netherlands Foreign Investment Agency)

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NETHERLANDS GATEWAY three activities attracted to the Netherlands from abroad, according to Mr Nijland. “Headquarter functions come to our country for many reasons, including our workforce, our infrastructure connecting the Netherlands to the rest of the world, and taxation factors,” he notes. The latter include the Netherlands’ network of taxation treaties to avoid double taxation, as well as the lack of withholding tax on royalties and interest. World-class physical and digital infrastructure A strategic location is of course only half the battle. To capitalise on its geography, the Netherlands offers Australian companies world-leading infrastructure. This includes not just road, rail and air links, but digital infrastructure as well.

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The country ranks fourth in the world on The World Bank’s latest logistics performance index, ahead of other global logistics hubs like Singapore, Hong Kong and the UAE. Foreign investors are already taking advantage of these infrastructure strengths. “It shows,” Mr Nijland says, “because we have more than 900 distribution centres of North American and Asian companies in our small country; that’s a huge number.” The Netherlands’ port infrastructure has been ranked best in the world for a number of years by the World Economic Forum (WEF). Its air transport infrastructure ranks fourth in the world, as do its roads, while its railroads rank seventh globally in the WEF’s latest Global Competiveness Report. Digital infrastructure figures into this equation as well.

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“We have a lot of data centres and IT attracting inward investment, and this is about the distribution of data,” Mr Nijland says. “The Amsterdam Internet Exchange is one of the biggest in the world, and most of the cables connecting Europe with the rest of the world enter via the Netherlands.” Room to grow the Australia-Netherlands relationship The Netherlands is a top-twenty trading partner for Australia, but only just. This leaves plenty of room to grow the relationship, especially given the many advantages the Netherlands can offer Australian companies we have outlined here. While our goods trading relationship is fairly balanced, in that we import as much as we export, in terms of services Australia exports only around one-third of what we import


‘Australian companies are perceived very well in the Netherlands as high-quality producers’ from the Netherlands.

potential of each other’s countries.”

Our relationship can grow on both sides of the ledger by harnessing existing and emerging strengths to access opportunity in each other’s countries. This includes leveraging Australia’s already strong reputation in the Netherlands.

In growth areas for the future, Mr Nijland points to emerging areas of innovation like fintech and data security, as well as others like e-commerce, where we can leverage mutual strengths to allow Australian companies to grow and penetrate the European market through the Netherlands.

“Australian companies are perceived very well in the Netherlands as highquality producers,” Mr Nijland says. “I think the image of Australia is quite good, but it’s just that we need to know more about the possibilities and

“I think agri-food is an outstanding example of investments that are related to the expertise and knowledge that we have, Mr Nijland

The NFIA can be your first stop to exploring opportunities in Europe. Australian companies are encouraged to contact Adeline Tan, Country Manager, at tan@ nfia-singapore.com for more information or assistance with tapping opportunity in the Netherlands. The Dutch Consulate in Sydney provides a host of other services; do visit www.hollandhubaustralia.com.au for an overview.

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says. “We have a number of research institutes focused on this, as well as on similar sectors.” “From Australia, where I see the potential to do more are in the IT, life sciences and health spheres, to name just a few,” Mr Nijland notes. We delve a bit deeper into the Netherland’s strengths as a start-up and innovation hub, as well as the model approach the country takes to making expatriates feel comfortable, elsewhere in this issue. Suffice it to say that this small country of 17 million people punches well above its weight on the world stage. It offers attractive incentives for virtually any Australian company eyeing opportunity in the Netherlands as a destination market itself, or as a wider gateway to Europe.

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NETHERLANDS CASE STUDY

INNOVATIVE MELBOURNE FIRM

SPREADS WINGS TO AMSTERDAM

H

uddle is an exciting example of an innovative Australian company building commercial links between Australia and the Netherlands.

office in the Netherlands, who are probably leading the charge in Europe in terms of the way they approach banking in the future,” says Managing Director Mr Paul Fairhead. Having a big Dutch client on board accelerated Huddle’s European

The Melbourne-based firm specialises in human-centred design and organisational transformation, and counts big Australian corporates like Telstra and Westpac among its customers. Growing from around 15 staff eight years ago to 50 today, the company now boasts a dozen-strong team in Amsterdam. “About two years ago we started working on digital transformation projects with ING Bank’s head

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expansion, but was not the sole factor driving the company overseas. “In our world where we deal with empathy, although Australia is catching up, we’re not at the same level of understanding or maturity as Europe yet,” Mr Fairhead says.


“We were always going to outgrow Australia.” “We wanted to be on continental Europe, rather than base ourselves in London like most Australian companies,” Mr Fairhead notes. “Amsterdam was the city that stood out, being very bilingual, with a great awareness of Australia and a great relationship between our two countries.” “Working in Amsterdam, we like being there; it’s a cultural fit and we have been able to attract a lot of really good talent because of the people who gravitate there,” Mr Fairhead says. “It’s also a very developed country in terms of thinking about the future – just look at their policies around energy or their approach to rehabilitation over incarceration.” Once the decision was made, Mr Fairhead notes that the Netherlands

‘We were always going to outgrow Australia’ - Paul Fairhead Foreign Investment Agency (NFIA) greatly eased the process of setting up in the country. “We had a few problems initially, but a lot of that was because we didn’t know agencies like the NFIA existed,” he says. “Once we became aware of them, the help they gave us has been phenomenal in terms of guiding us through the legal and corporate system in the Netherlands, and introducing us to great contacts.” “I wish we had some of the services they offered us there here in Australia,” Mr Fairhead adds.

Mr Fairhead urges Australian companies looking to make the jump to Europe to put the Netherlands on their radar. “Companies like to go to bigger, more traditional places because of the kudos that comes from an office in London or New York, and a lot of Australian companies think that the UK is where they should be by virtue of history,” he acknowledges. “But if you’re looking for an ideal pad for your European operations, just the ease of everything in the Netherlands, the ease of travel, you can’t beat it,” he says.

A panel discussion during the NFIA EY Seminar held during the Dutch State Visit to Australia late last year. From left: Mr Helmar Klink (EY), Ms Jillian Broadbent AO (European Australian Business Council), Mr Paul Fairhead (Huddle), Mr Bert Colijn (ING Bank), Mr Jeroen Nijland (NFIA)

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Netherlands: A THRIVING CENTRE FOR INNOVATION

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he Netherlands is one of the hottest start-up hubs in Europe and hosts the continent’s largest ecosystem for early-stage companies.

A thriving innovation centre, the country is the birthplace of many goods and services we use every day. Firms like Booking.com and WeTransfer build on the proud legacy of Dutch innovation taking on the world, from Philips to Unilever. Australia too has a proud history of leading innovation, from the black box flight recorder to Wi-Fi – actually an interesting but littleknown example of Dutch-Australia collaboration. Never short of innovative ideas, achieving scale is one of the biggest challenges

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BY NIELS STRAZDINS Head of Research Export Council of Australia facing Australian entrepreneurs and start-ups. This is an area where the Netherlands and its world-class startup ecosystem can help. The country provides an ideal place for Australian entrepreneurs and start-ups to begin their international journey. Why the Netherlands StartupDelta, an independent public-private partnership, lists three “unfair advantages” of the Netherlands as a start-up hub:

innovation can easily find a home for growth and commercialisation ▶▶ With an abundance of lead partners, launch customers and early adaptors in a tech-savvy country, the Netherlands offers a complete start-up ecosystem A healthy funding environment for start-ups and early-stage companies adds to these advantages.

▶▶ As a gateway to Europe and the rest of the world, the country is home to leading multinationals and presents an easy way to validate ideas across the rest of Europe

In 2015, over 150 Dutch start-ups raised €430 million (AUD 610 million) in private equity and venture capital investment. The median investment was €650,000 (AUD 922,740) and the largest investment round was €75 million (AUD 106 million), for online auction house Catawiki.

▶▶ With more than ten start-up and tech clusters within 90 minutes of each other (see image insert),

Those in the digital space also enjoy the infrastructure necessary to nurture their growth.

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NETHERLANDS – INNOVATION CENTER entrepreneurs as well: the country’s strategic location, the quality of its physical and digital infrastructure, and its well-educated multilingual workforce. There is plenty of scope for innovative Australian start-ups and entrepreneurs to leverage such benefits and make the Netherlands the first stop on their international journey.

“Our physical infrastructure is conducive to the IT sector,” Netherlands Foreign Investment Agency (NFIA)’s Commissioner Mr Jeroen Nijland says. “We have excellent fibre connections, allowing some of the highest internet speeds in the world, and add to that the techsavvy attitude of the Dutch people.” Recognising this, 60% of all Forbes 2000 companies active in the IT industry have already established operations in the country. Global giants like Microsoft, Cisco and Infosys are tapping the Netherlands’ competitive tax climate and a techsavvy English-speaking workforce, among the country’s other benefits. “We also have the largest security cluster and one of the most advanced data centre markets in Europe, not to mention world-class R&D facilities and

logistics infrastructure, making the Netherlands a smart choice for any IT business operation,” Mr Nijland adds. Together with Switzerland, the Netherlands in fact offers the fastest download speed in Europe and the highest number of broadband subscriptions per 100 inhabitants, according to the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). “Many tech companies use our country as a test-bed for new innovations,” he notes. “These factors are what make the country interesting for them.” What next In addition to those listed above, all the advantages of the Netherlands as a gateway to Europe discussed in this issue apply to start-ups and

“Both our countries rank very highly on innovation scoreboards, which I think is a known and appreciated in both Australia and the Netherlands, but I think there is potential to do more,” Mr Nijland notes. “You have companies in Australia that are very active in IT-related activities, whether e-commerce, fintech, data security – you name it and there is potential where we can work together,” he says.

Australian companies like Huddle are already taking advantage of the benefits the Netherlands can offer. Read more about their experience below, and contact Adeline Tan, Country Manager at the Netherlands Foreign Investment Agency at tan@nfia-singapore.com for more information on how the Netherlands can be a launchpad for your international journey. Source: StartupDelta

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POSTCARD FROM MYANMAR

Doing business

IN MYANMAR

I

solated for decades, its vast wealth and potential out of reach for international investors, Myanmar is now undergoing generational reform aimed at modernising its economy and catching up on decades of lost opportunity.

Strategically located at the crossroads between China, India and Southeast Asia, with vast reserves of onshore and offshore natural resources and favourable demographics, Myanmar is poised to be one of the brightest stars among frontier markets for the foreseeable future.

Export Council of Australia

For Australian businesses, these efforts translate into a gradually more stable and predictable operating environment, allowing the country’s vast potential can be explored with more confidence. However, Myanmar is still very much a developing frontier economy despite these positive movements, whose institutions and business practices are yet to rival those of

The country of 51 million people is now led by a nominally civilian parliamentary government. Significant reform over the past few years has been aimed at modernising the economy, strengthening civil institutions and introducing more accountable and democratic governance.

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its more economically mature neighbours in Southeast Asia. Myanmar is still the hardest country in which to do business in Southeast Asia, according to the World Bank (see insert), though improvements are being seen – the country jumped 24 places in one year in the ease of starting a business, for example. Until more reform is delivered,


Australian companies must deal with the typical challenges of doing business in a country at Myanmar’s stage of development. These include weak institutions and legal frameworks, political risk, and insufficient or nonexistent infrastructure. Bureaucracy and red-tape in obtaining permits and approvals processes, electricity and power

Country

consistency issues, and the competency of locally-engaged staff are fairly common issues to overcome in Myanmar. Resolving much of this comes down to managing expectations, being patient, and gradually becoming comfortable operating in a much different and less developed environment than Australia.

Spending time in Myanmar and familiarising yourself with the country, its nuances, and the unique challenges and opportunities in your sector is also crucial. In this Postcard, we offer some suggestions to make the most of your visit to this beautiful and potential-rich country as a first step toward exploring possibilities for your business.

2016 Ease of Doing Business Rank (global)

Singapore

2

Malaysia

23

Thailand

46

Brunei

82

Vietnam

82

Indonesia

91

Philippines

99

Cambodia

131

Laos

139

Myanmar

170

Ease of doing business in ASEAN countries, 2016 (Source: World Bank)

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POSTCARD FROM MYANMAR

POSTCARD FROM

YANGON Export Council of Australia Where should you go if you have a few hours to spare in Yangon? At the Shwedagon Pagoda, the contrast of 2600-year-old architecture and new and modern neon lights used to highlight various religious statues creates a breathtaking atmosphere for first-time and returning visitors alike. Before visiting a Buddhist temple, make sure you wear something appropriate that

covers your shoulders and knees, and leave your shoes and socks at the door. Dusk or dawn are the prefect times to see this national marvel. The beauty of the golden 326-foot-tall pagoda can be fully appreciated when dusted by the sun’s slowly disappearing orange rays. The site’s marble floor can get incredibly hot

during a sunny day, which could be an additional incentive to visit during sunrise or sunset. What is one of the city’s unique offerings? Burmese are famous for the traditional foot spa experience. Sapel Foot Spa is one of the best and highest rated Burmese traditional foot spas. Located at No.78 Middle Block, Ground Floor, 16th St in Yangon, the spa is open daily from noon to midnight. After a long day of meetings and sightseeing, give your feet some well-deserved R&R. You can choose from a wide range of offerings, including a traditional Burmese head-to-toe massage.

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Where do you suggest taking clients out? Whether breakfast, lunch, dinner or cocktails, the many offerings at the Chatrium Royal Lake Yangon provides several options for your business meeting.

temple town in central Myanmar. Home to over 2500 temples, the ancient city is a vast archaeological zone.

Dine on either Japanese, Chinese or Southeast Asian cuisine at the hotel’s three restaurants, or enjoy a great view over Bogyoke Park and Kandawgyi Lake at the Lobby Lounge. Pre-or-post-dinner drinks can be had at the hotel’s Club Rizzoli.

Be sure to hire an electric bike to conveniently explore the site, or better yet take to the skies in a hot air balloon. Exploring Bagan by air is sure to be an unforgettable experience to cap off any business trip to this beautiful country. There are a number of companies to book through, though I recommend Balloons over Bagan.

Any other advice for visitors on business? If you have a few days to spare be sure to visit Bagan, a spectacular

Enjoy your time in Myanmar, and don't forget to take in some of its beautiful sights and sample its delicious food!

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Q&A TRUSTED TRADER

Do you have what it takes to become

an Australian Trusted Trader? Australia’s export community has been quick to embrace the Australian Trusted Trader (ATT) program, launched on July 1 last year. Since the launch more than 400 applications have been received to join the program, administered by the Department of Immigration and Border Protection. ATT Communications Officer Angela MacDonald says feedback from participants has been very positive, especially in relation to the ATT benefits, designed to help businesses trade more efficiently. To date, there are 13 Trusted Traders, including some of Australia’s largest importers and exporters, including Ikea, Target Australia and IBM Australia.

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How does it work? ATT is a voluntary trade facilitation initiative operated by the Australian Border Force (ABF). ATT works by accrediting businesses against international standards relating to supply chain security and trade compliance. In return, businesses are rewarded with a number of trade facilitation benefits.

▶▶ Are financially solvent.

ATT is free to join, and open to all Australian businesses that are:

▶▶ A lighter touch at the border

▶▶ Active in the international supply chain ▶▶ Have an Australian Business Number (ABN) ▶▶ Have two years of trading history, and

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What are the main benefits of the program? Trusted Traders are rewarded with a number of trade facilitation benefits including: ▶▶ A dedicated ABF Account Manager ▶▶ Use of the ATT logo

▶▶ Faster clearance in export markets through Mutual Recognition Agreements (MRAs) with key trading partners ▶▶ Prioritised service and access to advanced ruling requests on the application of tariffs, valuation and origin to certain goods.


Future benefits include: ▶▶ Duty deferral; and ▶▶ Streamlined reporting. Is Australia working with key trading partners? Many of Australia’s key trading partners also operate Trusted Trader programs, including China, the US and the EU. By establishing Mutual Recognition Arrangements with countries which have similar programmes, Australian Trusted Traders will be extended trade facilitation benefits in the country of export. This means that Australian Trusted Traders will receive faster clearance in export markets. In July last year, the Department signed its first MRA with the New Zealand Customs Service. The Department is also in discussions with China, Singapore, Hong Kong, Korea, Canada and Thailand. Has it improved the international supply chain for participants? Australian Trusted Trader helps businesses to strengthen supply chain security and compliance – meaning that businesses have more surety on the security and movement of their goods. Participants also see great value in the trade facilitation benefits offered

to Trusted Traders, many of which improve efficiency and reduce red tape within the supply chain. What do members see as the advantages of the program? The ATT provides businesses with access to a range of trade facilitation benefits, which reduce red tape and administrative burden. Pacific Brands joined the programme to increase its international competitiveness. Tyrone Tapusoa, Head of Logistics at Pacific Brands, said a primary reason the company joined the programme was to increase speed and reduction of lead time of the products coming into Australia. “It was a natural progression for Pac Brands to move from the Bonded Warehouse into the Trusted Trader programme,” Mr Tapusoa said. John Langbridge, Manager, Corporate and Industry Affairs at Teys Australia firmly believes

that being in the Trusted Trader programme “will give us a competitive advantage, in that it will underpin the brands of our higher quality products, giving consumers confidence and therefore the expectation they would be prepared to pay a premium for that.” How can a business apply to join the program or learn more about it? To become a Trusted Trader, a business needs to: ▶▶ Visit www.border.gov.au/ trustedtrader and obtain a login ▶▶ Complete an expression of interest (EOI) ▶▶ Complete the self-assessment questionnaire (SAQ) ▶▶ Be verified through an on-site validation ▶▶ Enter into an ATT agreement.

For further information contact the Australian Trusted Trader Operations Team: Ph: 1300 319 024 E: trustedtrader@border.gov.au www.border.gov.au/trustedtrader

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THE ELUSIVE QUEST FOR INCLUSIVE GROWTH

G

overnments today like to declare that they are engaged in trade exercises that will result in inclusive growth. Leaders are increasingly using the term to try to counter growing concerns over globalization. Hence officials involved in crafting trade agreements are now being tasked with the idea of creating inclusive growth. However, they are likely to fail. Inclusive growth is an idea that sounds great but the quest to provide it through trade agreements will remain elusive. Inclusive growth is never defined. Does it mean that the benefits of trade will trickle down to every citizen? Or to nearly all citizens? Or perhaps the benefits are supposed to flow evenly to everyone? Trade agreements can do many

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things. Trade agreements, however, as an earlier post noted, are merely bridges that create opportunities for greater trade. These bridges are critically important, particularly in a time of slowing global trade. Trade matters. Trade remains the fastest, most reliable way to ensure economic growth and development for the largest number of citizens. There are lots of other things that are needed for development, of course, including education, health care, nutrition, security, and so forth. The basic economic model of international trade, simplified greatly, says that countries should specialize in what they do relatively better than others. Countries are not expected to be the world’s greatest, but simply make more efficient use of scarce resources than some other country. Having specialized in one area, they trade with their neighbours for things that they do not produce as efficiently. In the long run, in the

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Dr. Deborah Elms, Executive Director, Asian Trade Centre, Singapore

aggregate, both sides are better off. To dredge up memories from your intro economics class, you may recall the examples of French wine and English wool—the French should observe they make more money growing grapes and making in excellent wine that many people will buy and will specialize in this while the English will observe they make more money from wool and raise sheep or produce cloth and clothing that people adore and will want instead of wine.


We have no silver bullet for development, but trade gets everyone closer to growth than the rest of the available options. But the benefits of trade are not automatically evenly spread to everyone. Even the classic example of wine and wool shows up problems that can be faced in the short run.

French may have particular skills with wool or weaving or apparel that the English will never master or bother with developing.

Hence, we need government. It may be the case that governments in both countries need to figure out what to do with French wool producers and English wine growers in the short run. They may need retraining or reskilling. They may need more information about alternative jobs or careers. They may need short-term insurance.

A trade agreement is not the place to address the issues of French wool growers or the English wine industry.

Or government may opt to do nothing at all. It may even turn out that some English people are great at making different sorts of wine— not Champagne perhaps—or the

The point is that the decisions that must be made about how to handle any adjustment falls to domestic level governments and to individual citizens.

An agreement can provide new opportunities for markets. It can lower barriers to trade in wool and wine. It can make customs procedures faster and easier. It can help service providers design websites or apps to let new customers find unique products. It can make it easier to invest in vineyards or warehouses or factories. It can help spread technology or help license or protect the ideas and

intellectual property behind amazing designs. What a trade agreement does not do is provide inclusive growth. An agreement cannot create conditions for growth to spread to everyone or growth to flow evenly. It can only create new opportunities. It is up to companies and individuals to take advantage of these opportunities. Government can and should be supportive. Government can negotiate better agreements that give more options and build better bridges—stronger and wider trade bridges that connect more countries together. Governments can try to craft agreements that are easier to use and include provisions that benefit smaller firms. But at the end of the day, governments will have to take on the task of spreading inclusive growth at the domestic level on their own. Not through a trade agreement. In fact, governments are potentially spreading new risks when they claim to bring inclusive growth home through trade agreements. Promising more than agreements can possibility deliver is another way to build up a backlash against trade deals. Overpromising and under-delivering is not a recipe for success. It will not help. Let’s not burden trade negotiators with another such term in the form of “inclusive growth.”

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EDUCATION FEATURE Q&A

SCHOOL’S IN: HOW OPENLEARNING DISRUPTED THE ONLINE EDUCATION WORLD

OpeningLearning is a unique online learning platform that motivates and engages students to learn and help others. It boasts more than 697,000 students who have access to more than 3,700 courses from around the world. In 2014 OpenLearning secured a deal with the Malaysian government to deliver 15% of the countries public university courses online and the following year was awarded a contract to deliver Australia’s first federal government MOOC. Last year OpenLearning was awarded the 2016 Premier’s NSW Emerging Exporter Award. In this exclusive interview with International Business Today, OpenLearning CEO and co-founder Adam Brimo reveals the secret to the company’s outstanding global success …

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How and when was the company established? OpenLearning is a cloud-hosted, social online learning platform that enables educators to deliver effective, enjoyable and transformative online courses to students. With over 650,000 students and 4,000 courses across 180 countries, OpenLearning is considered an Australian innovation and technology success story and has over 50 full-time employees across its head office in Sydney and regional office in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. OpenLearning was founded in October 2012 by Adam Brimo (CEO), David Collien (CTO) and UNSW Prof Richard Buckland (Education Visionary) out of a passion to improve access to quality education by enabling anyone in the world to design and deliver effective online

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courses. As we’ve grown, Brooke Hahn, joined OpenLearning in 2014 as our Chief Learning Officer with a focus on learning design and educational quality. Who came up with the concept? There are many online learning platforms however the idea for OpenLearning came from our team’s mission to improve access to quality education, initially for Richard Buckland’s computer science course at UNSW. The platform has come a long way since then and we’ve incorporated many ideas from established educational research, popular social media tools and feedback from educators. However, the core idea, that learning is a social experience that relies on activities, projects and collaboration, still hold true.


How does it work? OpenLearning provides both a social learning platform and learning/ courseware design services to ensure that courses are designed effectively and take advantage of proven and cutting edge pedagogy, including fostering a community of students who encourage, motivate and communicate with each other throughout the course. Traditional models of education are no longer cost-effective, student expectations have increased and online learning has progressed. Uniquely, OpenLearning provides a complete learning environment that fuses content and community with online collaboration and realworld tasks to create a memorable, motivating and transformative learning experience across both formal and informal education. OpenLearning reduces the barriers to creating and delivering an online course by enabling anyone to create a course through its website: openlearning.com

It looks like a fun place to work — you obviously believe in combining work and play? The work we do at OpenLearning is exciting, transformative and necessary for society, and I think that attracts people who want to change the world by improving quality of education while increasing access. At the same time we try to ensure that the work environment is in line with our educational philosophy by empowering our team and encouraging collaboration in a diverse, understanding and multicultural environment. To support that, we have a ‘chillout room’ with games, cushions, drawing activities and more. We also have a room where we play with 3D printers and electronics, and weekly yoga for the team.

haven’t selected our next country yet. What’s the best thing about your job? And the worst thing? The best thing about my role at OpenLearning is being able to work with and meet so many extraordinary people who are passionate about changing the way students are educated worldwide. Knowing that I’m making an impact and that students are benefiting from our work is highly rewarding. Meanwhile, I really enjoy

You now have offices in Sydney and Kuala Lumpur — do you have any future expansion plans? OpenLearning is currently used by students worldwide with Australia and Malaysia being our primary markets. We work closely with higher education institutions in each country and it takes time to understand the regulations and dynamics in each market so we cannot expand too quickly. We plan to expand in Southeast Asia but we

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EDUCATION FEATURE Q&A working with our team and creating a work environment that’s inclusive, supportive and representative of modern Australian society. I’m optimistic and I love what we’re doing at OpenLearning so there isn’t any part of my job that I don’t enjoy. How did you feel about winning the 2016 Premier’s NSW Emerging Exporter Award? We’re very honoured to have won the award and it’s a huge achievement for our team in Australia and Malaysia. They’ve worked very hard over the past few years with some of our staff travelling regularly to support the higher education institutions in Malaysia. But this award is just the beginning and

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we hope to expand our business in Malaysia and across Southeast Asia in the years to come. Finally, what advice do you have for Australian SMEs looking to break into new overseas markets? Be patient. It will take time to understand a new market, and all

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the challenge and opportunities that exist. The business model and product/service offering that works in one country may not work in another. You will also need to spend time in the country on a regular basis as you cannot expect anything to happen if you only visit a couple times a year.


FEATURE

Your guide to doing

BUSINESS IN ASIA

A

re you ready to do business in Singapore, Tokyo or Hong Kong?

Or perhaps you would like to learn more about export opportunities in Jakarta? Well this is the show for you.

Renowned economist Tim Harcourt hosts a new TV show called The Airport Economist on Sky News Business Channel on Fridays at 8pm and Sundays at 9am.

on how to do business in countries around the world. Tim will be visiting thriving markets across Asia to find out what the emerging opportunities are for doing business there, how to get your foot in the door, learn from companies who are successfully operating there, as well as discover the local culture. In each episode Tim presents the “big picture” macroeconomic perspective of each country and its economic and political history then ventures into the microeconomic “nuts and bolts” of how to do

business locally. In doing so he draws on the expertise of his show partners – ANZ, Blackmores, Grant Thornton, Telstra, Australia Post, Qantas, Grand Hyatt and the Government of South Australia (who provide the case studies). In series one of The Asian Century Tim shows you how to do business in Japan, Hong Kong, China, Singapore, The Philippines and Indonesia. This will be followed by visits to Malaysia, Vietnam, Thailand, India, South Korea and the second tier cities of China.

The Airport Economist is also being screened on Qantas in-flight from January 2017. Tim Harcourt is the J.W. Nevile Fellow in Economics at the UNSW Business School. He was also the first chief economist of the Australian Trade Commission (Austrade) for over a decade. You can find out more about Tim’s show here: www.theairporteconomist.com

Produced by Pinstripe Media, The Airport Economist is the primary source of business intelligence for Australian and international companies engaged in trade and international business in the Asia Pacific region. The show is based on Tim Harcourt’s The Airport Economist series of books

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FEATURE

MAINTAINING AN OPEN TRADING ECONOMY IS THE ONLY PATHWAY FORWARD TO MAINTAIN OUR PROSPERITY AND CREATE JOBS OF THE FUTURE BY LISA MCAULEY CEO - Export Council of Australia

As the CEO of the Export Council of Australia, I truly believe that Australian jobs are best created and protected over the long term through an open and competitive economic system. In the wake of Brexit, as well as the recent election results in the United States, there are concerns over whether the anti-trade rhetoric will spread to Australia. In some way, we should be concerned. It is easy for protectionist rhetoric, driven by the minority, to distort the picture of trade’s importance to the Australian economy. It can easily give rise to a wrong impression to the general public on the benefits of trade. Australia is home to around 50,000 exporters. Growing this number, and increasing our international trade and investment, is absolutely crucial to unlocking our future economic potential, as well as increasing our country’s role in important regions like Asia. With our very small population and domestic market, the simple fact is we cannot afford to backslide toward protectionism. Trade is the very backbone of Australia’s economic stability.

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I have just returned from the United States, and while we cannot ignore that these are unique and somewhat challenging times, now is the time for Australia to buck the global trend and capitalise on the commercial opportunities sitting right on our doorstep. Maintaining an open trading economy is the only path toward maintaining our prosperity and creating Australian jobs today and tomorrow. At the ECA we will continue to support all Australian companies looking to support the Australian economy and create jobs by taking on the risks and challenges of growing an international business. If you want to grow your international business and capitalise on the world of opportunity waiting beyond our shores, please join our network as a member so we can work together to build a more prosperous future for us all.

Further information http://www.export.org.au/membership


LOOKING TO START IN THE WORLD OF INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS? Understand the basics and begin your journey with the Going Global online course! The full Going Global program aims to build capabilities and capacities for businesses to grow internationally.

Each module will help businesses gain new skills and knowledge about what’s involved in international business.

As you progress through each of the online modules, you will ultimately be guided towards developing an international business plan.

The online Going Global course will cover the following topics: ▶▶

Module 1: Introduction to Growing a Global Business

▶▶

Module 7: International Pricing Strategy

▶▶

Module 8: Export Marketing and Preparing to Visit the Market

▶▶

Module 9: Free Trade Agreements

▶▶

Module 10: Building Staff Capacity for International Growth Module 11: Pitching for International Success

▶▶

Module 2: How to Select the Right Market

▶▶

Module 3: Legal Contracts and IP Protection Managing Risk

▶▶

Module 4: Managing Your Freight and Logistics

▶▶

Module 5: Financing for Export Success

▶▶

▶▶

Module 6: Going to Market - How to Plan the Right Market Entry Strategy

The ECA is open for enrolments for those wishing to access the course from April 2017.

For further information, please contact the ECA at education@export.org.au or call (02) 8243 7400.

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INTERNATIONAL TRADE EVENTS

TRADE SHOWS

TRADE MISSIONS

APRIL:

MARCH

BEGIN EDU FAIR – AUSTRALIA FUTURE UNLIMITED RUSSIAN FAR EAST EDUCATION MISSION 2017 21 – 23 March Russian Federation

5 – 8 April FOOD & HOTEL INDONESIA Jakarta 25 – 27 April FOOD & HOTEL VIETNAM HCMC

AUSTRALIAN FINTECH ROADSHOW TO CHINA 21 – 23 March Shenzhen and Shanghai, China

MAY:

8 – 11 May HOFEX Hong Kong

APRIL

AUSTRALIA FUTURE UNLIMITED: EXECUTIVE EDUCATION AND TRAINING MISSION TO VIETNAM 2017 3 – 5 April Hanoi and Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam

8 – 11 May PROWINE ASIA Hong Kong 16 – 19 May SEOUL FOOD & HOTEL KOREA Seoul

MAY

MEXICO: OIL & GAS MISSION 2017 3 – 10 May Houston, USA and Mexico

23 - 25 May BROADCASTASIA 2017 Singapore

ENERGY MISSION TO VIETNAM - MAY 2017 22 – 25 May Hanoi, Dong Nai, Tra VInh, Vietnam

23 - 25 May COMMUNICASIA 2017 Singapore

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Advanced Diploma of International Business Management The ECA has partnered with the Centre of Customs and Excise Studies (CCES), Charles Sturt University, to broaden the scope and deepen the relevance of our international skills development offerings. This partnership means that each ECA Accredited workshop completed now brings you a step closer to achieving an Advanced Diploma of International Business Management from CCES.

Want to enrol in the Advanced Diploma? Visit the ECA’s website and access the course calendar: http://www.export.org.au/courses/ Choose the Accredited option, register, pay the Accredited fee and once you’ve attended the workshop on the scheduled date, use that workshop as a credit towards the Advanced Diploma. Once you’re registered for the Accredited workshop, we’ll advise the CCES and they’ll be in touch to enrol you in the Advanced Diploma.

Just want to enrol for one or more workshops, but don’t want to complete the Advanced Diploma? The ECA’s workshop program is available to everyone, whether you want to expand your knowledge base in one specific area only, or eventually complete the Advanced Diploma of International Business Management. Choose the Non-Accredited option, register, pay the Non-Accredited fee and attend the workshop on the scheduled date. No more needs be done!

Who should apply? ▶▶ Anyone with a keen desire to excel in an international business career ▶▶ Anyone needing practical, technical and professional training and qualifications to support their local business going global ▶▶ Anyone wishing to gain or enhance international managerial skills, knowledge and capabilities ▶▶ Anyone aiming to broaden their cultural horizons and strategic thinking

For further details please contact Angela Wright on (02) 8243 7490 or angelawright@export.org.au

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ECA COURSES 2017

EXPORT

IMPORT

APRIL: 4 April - 9am to 2pm MANAGING YOUR INTERNATIONAL FREIGHT RISKS Sydney

18 July - 9am-4.30pm DOING BUSINESS IN CHINA - E-COMMERCE Melbourne

5 April - 9am to 2pm MANAGING YOUR INTERNATIONAL FREIGHT RISKS Melbourne

AUGUST 8 August - 9am to 2pm APPLYING MANAGEMENT PRINCIPLES TO INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS Sydney

MAY: 2 May - 9am to 2pm FINANCING FOR GLOBAL GROWTH Sydney 3 May - 9am to 2pm FINANCING FOR GLOBAL GROWTH Melbourne 25 May - 9am to 4.30pm DOING BUSINESS IN CHINA - AGRIBUSINESS Sydney 26 May - 9am to 4.30pm DOING BUSINESS IN CHINA - AGRIBUSINESS Melbourne JUNE 6 June - 9am to 2pm GROWING YOUR BUSINESS OFFSHORE Sydney 7 June - 9am to 2pm GROWING YOUR BUSINESS OFFSHORE Melbourne 26 June - 9am-4.30pm DOING BUSINESS IN CHINA - MANUFACTURING Sydney 27 June - 9am-4.30pm DOING BUSINESS IN CHINA - MANUFACTURING Melbourne JULY 4 July - 9am to 2pm PITCHING FOR INTERNATIONAL SUCCESS Sydney 5 July - 9am to 2pm PITCHING FOR INTERNATIONAL SUCCESS Melbourne 17 July - 9am-4.30pm DOING BUSINESS IN CHINA - E-COMMERCE Sydney

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9 August - 9am to 2pm APPLYING MANAGEMENT PRINCIPLES TO INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS Melbourne 29 August - 9am to 5pm GETTING THE DOCUMENTATION RIGHT Sydney 30 August - 9am to 5pm GETTING THE DOCUMENTATION RIGHT Melbourne SEPTEMBER: 5 September - 9am to 2pm APPLYING MARKET RESEARCH TECHNIQUES TO INTERNATIONAL MARKETING RISK Sydney

MARCH:

28 March - 9am to 2pm GETTING THE IMPORT DOCUMENTATION RIGHT Sydney 29 March - 9am to 2pm GETTING THE IMPORT DOCUMENTATION RIGHT Melbourne

APRIL:

26 April - 9am to 2pm MANAGING YOUR INTERNATIONAL FREIGHT RISKS FOR IMPORT Melbourne 27 April - 9am to 2pm MANAGING YOUR INTERNATIONAL FREIGHT RISKS FOR IMPORT Sydney

MAY:

30 May - 9am to 2pm IMPORT FINANCING FOR GROWTH Sydney

6 September - 9am to 2pm APPLYING MARKET RESEARCH TECHNIQUES TO INTERNATIONAL MARKETING RISK Melbourne

31 May - 9am to 2pm IMPORT FINANCING FOR GROWTH Melbourne

OCTOBER: 3 October - 9am to 2pm EVALUATING INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS STRATEGY CONCEPTS Sydney

20 June - 9am to 2pm REGULATION AND COMPLIANCE FOR IMPORTING Sydney

4 October - 9am to 2pm EVALUATING INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS STRATEGY CONCEPTS Melbourne NOVEMBER: 7 November - 9am to 2pm DEVELOPING AN INTERNATIONAL MARKET ENTRY PLAN Sydney 8 November - 9am to 2pm DEVELOPING AN INTERNATIONAL MARKET ENTRY PLAN Melbourne

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JUNE:

21 June - 9am to 2pm REGULATION AND COMPLIANCE FOR IMPORTING Melbourne

JULY:

11 July - 9am to 2pm PRICING FOR IMPORT SUCCESS Sydney 12 July - 9am to 2pm PRICING FOR IMPORT SUCCESS Melbourne

To book a course, visit http://www.export.org.au/courses/ For more information, please contact the ECA on (02) 8243 7400 or education@export.org.au


The Peak Membership Body for companies involved in International Business

The Export Council of Australia (ECA) has a long, proud history of supporting Australian international business. For the past 60 years we have encouraged, educated and assisted Australian companies to take on the world.

We help promote Australian industry in international markets by: • Developing international business skills • Building Australian business capacity • Conducting international market research • Helping to break down barriers to trade • Building global networks • Informing Australian trade policy

Think globally. Think ECA!

www.export.org.au | info@export.org.au | 02 8243 7400


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International Business Today Autumn 2017  

International Business Today is the leading e-magazine in Australia for companies engaged in International Business.

International Business Today Autumn 2017  

International Business Today is the leading e-magazine in Australia for companies engaged in International Business.