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Master Gardener PROGRAM - Hennepin County

Learning Garden Tour Saturday, July 14, 2018

Come to look, to learn, to leave inspired.


2018 Learning GArden Tour

Welcome

Thank you for attending our 11th annual Learning Garden Tour! You’ll enjoy a close look at eight home gardens, designed and maintained by Hennepin County Master Gardeners, and the historic Dowling Community Garden, which began as a World War II Victory Garden. (See page 32 for more on Victory Gardens.)

INSECT & DISEASE MANAGEMENT PRUNING FERTILIZATION LIGHTNING PROTECTION DIAGNOSIS ROOT INVIGORATION REMOVAL

Meet with an ISA Certified Arborist who understands the science of tree care.

Master Gardener volunteers will be on hand to explain highlights of each garden and to answer your questions. In addition, each garden features an Education Station, where you’ll learn about specific topics and build your skills.

Ticket price includes: – Wristband for entry to all 9 gardens. – This booklet, which includes:

• The story of each garden

• Descriptions of the Education Stations

• Gardening articles

• An easy-to-navigate map, highlighting the location of each garden. (This is a self-guided tour, and you may visit the gardens in any order you choose.)

Please be sure to visit The Garden Shed, located at Garden A, offering a wonderful selection of fun, practical and decorative garden items, and The Book Nook, located at Garden I—a one-stop shop for a variety of gardening books for all ages, many written by Hennepin County Master Gardeners and Minnesota authors. All proceeds from Learning Garden Tour tickets and items in The Garden Shed and The Book Nook provide funding for the Extension Master Gardener Program – Hennepin County. Cover photo: Borage (Borago officinalis), photographed by Melinda Mattox, Hennepin County Master Gardener. The University of Minnesota Extension Master Gardener Program – Hennepin County, homeowners and volunteers are not responsible for any damages, injuries, lost or stolen articles.

CALL US AT 763-253-8733 OR VISIT WWW.BARTLETT.COM

University of Minnesota Extension is an equal opportunity educator and employer. In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, this publication/material is available in alternative formats upon request. Direct requests to the Extension Store at 800-876-8636. Printed on recycled and recyclable paper with at least 10 percent postconsumer waste material.

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What to Look for on the Tour

What is an extension Master Gardener? Hennepin County Master Gardener volunteers promote environmental stewardship by providing research-based horticultural information and education to enhance the quality of life in our communities. Hennepin County had 375 active Master Gardener volunteers providing 29,000 hours of service in 2017.

The Garden Shed This year’s Shed features rustic, reclaimed-wood birdhouses along with chicken-wire garden cloches, mini garden stakes, succulent planters and “Pollinator Packs” of native plants — loved by bees, butterflies and birds.

The Book Nook

Who we are Master Gardeners are gardeners just like you who have received extensive training through their county Extension program and then volunteer in their community. Master Gardener volunteers are active in all 50 states. What we know Our training covers a wide range of subjects such as soil health, plant pathology, sustainability and entomology. How we know it Master Gardener core courses are taught by University professors and Extension educators. Ongoing education is provided throughout the year in a variety of venues. Who we work with Master Gardener volunteers work with children, teens and adults in schools, community gardens, libraries, farmers markets and many other places. How to become a Master Gardener Visit www.HennepinMasterGardeners.org to learn how to get on the notification list for this year. Complete 50 hours of core course training and continue your education and service every year!

A perfect place to buy the perfect gift! You’ll find an appealing selection of gardening and nature-themed books for adults and children alike. Included are titles written by Hennepin County Master Gardeners on pollinator-friendly gardening, hydroponics, natural pest deterrents, sciencebased gardening tips and making simple preserves with your garden’s bounty.

Garden Plant List In each garden, 10 notable plants are highlighted with numbers. You’ll find the names of these plants on each garden’s booklet page.

Education Stations Fun and engaging Education Stations offer demonstrations on Flowers for Pollinators, Hydroponics, Pruning Trees and Shrubs, Vertical and Raisedbed Gardening and more. Look for a station description on each garden’s booklet page.

Food Trucks Garden D Camp Cheesecake/Muddy Paws Cheesecake—offering six award-winning flavors by the slice, including a glutenfree option.

Garden F Alimama’s Sambusa Mediterranean Cuisine—offering sambusas, falafel, hummus, salads, iced coffee and more.

Garden G For information call 612-596-2130 or visit: www.HennepinMasterGardeners.org 4  Master Gardeners’ 2018 Learning Garden Tour

O’Cheeze—offering specialty grilled cheese done varying ways, including pulled chicken and bacon. @HCMGS Master Gardeners’ 2018 Learning Garden Tour  5


Garden

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5620 Bloomington Avenue, Minneapolis

Calling All Pollinators

Plants Top 10 Plant List

Gardening is my hobby and my passion. I’ve only been in my house since 2015, but I’ve been reworking the gardens to draw pollinators and create a private, relaxing space in the back yard.

1. Tree Peony (Koukamon)

The dominant feature there is a massive silver maple. The roots reach everywhere, including into the ground around a concrete patio that had drainage problems, and into an old, overgrown garden. The patio is my favorite place to relax, so I tackled that issue first. In 2016, I edged the patio with a new garden featuring hydrangeas, junipers and a burning bush that help absorb water and create a privacy screen. I add pots of annuals for summer-long color. Last year I replaced the tired plantings in the existing garden with low-maintenance perennials that should draw pollinators. That garden is anchored by a tree peony with maroon flowers, surrounded by plants like bee balm, astilbe, penstemon, coneflowers and bugbane. I’ve tried to amend the soil as I go. The maple has been a challenge, but I respect the tree and value its shade and have tried to protect the roots. I love the sound of water and have fountains in the front and back yards. Birds and squirrels stop by for a drink, and once a Cooper’s hawk sat on the fountain in the front yard! EDUCATION STATION

Water Wisely

You can grow beautiful, healthy plants and turf while helping to conserve water at the same time. Watering Wisely means incorporating best practices for watering your home landscape efficiently. Stop by to learn about the effect of soil texture on water movement, how to determine the type of soil you have in your landscape, and ways to adopt recommended practices for watering gardens, newly planted and established trees and shrubs, and lawns. Water is one of our most precious resources, and you can make a difference in conserving it to benefit generations to come. 6  Master Gardeners’ 2018 Learning Garden Tour

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2. Hydrangea (Little Quickfire)

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3. Dwarf Burning Bush 4. Peonies (Sarah Bernhardt) 5. Prairie Smoke

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6. Swamp Milkweed 7. Bergenia 8. Sliver Maple Tree 9. Anise Hyssop 10. Ficus Tree

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Directions: From Hwy 62: Exit at Portland Ave., head North on Portland Ave., East on E56th St., South on Bloomington Ave. S.

Master Gardener – Hennepin County

The Garden Shed Don’t miss this year’s delightful collection of items at The Garden Shed — perfect gifts for all of the gardeners in your life, including yourself!

2 Rustic, reclaimed-wood birdhouses 2 Charming (and practical) chicken-wire garden cloches 2 Mini garden stakes 2 Succulent planters 2 “Pollinator Packs” of native plants — loved by bees, butterflies and birds All proceeds provide funding for the Extension Master Gardener Program – Hennepin County.

Located in Garden A, 5620 Bloomington Avenue Master Gardeners’ 2018 Learning Garden Tour  7


Garden

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4825 29th Avenue S, Minneapolis

Pleasing palate and palette

Top 10 Plant List Plants

I’m inspired by a desire to create a beautiful urban landscape that’s attractive to birds and insects—and by a passion for growing food.

1. Bur Oak (Quercus macrocarpa)

The challenges are growing vegetables in the shade of venerable old oaks, and MANY squirrels. I long ago gave up acquiring many plants I’d love for my garden, simply because there’s not sufficient sun for them to thrive. But I continually discover new shade-loving perennials that complement my garden’s palette.

3. Lungwort (Pulmonaria)

What I love most changes with the season: In spring, it’s Virginia bluebells, crocus, Scilla, and Hepatica in bloom! Fiddleheads for dinner. Rhubarb-raisin sauce. Spinach and radishes. And blooming pagoda dogwoods, cherry, bleeding hearts, pulmonaria, anemone and azalea.

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2. Pagoda Dogwood (Cornus alternifolia) 4. Bleeding Heart (Dicentra) 5. Thyme (Thymus)

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6. Hepatica 7. Foam flower, Tiarella 8. Nightshades, solanaceae; Tomatoes, Eggplants, and Peppers

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9. Baneberry (Actaea pachypoda) 10. Wild Ginger (Asarum canadense)

Summer brings a serendipitously beautiful arrangement of three large hostas in the back, and the fragrance of blooming hops. I pick yarrow, peonies, sage, opal basil, spirea, hydrangea and hosta for bouquets; raspberries, blueberries, tomatoes, zucchini, cucumbers and beans for supper. Last year I harvested my very first hazelnuts, and this year I look forward to the blooming of a VERY fragrant hosta.

Directions: From Hwy 77N: North on Cedar Ave., East on E. Minnehaha Pkwy., South on 29th Ave. S. From Hiawatha/Hwy. 55: West on East Minnehaha Pkwy, South on 29th Ave. S.

I have tended these gardens for 17 years now, and many features I proudly point to as ‘mine.’ But there are also contributions from my predecessors, and perfectly placed volunteers—gifts from the mysterious forces of nature. EDUCATION STATION

Vertical and Raised-bed Gardening

How can you have a garden when you have little or no space to work with? One solution is vertical gardening—the art of growing your plants UP! Easy to maintain and exceptionally productive, vertical gardening works well for many vegetables, fruits and flowers. Or what if you have plenty of soil … but it’s not very fertile? A raised bed allows you to enjoy the benefits of gardening in the soil of your choice, as well as improved drainage, fewer weeds, and a more accessible, comfortable gardening height. Stop by to see how vertical and raised-bed gardening could work for you! 8  Master Gardeners’ 2018 Learning Garden Tour

Invite

the raptors to your school, library, or other event! The Raptor Center raptors and staff travel around Minnesota and the United States, providing a unique educational experience. Our hour-long programs are packed with age-appropriate information that is both educational and entertaining. All outreach programs include a raptor education specialist, at least three live raptors, and a variety of hands-on props and activities that make this program a complete educational experience. Our staff and raptors are also available for booth-style meet-and-greet events. Outreach programs are available seven days a week, and our staff travels nationwide.

Call 612-624-2756 or email raptored@umn.edu for more information Master Gardeners’ 2018 Learning Garden Tour  9


Garden

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3901 46th Avenue S, Minneapolis

Dowling Community Garden

Top 10 Plant List Plants

Two blocks west of the Mississippi River, the Dowling Community Garden is located on the grounds of the Michael Dowling School, a K-5 urban environmental magnet school at 46th Avenue and 39th Street South in Minneapolis. The Dowling Community Garden is believed to be one of the last two remaining Victory Gardens in use today. We are celebrating our 75th anniversary this year.

1. Igleheart Yellow Cherry Tomatoes

The first lots for a Victory Garden were drawn on April 13, 1943. Today the garden has more than 190 plots with approximately 250 gardeners. There are currently two Master Gardeners with plots at Dowling, and they share their expertise as needed. A small volunteer steering committee manages the plots, the volunteers, and the outreach to the neighborhood. The wide variety of produce grown and shared by gardeners is stunning. Gardeners can grow fruits, vegetables, and flowers—no trees or shrubs. Excess produce is collected and shared with food shelves weekly.

7. Beauregard Sweet Potatoes

The grounds include accessible raised beds, a trial garden, shade and sun flower gardens, a Kids Club garden and food shelf gardens. Classes from Dowling School visit the gardens for lessons, neighbors walk their dogs on the lovely walking paths, and folks sit and read in the sun on our beautiful benches. Please stop by to experience the beauty and learn how a community garden survives and thrives. EDUCATION STATION

Integrated Pest Management (IPM)

Is this a good bug or a bad bug? What should I do about the powdery mildew on my peonies, and the scab on my apple trees? What can I use to control pests that won’t harm the bees? We will explain Integrated Pest Management (IPM), a management strategy offering effective, economical tactics that keep environmental damage to a minimum. IPM can help you determine the best course of action to keep pests and plant diseases at bay in your lawn and garden without resorting to harmful chemicals.

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2. Juliet Tomatoes 3. Carmen (Sweet Paprika Peppers) 4. Rainbow Swiss Chard

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5. Poppies - various throughout the gardens 6. Joe Pye Weed

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8. Brussels Sprouts 9. Broccoli 10. Kale - various

Directions: From Hiawatha/Hwy 55: East on E. 38th., South on 46th Ave. S.

Save $5 when you become a member of the Minnesota State Horticultural Society or renew your membership at our tour booth at Garden C. You’ll also receive the current issue of Northern Gardener magazine Free, as well as an exclusive gift! Membership includes: Northern Gardener, Minnesota’s only home-grown gardening magazine; a discount card good at over 100 nurseries and garden centers in Minnesota and Wisconsin; discounts on MSHS classes, tours, merchandise and plants; free Garden Show tickets; and much more. 651.643.3601 / 800.676.6747 www.northerngardener.org Master Gardeners’ 2018 Learning Garden Tour  11


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3445 46th Avenue S, Minneapolis D

A Cottage Garden

Top 10 Plant List Plants

I love cottage gardens, and mine evolved around our small, cottage-like bungalow. In 1994, there was nothing in the yard but old tree roots in the back and scraggly yews in the front. So I started with a blank slate, but I was inspired by the memory of my Grandma’s cottage garden, and Irish gardens.

1. Pussy Toes (Antennaria plantaginifolia)

I first dug along the garage and fence, planting mostly daylilies and other flowers I got for free! After we put in the deck, patio and retaining wall, I started building gardens around them. We replaced a black walnut tree with a brilliant Autumn Blaze maple and gradually amended the clay soil. I love a mixture of shrubs, flowers, herbs and veggies—and I have a lot of containers, too.

4. B lue False Indigo (Baptisia australis)

I recently added a raised bed next to the alley, with vegetables and colorful annuals. (It was dead space—can’t have that!) My Joe Pye weed and other full-size prairie plants thrive in the hot, western sun. Along the boulevard, where no grass would grow, I planted a pollinator garden with turtlehead, bee balm and other natives. And I love my Honeycrisp espalier, succulents and tiny fairy gardens! Despite being in the city, my yard is amazingly quiet and private. My greatest joys are walking people through my gardens, and then working in them by myself. After being in an office all week, this is my peaceful place. EDUCATION STATION

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Hydroponics

Imagine growing your own organic salad greens, herbs, and tomatoes (yes, even tomatoes!) in the depths of the Minnesota winter (or even comfortably inside during the hot and sticky Minnesota summer). You can do it easily and inexpensively through hydroponics, a soil-less growing system that’s easy to set up and maintain year-round. Hydroponic gardening works equally well for people who have lots of space … or very little space. It’s also a great addition to assisted-living and healthcare facilities. Stop by and learn how to build a simple hydroponics system for yourself!

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2. W  isteria macrostachya (Blue Moon) 3. S creaming Yellow False Indigo (Baptisia sphaerocarpa)

5. Clematis Integrifolia (Fascination) 6. Clematis Tangutica (Helios) 7. F ern Leaf Peony (Paeonia tenuifolia) 8. P eony “Pink Dogwood Whisper” (Peonia laciflora) 9. A  ngelica gigas (Korean angelica, giant) 10. Swamp Milkweed (Asclepias incarnata)

Directions: From Hiawatha/Hwy 55: East on E. 35th., North on 46th Ave. S.

Small Footprint, Surprising Selection. Enjoy $5 off your purchase of $25 or more. 3738 42nd Ave S. Mpls, 55406 2318 NE Lowry Ave. Mpls, 55418 motherearthgarden.com Master Gardeners’ 2018 Learning Garden Tour  13


3511 37th Avenue S, Minneapolis

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A Big Happy Mix

Top 10 Plant List Plants

When we moved into our home in May of 2010, the yard was already beautiful with perennial natives and non-native wildflowers. My wife, Amanda, and I didn’t know the first thing about flowers, and over the next few years we killed off most of the previous owner’s hard work!

1. Alpine Strawberry (Fragaria vesca) 2. Habanero (Capsicum chinense ‘Chocolate’ & ‘Mustard’) 3. Lemon Mint (Monarda citriodora) 4. Zucchetta Tromboncino (Cucurbita moschata) 5. Strawflower (Helichrysum bracteatum) 6. Volunteer Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) 7. Bronze Fennel (Foeniculum vulgare) 8. Red Milkweed (Asclepias incarnata) 9.  Gooseberries (Ribes uva-crispa) 10. Scarlet Runner Bean (Phaseolus coccineus)

Most of our yard is now garden space—a big happy mix of veggies, fruits, wildflowers, trees, grasses, and other native and non-native plants. What I love most is how much is happening in our garden on any random summer day. The plants are going strong; the entire space is filled with bees and butterflies, birds and squirrels; and there are beautiful colors everywhere. Just seeing how much we can make happen in our small Minneapolis yard is hugely satisfying. EDUCATION STATION

Preserving the Garden’s Abundance

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Directions: From Hiawatha/Hwy 55: East on 35th St., South on 37th Ave.

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Does your garden yield an abundant array of tomatoes, peppers, zucchini, cucumbers and other fruits and veggies at summer’s end? Are you eager to enjoy your delicious bounty throughout a long, cold Minnesota winter? Visit this Education Station to learn about a variety of ways to preserve your garden produce—through canning, fermenting, pickling and more. Don’t let your precious produce go to waste! When you preserve the fruits of your labor, you’ll enjoy a tasty and nutritious slice of summer all year long.

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At the same time, our interest in vegetable gardening grew, so we started adding vegetables to the flower garden (both to increase our veggie yield and to fill in the empty spaces). Incorporating pollinator-friendly flowers and plants right alongside our veggies became a yearly goal of ours. We built several raised beds for vegetables in areas of poor soil, and three years ago we added a bee garden. Our yard had a lot of shade at first, but removing three large silver maples opened up the entire yard to sun, and we planted 10 dwarf fruit trees.

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Vertical Vegetable Gardening: Grow UP! ertical gardening is a way to maximize your gardening space—and your produce yield—by training plants to grow vertically from a minimal footprint of soil.

Here are five great reasons to give vertical gardening a try: • Requires less space and soil • Is easy to maintain • Efficiently uses water and fertilizer • Makes for easy weeding, pruning and harvesting • Helps plants stay healthy because of good air circulation

Types of vertical gardening 1. Up from the ground: Use sturdy structures such as trellises, stakes, ladders, fences, walls, arches and pergolas. Even an unused swing-set or basketball hoop can work! 2. Containers: Place containers or pots on shelves (preferably with slats for good drainage), use hanging baskets that allow vines and fruit to hang down, or be creative. Use tall plastic trash cans, shoe caddies, rain gutters or PVC pipe! Just remember to water frequently, as pots, containers and baskets dry out fast.

Considerations Different vegetables require different supporting structures, depending on their type (vining or upright) and the weight of their fruit. For example: Peas and beans will easily climb up a lightweight lattice of twine, whereas squash and melons require a strong structure (such as a trellis covered with wire mesh) to support their heavy fruit. Tomatoes need three-dimensional support rather than a single stake. Herbs and lettuces work well in hanging baskets or pots on stacked shelves.

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2018 TOUR MAP Learning Garden Tour A. 5620 Bloomington Ave., Mpls.

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B. 4825 29th Ave. S, Mpls.

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C. 3901 46th Ave. S, Mpls. D. 3445 46th Ave. S, Mpls.

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E. 3511 37th Ave. S, Mpls. F. 3630 28th Ave. S, Mpls. G. 3501 12th Ave. S, Mpls. H. 2917 14th Ave. S, Mpls. I. 6645 Logan Ave. S, Richfield

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Water Wisely ou can grow and maintain healthy, beautiful plants and turf while helping to conserve our precious water supply.

Best watering methods Garden •W  ater when top 6 to 9 inches of soil are dry—and until moist • Water early in the morning • Water the soil, not the leaves • Use soaker hoses or drip irrigation

Newly planted trees & shrubs • Weeks 1 & 2: water daily • Weeks 3–12: water every 2 to 3 days • Water weekly until established • Make 3- to 4-inch soil wall around root ball edge (holds water) • Trees: apply 1 to 1.5 gallons for every inch of trunk diameter • Shrubs: apply the amount of water needed to fill 1/3 of the original pot

Established trees & shrubs • Water when top 6 to 9 inches of soil are dry—and until these top inches are moist • Water early in the morning • Use a sprinkler to reach all roots (root spread can be 2 to 3 times wider than the canopy)

Lawn • Water when footprints remain visible in the grass • Water when top 6 inches of soil are dry—and until moist

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• Use sprinklers to reach the whole lawn • Allow the top 6 inches to dry before watering again

Ways to conserve water Garden: • Choose drought-tolerant plants • Cover soil with 2 to 3 inches of organic mulch • Collect and use rainwater • Amend soil with compost

Lawn: • Plant drought-resistant grasses • Set mower height to 3 inches (promotes deeper roots) • Test automatic irrigation systems for proper functioning • Install a rain sensor, soil moisture sensor, or smart irrigation controller For more information:

z.umn.edu/waterwise

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Credit: Minnesota State Extension Master Gardener Program

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3630 28th Avenue S, Minneapolis A

Inspired by Mother Nature

Top 10 Plant List Plants

My beautiful, two-story magnolia tree is the only plant that remains from 2008, when I bought my house and faced a yard of dead sod and weeds! Early on, I spent a lot of time creating a landscape plan, and I phased in plantings over time.

1. Pagoda Dogwood (Golden Shadows)

Since this is a small lot, the mature size of the plants, trees and shrubs— including my fruit-bearing serviceberries, cherry tree and grape vines—were taken into consideration. The yard has become more shaded over time, so finding plants for the right light conditions continues to evolve. I augment my landscape with a lot of container plantings, from edibles such as tomatoes and herbs to a variety of annuals and specialty plants such as the corpse flower (voodoo lily). My inspiration has been working with Mother Nature, and I’ve incorporated environmental practices such as composting; rain barrels; planting natives and pollinator-friendly plants; selecting plants that don’t need large amounts of water, fertilizer and pesticides; and keeping rainwater on-site with a swale (small depression) and a rain garden. When a city pipe repair necessitated excavation of the grassy boulevard, I dug a trench to direct rainwater from the sidewalk into the boulevard (instead of the street) and planted perennials in place of turf. From my magnolia and redbud in spring, to perennials in summer, to hydrangea and sweet autumn clematis in fall, my garden’s seasonal variation of blooms is very satisfying. EDUCATION STATION

Vermiculture and Backyard Composting Turn waste into plant nutrients year-round!

Vermiculture: We’ll show you how to make and maintain a “fertilizer factory” in your own home (even your apartment) by working with red wiggler earthworms. These quiet creatures don’t take much room, and they tirelessly turn food and plant scraps into rich fertilizer for your plants and garden. An indoor red wiggler factory is a great complement to a backyard composting system.

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2. Black Lace Elderberry 3. Redbud (Minnesota Strain) 4. K atsura Tree (Cercidiphyllum japonica)

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5. V oodoo lily (Amorphophallus konjac; Sauromatum venosum) 6. Cherry (North Star) 7. Magnolia (Merrill) 8. Japanese White Pine 9. Willow (Hakuro-nishiki) 10. Sumac (Tiger Eye)

Directions: From Hiawatha/Hwy 55: West on 38th St., North on 28th Ave.

wagnergreenhouses.com

Growing color since 1901 Minneapolis Open year round

Hugo Open April- June

Bloomington Open April-December

6024 Penn Ave. S. 612-922-6901

4860 Frenchman Rd. 651-653-8863

2100 W. Old Shakopee Rd. 952-884-7889

Backyard Composting: Learn how to create an organic soil amendment or mulch by composting your yard and garden waste, fruit and vegetable scraps, coffee grounds, egg shells, shredded newspaper and more. 22  Master Gardeners’ 2018 Learning Garden Tour

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3501 12th Avenue S, Minneapolis

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Hidden charm

Top 10 Plant List Plants

Before I bought my house, I had no idea I wanted to garden.

1. Butterfly Weed (Asclepias tuberosa)

It happened at the farmers’ market, when I saw purple salvia and orange asclepias and yellow “Moonbeam” coreopsis—and imagined how beautiful they’d look together. That was the moment I became a gardener!

2. Coreopsis verticillata (Moonbeam)

I still have those flowers, as well as the original yard’s peonies, goat’s beard, and hydrangeas. When I dug up the grass, I discovered flagstone paths, buried six inches deep. I used those flagstones to edge my water garden. I wanted the sound of water … and goldfish. My Grandpa had goldfish in his backyard.

5. Cornus sericea/Redosier Dogwood (Cardinal)

One challenge is I have a lot of squirrels. The first time I planted tulip bulbs (about 200), not one came up! I learned to cover bulbs with turkey grit, which the squirrels won’t walk on. Now I plant bulbs every year, and it’s so worth it.

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3. Salvia (Common Sage)

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4. Nepeta/Catmint (Walker’s Low)

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6. Liatris spicata (Gayfeather) 7. Pontederia cordata (Pickerelweed) 8. Rudbeckia lacinata (Hortensia ‘Golden Glow’) 9. Nigella (‘Devil-in-a-bush’; ‘Lovein-a-mist’) 10. Sedum ellacombianum (Stonecrop)

Directions: From 35W: East on 36th St., North on 12th Ave. S. From Hiawatha/Hwy 55: West on 35th St., South on 12th Ave. S.

This area has nice, loamy soil, which I love. In the beginning, I was going for that wispy, cottage-y look with perennials. Now it’s more eclectic, with rocks and tropicals and annuals for fun and color. I want the kaBAM effect that comes from big areas of repeating blooms. What’s really charming about my garden is it’s so hidden. You’d never know it was there unless you peeked over the fence. I find joy just being in it. EDUCATION STATION

Container Water Gardening

Water gardening opens a whole new world of lovely plants for you to enjoy throughout the growing season—and you don’t need a large pond to be successful. Even a small fountain can be a serenely beautiful addition to your landscape. If you’re short on space, or just need a focal point somewhere, aquatic plants are easily grown in containers! And the best part is, you don’t have to worry about weekly watering.  Visit this education station to learn about creating small water features that can fit into containers. Learn how to make almost any container water-tight, what type of plants to grow, how to get them to the right height, and how to keep the water clear and mosquito-free. 24  Master Gardeners’ 2018 Learning Garden Tour

he During t our Garden T k Our Truc Look for

Sambusa is a big part of the food culture in Minnesota, the Bold North’s very own Alimama Catering will proudly present Minnesota’s unquestioned distinctiveness. Alimama’s Mediterranean Grill is located inside Metropolitan State University new Student Center. Our cafe offers fresh Mediterranean cuisines with recipes perfected over three generations. Alimama’s Sambusa food truck operates in downtown Minneapolis for corporate lunches, business functions, and special occasions. We offer buffet style, boxes lunches and small scale catering to student organization events, corporate meetings, and parties.

www.alimamacatering.com Alimama EA Catering LLC • 690 E 7th Street, St. Paul, MN 55106 • 651-793-1679, 612-388-8306

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2917 14th Avenue S, Minneapolis G

Alice-in-Wonderland Enchantment

Top 10 Plant List Plants

I bought my house in 2002, but my serious gardening didn’t start till about 2012. When we moved in, there were just a few perennials, and the fencing crossed the yard in odd places, pinching the trees. So initially we focused on replacing the fence and walkways, and building a back deck.

1. Weeping Crabapple

The next challenge was mowing the steep front bank. We first planted a line of bushes, and then decided we didn’t want to mow the yard AT ALL. Our patio brickwork was inspired by the landscaping at the original Hotel Sofitel. I’m proud to say I carried and placed every single block myself! We added our fountain to drown out traffic noise, and removed six diseased elms, but most of my decisions are driven by aesthetics. Gardening is relatively new to me, so every day has been a learning experience as I’ve come to understand that full sun really means full sun, that some plants like being planted in groups and others want to hang out by themselves. I’m mostly into perennial flowers, but also love bushes and bulbs.

2. Juniper (Mint Julip Pom Pom) 3. Hibiscus (Mocha Moon) 4. Red Twig Dogwood 5. Plume Poppies 6. Penstemon (Dark Towers) 7. Ragwort (Liguleria Desdemona) 8. C oral Bells/Heucherella (Brass Lantern) 9. Roses 10. Clematis (Virgin’s Bower)

Directions: From 35W: East on E. 28th St., South on 14th Ave. S. From Hiawatha/Hwy 55: West on E. Lake St., North on 14th Ave. S.

Over the past years, I’ve been going for an Alice-in-Wonderlandesque, enchanted-garden look. I have a pebbled area, with a fairy garden, that I call my “sacred circle.” Originally formed by several trees, only one Blue Spruce remains. But I still love sitting there, sipping wine and basking in the peace of my garden. EDUCATION STATION

Flowers for Pollinators

You can help honeybees, wild bees, monarch butterflies and other pollinators to survive—and thrive—by planting a pollinator-friendly garden and yard. You’ll enjoy the beauty, and pollinators will appreciate a life-sustaining home. We’ll share information on which flowers, trees and shrubs have beneficial nectar and pollen (not all plants have them!), how to create a welcoming pollinator habitat (where pollinators can raise their young), how to choose a variety of flowers to ensure season-long blooming, and how to plant a pollinator-friendly lawn by overseeding with low-growing flowers and fine fescue. 26  Master Gardeners’ 2018 Learning Garden Tour

Master Gardeners’ 2018 Learning Garden Tour  27


Garden

I

A

6645 Logan Avenue S, Richfield

Sacred Space

Top 10 Plant List D Plants

When my husband and I moved into this house, 15 years ago, we had many hopes and dreams. But soon after we moved in, my husband passed away. The garden was slow in coming because it was just me working on it, facing challenges like rabbits, tree roots and dandelions from the park across the street. But I love it all.

1. Japanese Lilac Tree

The front yard started as dirt. I added benches, brought in big rocks, and built a rock wall. I love rock as much as I love plants! A friend brought me a tiny silver lace vine (Fallopia baldschuanica), which has grown beautifully over the rock. I planted euonymus around the big maple’s roots, and added astilbe and hydrangeas for color. One evening, my neighbors brought over wine and cheese to celebrate the front garden’s completion, and as we sat enjoying its serenity, we decided to call it my “sacred garden.” It’s a very special place.

5. False Cypress (Kochia)

For the back yard, which also started as dirt, I designed my cedar fence, envisioning many birds and plants that make me happy: clematis, honeysuckle, hollyhocks, tomato vines and hibiscus. Another favorite is the city wall on the south side, which I’ve transformed with draping lavender phlox and succulents. I love different shapes, colors and textures—of rocks, wood and plants. My garden has no particular style. It’s just a “me” garden, changing to reflect who I am, year after year. EDUCATION STATION

Pruning Trees and Shrubs

Learn the basics of pruning your trees and shrubs so you can prepare them for long, productive lives in your landscape. Pruning for safety involves removing branches that could fail. Pruning for health involves removing thin, rubbing, and/or diseased branches. Pruning for aesthetics involves enhancing the natural form of the tree or shrub. The goal is to develop well-structured young trees and shrubs, and you’ll see how small pruning errors at the start can lead to larger problems later on. You’ll also learn about pruning safety, various types of pruning tools and tool-cleaning procedures. 28  Master Gardeners’ 2018 Learning Garden Tour

B

C

E

F

H

I

2. Japanese Painted Ferns (Athyrium niponicum) 3. Frost Grass -Silver Spike GrassG (Spodiopogon sibiricus) 4. Vine on the Boulder (Climbing Hydrangea) 6. Hibiscus (Mocha Moon) 7. Japanese Maple Tree 8. K atsura Tree (Cercidiphyllum japonica) 9. Conifers - Dwarf Japanese White Pines 10. Weeping Siberian Peashrub (Caragana arborescens ‘Pendula’)

Directions: From 35W South: Exit Heading West on W 66th St., Turn South on Logan Ave. From Hwy 62: Exit Heading South on Penn Ave. S, Turn East on W 66th St., Turn South on Logan Ave.

Master Gardener – Hennepin County

The BOOK NOOK The Book Nook offers an engaging selection of gardening and naturethemed books, many written by Hennepin County Master Gardeners. Here’s what one recent tour visitor had to say: “Thank you so much for having all these books together in one spot. It made my present-buying so easy!”

Stop by and stock up on gifts for friends and family of all ages.

Located in Garden I, 6645 Logan Avenue South Master Gardeners’ 2018 Learning Garden Tour  29


P

Pollinators need our help! ollinators such as honey bees, monarch butterflies, wild bees and more are struggling to survive these days. Why? They’re in need of a larger variety of nutritious plants to eat and more places to raise their young.

Here’s what you can do to help: • Plant annuals, perennials, shrubs and trees that have flowers with beneficial nectar and pollen. (Not all plants have what pollinators need!) For ideas on what to plant, check the resources listed below. • Choose a variety of plants to ensure constant blooming from spring into autumn, and plant three or more of the same type together instead of single plants. • Create a welcoming pollinator habitat: Keep some soil bare for ground nesters; cut perennial stems to 12 inches high in fall (for stem-nesting bees); and retain fallen logs (if safely possible).

• Instead of adding more turf to your landscape, plant a perennial bed, native area or rain garden. • Create a pollinator-friendly lawn by overseeding with fine fescue and low-growing flowers like ground plum, self-heal and white clover. It’ll be beautiful, and require less fertilizer, water and mowing! For more information:

z.umn.edu/f4pollinators University of Minnesota Bee Lab: www.beelab.umn.edu University of Minnesota Monarch Lab: https://monarchlab.org Xerces Society: www.xerces.org/pollinator-conservation Visit the Minnesota Landscape Arboretum’s Bee & Pollinator Discovery Center and Garden for Pollinators: www.arboretum.umn.edu 30  Master Gardeners’ 2018 Learning Garden Tour

Master Gardeners’ 2018 Learning Garden Tour  31


V

Victory Gardens ictory Gardens are often associated only with World War II. But the push to grow food in support of a war effort actually began after the United States entered World War I, when Americans were urged to cultivate Liberty Gardens. During both World Wars, residents planted gardens to help feed the troops overseas and the general population at home and abroad. Staples such as potatoes, corn, apples, onions and cabbage were shipped to Europe and helped sustain folks at home. More than 6 million victory gardens were planted in 1942. And in 1943, when called upon to plant 18 million gardens, people all over the U.S. planted more than 20 million! H.W. Hochbaum, chair of the Victory Garden Committee of the Department of Agriculture, wrote in the January 1944 issue of House and Garden: “As long as the war lasts and for years after, we’re going to need all the home-grown and home-preserved food we can possibly raise. Without it, we’ll be sunk.”

Supplies for Victory Gardens were available for purchase at local hardware and grocery stores. Photo: The Library of Congress.

People were encouraged to plant gardens in their back yards, schoolyards, vacant lots, and public parks—and not only to grow food for the summer and fall, but also to preserve for the winter. The University of Minnesota Extension worked with seed companies to distribute seeds, developed instructional materials on how to grow and preserve food, and, along with 4H staff, taught classes on food preservation throughout the state.

Today, the legacy of growing and sharing healthful produce lives on in community gardens throughout Minnesota.

32  Master Gardeners’ 2018 Learning Garden Tour

Notes

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Master Gardeners’ 2018 Learning Garden Tour  33


Our events

Extension Master Gardener – Hennepin County

COWSMO

Farmers Market Schedule Ask a Master Gardener booth at many Hennepin County farmers markets. Visit our website for dates and locations. HennepinMasterGardeners.org Free Classes | Hennepin County Libraries Please visit www.hclib.org for topics, locations and dates. THE FINEST QUALITY ORGANIC COMPOST

Minnesota State Fair | August 23 – Labor Day, Sept. 3, 2018 Agriculture Building. Ask a Master Gardener booth and The Dirt Stage presentations and demonstrations. Annual Plant Sale | May 18, 2019 Our 11th Annual Plant Sale features over 6,000 Master Gardener-grown plants. 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Learning Garden Tour | July 13, 2019 Self-guided tour of a select group of beautiful gardens in Hennepin County, featuring Education Stations and on-site Hennepin County Master Gardeners.

Thank you to all of our generous advertisers for helping to make the 2018 Learning Garden Tour a success. 2

Bartlett Tree Experts

23 Wagners

13 Mother Earth Gardens

27 Glacial Ridge Growers

15 Kelley & Kelley Nursery and Greenhouse

31 Tangletown Gardens

17 Ecogarden Supply 21 Bachman’s

35 Cowsmo 36 Heidi’s GrowHaus Nursery and Garden Centre

25 Alimama’s Mediterranean Grill

34  Master Gardeners’ 2018 Learning Garden Tour

1 Local Farm, 2 Great Products • Organic Manure-based Compost Add nutrients, organic matter, and microorganisms to soil. • Organic Potting Mixes Three unique compost-based formulations for starting seedlings, transplanting, and filling raised beds/planters.

Where to Buy: Minneapolis/St. Paul Metro • BFG Supply • The Garden By The Woods • Lakewinds Food Co-op • Landscape & Concrete Center • Mississippi Market (both) • Mother Earth Gardens • Otten Brothers Garden Center • Tangletown Gardens • The Wedge Co-op

Elsewhere in Minnesota • Knecht’s Nursery, Northfield • Sargent’s, Redwing • Sargent’s, Rochester • Pozanc Landscaping, Winona To Order Direct: Call John at 608-626-2571 E-mail jrosenow@mwt.net Visit www.cowsmocompost.com

Master Gardeners’ 2018 Learning Garden Tour  35


Visit our GrowHaus Nursery and Garden Centre! Over five acres of plants and landscape materials Innovative products and services to live a greener lifestyle Ongoing educational events and horticultural expertise Join us for Bee Smart Saturday! July 28th, 12:00 - 2:00 PMÂ See our bee hives surrounded by native plants Take a capture and release walk with author Heather Holm Wear a bee suit and hold a bee frame with Erin Rupp of Pollinate MN See our extensive native plant collection â&#x20AC;&#x201C; the largest in the area! a Visit with the Bee Squad from the U of MN Bee and pollinator books by Heather Holm available

7555 County Rd 116, Corcoran, MN 55340 Phone: 763-420-2909

Web: www.GrowHausMN.com

Hennepin County Master Gardener Learning Garden Tour, Saturday, July 14, 2018  

This brochure provides all of the highlights of the 2018 Learning Garden Tour. About the event The annual event features unique home gard...

Hennepin County Master Gardener Learning Garden Tour, Saturday, July 14, 2018  

This brochure provides all of the highlights of the 2018 Learning Garden Tour. About the event The annual event features unique home gard...

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