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THINK Together Annual Report 2009 – 2010

Table of Contents CEO’s Message........................................page 2 Programs........................................................... 6 Evaluation Outcomes....................................... 8 Schools & Community Sites............................ 9 Donors............................................................. 12 Financials......................................................... 14 Board of Directors........................................... 16

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The Importance of Scale “While small may be beautiful, size matters when it comes to having a substantial impact on society’s pervasive problems. By leveraging economies of scale and management talent, large nonprofits can deliver services at lower cost. They can offer their staff compensation and career opportunities. They have greater capacity to conduct experiments, assess innovations and share best practices across multiple locations. In an effective (philanthropic capital) system, innovative nonprofits with the best management and social change agendas would grow in scale and scope while less effective and efficient ones would diminish and eventually disappear.�

Robert S. Kaplan Allen S. Grossman Harvard Business Review October, 2010

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Message from the CEO Dear THINK Together Friends: Over the last few years, THINK Together has grown very rapidly while at the same time delivering strong outcomes for its students. This has unleashed a variety of dynamics many of which are articulated succinctly in the quote on the facing page. With this report, we want to explore some of these dynamics but first, let’s take a quick look at the numbers: • •

• •

Revenue is up about 5% year-over-year to $42,150,532. Over the five-year period revenue is up fifteen-fold from $2.6 million. Students served were up 35% to more than 70,000. However, that is not an apples-to- apples comparison because we are offering different kinds of programs with differing amounts of dosage. On an apples-to-apples basis, the number of students attending our core afterschool program for 30 days or more was 31,138, up 16% year-over-year. Philanthropy was down about 7% putting pressure on the organization’s infrastructure which supports the rapid growth in students served. The academic gains by our students continued to strengthen. A UCI comparison group study showed that statistically significant gains were achieved by THINK Together students in both language arts and math. A second UCI study showed that students that received multiple treatments through the THINK Together Ecosystem, showed double the increase in gains when compared against students that attended only the after-school program. These findings were also statistically significant.

Where We Are Headed After-school and related out-of-school time programs comprise an almost $10 billion market in California alone. The field is characterized by smallish organizations providing for the most part mediocre programs. The challenge for all of us working in this field is to deliver high quality programs with very thin funding. As an example, in our core programs our school district partners receive $7.50 per student per day in funding (THINK receives 95% of that). The $7.50 is about 20% of the funding that the regular school day receives. Our programs operate between 20 and 22 hours per week (schools operate about 30 hours per week). So, we have 20% of the funds of the regular day and we have students about two-thirds of the time. Delivering quality given these economic constraints is very challenging. That is why we have come to view after-school (from an economic perspective) as a high volume/low margin business. In a high volume/low margin environment, scale matters. Our vision is to build a world-class program department supported by best-in-class training and spread these costs over a large number of sites. From a mission perspective, we feel this is the best way to deliver consistently high quality programs for our students and families. We believe our programs are of higher quality today across more than 200 schools than they were when we were at 25 schools. And, we have the data to back that up. In addition, the infrastructure being built to support after-school programs can be leveraged to deliver other programs that surround schools including Summer Learning Programs, Saturday Programs, Early Childhood Education, Parent Programs, and to build connections to Community Health Initiatives that support these same students and their families. We believe with this structure we can build what amounts to a replicable, scalable Community Schools model.

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After a slower growth year in 2009-2010, THINK Together has resumed a faster growth rate in 20102011. We have added 50 new schools in the current year and are strengthening our capacity to add 100 or more new schools per year in the years to come. We also anticipate some consolidation as the field matures and are in various stages of merger discussions with several different organizations. By merging with other organizations, we believe we can become more financially efficient (and therefore stronger) and can take the best practices of the combined entities and share those best practices with more students, thereby serving our mission more effectively. This is being accomplished at a scale few other youth-serving organizations have attempted. Why We Need Private Philanthropy The public funding that finances after-school programs was designed to be augmented by a 33% local match. Some of this comes through in-kind donations of facilities (25% of the 33%) and through the federal snack program. However, to really deliver quality, we need to raise cash match as well. The public funds pretty much finance the direct site expenses. That is just enough to warehouse students. But the quality enhancements that increase student performance are funded through philanthropy. From a philanthropist’s perspective, this is a great investment. A relatively modest investment in program quality can be leveraged across the publicly funded distribution system. Only about 10% of California’s after-school programs raise any cash match. That is one reason why quality is often subpar. By taking over underperforming programs and upgrading them with the support of our strong (but not yet) world-class program department, we upgrade the quality of the services for more students. Investing in one large robust system therefore provides a better return on the philanthropic dollar than dividing up that same amount of money into smaller investments in weaker organizations. One may ask, “What difference will my $100, $1,000, $10,000 or even $100,000 matter to an organization with a budget north of $40 million?” It’s a good question. The answer is a BIG difference! Here’s why: First, we privately fund our legacy community sites which have now sent over 200 kids to college and the first 50 or so have graduated and are doing amazing things. Second, we privately fund several pilot programs that provide the opportunities to incubate innovations we hope can be taken to scale when shown to be effective. Third, we privately fund much of our evaluation work which helps us to continually improve our programs and document their impact. Fourth, we privately fund policy work which we hope will help to break down silos and re-shape public funding streams so those dollars can be used more effectively. Finally, we privately fund the augmentations to our programs (like our STEM Initiative) that enable them to be that much richer for our students.

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Thank You Thank you to all of you, our partners that have helped us to become one of the fastest growing, most effective non-profit organizations in the U.S. We feel that we have only just begun. We believe we can build a statewide platform delivering high quality programs that surround our schools with learning. Many of the resources are already in place. It is often a matter of re-organizing them and leveraging them so that they can be put to greater use. It will take all of us working Together – schools, federal, state and local officials, businesses, foundations, and individuals – to enable us to Teach, Help, Inspire, and Nurture our Kids in such a way that California regains its leadership position in education. Education is the engine that drives the greatest innovation machine on the planet – the California private sector. Thank you for your continued investment in the fuel of that economic engine – the education of the next generation of innovators. Sincerely,

Randy Barth Founder and CEO

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After-School Programs California leads the nation in funding for daily comprehensive after-school programs. State funding (known as ASES) and California’s portion of federal funding (21st Century Community Learning Centers and ASSETS) create an annual public investment of more than $700 million per year. These funding streams provide the basis for financing after-school programs at more than 4,400 schools across the state. THINK Together operated ASES and 21st Century funded programs at 192 schools across 17 districts in 2009-2010. In the 2010-2011 year we are currently operating at 230 schools across 20 districts. In total, THINK Together served 69,001 students in after-school. This breaks down by county as: 43,033 Orange County, 16,548 Los Angeles County, 6,217 Riverside County, 13,410 San Bernardino County. In 2010-2011, we began serving students in San Diego County and expect to begin operating in Sacramento County this school year as well. Saturdays and Summer Over the last two years THINK Together applied for and received $3.1 million in Supplemental 21st Century funding to serve schools in Azusa, Ontario and Santa Ana. This funding enables us to provide Saturday and Summer programs to more than 33,000 students. Saturdays and Summer are important opportunities for Extended Learning Time. Summer programs, in particular, are helpful in preventing summer learning loss and keeping students on track for performing at grade level. Supplemental Education Services Supplemental Education Services is the small group tutoring program funded by federal Title I dollars at schools that have been designated as Program Improvement Schools under No Child Left Behind. THINK Together and Santa Ana Unified are a U.S. Department of Education National Demonstration Site to build alignment between SES, after-school and the regular school day. In 2009-2010, THINK Together served 537 students across six districts through the SES program. Early Literacy THINK Together is very focused on using out-of-school time resources to help close the achievement gap. Research shows that exposing low-income children ages 0-5 to more words and different kinds of questioning makes them more receptive when they begin reading in the early K-12 years. Fewer than half of low-income students have access to quality Early Childhood Education. We are running a pilot program in Santa Ana funded by the Orange County Children and Families Commission to build the capacity of parents to read to their children. We teach these parents researched-based strategies and supply them with books through a book bag exchange program that we augment called Raising a Reader. In our inaugural year, we served more than 500 students and their parents. In the current year, we are also piloting another program with strong evidence called HABLA. School Age Care School Age Care is the term used for child care programs (often licensed) serving students ages 5-12 years old before school, after school, during school breaks and in the summer. These programs provide on-campus childcare for working parents. In more affluent communities, parents pay for these

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Programs programs. In low income communities, the state and federal government subsidize these programs. State and federal subsidies in California combined amounted to $1.2 billion last year. Together with parent fees, this is a more than $7 billion market in California. These programs are often provided by organizations that are primarily preschool providers. The programs often feel like preschool for older children. We think there is an opportunity to upgrade these programs and make them aligned and complementary with their schools. From the business perspective, operating additional parent pay programs would diversify our revenue streams making THINK Together better able to sustain possible cuts in public funding. In 2009-2010, we either operated or managed in conjunction with schools 5 school age care programs. Over time, we expect to grow this segment of our organization significantly. Place-Based Initiatives Children living in poverty face many challenges inside and outside of school that combine to make it very challenging for them to reach their full potential. Therefore, it is important to build integrated systems of support to address the whole child and the family support system to counter-balance the effects of poverty. Schools sit in the center of most neighborhoods, and are a trusted resource for the families in most communities. However, schools have their hands full providing a high quality education between 8 and 2:30. So, strategies utilizing public/private partnerships with services co-located at schools seem to be a promising way to build these integrated support systems. In New York City, the Harlem Children’s Zone (HCZ) has had some high-profile success with this sort of strategy. HCZ served as the inspiration for two place-based initiatives that THINK Together has become involved with. The first is the US Department of Education’s Promise Neighborhoods initiative. THINK Together serves as the lead agency in broad collaboration in Santa Ana pursuing this strategy. We are currently in the planning stage for a strategy that would provide integrated services from cradle-to-career in a neighborhood serving more than 8,000 students. The second is a place-based health initiative led by The California Endowment (TCE) called Building Healthy Communities. TCE has targeted 14 communities across California and THINK Together is an integral part of the Santa Ana Building Healthy Communities initiative. These two initiatives have some overlap in both their geography and their objectives, providing a real opportunity to build this integrated services model. THINK Together was also an integral part of planning a Promise Neighborhood-type initiative in San Bernardino. Some important early work was done in that deeply troubled community before that project was side-tracked by some perceived turf issues between the Mayor’s office and the local school board. There is hope that this work will be resurrected at some future date.

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Evaluation Outcomes 2009-2010

Each year, THINK Together conducts extensive surveys of parents, students and principals and other stakeholders involved with our programs. Some highlights from this year’s surveys include: •

• •

Over 80% of our principals indicated that they were satisfied or strongly satisfied with the quality of the academic program components in our program and found our staff to be professional and caring in their relationships with parents and students. Parents are overwhelmingly satisfied (97%) with the quality of the program in terms of the program helping their child to be in a safe place, do better in school and feel more confident. Notably, over 60% of parents report that the availability of the program has helped them keep a job, accept a job or continue their education.

While we are pleased that our program is meeting the expectations of our stakeholders, we also want evidence that we are accomplishing our mission by making a positive impact on academic outcomes for students. Therefore, we examine test scores annually, both internally and more recently, externally, as described below: Gains made in Afterschool • In general, about one-third of our elementary students and one-fifth of our middle and high school students moved up one performance level on the state standardized test scores in English Language Arts (ELA) and math from where they tested before they entered program; the percentages are about half of that when looking at students who moved from below proficient to the goal of proficient. When looking across years, movement between performance levels on the CSTs is greater for students who have participated for multiple years. • In 2010, comparison group analyses conducted by the University of California, Irvine, found that test score gains in ELA and math were significant for students who attended THINK Together for two years within one of our largest, most urban school districts. The gains were more than double those made by non-participants in ELA and Math. These gains were especially notable in math; whereas non-participants actually saw mean test scores decrease over two years by almost 12 points; THINK Together participants’ scores rose by almost 15 points. Impact of Supplemental Educational Services (SES) Perhaps the most notable finding in the UCI comparison analysis was that the most significant gains were made among students who participated in layered programming that included small group tutoring (1:5) and one other program element: THINK SES and afterschool or THINK SES and supplemental programming, which included summer and weekends during the school year. These gains were double those made by students who participated in the after-school program alone.

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Partners

Schools and Community Sites THINK Together serves more than 70,000 at-risk students at 225+ sites in communities throughout Los Angeles, Orange, Riverside and San Bernardino Counties. Bassett Unified School District

La Primaria Elementary

Edgewood Academy (Elem)

Miramonte Elementary

Azusa High

Julian (Don) Elementary

Monte Vista Elementary

Center Middle School

Sunkist Elementary

Parkview Elementary

Dalton (Henry) Elementary

Torch Middle School

Payne Elementary

Ellington (Alice M.) Elementary

Vanwig (J. E.) Elementary

Twin Lakes Elementary

LOS ANGELES COUNTY Azusa Unified School District

Foothill Middle School

Maxson Elementary

Voorhis Elementary

Gladstone St. Elementary

Duarte Unified School District

Hodge (Victor F.) Elementary

Andres Duarte Elementary

South Whittier School District

Lee (Charles H.) Elementary

Beardslee Elementary

Carmela Elementary

Longfellow Elementary

Maxwell Elementary

Magnolia Elementary

Northview Intermediate

Graves (Richard L.) Middle School

Mountain View Elementary

Royal Oaks Elementary

Lake Marie Elementary

Murray (Clifford D.) Elementary

Valley View Elementary

Loma Vista Elementary

Gladstone High

Los Altos Elementary

Paramount Elementary Little Lake City School District

McKibben (Howard J.) Elementary

Valleydale Elementary

Cresson Elementary

Monte Vista Elementary

Jersey Avenue Elementary

Telechron Elementary

Baldwin Park Unified School District

Lake Center Middle School Lakeland Elementary

ORANGE COUNTY

Bursch Elementary

Lakeside Middle School

Central Elementary

Orr (William W.) Elementary

Santa Ana Unified School District

De Anza Elementary

Paddison Elementary

Adams Elementary

Elwin Elementary

Studebaker Elementary

Carr Intermediate

Geddes Elementary

Los Nietos School District

Carver (George Washington) Elementary

Heath Elementary

Aeolian Elementary

Kenmore Elementary

Los Nietos Middle School

Pleasant View Elementary

Nelson Elementary

Diamond Elementary

Santa Fe Elementary

Rancho Santa Gertrudes Elementary

Esqueda (Manuel) Elementary

Powell (W. R.) Elementary Slauson Intermediate

Foster Elementary

Tracy Elementary Vineland Elementary Walnut Elementary

Century High Davis (Wallace E.) Elementary Edison Elementary Franklin Elementary

Mountain View School District

Fremont (John C.) Elementary

Baker Elementary

Harvey (Carl) Elementary

Cogswell Elementary

Heninger Elementary

Garfield Elementary

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Heroes Elementary

Community Sites

Elsinore Middle School

Hoover Elementary

Highland Learning Center

Lakeland Village Middle School

Jackson (Andrew) Elementary

Highland Teen Center

Machado Elementary

Jefferson (Thomas) Elementary

Noah Teen Center

Railroad Canyon Elementary

Kennedy (John F.) Elementary

Shalimar Learning Center

Terra Cotta Middle School

King (Martin Luther, Jr.) Elementary

Shalimar Teen Center

Wildomar Elementary

Lathrop Intermediate

THINK Together CARE Consulting Partnerships with:

Lincoln (Abraham) Elementary

Withrow Elementary

Lowell (James Russell) Elementary

THINK at St. Angela Merci

Romoland Unified School District

THINK at St. John’s

Boulder Ridge Middle School

MacArthur (Douglas) Fundamental Institute

THINK at St. Norbert’s

Harvest Valley Elementary

THINK at Veeh

Romoland Elementary

RIVERSIDE COUNTY

THINK Together CARE Consulting Partnerships with:

Madison Elementary Martin (Glenn L.) Elementary McFadden Intermediate Mendez (Gonzalo Felicitas) Fundamental Intermediate Monroe (James) Elementary Monte Vista Elementary Muir (John) Fundamental Elementary Pio Pico Elementary Remington (Frederick) Elementary Romero-Cruz (Lydia) Elementary Roosevelt (Theodore) Elementary

Jurupa Unified School District

THINK at Mesa View

Glen Avon Elementary Granite Hill Elementary

SAN BERNARDINO COUNTY

Ina Arbuckle Elementary Jurupa Middle School

Cucamonga School District

Mira Loma Middle School

Cucamonga Elementary

Mission Bell Elementary

Los Amigos Elementary

Mission Middle School

Rancho Cucamonga Middle

Pacific Avenue Elementary

The Ontario Center

Pedley Elementary Peralta Elementary

Ontario-Montclair School District

Santiago Elementary

Rustic Lane Elementary

Sepulveda Elementary

Stone Avenue Elementary

Sierra Intermediate

Sunnyslope Elementary

Spurgeon Intermediate

Troth Street Elementary

Taft Elementary

Van Buren Elementary

Thorpe (Jim) Fundamental Elementary

West Riverside Elementary

Central Elementary

Valley High

Lake Elsinore Unified School District

De Anza Middle School

Brown (David A.) Middle School

Edison Elementary

Walker (Adeline C.) Elementary

Butterfield Elementary

Elderberry Elementary

Washington Elementary

Collier (William) Elementary

Euclid Elementary

Willard Intermediate

Elsinore Elementary

Hawthorne Elementary

Villa (Raymond A.) Fundamental Intermediate

Wilson Elementary

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Arroyo Elementary Berlyn Elementary Bon View Elementary Buena Vista Elementary Corona Elementary Del Norte Elementary

Haynes (Richard) Elementary


Lincoln Elementary Mariposa Elementary Oaks Middle School Sultana Elementary Vina Danks Middle School Vineyard Elementary Vista Grande Elementary Wiltsey (Ray) Middle School Redlands Unified School District Clement Middle School Cope Middle School Franklin Elementary Kingsbury Elementary Lugonia Elementary Moore Middle School Victoria Elementary San Bernardino City Unified School District Chavez (Cesar E.) Middle School Curtis Middle School Del Vallejo Middle School Golden Valley Middle School Richardson Prep Middle School Serrano Middle School Shandin Hill Middle School Warm Springs Elementary

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KEY STRATEGIC PARTNERS COMERICA BANK | THE IRVINE COMPANY | ST. JOSEPH HEALTH SYSTEM FoundationS BNSF Foundation California Community Foundation CarMax Foundation Community Foundation of Western Nevada The Croul Family Foundation Draper Family Foundation Dwight Stuart Youth Foundation Edward and Helen Shanbrom Family Fund Fainbarg Family Foundation The Green Foundation Henry L. Guenther Foundation Hughes Schmidhauser Family Fund Kroger Co. Foundation LA84 Foundation Majestic Realty Foundation The Marion Knott Foundation Orange County Community Foundation Pacific Life Foundation PLUS Foundation The Rose Hills Foundation Singgod Foundation Ueberroth Family Foundation Union Pacific Foundation The Wal-Mart Foundation Willdan Group of Companies Foundation ORGANIZATIONS Anaheim Ducks & Honda Center Anonymous Apollo Electric Bank of America Brown Colonial Mortuary Charles Abbott Associates, Inc. Church of the Messiah Food Industries Sales Managers Club of Los Angeles Inc. Ganahl Lumber Company Garrett Concrete Coring & Sawing, Inc. Global Impact Henkel of America Hindu Matiya Patidar Samaj Inc. IBM Employee Service Center Innovate Partners, Inc. Irvine Company Jamba Juice K2 Demolition Co., Inc.

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Latham & Watkins, LLP Law & Mediation Office of Troy Roe, Esq. Livingston Family Foundation MOMS Club of Southeast Irvine MOMS Club Tustin North National Charity League, Inc., Newport Chapter National Charity League, Orange Villa Park Chapter The Nikols Company The O’Donnell Group, Inc. Orange County United Way Partners Pantry Posterscope USA Ralphs RR Medical Services, Inc. Second Church of Christ Scientist, Newport Beach St. Andrews Presbyterian Church Stater Bros. Charities Stradling Yocca Carlson & Rauth Surface Mount Technology Association TenneyHarrison PR The Prudential Foundation Matching Gifts Trinity United Presbyterian Church United Way California Capital Region United Way of Greater Los Angeles United Way Silicon Valley United Way of the Inland Valleys University of California, Irvine University of Phoenix Women of Vision INDIVIDUALS Abbott, Mark Abbott, Susan Adams, Zoe Albonetti, Joseph Alfieri, Joseph Allen, Jon & Kathryn Alvarez, Elizabeth Anderson, Darrel Anderson, Sam and Susan Aronoff-Sadacca, Leona Artis, Kimberly Barkawi, Janet Barth, David and Marseilla Barth, Katie Barth, Randy and Mary

Bergman, James and Judy Berry-Cowen, Katie Blank, Kathleen Blase, Bobbi Blodgett, Kurt and Michelle Bock, Larry and Diane Bogh, Mark Bombardier, Sara Braun-Lewis, Kathy Bren, Donald and Brigitte Broedlow, Theodore and Elizabeth Brown, Bart and Laurie Brown, Greg and Stacey Brown, Roy and Joyce Bryan, Vaughn and Ann Bucci, Donna Bucci, Erin Nicole Budner, Lawrence Bui, David and Cheryl Calderon, Lupita Campbell, John Cano, Michelle Cantú, Celeste Cardoso, Norberto and Erica Carlson, Karen Kay Casey, Chris and Lynn Cazares, Fernando and Alicia Christeson, Don and Bonnie Clark, Matthew and Kathleen Claster, William Coffee, Bill and Mary Lynn Contreras, Leticia Crawford, Kim Daley, Rod and Nancy Daniher, Jr., Charles and Margaret Dauderman, Jerry and Bobbi Davis, Donna Dialynas, Chris Diaz, Melissa Diaz, Miguel and Maria Dobrenen, Diana Donahue, Joan Donaldson, David and Leigh Dorsey, Megan Dyche, Jerry and Katherine Fairborn, John and Sharon Felix, Joshua Feller, Frank and Shirley Ferris, Josephine Florian, Luis and Monica Fox, George and Natalie French, Tony


Partners

Donors FY 2009 – 2010 Fuller, Jr., Winston and Carlita Gaeta, Jesus Garcia, Trisha Gartman, Laurel Peniche Gerken, Andrew and Catharina Gleason, Fredrick and Betty Goodrich, Lori Granitto, Shelly Greene, Heather Guggenheim, Daniel and Sue Hall, Richard and Elinor Jane Harrison, Gloria Harrison, Nancy Hayes II, Kevin Held, Rick Hermesch, Anita Hill, Robert Holmes, Bill Howard, Glenn and Joyce Hughes, Michael and Donna Davis Inman, Fran Jackson, Gary Jackson, Gordon and Wilma Jaquess, Jerry Jenkins, Walter and Laurie Johnson, Archie and Erin Joshua Gonzalez and Maria Aguilar Kargenian, Robert and Michelle Kato, Stacey and Leslie Katz, Ina Kelly, Sara Kim, David Kingston, Adriana Kingston, Chris Kiralla, John and Josephine Kiralla, Nick Kiralla-Orr, Gail Kirschenbaum, Larry and Myra Kiss, Robert and Marisa Kozberg, Roger and Joanne Krejci, Rise Lee Kuehl, Karl and Norma Laborde, Beatriz Lambert, Mark and Carol Lauer, Lois Lee-Johnson, Monalisa Lewis, Mike and Kathy Leyden, Timothy and Margaret Linnert, Charles Linnert, Ralph and Alice Loats, Norm and Sara Loper, Meghan Louchheim, Mark and Cathy

Lunde, Robert and Peggy Macias, Vanessa Nichole Magana, Lupe Magdaleno, Lawrence Manchester, Colleen Margolis, Jeff and Debbie Marshall, Al May, Bruce Mc Whertor, Jill McClellan, Robert McDermott, Rod Metzler, Michael Miedema, Henry and Janet Mirando, Linda Miya, Kirk and Kathy Mooradian, Aregnaz Moore, Dwight and Barbara Moore, Steve and Melinda Munoz, Jayne Murillo, Julie Amanda Murphy, Pat and Michele Nelson, Eric Nguyen, Kathy Nichols, Michael Nussbaum, Marc and Besser, Sherri O’Donnell, John and Patricia Olsky, Martin & Cathie Ornelas, Enedelia Ouellette, Joseph Pangan, Conrad Paulsen, Scott and Elizabeth Paulson, Theodore and Suzanne Pedroza, Martin and Cordova, Evelyn Peters, James and Beverly Petersen, Lynn Pettis, Alan Pham, Quang Pichardo, Aydde Pollock, Becky Ramirez, Sheri Rayner, Ralph and Eva Recinos, Maritza Rehnborg, Joan Rivera, Maria Roberts, William and Barbara Robertson, Pauline Robinson, Tanisha Robles, Gabriel and Arcelia Rodriguez, Cassandra Ross, Alan and Linda Rudin, Murray Rutherford, Frank

Rutledge, Richard and DaruwalaRutledge, Tehnaz Salata, Paul Salgado, Ken Sandoval, Astrid Schoettinger, Paul Schutz, Andrew and Elisabeth Selna, Mike and Marja Sewell, Sandra Shepard, Betty Shimamoto, Alan and Ellen Shimoff, Paul Silberman, Donn Simon, John and Mary Ellen Siperstein, Jerold and Phyllis Skorpanich, Mary Anne Slaughter, Liza Solano, Paul Somers, Maclyn and Gerry Stafford, Ruth Stanbridge, Ericand Polly Succa, Cynthia Tamaribuchi, Sat Tarbell, Donald and Betsy Taube, Robert and Penny Taylor, Regina Temkin, Gary and Janet Tenney, Larry Thomsen, Bart and Deborah Tipre, Karl and Katherine Tirre, Lorenzo Trujillo, Siria Uribe, Maria Vaca, Veronica Valenzuela, Enrique and Valdez, Guadalupe Valenzuela, Valerie Van Dyke, Adam Varner, Bruce and Nancy Varner, Sean Villaescusa, Frank and Ly Von Freymann, Ronald and Janet Wang, Yuh Shin (Jackie) Wenke, William and Jean Williams, Tamika Wittenberg, Donald Wride, Douglas and Gretchen Wylde, Trent and Christy

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Revenues & Expenses Revenue 2009-2010 7%

Revenue 2009-2010

2%

Program Services - State

Revenue 2009-2010

2%

Program Services - State Program Services - Federal

7% 7%

Expe

2%

Exp

2%

Pr Expe

2%

Fu

2%

Program Services - State Program Services - Federal Program Services - In-Kind

Pr Ge

21%

Program Services - Federal Program Services - In-Kind Supplemental Education Services (K-12) Program ServicesEducation - In-Kind Services (K-12) Supplemental Philanthropy

Fu

21% 52%

21%

Supplemental PhilanthropyEducation Services (K-12) Other Philanthropy Other

Ge

52%

16%

52%

16% 16%

Other

Program Services - State.............................. 22,261,931

Progra

Program Services - Federal.............................. 6,619,825 Program Services - State.............................. 22,261,931 Program Services - In-Kind .............................. 9,073,427 Program Services - Federal.............................. 6,619,825 Program Services - State.............................. 22,261,931 Supplemental Education Services (K-12) ............ 779,582 Expenses 2009-2010 Program Services - In-Kind .............................. 9,073,427 Program Services Federal.............................. 6,619,825 Philanthropy.................................................... 3,045,464 Supplemental Education Services (K-12) ............ 779,582 Program Services - In-Kind .............................. 9,073,427 Other .................................................................. 635,680 Philanthropy.................................................... 3,045,464 Supplemental Education Services (K-12) ............ 779,582 Program Services Other .................................................................. 635,680 Philanthropy.................................................... 3,045,464 Expenses Fundraising 2009-2010 Other .................................................................. 635,680

Fundra Prog Genera Fun Progra Gen Fundra

2%

Expenses 2009-2010

General & Administrative Program Services

52%

Program Services Fundraising

2%

6%

Genera

2% 6%

6%

92%

Fundraising General & Administrative General & Administrative 52%

Revenues & Expens 92%

Revenues & Expen 45 million Year............................................Revenue .................. Expenses 52% 92% 1998-1999.................................. 552,410 .................... 430,125 millionRevenues & Expens Year............................................Revenue .................. Expenses 40 45 million 1999-2000.................................. 812,809 .................... 740,556 1998-1999.................................. 552,410 .................... 430,125 45 40 million Year............................................Revenue .................. Expenses 2000-2001.................................. 983,850 Services .................... 928,198 Program ......................................... 38,982,982 35 million 1999-2000.................................. 812,809 .................... 740,556 1998-1999.................................. 552,410 ................. ....................1,322,079 430,125 2001-2002 ............................... 1,446,638 Fundraising 676,683 30 2000-2001.................................. 983,850 ...................................................... .................... 928,198 million 40 35 million 1999-2000.................................. 812,809 ................. ....................1,818,653 740,556 2002-2003 .............................. 1,763,308 General & Administrative............................... 2,490,867 2001-2002 ............................... 1,446,638 ................. 1,322,079 million 2000-2001.................................. 983,850 ....................1,900,156 928,198 2003-2004 .............................. 1,804,091................. 35 30 25 million 2002-2003 .............................. 1,763,308 ................. 1,818,653 2001-2002 ............................... 1,446,638 2004-2005 .............................. 2,590,996 ................. 2,651,140 Program Services1,322,079 ......................................... 38,982,982 2003-2004 .............................. 1,804,091................. 1,900,156 30 25 million 20 million 2002-2003 .............................. 1,763,308 1,818,653 2005-2006 3,160,919 ................. 3,266,151 Fundraising ...................................................... 676,683 2004-2005 .............................. 2,590,996 ................. 2,651,140 Program Services ......................................... 38,982,982 14 million 2003-2004 .............................. 1,804,091................. 1,900,156 2006-2007 (a)........................ 19,231,847............... 18,989,339 15 20 million 25 General & Administrative............................... 2,490,867 2005-2006 .............................. 3,160,919...................................................... ................. 3,266,151 Fundraising 676,683 2004-2005 .............................. 2,590,996 ................. 2,651,140 2007-2008 (a)........................ 32,416,478 ................ 32,347 ,924


General & Administrative

Financials

92% Statement of Activities

52%

THINK Together Statement of Activities For Fiscal Year Ended June 30, 2010 2009-2010

Revenues

2009-2010

Expenses

ASES/21stCCLC (K-12)**.................................. 37,407,183

Program Services

Supplemental Education Services (K-12)............. 779,582 ASES/21stCCLC** (K-12).................................. 36,390,930 Program Services ......................................... 38,982,982 Early Childhood (0-5)............................................. 548,000 Supplemental Education Services (K-12)............. 641,807 Fundraising ...................................................... 676,683 School Aged Care (K-5)......................................... 560,269 Early Childhood (0-5)............................................. 505,807 General & Administrative............................... 2,490,867 Philanthropy........................................................ 3,045,464 School Aged Care (K-5)......................................... 556,633 Other......................................................................... 75,411

Community Sites (K-12)........................................ 887,805

Total Revenues......................................................... 42,415,909

Total Program Services........................................... 38,982,982

Fundraising................................................................... 676,683 General & Administrative......................................... 2,490,867 Total Expenses.................................................. 42,150,532 Net Income................................................................. 265,377 Ending Net Assets.................................................. 913,310

Revenues & Expenses 1998-2010 45 million 40 million 35 million 30 million 25 million 20 million 15 million 10 million 5 million

Revenue

01 20 01 -2 00 2 20 02 -2 00 3 20 03 -2 00 4 20 04 -2 00 5 20 05 -2 00 20 6 06 -2 00 7 ** 20 07 -2 00 8 ** 20 08 -2 00 9 ** 20 09 -2 01 0 **

20 0

0-

20

0 00 -2

19 99

19 9

9

0 19 98 -

92%

Revenue Expense

Expense ** Includes recognition of In-Kind program services, such as volunteer time, and facility and snack costs contributed by school district partners.

15


Partners

2009-2010 Board of Directors & Leadership Council BOARD OF DIRECTORS Randy Barth Founder & CEO, THINK Together Joseph Albonetti Founder, Latinolandia USA Darrel Anderson President, (Ret.), Knott Anderson Enterprises

Jayne Munoz English Teacher, Santa Ana Community College

Carole Beswick President & CEO, Inland Action Inc.

Eric Nelson Vice President, Red Mountain Retail Group

Mark Bogh President, Bogh Construction Inc.

Alan W. Pettis Partner, Innovate Partners

Celeste Cantú General Manager, Santa Ana Watershed Project Authority

Quang X. Pham Founder & CEO, Lathian Health

Samuel Anderson Retired Pharmaceutical Executive

Ken Salgado Partner, Moss Adams LLP

Leona Aronoff-Sadacca Founder, LBJ Management, LLC

Lois Lauer Owner, Lois Lauer Realty Ellen Weisser (Ret.), Network Pharmaceuticals

Sat Tamaribuchi Environmental Policy Consultant

Mark Bogh President, Bogh Construction

ORANGE COUNTY LEADERSHIP COUNCIL LOS ANGELES LEADERSHIP COUNCIL

Kathy Braun-Lewis Retired Executive, Western Digital

Brigitte Bren Attorney/Education Advocate

Brigitte Bren Attorney/Education Advocate

Jorge Delgado President, ValueSat LLC

Sam Anderson (Ret.) Pharmaceutical Executive Bobbi Dauderman Community Volunteer Ranney Draper Chairman, Spring Creek Investors

Celeste Cantú General Manager, Santa Ana Watershed Project Authority

Senator Martha Escutia Attorney (Ret.)

Mary Lynn Coffee Attorney at Law, Nossaman, LLP

Lynda Boone Fetter Principal, Samuelson & Fetter LLC

Tony French Philanthropist

Fran Inman Senior Vice President, Majestic Realty Co.

Kevin Hayes, II Sr. Vice President - Southern California, Lincoln Property Company

Gilbert Ivey Chief Administrative Officer, Metropolitan Water District of Southern California

Judge Frances Muñoz (Ret.), Harbor Municipal Court

Glenn Howard Attorney & CPA

Lupe Valdez Director of Public Affairs, Union Pacific Railroad

John O’Donnell The O’Donnell Group, Inc.

Fran Inman Senior Vice President, Majestic Realty Co.

Alan Arkatov President, Changing.edu

Bill Podlich Co-Founder (Ret.), PIMCO Advisors

Rod McDermott Managing Director, McDermott & Bull Executive Search

INLAND EMPIRE LEADERSHIP COUNCIL

Michael Metzler President & CEO, Greater Santa Ana Business Alliance

Michael Kerr CEO, Bluestone Communities Marion Knott Philanthropist Don Moe Consultant

Leona Aronoff-Sadacca Chair, IE Leadership Council Founder, LBJ Management, LLC Pete Aguilar Consultant

THINKtogether.org facebook.com/THINKtogether twitter.com/THINK_together 2100 E. Fourth Street, Suite 200, Santa Ana CA 92705 888.485.THINK


2009-10 Annual Report, THINK Together Inc.