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making news THINK Together 2008 – 2009 Annual Report


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Table of Contents Mission and Vision......................................Page 3 CEO’s Message..................................................... 5 School Support Ecosystem.................................. 6 Alignment.............................................................. 8 Early Learning..................................................... 10 Summer Learning............................................... 12 STEM Learning................................................... 14 Fitness.................................................................. 16 Extended Learning.............................................. 18 Results................................................................. 20 Community Engagement................................... 22 Schools & Community Sites.............................. 24 Donors................................................................. 26 Leadership Councils........................................... 32 Board of Directors............................................... 33 Milestones Timeline........................................... 34 Financials............................................................. 36 Call to Action....................................................... 38

photo by Omar de la Riva

THINK Together Annual Report 2008-2009

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THINK Together Annual Report 2008-2009

photo by Omar de la Riva


Mission To provide high quality academically-oriented out-ofschool programs for K-12 students regardless of race, creed, or socioeconomic status. Vision All children will receive the support they need from family, school and community to enable them to reach their full potential and become productive adults and responsible, contributing members of the community.

THINK Together Annual Report 2008-2009

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After-School Programs Bright Idea, the Orange County Register

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After-school program in Lake Elsinore a big draw, the Riverside Pr

“In the 21st century, the best anti-poverty program around is a world-class education. And in this country, the success of our children cannot depend more on where they live than on their potential.� Barack Obama

President of the United States

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THINK Together Annual Report 2008-2009


ress Enterprise

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Santa Ana enrichment program replaces traditional classes lost to budget cuts, the Orange County Register

CEO’s Message This will plague California’s workforce competitiveness. With baby boomers beginning to retire, the Public Policy Institute of California estimates that by 2020 California’s workforce will be short one After-School Programs Bright Idea million college graduates. California is already a high-cost place Originally published as an op-ed in The to live and do business. Where we have remained competitive it Orange County Register has been through an educated workforce. With more than half the state on the wrong side of the “achievement gap,” our economy Today we celebrate “Lights On Aftercould be facing further peril. After-school is not the silver bullet for school,” a nationwide rally to draw all that ails California schools. It can, however, be a cost-effective attention to the need for, and protool that supports higher student achievement. Students attendliferation of, after-school programs. ing after-school programs until 6 p.m. increase the hours spent in After-school programs emerged over school by two-thirds. Because these programs are staffed with the past two decades in response to paraprofessionals and leverage existing school facilities, they cost changes in our society – particularly about 20 cents on the dollar when comthe move of Further, California’s afterpared against the regular school day. women into the

Randy Barth, Founder & CEO of Santa Ana-based THINK Together, workplace. a nonprofit education company.

Approximately 70 percent of households with kids in school have two parents working or are headed by single parents. This phenomenon, coupled with the shrinking school day (school often is out at 2:30 p.m. or even earlier with minimum days) created a situation where the number of “latchkey kids” exploded, and crime increased from 3-6 p.m.

school infrastructure can be leveraged to deliver other learning programs that boost student achievement including early literacy for preschoolers, summer learning, Saturday school and small group tutoring. Many of these programs exist but are not yet coordinated or aligned with school-day learning.

In middle-class communities, parents pay for after-school programs, and in low income communities a mix of tax dollars and private philanthropy often fund programs. Such programs have found bipartisan support from powerful and wealthy benefactors, including Arnold Schwarzenegger, Sen. Barbara Boxer and Irvine Co. boss Donald Bren. After-school programs will be more than just a safe place for children to be during these dangerous hours. Increasingly, afterschool programs are integrated with regular school-day learning.

Further, California’s after-school infrastructure can be leveraged to deliver other learning programs that boost student achievement including early literacy for preschoolers, summer learning, Saturday school and small group tutoring. Many of these programs exist but are not yet coordinated or aligned with schoolday learning.

THINK Together has collaborated with Santa Ana Unified to build this next-generation model – an “Ecosystem” of support. It is early but the results are promising. Student achievement is up, and crime during the after-school hours is down. Importantly, this integrated model makes our tax dollars (and philanthropic investments) go farther and produces improved results. As a society, we can pay on the back end, through incarceration, more cops on the street, special education and through a lessproductive workforce. Or we can front-load our investments for pennies on the dollar; making the time children are not in school more productive. In this light, after-school – or, more correctly, out-of-school programs – seem like a bright idea.

Budget cuts and the shrinking school day have eliminated or reduced science and art programs – curriculums that foster imagination and creativity. Physical fitness and sports programs have been cut at a time when childhood obesity is epidemic. The after-school platform can fill these gaps. For low-income students, after-school programs are even more vital. There is a persistent “achievement gap” in which the average 18-year-old African American or Latino student performs at the level of an average 13-year-old white or Asian student. If you think that’s “their” problem consider this: Latino and African American students comprise 55 percent of all K-12 students in California.

Randy Barth Founder & CEO

THINK Together Annual Report 2008-2009

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After-school program in Lake Elsinore a big draw, the Riverside Press Enterprise

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Santa Ana enrichment program replaces traditio

Schoo “We need a wide variety of after-school programming, academic enrichment being at the heart but drama and sports and art and music and chess and debate and activities not just for children but for parents — GED, ESL and family literacy nights and potluck dinners. And the more our schools become centers of the community, the more our families are learning together, the better our children are going to do.” Arne Duncan

U.S. Secretary of Education After-School Programs THINK Together’s daily comprehensive programs consist of academic enrichment, homework help, nutrition and structured physical fitness, and includes other enrichment opportunities in science and the arts. Staffed at a 20:1 ratio, this program is provided for approximately 720 hours per school year.

Tutoring (SES) THINK Together also offers small group tutoring (5:1 student staff ratio) that provides deeper, more focused academic support in a given subject matter for 40 to 50 hours per school year.

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THINK Together Annual Report 2008-2009


onal classes lost to budget cuts, the Orange County Register

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After-school program gets $250,000 grant to boost science, math

ol Support Ecosystem

Summer Programs THINK Together engages project based learning in language arts, science and math supplemented with music, dance and physical fitness. Each summer season offers an additional learning theme with accompanying interactive learning opportunities.

Saturday Programs THINK Together combines academic support programs and test preparation with engaging enrichment opportunities including sports, arts and music that can attract students and parents to school campuses on weekends. We also provide literacy, English classes and other educational opportunities for parents.

Early Literacy THINK Together is assisting parents and other caretakers of young children (0-5 years) develop regular reading routines and utilize other methods to increase their child’s vocabulary so that he/she enters kindergarten with strong skills.

THINK Together Annual Report 2008-2009

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After-School Programs Bright Idea, the Orange County Register

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After-school program in Lake Elsinore a big draw, the Rive

After-school program in Lake Elsinore a big draw “What I’m seeing is it’s helping kids academically,” said Slane. “They’re really focusing on academic enrichment. They’re willing to work with school staff on aligning their curriculum to the school’s.”.

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THINK Together Annual Report 2008-2009


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Santa Ana enrichment program replaces traditional classes lost to budget cuts, the Orange County

Alignment After-school program in Lake Elsinore a big draw Originally published in The Riverside Press Enterprise

By Michelle L. Klampe At Terra Cotta Middle School in Lake Elsinore, children are so eager to stay after school and do their homework, there’s a waiting list. It’s a waiting list for an after-school program at the southwestern Riverside County school. “You get to hang out with friends. You can also do your homework and talk with the teachers,” said Abraham Zarate, a 14-year-old eighth-grader, about THINK Together. The program is free and can serve about 100 youths daily, said site coordinator Minerva Huerta. Students have to attend the four-hour program at least three days a week to keep their spots.

Marybeth Slane, director of elementary curriculum and instruction in Lake Elsinore, said the program has been a good fit. “What I’m seeing is it’s helping kids academically,” said Slane. “They’re really focusing on academic enrichment. They’re willing to work with school staff on aligning their curriculum to the school’s.” Huerta, the site coordinator at Terra Cotta, said, “I’ve had kids who come to school just for THINK Together. I’ve had kids who were not going to school, getting Ds or Fs, and seen a 360-degree turnaround. The majority of the kids are here because they want to be here.”

The Lake Elsinore Unified School District has grants for after-school programs at 11 of its elementary and middle schools, including Terra Cotta. The district has contracted with several organizations to operate the programs in the past, but this year Lake Elsinore is using THINK Together exclusively.

THINK Together is paid for through a grant from the California Department of Education’s After School Education and Safety program. It offers a place to get help with homework and take academic enrichment activities such as cooking classes, robotics, or the “news crew” that does the program newsletter. The Lake Elsinore Unified School District has grants for afterschool programs at 11 of its elementary and middle schools, including Terra Cotta. The district has contracted with several organizations to operate the programs in the past, but this year Lake Elsinore is using THINK Together exclusively. Run by an Orange County nonprofit group, also named THINK Together, the agency serves more than 35,000 students at more than 200 schools and community centers in Los Angeles, Orange, San Bernardino and Riverside counties.

When school gets out at 2 p.m. each afternoon, the program starts with music and games such as musical chairs and students compete for small prizes such as candy.

They spend at least an hour on homework each day, with help available from classmates or program leaders. There’s also time for enrichment classes, physical activity such as volleyball or track, and even some time to talk in small groups about things going on at home or at school. Bertha Elizalde, 12, is a sixth-grader and began attending THINK Together this year. Her favorite activities include the physical activity program, called CATCH, and the cooking class, where she made fruit kabobs and milkshakes. “It’s really fun,” she said. Zarate, the eighth-grader, is now a junior site coordinator, leading his classmates by example and helping Huerta and the staff. He said he changed a lot after he started attending the program. “My grades are up all the time,” he said. “Now my parents are proud of me.”

THINK Together Annual Report 2008-2009

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Santa Ana enrichment program replaces traditional classes lost to budget cuts, the Orange County Register

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THINK Together Annual Report 2008-2009

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After-school prog

photo by Omar de la Riva


gram gets $250,000 grant to boost science, math education at middle schools , the Whittier Daily NewsDaily News

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Local kids pinch 8.4

Early Learning

photo by Omar de la Riva

There are close to 5,000 children entering kindergarten each school year in the City of Santa Ana. One of out three children enter lacking the basic pre-reading skills which are proven to be a key factor in determining high school graduation and lifelong success. In order to support the hundreds of families in Santa Ana with children ages 0-5, the Children and Families Commission of Orange County deemed Early Literacy programs necessary to bridge the gap for students who did not have access to a preschool program or other support services for pre-k school readiness. Early Literacy programs have proven an effective approach to improving reading and retention scores and language development for young children. By creating a partnership with THINK Together to deliver Early Literacy programs, THINK’s resources can be leveraged for a synergistic strategy with the school district and the community. Five elementary school sites - Pio Pico, Heninger, Walker, Madison, and Franklin will each have a full time community outreach coordinator who will implement two key Early Literacy Programs with families. This model allows a deeper reach to families and

communities with the greatest need. The two programs being implemented are Raising a Reader and The Latino Family Literacy Project. Raising a Reader is designed to foster healthy child development and early literacy skills critical for school success by engaging parents in a routine of daily reading with their young children. Parents learn strategies anchored to language development research and storytelling traditions to help inspire low-literacy families to share books with their children, even when there are significant language barriers or they cannot read at all. The bilingual books and materials are tailored to diverse cultural traditions and are customized to a variety of multicultural and multilingual communities. The Latino Family Literacy Project provides support for parents and their children in building a regular family reading routine and developing strong language skills. This program is also adaptable to other languages. The bilingual program is a proven success model that has developed the base language for children to enable them to learn to read in English when they start school.

By age three, children of professional parents had developed vocabularies of about 1,000 words and children of parents on welfare had vocabularies of about 525 words. And the children’s IQs correlated closely to their vocabularies. Paul Tough Author, Whatever It Takes: Geoffrey Canada’s Quest to Change Harlem & America THINK Together Annual Report 2008-2009

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Santa Ana enrichment program replaces traditional classes lost to budget cuts, the Orange County Register

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After-school progra

$2.3 million grant keeps 11,200 students in summer school “If it wasn’t for THINK Together and Summer Enrichment, we wouldn’t be able to provide these services,” said Dr. Cathie Olsky, the district’s deputy superintendent. “In these economic times, we are still able to serve more than 11,000 students a day.” 12

THINK Together Annual Report 2008-2009


am gets $250,000 grant to boost science, math education at middle schools , the Whittier Daily News

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Whittier students’ fitness

Summer Learning already work in the district during the regular school year. Students take classes from June 25 to July 31 in English, physical fitness, art and other subjects, including dance. They are also provided free lunches and snacks while in school. Teachers don’t give homework or report cards, but instead provide evaluations that will follow students into the regular school year. Class sizes are also limited to 20 students. For students, the summer classes help them stay on top of their academics. For the 54,000-student Santa Ana Unified, Summer Enrichment helps the county’s largest district provide a comprehensive summer school curriculum during a time when other districts are slashing similar services because of the state’s financial crisis.

Santa Ana enrichment program replaces traditional classes lost to budget cuts

Originally published in The Orange County Register By Fermin Leal SANTA ANA – Eleven-year-old Jessica Ugalde is spending her summer learning about the different continents, studying language and grammar and going on field trips to places like the Aquarium of the Pacific in Long Beach.

The summer program is primarily funded through the federal 21st Century Supplemental Grant awarded to THINK Together for use in Santa Ana. The grant provides about $2.3 million yearly for five years. But, two years ago, THINK Together also received an $8.5 million grant from Irvine Co. Chairman Donald Bren to run tutoring, after-school programs and other services in urban schools across Southern California.

The The Summer Enrichment program also allows the district to enroll more students in summer classes because of the wide range of coursework than traditional summer school programs that often focus primarily on remediation, Olsky said.

Jessica, a summer-school student at Muir Fundamental Elementary, says she loves keeping busy during her vacation. “I’m learning a lot to help me keep my good grades,” said Jessica, a soon-to-be fifth-grader. “If I wasn’t coming for classes here, I’d probably just be at my grandmother’s watching TV all day.”

Jessica is among 11,200 students in Santa Ana Unified enrolled in the district’s Summer Enrichment, a program replacing summer classes eliminated because of state budget cuts. It’s open to all students free of charge in pre-kindergarten through the eighth grade, regardless of whether they earn straight A’s or need remediation. The Summer Enrichment program is run at 36 campuses throughout the city by THINK Together, a Santa Ana-based nonprofit that runs after-school programs in Orange and surrounding counties. THINK Together created the lesson plans in cooperation with district officials and hired the teachers and staff, most of whom

“If it wasn’t for THINK Together and Summer Enrichment, we wouldn’t be able to provide these services,” said Dr. Cathie Olsky, the district’s deputy superintendent. “In these economic times, we are still able to serve more than 11,000 students a day.”

The Summer Enrichment program also allows the district to enroll more students in summer classes because of the wide range of coursework than traditional summer school programs that often focus primarily on remediation, Olsky said. Last year, the district had about 7,500 students in grades kindergarten through eight, she said. In a district with high poverty and where many parents work long hours, the program and free meals help parents with child care and other needs during the summer months. “This is definitely a great service for this community,” said parent Minerva Cervantes, whose daughter attends summer classes at Carr Intermediate with 200 classmates. “I think going to school now will only help her get ahead this fall.”

THINK Together Annual Report 2008-2009

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After-school program gets $250,000 grant to boost science, math education at middle schools , the Whittier Daily News

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Whittier stu

STEM LEARNING Science Technology Engineering Math

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THINK Together Annual Report 2008-2009


udents’ fitness scores up, but two-thirds still unfit, the Whittier Daily News

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THE SCHOOL BELL RINGS AND STUDENTS STAY TO STUDY, LOS

stem learning formed by those in other nations; and Expanding STEM education and career opportunities for underrepresented groups, including women and minorities.

After-school program gets $250,000 grant to boost science, math education at middle schools

Originally published in the Whittier Daily News By Tracy Garcia

At the K-8 Edgewood Academy in La Puente - a THINK Together site - Deborah Moran already has a robotics program for students in grades 6-8 that’s yielded good results over the past three years.

“It inspires kids to think outside the box,” said Moran, adding that A new federal campaign that aims to move American students the current robotics program will be enhanced by the new THINK from the middle to the top of the pack in science and math Together grant. achievement will get a boost at local schools this year, thanks to a $250,000 grant awarded to the non“I had a student last year who, after profit THINK Together program. “Thanks to the generosity of he was in the program, decided he Southern California Edison, we’ll wanted to be an engineer,” Moran The grant from Southern California now have Academy of Robotics said. “It makes them become critical Edison will support a new robotics prothinkers - it takes learning outside of gram and STEM (science, technology, labs available to students at all the classroom.” engineering and math) education at 41 middle schools where the nonprofit THINK Together provides after-school programs. That includes sites within the Bassett and Azusa Unified districts in the San Gabriel Valley, as well as the Los Nietos, Little Lake City and South Whittier districts in the Whittier/Santa Fe Springs region. “Thanks to the generosity of Southern California Edison, we’ll now have Academy of Robotics labs available to students at all of (our) middle school sites,” said Randy Barth, founder and chief executive officer of THINK Together, which operates in four Southern California counties.

of (our) middle school sites,” said Randy Barth, founder and chief executive officer of THINK Together, which operates in four Southern California counties.

“The focus of after-school programs is no longer simply fun and games,” Barth said. “When aligned with a child’s school day, after-school programs can extend a student’s annual learning time by up to 50 percent.”

“The focus of after-school programs is no longer simply fun and games,” Barth said. “When aligned with a child’s school day, after-school programs can extend a student’s annual learning time by up to 50 percent.” The grant coincides with President Barack Obama’s “Educate to Innovate” campaign, a nationwide effort announced last week to increase students’ skills and knowledge in math and science through public-private partnerships that include leading companies, foundations, nonprofits, and science and engineering societies. Obama outlined three priorities for STEM education, including: Increasing literacy so all students can think critically in science, math, engineering and technology; Improving the quality of math and science teaching so American students are no longer outper-

With the $250,000 Edison grant, THINK Together officials said they expect a dramatic enhancement of their current STEM education curriculum. The new robotics academies will allow students to create in a Computer-Aided-Design program, while still emphasizing workplace skills like teamwork, cooperative learning, problem-solving, critical thinking, analysis and logical development.

“Anything that we can do to help with science and technology - we welcome it,” said South Whittier School District Superintendent Erich Kwek, adding that about 100 students are in the THINK Together after-school program at Graves Middle. “THINK Together is always looking for new ways to bring services - they’re applying for grants constantly. It’s outstanding,” Kwek said. “Parents don’t have to pay anything for the program, and it provides academic programs and enrichment every day after school.” The new robotics academies will be implemented at the middle schools sometime in the next few months, including at Edgewood Academy and Graves Middle. “And exposure to the robotics lab will no doubt put some students on a path to STEM careers,” Barth said.

THINK Together Annual Report 2008-2009

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After-school program gets $250,000 grant to boost science, math education at middle schools , the Whittier Daily News

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THINK Together Annual Report 2008-2009

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photo by Linda Mirando


tudents’ fitness scores up, but two-thirds still unfit, the Whittier Daily News

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THE SCHOOL BELL RINGS AND STUDENTS STAY TO STUDY, LOS

FITNESS Whittier students’ fitness scores up, but two-thirds still unfit Originally published in the Whittier Daily News By Tracy Garcia

The percentage of physically fit students in fifth, seventh and ninth grades may be on the rise, but nearly two-thirds of Whittierarea students are still considered unfit by state guidelines, according to figures released Monday.

Gail Baxter, director of special programs at the South Whittier district, said elementary school teachers have always been able to maintain the required 200 minutes of P.E. every 10 days, and a new wellness committee meets on an ongoing basis to review the district’s health and welfare practices and policies. But its THINK Together afterschool program, which serves about 100 kids at each site, also has an outdoor activity component to it - and likely contributed to the rise in fitness test scores this year.

“So we have kids every day who, instead of going home and being inactive, stay at the school But its THINK Together afterschool and participate in those programs,” Among nine Whittier-area school disBaxter said. tricts, only about 32 percent of nearly program, which serves about 100 kids at each site, also has an outdoor 17,000 fifth-, seventh- and ninthThe lowest percentage of fit students graders were able to meet the state’s activity component to it - and likely were fifth-graders (20.6 percent) and standards in six fitness areas during contributed to the rise in fitness test ninth-graders (27.2 percent) in the testing in the 2008-09 school year. Norwalk-La Mirada Unified School scores this year. District, and seventh-graders (23.8 However, a large number - about 60 percent) at Los Nietos Middle School. percent - were able to meet at least five of the six fitness standards, mirroring a statewide trend. “With that said, students are making improvement,” State Superintendent of Public Instruction Jack O’Connell said Monday. “But the percentage of students who are not even minimally fit remains unacceptably high. “We have a long way to go to eradicate the epidemic of childhood obesity.” Locally, the state’s Fitnessgram was administered to students in grades 5, 7 and 9 at the East Whittier City, El Rancho Unified, Little Lake City, Los Nietos, Lowell Joint, Norwalk-La Mirada Unified, South Whittier, Whittier City and Whittier Union High school districts.

“The scores need significant improvement, and we have identified the area of cardiovascular fitness as the one where we probably need the most work,” said Los Nietos Middle School Principal Olga Hofreiter. “The students need more movement, endurance, running long distances or doing jumping jacks for a long time - that’s where the scores are pointing us,” Hofreiter said. “The kids are good in flexibility and individual skills. But in cardio, that’s where they’re lacking.” This year, the school offered an extra P.E. class to students and has a group of about 25 training to run the Los Angeles Marathon, Hofreiter said.

It tests kids in six areas: • Aerobic capacity; • Body composition; • Abdominal strength; • Trunk extensor strength; • Upper body strength; and • Flexibility.

Coupled with efforts to incorporate more cardio into their P.E. classes, Hofreiter said she hopes they will “have a positive effect on test results next year.”

A number of test options are provided so most students can participate, officials said.

The pair debunked the so-called myth that academic excellence and physical fitness are mutually exclusive - that schools don’t have the time for P.E. or aren’t able to make the effort because there is such a strong focus on academics.

O’Connell announced the annual fitness testing results at a school in Los Angeles with Jake Steinfeld, chairman of the Governor’s Council on Physical Fitness and Sports.

Locally, the highest percentage of physically fit kids were fifthgraders in the South Whittier district (33.5 percent); seventh-graders in the Little Lake district (48.1 percent); and ninth-graders at the Whittier Union High School District (42 percent).

“I don’t buy it,” O’Connell said. “We know strong bodies and minds work together so they can succeed. We’re in a no-excuse zone.”

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Whittier students’ fitness scores up, but two-thirds still unfit, the Whittier Daily News

The school bell rings and students stay to study Originally published in the Los Angeles Times By Seema Mehta

The bell signaling the end of the school day at De Anza Elementary in Baldwin Park rang more than an hour ago. But hundreds of students are still at school, studying vocabulary, practicing math and completing homework under the supervision of teachers. With the help of state grants, federal funds and teacher volunteers, nearly half of De Anza’s students spend extra hours every week learning at school -- hours well beyond the traditional school day.

THE SCHOOL BELL RINGS AND STUDENTS STAY TO

Hawaii has hacked 17 days off its school year. California schools, whose academic year has traditionally been 180 days, were not spared; districts in Riverside, Camarillo, Ojai and Whittier lopped a week off the school year and other districts eliminated afterschool programs. More are expected to make such cuts as the state grapples to close a $21-billion budget gap. “There are conversations in half of our districts about whether they can reduce instructional days, not because any of them want to . . . but they can’t figure out any other way to absorb the next round of budget cuts,” said Charles Weis, president of the Assn. of California School Administrators. De Anza, which faces difficult challenges, is bucking that trend in an unlikely place. More than half the students are learning English and 84% receive free or reduced-price lunches, a measure of poverty.

“Until six o’clock at night, you would think we’re still in session,” said Principal Christine Simmons. “Seeing the campus so alive like that, and seeing the parents and students so excited, just makes me and all the teachers want to work harder.” The result, according to the state Department of Education, is a dramatic improvement in student achievement.

The 650-student campus is tucked into a rough neighborhood near the interchange of the 10 and 605 freeways. Gunshots were recently fired near a school bus two blocks from school. For three years in a row, until the 2008-09 school year, De Anza’s test scores failed to meet federal academic targets.

The school, despite serving a community with considerable obstacles, had more than four times the average elementary school’s academic gains on state standardized tests of language and math skills. The school reached 754 on the Academic Performance Index, which ranges from 100 to 1,000 based on test scores. The state’s goal is 800. Though impressive, the gains are not entirely surprising.

But a refocused teacher corps, an energetic new principal, a hands-off superintendent who protected staff from pink slips and a slew of after-school opportunities turned the school into a gathering spot for families in the community -- and stopped De Anza’s academic stagnancy. “It’s very good for all the kids,” said mother Rocio Lopez, 31, as she watched her son and daughter practice math problems in the computer lab after school.

Researchers and educators for decades have said that increasing the amount of time American children spend in school is vital to improving their achievement and competing with such nations as India and China. Earlier this year, President Obama called for lengthening the school day and year.

Teacher Chuck Kemp, 60, circled the room, helping children when they got stuck.

Despite widespread agreement that more classroom time is the right course, states’ budget shortfalls have hampered the ability of districts to increase academic offerings.

Kemp, like the other teachers who staff the computer lab and the library, isn’t getting paid a dime to be there. When the district ran out of money to keep facilities open after school nearly a year ago, teachers volunteered their time to ensure that the children had access to computers and books.

Along with teacher layoffs, rising class sizes and fewer arts and music offerings, state funding cuts also are increasingly taking a toll on the time students spend in school.

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“These programs, they just extend and support what we’re doing throughout the day in our regular instructional program,” he said.

The 32 teachers at De Anza are veterans; the newest one was

THINK Together Annual Report 2008-2009


STUDY, LOS ANGELES TIMES

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Local kids pinch 8.4 million pennies to set world record, the San Bernardino Sun

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After-School

Extended Learning hired eight years ago. But unlike teachers in other school districts and despite the tough economic times, not a single instructor in the Baldwin Park district was threatened with a layoff last year. Across the state last spring, tens of thousands of teachers received notices of possible layoff. Most were rescinded, but Baldwin Park Supt. Mark M. Skvarna said the damage was already done.

The programs at De Anza have been a boon for Maggie Portillo, a sixth-grader who was working on math homework about scale drawings. “I like how they help us when we need help,” said the 11-yearold, adding that her parents, a tire repairman and a receptionist, work long hours. “At home, I have nobody, it’s just me and my brother,” who is 8.

“If you hand out pink slips to 600 or 700 people, your instruction on that day stops,” he said. “You can’t expect people to do what they’re doing, which is trying to make up years and years and years of the status quo, without them knowing if they have a place of employment.” The school also revamped classroom lessons last year so that teachers were hewing more closely and explicitly to the state’s standards. But most notably, according to Skvarna and Simmons, De Anza increased opportunities after school.

An after-school program operated by the nonprofit organization Think Together and funded by a state grant provides five days a week of supervised learning. Nearly 90 children receive assistance with homework, English, math and science lessons, physical education, and arts for 15 to 19 hours a week. There is a waiting list.

In addition to the computer lab, which can be used by 65 students after school, two other voluntary programs are drawing more than 200 students. An English and math tutoring program for struggling students, funded by federal dollars, provides four hours of instruction each week to 141 students. And an after-school program operated by the nonprofit organization Think Together and funded by a state grant provides five days a week of supervised learning. Nearly 90 children receive assistance with homework, English, math and science lessons, physical education, and arts for 15 to 19 hours a week. There is a waiting list. Experts say such opportunities for extended learning are vital in improving student achievement and narrowing the achievement gap. However, the best efforts enrich children’s learning and are not solely focused on improving test scores, said Sylvia Rousseau, a professor of clinical education at USC’s Rossier School of Education.

Another change that has driven the students’ success is a tangible effort to turn the school into a safe gathering place for families. Parents and students mill around the campus, studying in the library or lining up to borrow books. Simmons, who became principal at De Anza last year, said the goal is to create access to amenities -- a structured study environment, computers, the Internet and books -- that are commonplace in more affluent communities.

“Parents come here and study with their kids because they don’t have a quiet place at home,” she said. “We’re trying to make it so they have access to things they don’t have access to at home.” Walking across a playground decorated with flags from universities across the nation, she added that the students and their parents need to believe opportunities are open to them if they work hard enough. Simmons recalled an assembly that took place hours earlier, when she handed out ribbons and key chains to students who excelled at their lessons or read large numbers of books. Why were they were working so hard, she asked. “To go to college!” they roared.

All children should have an opportunity to participate, Rousseau said. She lauded De Anza’s test gains but said the most important measure is not a standardized test but whether students are becoming critical, creative thinkers who will be competitive in the global economy. Extended time “can be very helpful [but] it has to be carefully crafted,” she said.

THINK Together Annual Report 2008-2009

19


THE SCHOOL BELL RINGS AND STUDENTS STAY TO STUDY, LOS ANGELES TIMES

20

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Local kids pinch 8.4 million pennies to set world record, the San

THINK Together Annual Report 2008-2009

photo by Daren Howard


an Bernardino Sun

|

After-School Programs Bright Idea, the Orange County Register

|

After-school program in Lake Elsinore a big

Results 10%

9.8%

8% 6%

6.1%

4.1%

2% 0%

THINK Together also works with researchers at the University of California, Irvine (UCI) and elsewhere to facilitate other third-party evaluation projects that examine the various programs and projects being designed and implemented to serve students outside their normal school day.

ELA

English Language Arts

2.6% NON–THINK

4%

THINK

THINK Together is committed to regular examination of CST outcomes and survey feedback from a variety of stakeholders in order to monitor program quality and to help drive continuous program improvement efforts – all with the goals of helping students achieve -- closing the achievement gap.

2007 (Baseline) vs. 2008 (Follow-Up) CSTs THINK Together Regular Attendees 1 vs. District-Wide Results 2

NON–THINK

And in some cases, like the partnership THINK Together has with the Little Lake City School District where data reflection and other related strategic methods are practiced regularly to align school day priorities with continued learning in the after-school program, the rate of improvement for THINK Together students is even greater.

Growth Rate Towards Proficiency

THINK

An analysis of student test scores year-over-year now indicates that across the enterprise students who participate in THINK Together’s academically-focused after-school programs generally show improvement in their California Standards Test (CST) scores for both math and English Language Arts at a rate nearly double that of their peers.

MATH

Regular Attendees = Students who attend THINK Together after-school programming 60 days or more in 2007-2008. ELA (N=6,558); MATH (N=6.555).

1

District-wide CST results for all 3rd-8th graders across all districts served by THINK Together in 2007-2008 (N=18).

2

“We attribute many of Jersey’s successes to THINK Together. Our 08-09 state testing results raised our API to 841!” Monica Johnson Principal, Jersey Avenue Elementary School THINK Together Annual Report 2008-2009

21


Local kids pinch 8.4 million pennies to set world record, the San Bernardino Sun

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After-School Programs Bright Idea, the Orange Co

Com

Local kids pinch 8.4 million pennies to set world record MILES OF CHANGE TIMES SQUARE, NYC

22

THINK Together Annual Report 2008-2009


ounty Register

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After-school program in Lake Elsinore a big draw, the Riverside Press Enterprise

|

Santa Ana enrichment program

mmunity Engagement

Local kids pinch 8.4 million pennies to set world record Originally published in The San Bernardino Sun By Josh Dulaney Don’t tell cash‐strapped lawmakers this, but Wednesday about 2,000 students from 67 schools across Southern California laid a chain of 8.4 million pennies on the race track at Auto Club Speedway. The goal was to weave a chain 100‐ miles long and break the Guinness World Record held by the folks in Fort Scott, Kansas, who placed a 40‐mile chain of pennies in July.

The kids collected a total of more than 14.6 million pennies. The money will go to the outreach.

The program is a tribute to President Barack Obama’s campaign theme of hope and change, and a celebration of the bicentennial of President Abraham Lincoln’s birth and the centennial of the Lincoln penny. The kids collected a total of more than 14.6 million pennies. The money will go to the outreach.

Twins Rebecca and Morgan Metts, 11, traveled with friends from Boulder Ridge Middle School in Sun City to help break the record. “It would be very awesome,” Rebecca said. “All of our friends would see us as more than friends. We would give them our autographs.” Called “Miles of Change,” the penny drive was started in February by students, staff and volunteers involved with THINK Together, an after‐school outreach that serves more than 35,000 low‐income students at 200 locations across San Bernardino, Riverside, Los Angeles and Orange Counties. The program is a tribute to President Barack Obama’s campaign theme of hope and change, and a celebration of the bicentennial of President Abraham Lincoln’s birth and the centennial of the Lincoln penny.

Montgomery Goodermont, a 12‐ year‐old from Rancho Cucamonga, joined the penny drive as a way to serve the community. He and his mother found out about the outreach while surfing the Internet for volunteer opportunities. “It’s kind of cool because you’re helping set a world record,” Goodermont said. “And it’s something to do.”

While plenty were excited about setting the record, many were excited about seeing the Speedway. “A lot of these kids have never been on a field trip before, so this is awesome for them,” said Larry Tenney, a spokesman for THINK Together. The roster of those who were there to validate the record for Guinness included Dave Allen, vice president of the Speedway, Chivas USA soccer player Gerson Mayen, Matt Mullins from the TV show “Kamen Rider: Dragon Knight,” Michelle Babin of America’s Next Top Model and representatives from Think Together. Miles of Change is recognized by the official Abraham Lincoln Bicentennial Commission established by Congress.

THINK Together Annual Report 2008-2009

23


THINK Together serves more than 50,000 at-risk students at 200+ sites in communities throughout Los Angeles, Orange, Riverside and San Bernardino Counties. 2008-2009 Partners: Schools & Community Sites LOS ANGELES COUNTY Azusa Unified School District Center Middle Dalton Elementary Ellington Elementary Foothill Middle Gladstone Street Elementary Hodge Elementary Lee Elementary Longfellow Elementary Magnolia Elementary Mountain View Elementary Murray Elementary Paramount Elementary Powell Elementary Slauson Intermediate Valleydale Elementary Baldwin Park Unified School District Bursch Elementary Central Elementary DeAnza Elementary Elwin Elementary Foster Elementary Geddes Elementary Heath Elementary Kenmore Elementary Pleasant View Elementary Santa Fe Elementary Tracy Elementary Vineland Elementary Walnut Elementary Bassett Unified School District Edgewood Academy Elementary Julian Elementary Sunkist Elementary Torch Middle Vanwig Elementary Celerity Educational Group Celerity Nascent Charter School Celerity Dyad Charter School Celerity Troika Charter School Duarte Unified School District Andres Duarte Elementary Beardslee Elementary Maxwell Elementary Northview Intermediate Royal Oaks Elementary Valley View Elementary

24

THINK Together Annual Report 2008-2009

Little Lake City School District Cresson Elementary Jersey Avenue Elementary Lake Center Middle Lakeland Elementary Lakeside Middle Orr Elementary Paddison Elementary Studebaker Elementary Los Nietos School District Aeolian Elementary Los Nietos Middle Nelson Elementary Rancho Santa Gertrudes Elementary Pomona Unified School District Alcott Elementary Cortez Elementary Emerson Middle Fremont Middle Kellogg Polytechnic Elementary Kingsley Elementary Lexington Elementary Lincoln Elementary Lopez Elementary Marshall Middle Montvue Elementary Palomares Middle Philadelphia Elementary Pueblo Elementary Roosevelt Elementary San Antonio Elementary Simons Middle Washington Elementary Yorba Elementary South Whittier School District Carmela Elementary Graves Middle Lake Marie Elementary Loma Vista Elementary Los Altos Elementary McKibben Elementary Monte Vista Elementary Telechron Elementary ORANGE COUNTY Santa Ana Unified School District Adams Elementary Carr Intermediate Carver Elementary Davis Elementary


Partners Schools & Community Sites Diamond Elementary Edison Elementary Esqueda Elementary Franklin Elementary Fremont Elementary Garfield Elementary Harvey Elementary Heninger Elementary Heroes Elementary Hoover Academy Jackson Elementary Jefferson Elementary Kennedy Elementary King Elementary Lathrop Intermediate Lincoln Elementary Lowell Elementary MacArthur Fundamental Intermediate Madison Elementary Martin Elementary McFadden Intermediate Mendez Fundamental Intermediate Monroe Elementary Monte Vista Elementary Muir Fundamental Elementary Pio Pico Elementary Remington Elementary Romero-Cruz Elementary Roosevelt Elementary Santiago Elementary Sepulveda Elementary Sierra Intermediate Spurgeon Intermediate Taft Elementary Thorpe Fundamental Elementary Villa Fundamental Intermediate Walker Elementary Washington Elementary Willard Intermediate Wilson Elementary

RIVERSIDE COUNTY Banning Unified School District Cabazon Elementary Coombs Middle Hemmerling Elementary

Community Sites Highland Learning Center Highland Teen Center Noah Teen Center Shalimar Learning Center Shalimar Teen Center

SAN BERNARDINO COUNTY Cucamonga School District Cucamonga Elementary Los Amigos Elementary Rancho Cucamonga Middle The Ontario Center

THINK Together CARE Sites THINK at St. John’s THINK at St. Norbert’s THINK at Veeh

Ontario-Montclair School District Arroyo Elementary Berlyn Elementary Bon View Elementary Buena Vista Arts Elementary Central Elementary Corona Elementary

Jurupa Unified School District Arbuckle Elementary Glen Avon Elementary Granite Hill Elementary Jurupa Middle Mira Loma Middle Mission Bell Elementary Mission Middle Pacific Avenue Elementary Pedley Elementary Peralta Elementary Rustic Lane Elementary Stone Avenue Elementary Sunnyslope Elementary Troth Street Elementary Van Buren Elementary West Riverside Elementary Lake Elsinore Unified School District Brown Middle Collier Elementary Elsinore Elementary Elsinore Middle Lakeland Village Middle Railroad Canyon Elementary Terra Cotta Middle Wildomar Elementary Withrow Elementary Romoland School District Boulder Ridge Middle Harvest Valley Elementary Romoland Elementary THINK Together CARE Sites THINK at Mesa View

THINK Together Annual Report 2008-2009

De Anza Middle Del Norte Elementary Edison Elementary Elderberry Elementary Euclid Elementary Hawthorne Elementary Haynes Elementary Lincoln Elementary Mariposa Elementary Oaks Middle Sultana Elementary Vina Danks Middle Vineyard Elementary Vista Grande Elementary Wiltsey Middle Redlands Unified School District Clement Middle Cope Middle Franklin Elementary Kingsbury Elementary Lugonia Elementary Moore Middle Victoria Elementary San Bernardino City Unified School District Arrowview Middle Chavez Middle Curtis Middle Del Vallejo Middle Golden Valley Middle King Middle Richardson Middle Serrano Middle Shandin Hill Middle Warm Springs Elementary Yucaipa-Calimesa Joint Unified School District Dunlap Elementary Yucaipa Elementary

25


26

THINK Together Annual Report 2008-2009

photo by Diana Alsup


Partners Donors

KEY STRATEGIC PARTNERS COMERICA BANK | THE IRVINE COMPANY | ST. JOSEPH HEALTH SYSTEM Donors FY 2008-2009

Anonymous

FoundationS

2009 MLB Commissioner’s Initiative for Kids

Leona Aronoff Charitable Foundation

Law & Mediation Office of Troy Roe, Esq.

INDIVIDUALS

Los Angeles Dodgers

Abelar, Nancy

2009 Charles Abbott Memorial Golf Tournament

McLarand Vasquez Emsiek & Partners, Inc.

Abundis, Isabel

AT&T Foundation

Charles Abbott Associates

Network for Good

Ayco Charitable Foundation

Anaheim Arena Management

The Nikols Company

The CarMax Foundation

Anaheim Ducks (NHL)

Nossaman LLP

Chapman Charitable Foundation

Auto Club Speedway

Orange County United Way

The Croul Family Foundation

Bank of America

Pacific Life Insurance Company

Ranney and Priscilla Draper Foundation

Burrtec

Park Place Lexus Mission Viejo

Chevron Humankind Matching Gift Program

Posterscope USA

Chiu & Wang, Inc.

Quality Office Furnishings, Inc.

Fluor Foundation

Church of the Messiah

Rotary Club of Orange

The Green Foundation

City of Santa Ana

Henry L. Guenther Foundation

Colonial Electric, Inc.

Shea Properties Management Co., Inc.

Bill Holmes Charitable Trust

Community Settlement Association

Social Media Breakfasts San Diego

Control Air Conditioning Corp.

So-Phis of Orange County

The Marion Knott Foundation

Crevier BMW

LA84 Foundation

Digital Operative

Southern California Edison, an Edison International Company

The Kenneth E. Lester Family Foundation

Downey Brewing Co.

Starbucks Coffee Company

Andersen, George

Edwards Lifesciences

Stater Bros. Charities

Anderson, April

Livingston Family Foundation

Electrical Building Systems

Steven Perryman Family Trust

Anderson, Sam & Susan

Majestic Realty Foundation

Elite Concrete Restoration, Inc.

Technical Works, Inc.

Andrews, Penny

Margolis Family Foundation

Ganahl Lumber Company

TenneyHarrison PR

Andriese, Pamela

Orange County Community Foundation

Geller Family Trust

Trinity United Presbyterian Church

Angier, David & Kendra

United Brotherhood of Local Union 409

Anton, Tim

United Way California Capital Region

Arevalo, Jennifer

United Way of Greater Los Angeles

Aronoff, Barry & Heidi

The Dwight Stuart Youth Foundation

Hughes Schmidhauser Family Fund

Pacific Life Foundation Palos Verdes Peninsula Rotary Foundation Ralphs/Food 4 Less Foundation The Rose Hills Foundation The Rothschild Family Foundation

Global Impact GoodSearch GR Engineering, Inc. Grant Chiropractic Greater Santa Ana Business Alliance Haye Family Trust Henkel Corporation

Premier Commercial Bank

United Way of the Inland Valleys

Abbott, Susan

Acevedo, Adrian & Sylvia Ackermann, Jakob & Marlene Aguirre, Jennie Aguirre, Victor Alcantar, Xotchilt Alfieri, Joseph & Laura Allen, Jon & Kathryn Allen, Joyce Alvarado, Augustine & Isabel Alvarez, Angelica Alvarez, Beronica Alvarez, Elia Alvarez, Erica Alvarez, Ernesto Alvarez, Irma Alvarez, Wendy Amador, Melissa

Angier, Eileen Antonelli, Karen Armijo, Shirley Aroy, Norma Ascencio, Veronica

Hindu Matiya Patidar Samaj, Inc.

United Way of Northeastern NY, Inc.

Honda Center

UPS

The Singgod Foundation

IBM Employee Service Center

UST Global

Avila, Janet

Ueberroth Family Foundation

Kiwanis Club of OntarioParkway

Van Buren Elementary Booster Club

Bahner, Josh Bailey, Beverly

Kiwanis Club of RedlandsMorning

Western Digital

Bailey, James & Diane

Women of Vision

Barajas, Melissa

Yakult USA, Inc.

Barker, Sam & Margaret

Samueli Foundation Edward and Helen Shanbrom Family Fund

Warne Family Charitable Foundation ORGANIZATIONS

The Irvine Company St. Andrews Presbyterian Church

Knott’s Berry Farm KOLA 99.9 Kroger/Ralphs Grocery Company

THINK Together Annual Report 2008-2009

Astorga, Noemi Atherton, Jan

Barrera, Lisa Barriga, Quetzali Barrington, Bill & Bonnie

27


“The Irvine Company has proudly supported THINK Together. It’s been rewarding for me to difference in thousands of lives of our children.” Donald Bren, Chairman, Irvine Company

28

Barth, David & Marseilla

Carlson, Karen

Dialynas, Chris

Garcia, Adrina

Barth, Randy & Mary

Carnahan, Jay & Kris

Diaz, Griselda

Garcia, Cynthia

Barth, Steven & Amy

Carter, Sommer

Diaz, Melissa

Garcia, Daniel & Anna

Bassiri, Shila

Casey, Chris & Lynn

Diaz, Rosa

Garcia, Erika

Beauchamb, Deanna

Casey, Jenny

Diaz, Virginia

Garcia, Lupe

Beeghly, Tom

Cashion, John & Marcia

DiOrio, Carolyn

Garcia, Maria

Bell, Robert

Casillas-Perez, Susan

Distor, Roger & Jocelyn

Garcia, Mayra

Bello, Alejandro

Castaneda, Francisco

Do, Anthony

Garcia, Yvonne

Bergman, Jim & Judy

Castanon, Robert & Otilia

Donahue, Joan

Gatmaitan, Manuel & Elma

Berry, Terri

Castillo, Jennifer

Donaldson, David & Leigh

Gaxiola, Elizabeth

Bickle, David

Castillo, Mia

Dooley, Nancy

Gaynor, Diane

Bobadilla, Irene

Castillo, Rosali

Dorsey, Megan

George, Eugenia

Boggs, Patricia

Castro, Roxana

Draper, Ranney & Priscilla

Gerken, Andrew & Catharina

Bohmer, Camille

Cazares, Mavi

Duarte, Yolanda

Gillett, Donald & Stacy

Bonser, Paul

Cervantes, Dana

Durham, Michael & Vicky

Goldfarb, Jeff

Booth, Vicki

Cervantes, Evangelina

Duvall, Sara

Goldhammer, Gary & Christine

Bramel, Chris

Cesario, Katie

Dwyer, Dawn

Gonzales, Reba

Bren, Donald & Brigitte

Chaidez, Gonzalo

Dyche, Jerry & Katherine

Gonzalez, Chau

Bringas, Melissa

Chavez, Dallys

Escobar, Rose Mary

Gonzalez, Diana

Briseno, Angelina

Clark, Cal & Bonita

Esperon, Michael

Gonzalez, Gabriel

Brooks, Sharlena

Clark, Tracey

Espinosa, Mary

Gonzalez, Melissa

Brown, Bart & Laurie

Coffee, Mary Lynn

Eylicio, Jodi

Goodman, Kenny & Laurie

Brown, Greg & Stacey

Colchado, Leticia

Fainbarg, Allan & Sandy

Granitto, Dorothy

Brush, Matthew

Collins, William & Josephine

Fairchild, Marney

Granitto, Shelly

Buchanan, Lee Ann

Cone, Carol

Favrow, Valerie

Grant, Carmen

Budner, Lawrence & Teri

Cornell, Sue

Felipe, Christian & Mary

Graves, Brad

Buenaluz, Samuel

Corrales, Alex & Carleen

Fernandez, Eva

Grijalva, Sasha

Bui, David & Cheryl

Cosgrove, Cathy

Fernandez, Rosa

Grimaldo, Maria

Bullard, Barbara

Costruba, Anee

Fernandez, Ruby

Groetsch, Lucy

Bundy, Jeffrey & Ruth

Cottle, Barry

Ferris, Josephine

Groetsch, Susan

Byrd, Ashley

Cox, Patrisha

Fidelson, Joan Joy

Guerrero, Mark

Byrne, Alma

Cozad, Coral

Field, Sheila & Gertrude

Guggenheim, Dan & Sue

Cacioppo, Angelina

Crevier, Don

Fisher, Jim

Guijarro, Nicholas

Cacioppo, Pat

Cruz, Christina

Florian, Luis & Monica

Gustafson, Lawrence

Calderon, Lupita

Cruz, Mariel

Forde, Arnold & Marie

Gutierrez, Cynthia

Caldwell, Kimberly

Cruz, Rosa

Forte-Bruno, Lyn

Gutierrez, Lazaro

Calsada, Jess

Daleiden, Michelle

Fortune, Nancy

Gutierrez, Maribel

Camacho, Yolanda

Daley, Rod & Nancy

Foster, Pamela

Hadley, Janet

Campbell, Charlene

Dauderman, Jerry & Bobbi

Fox, George & Natalie

Hall, Ralph

Campbell, John

de la Libertad, Armando

French, Tony

Harrison, William & Gloria

Canale, Terry

Deaver, Doug

Frias, Jorge

Harrison, Nancy

Canizales, Samantha

Debo, Mary

Frobenius, Mike & Kathy

Harshman, Denise

Cantrell, Karen

Deeley, Brian & Brenda

Fuller, Win & Carlita

Harvey, A.

Cantu, Celeste

Dempsay, Linda

Gaeta, Jesus

Haskell, Robert

Cao, Florence

DeSa, Antonio

Gair, William & Mary

Hensgen, Oscar

Cardenas, Janyce

Desforges, Peter & Suzanne

Gamiz, Ana

Hermesch, Anita

Carlos, James

Desjardins, Kevin & Rita

Gangi-Hall, Deborah

Hernandez, Larry

THINK Together Annual Report 2008-2009


watch THINK Together make the

Partners Donors

Hernandez, Michelle

Lambaren, Lesvia

Manrique, Gloria

Nolasco Jr, Othon

Hernandez, Stephanie

Lambert, Mark & Carol

Marquez, Michelle

O’Donnell, John & Trish

Hernandez-Barker, Paloma

Landstrom, Joe & Shelley

Martinez, April

O’Dore, Kathleen

Herrera, Regina

Lantz, Allison

Martinez, Mike

O’Hern, Dennis

Hickman, Mary

Larios, Jennifer

Martinez, Rosario

ODowd, Tracy

Hill, Dwon

Larson, Bonnie

Martinez, Sally

Ojeda, Jose

Hohl, Linda

Layton, Mary

Martinez, Steven

Olhasso, Pete

Holden, Gregg & Ann

Le Cocq, Joanne

Martinez, Veronica

Olmos, Selina

Howard, Glenn & Joyce

Lebel, Melanie

Maya, Tereza

Olsky, Martin & Cathie

Hughes, Michael & Donna

Ledesma, Leyna

Mayeshiro, Dennis & Margie

Ornelas, Enedelia

Hurd, James & Betty

Lee, Danae

Mayhew, Pamela

Ornelas, Lorena

Hurtado, Liz

Lee, JoniL

McDermott, Rod & Laura

Ortega, Sussan

Hutchinson, Judy

Lee-Johnson, Monalisa

McQuaid, Dan

Ortiz, Ana

Ibrahim, Ibrahim

Leon, Evelia

Meaders, Lori

Ortuno, Tatiana

Iem, Jennifer

Leung, Derek

Medina, Amy

Osborne, J. Matthew & Lois

Inman, Fran

Lewis, Jackei

Medina, Gregg

Ouellette, Joseph

Inouye, Wayne & Shannon

Lindquist, Susan

Mejia, Michelle

Oupraxay, Anandeth

Isbell, James

Linnert, Bob

Melendrez, Edgar

Ow, David

Isbell, Marchelle

Linnert, Ralph & Alice

Mendes, Erica

Ozaki, Ronald & Irene

Jackson, Gordon & Wilma

Lomeli, Aurora

Mendoza, Denise

Padilla, Maggie

Jaquess, Jerry

Long, Mary

Mendoza, Joseph

Palma, Vilma

Jenkins, Sarah

Loper, Meghan

Mendoza, Robinson

Papp, Scott

Johnson, Alec & Olivia

Lopez, Brandon

Merrell, Kristen

Patricio, Ashley

Johnson, Archie & Erin

Lopez, Crystal

Metzler, Michael & Stephanie

Paulson, Theodore & Suzanne

Johnson, Jeannette

Lopez, Eduardo

Meyer, Michael

Paveloff, Donald

Johnson, John

Lopez, Elsa

Meza, Gabriela

Pedroza, Martin & Evelyn

Johnson, Sonja

Lopez, Gil

Miedema, Henry & Janet

Pena, Amadeus

Jolly, Burt

Lopez, Gildardo

Miles, Chris

Pena, Rico & Shirlyn

Jonathan, Naveen

Lopez, Gloria

Mireles, Victoria

Pena, Jennifer

Jones, Ray & Phyllis

Lopez, John & Linda

Mittrick, Stacy

Pena, Jesse

Jordan, James

Lopez, Monique

Moe, Don & Kate

Pena, Jesus

Jost, Honor

Lu, Mary

Mogasemi, Ellen

Pena, Lisette

Kamp, Jay & Esther

Luis, Frank & Joyce

Mojarro, Juan & Cynthia

Pena, Maria

Kampa, MaryLou

Luna, Uriel

Moore, Dwight & Barbara

Pena, Martha

Kapsch, Joe

Ma, Richard

Moore, Jim

Pennella, James

Kato, Stacey & Leslie

Madrid, Raul

Morales, Elvie

Pentecost, Amanda

Keefe, Ken

Magana, Lupe

Morse, Richard & Carole

Perez, Carlos

Kelly, Ann

Magana, Rodrigo & Liliana

Munguia, Daniel

Perez, Hector

Kessler, Bill & Pat

Mahnke, Vaughn

Muniz, Laura

Perez, Maria

King, Jeff & Ellen

Malagon, Patricia

Muzzy, James & Pam

Perkins, Scott

Kiralla, Valerie

Maldonado, Briana

Nanney, Michelle

Perry, David & Terry

Kiralla-Orr, Gail

Maldonado, Rick

Nativo, Sherry

Perryman, Virginia

Kleiman, Paula

Maloney, Mike

Navarro, Olivia

Peters, James & Beverly

Kozberg, Roger & Joanne

Malta, Salvador

Neuhauser, Kimberly

Petersen, Lynn

Kuehl, Karl & Norma

Mancilla, Monique

Newman, Emily

Pettis, Alan

Kuhel, Robert & Lisa

Mancilla, Roalian

Nicholsen, Marcus

Pham, Quang

Kwan, Trisha

Mangan, Brian

Nickel, Nancy

Phebus, Richard & Donna

THINK Together Annual Report 2008-2009

29


“When we invest wisely in children and families, the next generation will pay that back through citizenship.� Center on the Developing Child, Harvard University

30

Phelps, Michael & Irene

Rodriguez, Mario

Smith, Heather

Piercy, Isaac

Rodriguez, Robert

Solano, Paul

Valenzuela, Enrique & Guadalupe

Pimentel, Marcelo & Julie

Rogel, Lorena

Somers, Maclyn & Gerry

Valley, Kent

Pinon, Prycilla

Romero, Magda

Somerville, Lisa

Vargas, Fidel

Pitts, Virginia

Romero, Nidia

Somerville, Robert

VargasReal, Esther

Placentia, Fran

Root, Larry & Karen

Sornstein, William

Varner, Bruce & Nancy

Portillo, Eric & America

Rosener, Joe & Judy

Spataro, Coreena

Vasquez, Bezalet

Prenovost, Jenel

Roski, Jennie

Spellman, James

Vasquez, Frances

Prittie, Karen

Roski, Patricia

Stanbridge, Eric & Polly

Vazquez, Katherine

Proctor, Mark

Ross, Alicia

Stephens, John

Vazquez, Sergio

Putnam, Julie

Rubalcava, Edward

Stevens, Troy & Jennifer

Vega, Desiree

Quezada, Christine

Rueda, Esperanza

Sullivan, Neil

Velasco, Veronica

Quick, Tracy

Rueda, Octavio

Sweet, Dan & Diane

Velin, Terry

Quintanilla, Julie

Ruiz, Nicole

Sweet, Robin

Vera, Maritza

Rahimian, Donna

Rundle, Scott

Tamaribuchi, Sat

Volz, James

Ramirez, Omar

Rutledge, Richard & Tehnaz

Tarbell, Don & Betsy

Von Freymann, Ronald & Janet

Ramirez, Veronica

Saenz, Hector & Gloria

Tarshis, Wayne & Louise

Voreh, Chloe-Linh

Rangel, Guillermo

Salata, Paul

Taube, Robert & Penny

Walsh, Mike

Rangel, Lupita

Salce, Tom

Taylor, Regina

Weinberg, Bette

Rayas, Monica

Samarin, Vetta

Taylor, Yvonne

Weissinger, Jim

Rehnborg, Joan

Sanchez, Jesus

Tenney, Larry

Wenke, Bill & Jean

Reno, Natalie

Sanchez, Maria

Tenney, Stephanie

Wennerholm, Michelle

Reyes, Thomas

Sanchez, Ruth

Terrazas, Stephanie

Whiting, David

Riley, John

Sasnett, Teresa

Thomas, Joseph & Jacquelynne

Wickersham, Grace

Rios, Sara

Schatz, Sue

Thompson, Ott & Flora

Wiering, Larry

Rivas, Lupe

Scherer, Lori

Thomsen, Bart & Debbie

Wilfong, Teri

Rivas, Olga

Schnur, Dan

Thorell, Robert & Shari

Wilson, Ann

Rivera, Delia

Schoettinger, Paul

Throenle, Teresa

Wilson, Dwanesha

Rivera, Michelle

Schutz, Andrew & Elisabeth

Tipre, Karl & Katherine

Windhorst, Maggie

Rivero, Michelle

Schwartz, David

Toan, Jack

Wizelman, Larry

Robart, Erin

Selby, Brenda

Torres, Laurie

Wong, Frances

Robello, Wendy

Semmelman, Elliot & Keri Gee

Tovar, Patty

Wood, Charles

Roberts, Ryan

Sennikoff, Keith

Townley, Katie

Woodward, Gail

Robinson, Tanisha

Sennikoff, Shirley

Trefethen, Wade

Woodward, Stacy

Robles, Adriana

Sennikoff, Steven

Troske, Carol

Wride, Douglas & Gretchen

Robles, Jeannette

Sentner, Maria

Trujillo, Briana

Wylde, Trent & Christy

Robles, Sandra

Servin, Renee

Trujillo, Modesto

Yamamoto, Candis

Rodriguez, Carolina

Shimamoto, Alan & Ellen

Turpit, William

Yanez, Jaimee

Rodriguez, Cezar

Shimoff, Paul

Uribe, Maria

Yepez, Edmundo

Rodriguez, Claudia

Shoup, Fay

Uribe, Nina

Zamora, Desiree

Rodriguez, Erica

Silva, Stewart & Greta

Uribe, Teresa

Zamudio, Dawn

Rodriguez, Gabriel

Simon, John & Mary Ellen

Uro, Evie

Zandes, Brett

Rodriguez, Gabriella

Sims, Karen

Uro, Michael

Zandes, CynDee

Rodriguez, Giovanni

Sims, Lauren

Vaca, Edward

Zapata, Juana

Rodriguez, Lois

Siperstein, Jerry & Phyllis

Vaca, Philip

Rodriguez, Luis

Skorpanich, Mary Anne

Vaca, Veronica

THINK Together Annual Report 2008-2009


a lifetime of productivity and responsible

THINK Together Annual Report 2008-2009

31


Leadership Council LOS ANGELES LEADERSHIP COUNCIL

ORANGE COUNTY LEADERSHIP COUNCIL

Alan Arkatov President, Changing.edu

Judge Frances Muñoz (Ret.), Harbor Municipal Court

Brigitte Bren Attorney/Education Advocate

Bobbi Dauderman Community Volunteer

Jorge Delgado President, ValueSat LLC

Ranney Draper Chairman, Spring Creek Investors

Senator Martha Escutia (ret.) Attorney

Michael Kerr CEO, Bluestone Communities

Lynda Boone Fetter Principal, Samuelson & Fetter LLC

Marion Knott Philanthropist

Fran Inman Senior Vice President, Majestic Realty Co.

Don Moe Consultant

Gilbert Ivey Chief Administrative Officer, Metropolitan Water District of Southern California

John O’Donnell The O’Donnell Group, Inc. Bill Podlich (Ret.) Co-Founder, PIMCO Advisors

Lupe Valdez Director of Public Affairs, Union Pacific Railroad

INLAND EMPIRE LEADERSHIP COUNCIL Pete Aguilar Vice President, Director of Governmental Affairs, Arrowhead Credit Union Leona Aronoff-Sadacca Chairman of IE Leadership Council Founder, LBJ Management, LLC Carole Beswick President & CEO, Inland Action Inc. Mark Bogh President, Bogh Construction Inc. Celeste Cantú General Manager, Santa Ana Watershed Project Authority Lois Lauer Owner, Lois Lauer Realty Ellen Weisser (Ret.), Network Pharmaceuticals

32

THINK Together Annual Report 2008-2009


Board Of Directors 2008-2009 Board of Directors Randy Barth* Founder & CEO, THINK Together

Kevin Hayes, II Sr. Vice President-CA, Lincoln Property Company

Joseph Albonetti Founder, LatinoLandia USA

Glenn Howard* Attorney & CPA

Darrel Anderson* Retired President, Knott Anderson Enterprises

Fran Inman Senior Vice President , Majestic Realty Co.

Samuel Anderson Retired Pharmaceutical Executive

Rod McDermott Managing Director, McDermott & Bull Executive Search

Leona Aronoff-Sadacca Founder, LBJ Management, LLC

Michael Metzler President & CEO, Greater Santa Ana Business Alliance

Mark Bogh President, Bogh Construction & Engineering

Jayne Munoz English Instructor, Santa Ana Community College

Kathy Braun-Lewis* Retired Executive, Western Digital

Eric Nelson Vice President, Red Mountain Retail Group

Brigitte Bren Attorney/Education Advocate

Alan Pettis Partner, Innovate Partners, Inc.

Celeste CantĂş General Manager, Santa Ana Watershed Project Authority

Quang X. Pham CEO, Lathian Health

Mary Lynn Coffee* Attorney At Law, Nossaman, LLP

Ken Salgado* Partner, Moss-Adams LLP

Tony French* Philanthropist

Sat Tamaribuchi Environmental Policy Consultant

* Executive Committee Member

THINK Together Annual Report 2008-2009

33


‘96

‘97

‘98

‘00

‘02

‘03

Established the Shalimar Learning Center in Costa Mesa; our first after-school program. Became an award-winning program replicated by numerous organizations nationwide.

Worked as part of a collaboration to establish the Minnie Street Learning Center (now called the Lighthouse Learning Center) in Santa Ana.

THINK Together, Inc. formed as a 501(c)(3) nonprofit provider of academicallyoriented afterschool programs. Awarded the Disneyland Community Service Award (and $40,000) as Orange County’s top charity for its work at the Shalimar Learning Center.

Established our first privatelyfunded public school program sites at Davis Elementary in Santa Ana and Thorman Elementary in Tustin.

Opened our 10th site and began serving more than 1,000 students per day across elementary, middle and high schools.

California voters passed Proposition 49, the After School Education & Safety (ASES) Program Act.

Partnered with Santa Ana Unified to win a $2.6 million per year federal 21st Century Community Learning Centers grant award. Third-party evaluation by Hoffman, Clark & Associates validated strong program outcomes. Named Best AfterSchool Program in the U.S. as part of a National Education Awareness Week contest of more than 800 after -school providers.

“A relentless focus on improving outcomes, on regional scalability, and sustainability are the core elements for a successful assault on poverty and educational inequality.” Arne Duncan

U.S. Secretary of Education 34

THINK Together Annual Report 2008-2009

3,000 students

1,000 students

2,500 students

Received first round of federal funding ($400,000) from the U.S. Department of Education Fund for the Improvement of Education.

Listed in U.S. Department of Education’s Guide to After-School, as a model program exemplifying Best Practices.

800 students

Awarded the R.C. Hoiles Award (and $50,000) from the Orange County Register as OC’s Charity of the Year.

200 students

‘94


‘05

‘06

‘07

‘08 28,000 students

‘04

4,000 students

Awarded first $1 million private grant from The Irvine Company.

15,000 students

Partnered with Tustin Unified and Camp Fire USA to win a $1 million per year federal 21st Century Community Learning Centers grant award.

Named 1 of 2 Bank of America Neighborhood Builder Awards ($200,000) in Orange County and 1 of 78 nationally.

4,000 students

Awarded the Ethics in America Award from the Passkeys Foundation.

Opened 150 new sites across 19 school districts in Los Angeles, San Bernardino and Riverside Counties serving more than 20,000 students making THINK Together one of the largest after-school program providers in the U.S.

35,000 students

Began providing free tutoring services to lowincome students under the federal Supplemental Educational Services (SES) program outlined in the No Child Left Behind (NCLB) Act. Named by the U.S. Department of Education as 1 of 5 National Demonstration Sites to study and develop a national model for the alignment of SES and 21st Century Community Learning Center funded after-school programs. Awarded $8.5 million grant from The Irvine Company.

THINK Together Annual Report 2008-2009

50,000 students

Milestones ‘09

Launched inaugural Summer Learning program serving 11,000 students. Awarded $250,000 grant from Southern California Edison to establish Robotics Labs at 41 middle schools. Awarded $690,000 grant from the Orange County Children & Families Commission to pilot early literacy programs at Santa Ana neighborhood schools. Awarded $1.14 million in annual 21st Century ASSETS grants to launch & sustain key high school programs in Azusa & Santa Ana for 5 years. Awarded $2.7 million in annual 21st CCLC grants to support Summer Learning and Saturday programs for 5 years.

35


Revenues & Expense Statement of Activities Revenue 2008-2009

8%

Expenses 2008-2009

1%

2%

Revenue 2008-2009 Program Services - State

8%

Expenses 2008-2009 Program Services

1%

2%

Program Services - Federal Program Services - State Program Services - In-Kind Program Services - Federal

18%

Supplemental Education Services (K-12) Program Services - In-Kind

18%

Philanthropy Supplemental Education Services (K-12)

Fundraising Program Services General & Administrative Fundraising

General & Administrative

52% 19%

52%

Other Philanthropy 19% Other

Program Services - State.............................. 20,861,981

Program Services ..................

Program Services - Federal.............................. 7,670,491

Fundraising ............................

Program ..............................20,861,981 7,228,395 Program Services Services -- In-Kind State.............................. Supplemental Education Services (K-12) ........ 1,030,800 Program Services - Federal.............................. 7,670,491

General Administrative........ Program&Services ..................

Philanthropy.................................................... Program Services - In-Kind .............................. 3,058,673 7,228,395 Other ................................................................. 504,436 Supplemental Education Services (K-12) ........ 1,030,800

General & Administrative........

Philanthropy.................................................... 3,058,673 1% 8% Other ................................................................. 504,436 2% 8%

1%

Fundraising ............................

Expenses 2008-2009 2% Program Services Expenses 2008-2009 2%

Fundraising

2%

5%

5%

Program General &Services Administrative

18%

Fundraising

ices (K-12) 18%

ices (K-12)

General & Administrative

52%

93%

Revenues & Expenses 1998-2009 19% Year............................................Revenue 52% .................. Expenses

45 million

1998-1999 .................................. 552,410 .................... 430,125

93%

Revenues & Expenses 1998-2009

40 million 45 million 35 million 40 million 2001-2002 ............................... 1,446,638 ................. 1,322,079 1999-2000.................................. 812,809 .................... 740,556 30 million 2002-2003 .............................. 1,763,308 ................. 1,818,653 2000-2001.................................. 983,850 .................... 928,198 35 million Program Services .......................................... 37,213,216 2003-2004 .............................. 1,804,091................. 1,900,156 25 million 2001-2002 ............................... 1,446,638 ................. 1,322,079 Fundraising ......................................................... 774,849 30 million 2004-2005 2,651,140 2002-2003 .............................. .............................. 2,590,996 1,763,308 ................. ................. 1,818,653 20 million General & Administrative................................ 2,175,861 2005-2006 3,160,919 ................. 1,900,156 3,266,151 2003-2004 .............................. .............................. 1,804,091................. 25 million Program Services .......................................... 37,213,216 2006-2007 (a)........................ 18,942,047............... 18,699,539 15 million 2004-2005 .............................. 2,590,996 ................. 2,651,140Fundraising ......................................................... 774,849 20 million 2007-2008 ................ 31,837 ,324 2005-2006 (a)........................ ..............................31,905,878 3,160,919 ................. 3,266,151 General & Administrative................................ 2,175,861 10 million 2008-2009 40,354,776 ............... 18,699,539 40,163,926 2006-2007 (a)........................ (a)........................ 18,942,047............... 15 million 5 million 2007-2008 (a)........................ 31,905,878 ................ 31,837,324 10 million (a) Revenue and Expense amounts include In-Kind contributions

19% 1999-2000.................................. 812,809 .................. ....................Expenses 740,556 Year............................................Revenue 2000-2001.................................. 1998-1999 .................................. 983,850 552,410 .................... .................... 928,198 430,125

.................. 7,670,491

.................. 7,228,395 ............... (K-12) ........20,861,981 1,030,800

.................. 3,058,673 7,670,491 ................. .................. 7,228,395 .................... 504,436

(K-12) ........ 1,030,800

................. 3,058,673

.................... 504,436

2008-2009 (a)........................ 40,354,776 ............... 40,163,926 photo by Daren Howard

0

5 million

0

19 9

(a) Revenue and Expense amounts include In-Kind contributions

19 98 8-1 19 99 99 9 19 19 99 99 -2 -2 00 00 0 0 20 20 00 00 -2 -2 00 00 1 1 20 20 01 01 -2 -2 00 00 2 2 20 20 02 02 -2 -2 00 00 3 3 20 20 03 03 -2 -2

............... 20,861,981

36

THINK Together Annual Report 2008-2009

Revenues & Expenses 1998-2009


25 million 20 million 15 million 10 million 5 million

(a )

)

9 00 -2

20

08

00 8

(a

) 72 20 0

00 -2

20

06

05

-2

7

(a

00 6

05 20

20 04 20

20

04

0 03 -

ns

30 million

20

26

Expense

03

24

35 million

20

9

Revenue

02 -

51

40 million

2

40

45 million

20

56

Revenues & Expenses 1998-2009

00

53

**Includes recognition of In-Kind program services, such as facility costs and snacks, contributed by school district partners.

20 01 -2

79

Net Income............................................................................ 190,850

020 01

98

Fundraising............................................................................ 774,849 General & Administrative.................................................... 2,175,861 Total Expenses............................................ 40,163,926

0

56

93%

Expenses Program Services Program Services .......................................... ASES/21stCCLC** (K-12)...................................... 34,915,36037,213,216 Fundraising ......................................................... Supplemental Education Services (K-12)................. 1,236,938 774,849 Early Childhood (0-5)............................................................... General & Administrative................................ -2,175,861 School Aged Care (K-5)............................................... 396,197 Community Sites (K-12).............................................. 664,721 Total Program Services............................... 37,213,216

20 0

25

General & Administrative

2008-2009 Revenues ASES/21stCCLC (K-12)**................................................. 35,760,867 52% Supplemental Education Services (K-12)............................ 1,030,800 Early Childhood (0-5).......................................................................... School Aged Care (K-5).......................................................... 428,352 Philanthropy........................................................................ 3,058,673 Other....................................................................................... 76,084 Total Revenues........................................... 40,354,776

20 0

es

5%

THINK Together Program Services Statement of Activities For Fiscal Year Ended June 30, Fundraising 2009

19 99 -

%

2%

-1 99 9

2%

8%

Financials Statement of Activities

Expenses 2008-2009

1%

19 98

es

(a) Revenue and Expense amounts include In-Kind contributions

THINK Together Annual Report 2008-2009

37


A Call To Action The achievement gap we face in California’s schools may well be the civil rights issue of our generation. It calls for a willingness to collaborate, to change, to be bold, to be accountable and to try new, innovative ideas. The time has come for us all to answer this call -- to offer the best of what we can collectively and as individuals so that future generations may have the same, or greater, opportunities that what we’ve been afforded. The people and partnerships behind THINK Together have proven that hand-in-hand we can close California’s achievement gap, thereby opening the door to a better future for every student, without exception. Will you join us?

“How many kids don’t get the same chance to achieve their full potential? The number is very large. Every year, 1 million kids drop out of high school. Only 71 percent of kids graduate from high school within four years, and for minorities the numbers are even worse—58 percent for Hispanics and 55 percent for African Americans.” Bill Gates

Co-Chair & Trustee The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation 38

THINK Together Annual Report 2008-2009


helping • inspiring • nurturing • KIDS • teaching • help • THINK • TEACHING • helping • inspiring • nurturing • spiring • nurturing • KIDS • THINK • TEACHING • hel S • teaching • helping • inspiring • nurturing • KIDS • iring • nurturing • KIDS • teaching • helping • inspi aching • helping • inspiring • nurturing • KIDS • teach ng • KIDS • THINK • TEACHING • helping • inspiring • helping • inspiring • nurturing • KIDS • THINK • TEAC ng • KIDS • teaching • helping • inspiring • nurturing ping • inspiring • nurturing • KIDS • teaching • helpi THINK • teaching • helping • inspiring • nurturing • KID g • nurturing • KIDS • THINK • TEACHING • helping • ins hing • helping • inspiring • nurturing • KIDS • THINK • nurturing • KIDS • teaching • helping • inspiri ACHING • helping • inspiring • nurturing • KIDS • tea ng • KIDS • THINK • teaching • helping • inspiring • nur ng • inspiring • nurturing • KIDS • THINK • TEACHING KIDS • teaching • helping • inspiring • nurturing • • inspiring • nurturing • KIDS • teaching • helping • NK • TEACHING • helping • inspiring • nurturing • KID g • nurturing • KIDS • THINK • TEACHING • helping • ins hing • helping • inspiring • nurturing • KIDS • THINK THINKtogether.org • teaching • helping • inspiri • nurturing • KIDS 2100 E. Fourth Street, Suite 200, Santa Ana CA 92705 aching • helping • inspiring888.485.THINK • nurturing • KIDS • teach 39 ng • KIDS • THINK • TEACHING • helping • inspiring Randy Barth Founder & CEO

2100 E. Fourth Street, Suite 200 Santa Ana, California 92705 714.543.3807 714.543.3852

THINK Together Annual Report 2008-2009


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2008-09 Annual Report - THINK Together, Inc. "Making News"