Issuu on Google+

ENVS10003 LOGBOOK THI K.L LAM 697971


Week 3: Footings and Foundations


Knowledge Map #1


Knowledge Map #2


Activity: On Site Take 1

Cantilever - ABP Building.

- Constructed after main structure of facade was up.

- Put together ‘stick by stick’.

- Diagonal bracing used to carry load of cantilever

- It was anticipated that the cantilever will drop 15mm after concrete load, so it was positioned 15mm above its original position.

Steel Truss out side Arts West

Steel trusses are welded together and continues through all the way inside the building.

The beam of the truss is most likely to be supported. The white ‘shape’ around it acts as a cover up for the support.


Back of Union House

- The platform of the stairs and stairs itself were supported and held by the ropes.

!

- Ropes were acting in tension, keeping the platform above.

On top of South Lawn underground car park. For every tree, below is a column that is aligned below. This allows for growing capacities of the trees where their soil capacities are increased.

A rough section of the underground car park.

- No structural supports beneath the stairs or platform.

!- Simply supported by the horizontal beam below.

!- Beam was welded to the steel.

Underground car park. Columns are concrete and also supports the roof of the car park. Loads will spread to the columns which transfer loads to the ground.


Week 4: Floor Systems and Horizontal Elements


Knowledge Map #1


Knowledge Map #2


Scale of the building and scale of the drawings differ greatly. Obviously, in order to portray the structures of the building onto paper, the size had to be reduced which makes dealing with dimensions on paper more manageable.

!

Structural drawings differ in representing information. Structural engineers focus on the structural elements of the design where scale, codes, symbols and conventions are applied accurately to convey accurate information.

Lines and symbols on the drawing set represented every element that needed to be taken noticed of. There is a huge contrast between observing the site in person and looking at elevations and symbols. The drawing sets made the building clearing to understand as everything was taken into great detail.

!

Whereas architectural drawings differ slightly. Architects more or less focus on the design aspect of the drawing rather than structural elements. It is typical that once architectural drawings are handed to the engineers, their drawings will most likely override what the architects have drawn.

Different lines and thicknesses also represented exterior and interior walls, as also main structures of the building. Coding of each structural element of the building was used as a reference to connect it to another.


Week 5: Columns, Grids and Wall Systems


Knowledge Map #1


Knowledge Map #2


Structural Concepts

We were allocated a part of the canopy truss structure. Each member of the team was allocated to different elements of the truss and had the responsibility to scale and cut the materials. We decided to make all elements of the truss out of balsa wood, this ensured that all members of the truss were consistent in size and scale.

Connection of the top chord to the webs. Sticky type was our material of choice to reinforce and connect the pieces together.

Elevation of truss looking head on. This section in particular was rather difficult for me to understand as it started to get confusing. I was unsure whether or not a new support beam was to be made or whether the web of the trust were to be attached with the existing structure.

Through the process we had to ensure that every piece of balsa wood had the exact width. Various widths would have made it difficult to construct the canopy effectively and would difficult our understanding of the drawings and process.

Completed spine of truss.


Our canopy was then joined by the group who constructed the second half. They also used balsa wood however their strips were slightly thicker. Despite being a little dierence, it just shows the importance of having accurate material and sizes in order to achieve/respond to the drawings correctly. If this was real life, there would have been major issues with the structure and would aect the rest of the pavillion.

Connecting the spine with the other truss elements. From here it, the scaled drawings started to make a lot more sense. Each elevation had its own dimensions and codes which were quite confusing to follow.

Load Path Diagram in Trusses

Truss must be loaded only at its panel points if its members are to be subject only to axial compression or tension

Load at a joint should pass through a common point.

In real life, members would have been bolted or welded together. It was also easier to see how lateral bracing would work with all the elements in 3D form.


Week 6: Spanning and Enclosing Space


Knowledge Map #1


Knowledge Map #2


Week 7: Detailing Strategies


Knowledge Map #1


Knowledge Map #2


Week 8: Strategies for openings


Knowledge Map


Activity: In Detail


The steel frame was actually quite thin, only a few millimetres. From drawing the 1:1 scale, the proportions for the frame was quite odd. This may be due to faults made by architects or change that weren’t documented.

This was the error on the drawing set

This is how the section in the drawing set should have looked like. There drawing also showed an element that didn’t have to be there. A steel/timber beam was represented twice, however at the site there was no site/evidence of its existence.


Week 9: Detailing Strategies


Knowledge Map


Activity: Off Campus

Only 1 crane was available on site, this limits how quickly you can build. From the bottom, the crane will be joined together at the top. Bit by bit. The entire construction of the site was heavily crane reliant as it was the only way to transfer materials onto the top floors. All loads are coordinated from the top and bottom of the building.

All deliveries were loaded onto a dock which acted as a cantilever. A hole in the roof was made for putting the crane together. A diesel crane was available. It is quicker but had less parts that were serviceable and only had a 10 meter radius.


! ! ! ! ! ! The structure of the 5 and a half floors is all structural steel and had a light weight concrete floor. If conventional concrete were to be used with the steel frame in conjunction with the existing building, it would only allow two stories.

Insulation installed in roof to keep temperatures in. The floors also have acoustic ceilings which prevents noise transferring to the above floors. An acoustic rating would be done first then followed by a normal ceiling at the standard height.

Beams are fire sprayed. If the building were to catch on fire, certain parts of the building need to be fire rated for up to two hours. Each floor is separated so fire won’t transfer to floors easily.

Blue plaster boards were seen at the sight, also known as aqua check. These boards pink in colour and are actually waterproof.

!

Outlines of vents were sprayed on the floor. This was used as a guide for positioning where the vents would go. The builders would align the vents with the outline and would work from bottom up. If there were any mistakes with the positioning of the vent before it gets attached, it would b easily fixed.


Week 10: When things go wrong


Knowledge Map


Activity: Detailing Volume I had to adjust the scale drawing as there was structural element that was not required. By removing the mistake from the drawing set, the section of the drawing become more clear and looked like the window on site.

The steel frame however in this drawing appear quite thick, where in reality it is only about a few millimetres. The frame also started to rust under the bottom after only 3 months. Parts of the drawing are coloured in to give a sense of depth and form. Lines were also darkened so that parts of the drawing could be easily identified (similar to line thickness conventions applied in the drawing set).


Key Terms •

Structural joint

Joist

Rafter

Down pipe

Stability

Steel Decking

Purlin

Flashing

Tension: Pulling apart

Span

Cantilever

Insulation

Frame:

Girder

Portal Frame

Sealant

Window Sash

Reflection

Moment of Inertia

Door Furniture

Stress

Shear Force

Sandwich Panel

Bracing Column Moment Retaining Wall

Concrete Plank Spacing Stud Nogging

Eave Alloy Sorfit Top Chord

Pad Footing

Lintel

Drip

Strip Footing

Axial Load

Vapour Barrier

Slab

Buckling

Gutter

Bending

Substructure

Seasoned Timber

Parapet

Skirting

Composite beam

Shadow line joint


References Ching, Francis D.K. Building Construction Illustrated. 4th Ed. New Jersey: John Wiley & Sons Inc., 2008. Print.!

! W03_s1 STRUCTURAL ELEMENTS. Clare Newton. University of Melbourne, 2014. Video. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wQIa1O6fp98&feature=youtu.be! ! W03_c1 FOOTING AND FOUNDATIONS. Clare Newton. University of Melbourne, 2014. Video. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PAcuwrecIz8&feature=youtu.be! ! W03_m1 INTRODUCTION TO MASS CONSTRUCTION. Clare Newton. University of Melbourne, 2014. Video. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8Au2upE9JN8&feature=youtu.be! ! W03_m2 INTRODUCTION TO MASONRY. Clare Newton. University of Melbourne, 2014. Video. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DC8Hv8AKQ8A&feature=youtu.be! ! W03_m3 BRICKS. Clare Newton. University of Melbourne, 2014. Video. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4lYlQhkMYmE&feature=youtu.be! ! W3_m5 CONCRETE BLOCKS. Clare Newton. University of Melbourne, 2014. Video. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=geJv5wZQtRQ&feature=youtu.be! ! W3_m4 STONE. Clare Newton. University of Melbourne, 2014. Video. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2Vn5_dk4RtQ&feature=youtu.be! ! W04_c1 FLOOR SYSTEMS. Clare Newton. University of Melbourne, 2014. Video. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=otKffehOWaw&feature=youtu.be! ! W04_m1 CONCRETE. Clare Newton. University of Melbourne, 2014. Video. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c1M19C25MLU&feature=youtu.be! ! W04_m2 IN SITU CONCRETE. Clare Newton. University of Melbourne, 2014. Video. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c3zW_TBGjfE&feature=youtu.be! ! W04_m3 PRE-CAST CONCRETE. Clare Newton. University of Melbourne, 2014. Video. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=scYY-MMezI0&feature=youtu.be! ! W05_c1 WALLS, GRIDS AND COLUMNS. Clare Newton. University of Melbourne, 2014. Video. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vq41q6gUIjI&feature=youtu.be ! ! W05_m1 From Wood to Timber. Clare Newton. University of Melbourne, 2014. Video. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YJL0vCwM0zg&feature=youtu.be! ! W05_m3 Engineered Timber Products. Clare Newton. University of Melbourne, 2014. Video. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0YrYOGSwtVc&feature=youtu.be! ! W06_c1 Roof Systems. Clare Newton. University of Melbourne, 2014. Video. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q5ms8vmhs50&feature=youtu.be! ! W06_m1 Introduction to Metals. Clare Newton. University of Melbourne, 2014. Video. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RttS_wgXGbI&feature=youtu.be! ! W06_m2 Ferrous Metals. Clare Newton. University of Melbourne, 2014. Video. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SQy3IyJy-is&feature=youtu.be! ! W06_m3 Non Ferrous Metals. Clare Newton. University of Melbourne, 2014. Video. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EDtxb7Pgcrw&feature=youtu.be!


W07_c1 Detailing for Heat and Moisture. Clare Newton. University of Melbourne, 2014. Video. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Lhwm8m5R_Co&feature=youtu.be

W07_m1 Rubber. Clare Newton. University of Melbourne, 2014. Video. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OPhjDijdf6I&feature=youtu.be

W07_m2 Plastics. Clare Newton. University of Melbourne, 2014. Video. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5pfnCtUOfy4&feature=youtu.be

W07_m3 Paints. Clare Newton. University of Melbourne, 2014. Video. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WrydR4LA5e0&feature=youtu.be

W08_c1 OPENINGS: DOORS AND WINDOWS. Clare Newton. University of Melbourne, 2014. Video. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g7QQIue58xY&feature=youtu.be

W08_m1 GLASS. Clare Newton. University of Melbourne, 2014. Video. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_I0Jqcrfcyk&feature=youtu.be

W09_c1 Construction Detailing. Clare Newton. University of Melbourne, 2014. Video. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yqVwAV7yJCI&feature=youtu.be

W09_m1 Composite Materials. Clare Newton. University of Melbourne, 2014. Video. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Uem1_fBpjVQ&feature=youtu.be

W10_m1 Heroes and Culprits. Unknown. University of Melbourne 2014. Video. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FhdfwGNp_6g&feature=youtu.be

!


Thi k l lam 697971 Log Book Full Size