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PORTFOLIO ZACHARY B. BURSON / selected architectural work 2011 . 2016

when you walk 25-30 feet above ground, it is a miracle, because you are still in the city … but you are flying above the city. You are in the middle of trees, and that is a moment of beauty. your only legend is making an allegation. if I was to realize new buildings I should have to have new technique. I should have to design buildings that they would not only be appropriate to materials but design them so the machine that would have to make them could make them surpassingly well. impossible is nothing. i can hear the war drums approaching, slowly, surely, undeniably. they come like the swiftness of night among the stars. the fact is that automobiles no longer have a place in the big cities of our time. never talk to a client about architecture. talk to him about his children. that is simply good politics. he will not understand what you have to say about architecture most of the time. an architect of ability should be able to tell a client what he wants. most of the time a client never knows what he wants. if you weren’t an optimist, it would be impossible to be an architect. public space is the city. 98% of what gets built today is shit. the best engineer a few decades ago was someone who could create the most beautiful beam or structure; today it’s to do a structure you cannot see or understand how it’s done. it disappears and you can talk only about color, symbols, and light. it’s an aesthetic of miracle. the world is undeniably beautiful, it is man who needs the work. a world which sees art and engineering as divided is not seeing the world as a whole. architecture is the constant fight between man and nature, the fight to overwhelm nature, to possess it. the first act of architecture is to put a stone on the ground. that act transforms a condition of nature into a condition of culture; it’s a holy act. beware of overconfidence. it is the light of the sun that illuminates the truth of most things. shakespeare never wrote anything. most of the time I hear only nonsense. I set fire to the rain. I was given keys to the city of your dreams. let this music serve the deed. I can’t predict the past. superman is an awful superhero. there was no checking of typos in this entire portfolio. “whom shall I send? and who will go for us?” and I said, “here am I. send me!” everything you can imagine is real. you must have chaos within you to give birth to a dancing star. I want to write my own eulogy, and I want to write it in Latin. it seems only fitting to read a dead language at my funeral. the life of a designer is one of fight: fight against the ugliness. basically, the idea is that with everyone striving to be revolutionary, you will be most revolutionary if you try to be ordinary. I am always searching for more light and space. a sheep among wolves stands out because it is a sheep.


ZACHARY B. BURSON EDUCATION OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY | STILLWATER, OK BACHELOR OF ARCHITECTURE MINOR OF ARCHITECTURE HISTORY

2016

MIDLOTHIAN HIGH SCHOOL | MIDLOTHIAN, TX GRADUATE

2011

EXPERIENCE

CONTACTS

CORGAN ASSOCIATES, INC. | DALLAS, TX ARCHITECTURAL INTERN

2015

OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY | STILLWATER, OK GALLERY & ARCHIVE TEACHER ASSISTANT

2015

EUROPEAN STUDY ABROAD PROGAM | OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY INTERNATIONAL STUDY OF CULTURE & ARCHITECTURE

2014

972.358.4794 zburson@okstate.edu 1341 BOIS D ARC LANE MIDLOTHIAN, TX 76065

OBJECTIVE

AWARDS

REFERENCES

ABOUT ME Throughout my life, I have been a creative thinker, and a designer. I have always loved creating. From drawing cartoons to building forts, and from designing T-shirts to drawing “ideal house” floor plans, it all naturally led me to architecture. Being an architect allows you to truly impact communities not only in a practical or useful manner, but it also allows you to create powerful experiences. Growing up in a small town outside of Dallas, Texas really gave me an understanding about the importance of community and the potential impact architecture can have. My dream is to create structures that not only benefit communities, but allows people to be inspired.

2015

PEORIA TRIBE OF INDIANS EDUCATION SCHOLARSHIP SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE HARRIL SCHOLARSHIP HUMPHRY’S INTERNATIONAL STUDY GRANT CEAT DEAN’S INTERNATIONAL STUDY SCHOLARSHIP EASON LEONARD INTERNATIONAL SCHOLARSHIP IES STUDENT LIGHTING COMPETITION - OKLAHOMA CHAPTER 2nd PLACE PELLA DESIGN AWARD 2nd PLACE

2011

Contribute my knowledge and skills in the field of architecture to create powerful experiences through design.

JERRY STIVERS EMAIL | jerry.stivers@okstate.edu AST. PROF / AIA / LEED AP TELE | 405.744.9059 JEFF WILLIAMS EMAIL | jeffrey.williams@okstate.edu PROF / RA TELE | 405.744.2903 DAVID ZATOPEK EMAIL | david.zatopek@corgan.com V. PRESIDENT / CORGAN TELE | 214.757.1677

SKILLS RHINO 3D

VRAY

REVIT

LASER CUTTING

PHOTOSHOP

CNC

InDESIGN

3D PRINTING

ILLUSTRATOR

MODELING

GRASSHOPPER

GRAPHIC DESIGN


The School of Architecture at Oklahoma State University prepares future architects and architectural engineers to make vital contributions to humanity through the creation of architecture. The School focuses its unique combination of accredited programs in architecture and architectural engineering to prepare and inspire students for the professional leadership roles and responsibilities required to shape the physical environment and to have a positive impact on the social, economic and cultural qualities of life in Oklahoma and the entire international context. The School of Architecture endeavors to instill in each individual a sensitivity to human needs, a genuine concern for quality, integrity and high ideals, a positive attitude for life-long learning, and an appreciation for one’s own self-esteem. The “concept� for our school and the focus of our studios is to mirror the societal responsibilities of our profession and to promote a thoughtfully designed response to the environmental needs of our culture. The range of design concerns, from the scale and needs of a single individual to the collective interaction of thousands, are studied and responded to in a project to project sequence throughout the five year undergraduate program. An emphasis on providing a service to the university and the public enhances the design studio experience, and provides an opportunity for each student to make a contribution to their community, their state and nation.


01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08

STAZIONI

FORO.

oklahoma state university school of architecture | sp.2014 studio V / self OCEANARIUM

SAN JUAN.

oklahoma state university school of architecture | fa.2014 studio VI / self BREWERY

OKLAHOMA CITY.

oklahoma state university school of architecture | fa.2014 studio VI / self LIBRARY

OKLAHOMA CITY.

oklahoma state university school of architecture | sp.2015 comprehensive studio VII / self / PELLA DESIGN AWARD FRAMEWORK

PORTLAND.

oklahoma state university school of architecture | fa.2015 urban studio VIII / team NIKE

PORTLAND.

oklahoma state university school of architecture | fa.2015 urban studio VIII / team PHOTOGRAPHY europe study abroad & others | varies as desired / self SKETCHING europe study abroad & others | varies as desired / self

fa.2013

sp.2014

fa.2014

oklahoma state university

sp.2015

06 05

sp.2013

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fa.2012

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sp.2012

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pre-architecture fa.2011

fa.2015

sp.2016 post graduation


TOLLO CANOSA SANNITA STAZIONI (TRAIN STATION) / FORO, ITA / OSU STUDIO 5 / sp.2014 Using steel as the primary material, design a railway station for the Rete Ferroviaria Italiana; the high speed train system in Italy. The purpose is to provide the local people with more access to the train system of Italy and expand travel. The station must be able to accommodate a maximum of 500 travelers per hour and provide an information center for new-comers. This project was entered in the AISC Steel Competition for 2014. FOUR WEEK PROJECT / self / third year


FORO, ITALY

tollo canosa sannita

train station


MASSING

CREATING CONNECTION When designing the train station, a connection to the beach and providing space for local vendors and artisits was of the utmost importance. Research showed this to be true. Much of the beach in this area is owned by private clubs and hotels, so by providing a public train station with rights to the beach, it allows access to the public for both locals and visitors as well as local vendors and artists to display and sell their work along the beach walk.

LOBBY

Travelers can use the elevator or walk down the stairs to access the ticket and information desk. This lower zone also connects directly to the beach walk and the second set of stairs that connect to the boarding platform.

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SAN JUAN OCEANARIUM OCEANARIUM / SAN JAUN, PUERTO RICO / OSU STUDIO 6 / fa.2014 There are two driving forces on the island of San Juan, Puerto Rico; that of energy and drive, and that of relaxation and reflectance. The energy and drive, are focused in the heart of the old city to the Northwest. The relaxation and reflectance are focused near the open green spaces and parks to the Northeast. There is a lack of connection between the two, right in the middle of the island. We have the opportunity to create a link between the forces of the island. SIX WEEK PROJECT / self / fourth year


SAN JUAN, PUERTO RICO San Juan, the capital and most populous city of Puerto Rico, is very diverse. Architecturally, ethnically, and culturally. The oldest part of the city, known as Old San Juan, is home to most of the Spanish influenced architecture in the community; comprised of setted roads and incredibly old two-story buildings. The streets are small and tight and the local people use these small alleys to hold dancing, parties, dinners, and many night life activities that make San Juan what it is. There seem to be two driving forces on the island; that of energy and drive, and that of relaxation and reflectance. The energy and drive, are focused in the heart of the old city to the Northwest. The relaxation and reflectance are focused near the open green spaces and parks to the Northeast. There is a lack of connection between the two, right in the middle of the island. We have the opportunity to create a link between the forces of the island.


...ONTO THE SITE Located between muelle 8 and muelle 10, this site is the perfect spot for the "missing link". Bridging all the piers and connecting to the waterfront promenade, we have the opportunity to create a place for the perfect mix between the two forces of the city; all flowing into this site. The market will serve as the energetic and driven force for the locals and a fun place for tourists to see the San Juan culture, and the urban beach and passive plaza serves for the relaxation and reflecatance for individuals.

san juan oceanarium

muelle 09


When deciding a form and shape of the urban space, I used the circulation of pedestrians to help drive the direction. Coming from Old San Juan, the visitors hit the pier on an angle and wash into the market plaza like a wave; hitting the building mass and flowing into the more private and relaxing passive activity space. And as the visitor goes farther into the site, they feel more and more a sense of privacy and individuality.

CONCEPT MASSING

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GROUND LEVEL

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01 WATER FILTRATION 04 FOOD PREP 07 GIFT SHOP

02 LABORATORIES 05 LOBBY 08 AUDITORIUM

03 ANIMAL REHAB 06 OUTDOOR EXHIBITION 09 MANGROVE

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OCEAN TANK CORAL REEF MANATEE EXHIBIT RESEARCH INSTITUTE ADMINISTRATION RESTAURANT SERVICE

THIRD LEVEL

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HOLDING TANK BIOLUMINESCENT ROOF TERRACE SERVICE OCEAN TANK CORAL REEF MANATEE EXHIBIT


BRICKTOWN BREWERY BREWING ACADEMY / OKLAHOMA CITY, OK / OSU STUDIO 6 / fa.2014 From proportions, to levels, to circulation, to materials, this brewery follows A cycle. A very open, public street level that is almost completely encompassed in glass, followed by a more corporate, private second level emphasized by the brick band that connects with the local district, and finally crowned by a secluded residential level complete with a feeling of identity and ownership. FOUR WEEK PROJECT / self / fourth year


MILLING

MASHING

LAUTERING

WANDA JACKSON WAY

BOILING

HOPS

WHIRLPOOLING

MATURING

FILTERING

FERMENTING

COOLING


EAST RENO AVENUE SOUTH MICKEY MANTLE DRIVE


CANAL LEVEL

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FIRST LEVEL

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GRAIN SILO MILLING WATER STORAGE MASH TANK COPPER KETTLE COOLING FIRST FERMENT SECOND FERMENT CONDITIONING FILTERING BRIGHT BEER BOTTLING CANNING KEGGING SHIPPING/RECEIVING BREW MASTER RESTROOM HOP COOLER SHOP STORAGE BOILER DRY STORAGE BEER COOLER YEAST COOLER MUSEUM BEER GARDEN REFRIGERATION

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RESTAURANT COOKING AREA CHEF’S OFFICE DRY STORAGE JANITOR RESTROOM WALK-IN FRIDGE WALK-IN FREEZER BEER COOLER LOBBY GIFT SHOP TERRACE


In all facets of architecture, there is a cycle; a flow. A beer brewery is certainly no exception. It is evident in the beer brewing process that there is a pattern to follow and the architecture should follow that same process; follow a cycle. The flow of goods and ingredients is controlled by the placement of the brew tanks and the surrounding architecture for all other spaces outside the brewing area should all derive from the same cycle. From proportion, to levels, to circulation, to materials, this brewery follows that cycle. A very open, public street level that is almost completely encompased in glass, followed by a more corporate, private second level emphasized by the brick band that connects back to the local district’s materiality, and finally crowned by a secluded residential level complete with a feeling of identity and ownership. A certain level of privacy is provided while simultaneously giving great views of the Bricktown district. Each zone follows the cycle and the result, is a premier building in the local district of Bricktown, Oklahoma City.


UPTOWN LIBRARY PUBLIC LIBRARY / OKLAHOMA CITY, OK / OSU COMPREHENSIVE STUDIO 7 / sp.2015 In today’s libraries, there are seemingly only two choices: a communal gathering center, or a conservative, traditional space for books and study. Providing just one style of library is not enough to support the needs of the surrounding community. By inserting a traditional library inside a contemporary community center, all users can be accommodated. SIXTEEN WEEK PROJECT / self / fourth year / PELLA DESIGN AWARD


Oklahoma City, located in Central Oklahoma, is the Capital and largest city in the state with a population of roughly 1,300,000. “OKC” as it’s called, is a fast-growing and far reaching city with a small town community. With 14 different districts located within the city, each one brings a unique culture. The city is bisected geographically and culturally by the North Canadian River, which basically divides North Oklahoma City and South Oklahoma City. The two halves of the city were actually founded and plotted as separate cities, but soon grew together. The north side is characterized by very diverse and fashionable urban neighborhoods near the city center and sprawling suburbs further north. South Oklahoma City is generally more blue collar working class and significantly more industrial, having grown up around the Stockyards and meat packing plants at the turn of the century, and is currently the center of the city’s rapidly growing Latino community. The Uptown 23rd district is a smaller community just north of downtown, but is growing rapidly. With the popularity of urban living returning to younger generations, people are moving to the area like never before. In addition, the area is home to a few elementary schools as well as a local community college.

OKLAHOMA CITY


COMMUNITY


STUDY


MASSING In today’s libraries, there are seemingly only two choices: a communal gathering center, or a conservative, traditional space for books and study. Providing just one style of library is not enough to support the needs of the surrounding community. By inserting a traditional library inside a contemporary community center, all users can be accommodated.


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AXON COMPONENTS

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wood slat paneling suspended glass panel glass curtain wall wood slat drop ceiling floor supply slot diffusers


POD INTERIOR Inside the POD, people can access a vast assortment of informational books that many public libraries do not offer. With the community college just down the road, this POD library can accommodate various users without the distractions a community library can often times have.

N. ELEVATION


BROADWAY FRAMEWORK PLAN PORTLAND MASTERPLAN / PORTLAND, OR / OSU URBAN STUDIO 8 / fa.2015 After thorough research of the Portland Development Commission’s Framework Plan, our team prepared an in depth analysis for the site envisioned by the city. Recognizing the need for an urban center that linked Pearl District and Old Town/Chinatown, the idea of an inner city oasis that would allow relief from the city, as well as safety and direct access for all forms of transportation. By pushing the use of the car to the perimeter of the site, the focus could be shifted inward and the resultant urban center would become the gateway for all forms of public transit. SIX WEEK PROJECT / team / fifth year


PORTLAND, OREGON


STUDY AREA The Broadway Corridor Plan represents just a small portion of the proposed West Quadrant Plan, just one element of the larger Central City Plan, which is meant to create a highly sustainable development that effectively addresses the current climate change issue our society is facing. The intdended study area, divided into two sections by the prominent Broadway Street, is approximately 24 acres of land currently owned by the Portland Development Commission (PDC). It consists of the current United States Postal Service (USPS) site and the areas immediately surrounding it, including the Pacific Northwest College of Art (PNCA) building, the Greyhound Station, and the historic Union Station. This site is expected to provide a crucial connection between the different districts of the Portland area including the downtown district to the south, the Old Town/Chinatown District to the north, and the Pearl District to the Northwest, as well as the Rose Quarter and Central Business District. It is also intended to connect the preexisting “Green Loop” that runs across the Broadway Bridge to the northeast to the portion stretching north from Downtown. The PDC is currently involved in active negotiations with the USPS to acquire their 14 acre site to complete the PDC’s land goal. The USPS site would be an important anchor to the redevelopment of this area and a big step towards potential future phases of development desired by the PDC and the local community.7

CIRCULATION The Broadway Corridor is located on the converging of multiple forms of circulation paths, including cars, trains, street cars, pedestrians, and bicycles. The primary vehicular path is from the Broadway Bridge, which connects to the northeast corner of the site, and continues south along Broadway and west along Lovejoy Street. The secondary vehicular path is Johnson Street, which bisects our site on the western edge and the continues south on 9th Avenue. The public streetcar is located just one block to the east and west of the site, both running north to south. Union Station, the highly trafficked pedestrian-train station, is located on the northeast corner of the site, with the Greyhound bus station positioned just one block to the south. The primary bike path also intersects the site on the northeast corner from across the Broadway bridge by means of the Green Loop, from which the bikes then diverge south along Broadway and west along Lovejoy Street. The primary path for pedestrians is from the south, where the southern end of the Green Loop bisects the site. A secondary pedestrian path, in the form of a pedestrian bridge, connects the residential area to the east of the site to the Union Station.

STREETCAR PATH

P

PARKING

TRAIN PATH

STREETCAR STOP

PEDESTRIAN PATH

BUS STOP

VEHICLE PATH


VISION

INTERNAL TRANSIT ORIGINAL CONTEXT VISUAL CUES

TRANSPORTATION EVOLVING SPACE PROXIMITY OF NEEDS

BALANCE USES

PUBLIC & PRIVATE INTEGRATION

LINKING DISTRICTS

We envisioned the Broadway Corridor to be a prime place for the creation of an “inner city oasis,” a sort of “cultural campus” that breaks from the hustle and bustle of the fast-moving city outside, ruled by cars. It will be designed based on the human scale and will be inspired by the pedestrian. It will strive to transform the already busy Union Station into a new hub of mass transportation, maximizing the citizens’ use of the of public transportation and providing a critical link to the different forms of transportation the city has to offer, such as its street cars, buses, and trains. Car traffic will be completely limited to the perimeter of the site in order to maximize the area within the site that is completely safe for pedestrians. The buildings will respond to the regimented city blocks along 9th Avenue to the west, but will begin to break down as they near the center of the site to provide an intimate space, more suitable to the individual, while still creating an air of suspense.


OBJECTIVES After thorough research of the Portland Development Commission’s Framework Plan, our team prepared an in depth analysis for the site envisioned by the city. Recognizing the need for an urban center that linked Pearl District and Old Town/ Chinatown, the idea of an inner city oasis that would allow relief from the city, as well as safety and direct access for all forms of transportation. To create this cultural campus, the site needed to be liberated from the car. By pushing the use of the car to the perimeter of the site, the focus could be shifted inward and the resultant urban center would become the gateway for all forms of public transit. A balance of the site between public urban space and the built environment was met by responding to the existing blocks of 9th Avenue and allowing the site to degrade towards the inner plazas.

The two zones of the site are then knitted together through the continuation of the green loop path towards downtown. To accomplish safe passage from the Broadway Bridge, Lovejoy was shut down from car access and repurposed for the pedestrian and biker. Accommodation of the current and future needs of the site was determined through a market analysis of the expected growth in population. An intensive study of the city’s current development and proximity to all uses inside of a mile radius, allowed for an intuitive application of the site’s program based on the proximity to all uses.

PRESENT FUTURE LIBERATING

BALANCE

ACCOMMODATION

PEDESTRIAN

PROXIMITY

PROCESS

FADE

CARVE

SHIFT


PUBLIC CIRCULATION

PRIVATE CIRCULATION


LOCAL ANALYSIS 01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09

RESIDENTIAL FOOD ENTERTAINMENT RETAIL TRANSIT COMMUNITY HOSPITALITY OFFICE CULTURAL

Our initial approach to solving our design goals was to thoroughly research the surrounding areas in terms of their population density and building type (i.e. retail, food, business, entertainment, etc.).

We then tagged We then each building with the data we collected and added in their relative distance to our site in order to determine program development and location relevant to our site.


MASSING CALCULATION PROJECT WASP WANDERING ALGORITHM SEARCHING PARAMETERS

CALCULATION ON SERVICES Project WASP will throw out an initial radius, pull tags, and search for retail, entertainment, and food. It takes the uses of each tag and calculates its max occupancy, with a variable that can be controlled based on activity throughout the day. It then checks other services and divides them up to get the total numbers needed. Then it pulls the residence numbers and calculates the square footage needed to sustain the community. If the number exceeds existing data, it will cull the remaining square footage and calculate what our site needs to make up the deficiency. CALCULATION OF EMPLOYEES When WASP Stings the tags in the radius, it pulls tags that includes retail, entertainment, office, and food. It then calculates employees for office and service related industries which purges into a list per building in the area and then cross references that number with residential towers nearby. It is then divided out based on the square footages of our site, references FTE, and solves jobs needed on our site. It then calculates itself to solve how many patrons are needed to keep that function going, which ties into our site for residence and service needed. SURGE IN PEOPLE Wasp evolved to handle a parameter of people coming to the site in numerous ways. A level of sophistication is taken into account on biking, walking, driving, and mass transit. Built within the parameters, we can justify the amount of people coming in and out of our site based on the time of day. This, in turn, is taken into the overall uses of the radius and distributes them. It is added into a large pool of people and given a multiplier of dependency and averaged out to give us a more accurate estimate of people. In addition, Wasp has the capability to calculate square footage of parking and the overall cars per 1000 square feet based on the number of residences on site and within the radius of uses. Square footage can be added automatically when the conditions change within the radius. USE OF RESIDENCES WASP calculates several factors when searching for tags. The overall jig to calculate residences depend on the existing infrastructure. To avoid what is called “looping� we pulled tags, culled the residences, and crossed checked jobs in the area from all fields. WASP then sees potential growth in certain areas and calculates growth based on square footages of FTES. When the total employees needed is more than the residential towers and incoming people to the area can provide, it calculates and solves the number of units needed to sustain the community given the radius we provide. It then takes into account all the other variables on our site and fills the gaps and needs to then make our site stable again.


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PROGRAMING OPTIONS

T NM E N TAI L ER IDENTIA L T N ES RETAI R E C I O FF

KEY

6 2 , 0 0 0S F 1.8 MI L L I O N S 350,000 F SF 800,000 SF

OP.03

6 2 , 0 0 0S F 990 , 0 0 0 SF 80 0 , 0 0 0 SF 1.8 MILLION S F

OP.02

62,00 0 207,00 SF 0S 1.3 MILLION F SF 1.4 MILLION S F

OP.01

6.6 MIL L I O N S 17.3 MILLION F S 17.3 MILLION F SF 20.6 MILLION S F

CITY

OPTION 1: The first option, or “local option,” was developed by using an algorithm that analyzed all of the data gathered within a radius of 1500 feet from the center of the site, which represents the lower end of the range that defines “walkability” (1500-3000 ft). Using this data, the algorithm was able to calculate the needs of the current residents in terms of office space, food and retail options, and living spaces. This allowed us to design the site based on these preexisting needs of the locals. However, this model did not take into account the projected influx of residents onto the site, which resulted in a low square footage of residential development.

OPTION 2: The second option, or “residential option,” was developed by loading the algorithm with the projected influx of residents over the next ten years, which was predicted to be about 2200 residents. This algorithm suggested that we significantly underestimated the amount of residential and office square footage that would be needed on site to accommodate the programming projected to stabliize the community. However, this model did not take into account the nearby business district located a few blocks from the site, resulting in more suggested office space than seemed plausible.

OPTION 3: The third option used what we learned from the first two options to create a more balanced and complete design. The radius of data being utilized by the new algorithm expanded to 3000 feet, the upper end of the “walkable” distance, and accounted for residents moving to our site. The larger radius allowed us to pick up the business district to the northeast, which drastically lowered our need for office space. This, in turn, bumped up our number of residents, and services they would require, by 4000 people. Based on these numbers, the algorithm stabilized the site at 2.5 million square feet, which allowed us to include 500,000 square feet of extra office space to satsifty the needs of those commuting to the site and to reach our goal of 3 million total square feet.


SELECTION

2.5 MILLION SQUARE FEET: 800,000 SF / OFFCE 350,000 SF / RETAIL 1.8 MILLION SF / RESIDENTIAL 62,000 SF / ENTERTAINMENT

WELL-BALANCED

6 2 , 0 0 0S F 1.8 MI L L I O N S 350,000 F SF 800,000 SF

OP.03

After analyzing all three options provided by the algorithm, as well as our market analysis of the area, we decided that option 3 provided a more well-balanced approach than option 1 and 2. The scheme took into account commuters to the site and allowed the site to be able to expand with the growing needs of the city.


PASSAGE


By pushing parking to the perimeter of the site, and excluding the car from the inner urban center, the East/West through streets become carved out spaces for the safe passage of the pedestrian and biker. The pathways gently slope up from the street, obscurring the interior of the site from view and creating a moment of suspense before the slope down into the urban spine.


NIKE INNOVATION CENTER PORTLAND URBAN DEVELOPMENT / PORTLAND, OR / OSU URBAN STUDIO 8 / fa.2015 Portland’s drive and commitment for sustainability and innovation brought about a lifestyle for next generation mindsets and designers. This site, home to Nike’s Next Innovation Center, is located in the retail district of Portland, distinguished by its open urban spaces that collect people and activity. Building on the retail and urban spaces already in place, the goal is to anchor our three-block development by creating an innovative lab to house Nike’s creative, next generation endeavors. Supporting this innovation lab will be a string of incubator spaces, designed to provide a collaborative environment whose goal is to foster competition. This innovative, next generation, core will intersect all aspects of the daily routine. Permeating the routines of their work, live, and play, this innovative core will support the next generation of humans. TEN WEEK PROJECT / team / fifth year


PORTLAND, OREGON Portland has established itself as the leader in sustainability and green development in the United States. Its drive and commitment to this lifestyle has brought along with it the next - generation of innovative and active individuals. Our site is located in a retail district, distinguished by its open urban spaces that collect people and activity. Building on the retail and urban spaces already in place, the goal is to anchor our three block development by creating an innovative lab to house Nike’s creative, next - generation endeavors. Supporting this innovation lab will be a string of incubator spaces, designed to provide a collaborative environment whose goal is to foster competition. This innovative, next - generation, core will intersect all aspects of the daily individual routine.


...VISION Permeating the routines of work, live, and play, our innovative core will support the next - generation of individuals.


BROADER CONNECTION

NIKE HEADQUARTERS


NIKE+ ACCELERATOR

INNOVATION CENTER

FACTORY STORE


... IT’S MUTUAL

NIKE

PORTLAND

PORTLAND IS A CULTURAL HUB FILLED WITH DESIGN MINDED PATRONS AND COMPANIES

CUTTING EDGE

INNOVATION NIKE IS ON THE FOREFRONT OF NEW TECHNOLOGIES AND DESIGN

A MAJOR DRIVER FOR PORTLAND IS CLEAN SUSTAINABLE LIVING

SUSTAINABLE

OPPORTUNITY INNOVATION THROUGH SUSTAINABILITY IS NIKE’S VISION OF GROWTH

LOCATED IN A RETAIL DISTRICT, THE SITE IS PERFECT FOR AN ENTREPRENEURIAL HUB

RETAIL CORE

ACCELERATOR CONNECTS START-UP COMPANIES TO ANGLE INVESTORS, VENTURE CAPITALISTS, AND INDUSTRY LEADERS


NIKE+ ACCELERATOR 660 COMPANIES 89% ACTIVE OR ACQUIRED $1.81B TOTAL FUNDING $4.4B MARKET CAP

START-UPS MOVE TO PORTLAND HQ .I BEGIN COLLABORATION WITH NIKE+ MENTORS .II PRODUCTS CORRELATED WITH NIKE .III PRODUCTS DEVELOPED AND REFINED .IV DEMO DAYS .V PRESENT PRODUCT CONCEPTS TO OVER 1,000 NIKE LEADERS, INVESTORS, VENTIRE CAPITALISTS, INDUSTRY LEADERS, AND THE MEDIA

MENTORS TOOLS CONNECTIONS FACILITIES DEMO DAYS INVESTORS WORLDWIDE NETWORK MARKETING FUNDING DESIGN

PROGRAM


DREAM TO PROVIDE A SPACE FOR LIVING, NESTED IN AN ENVIRONMENT CAPABLE OF FOSTERING CREATIVE AND INNOVATIVE IDEAS. PROVIDING THE FORWARD THINKING INDIVIDUAL WITH A SPACE FOR DREAMING. CREATE WE’VE CREATED STUDIO + LAB SPACES DESIGNED TO ENCOURAGE INTERACTION AND CROSS CONTAMINATION BETWEEN FIRMS. OPEN SPACES AND APPROPRIATE FACILITIES HAVE BEEN PROVIDED TO ACCOMPLISH THIS GOAL. REFINE NIKE’S FACILITY PROVIDES ITS TENANTS [OF BUSINESS + RESIDENTIAL] WITH TESTING LABS EQUIPPED WITH THE TOOLS NEEDED TO REFINE AND PERFECT IDEAS AND BODIES. THE ACTIVE FLOORS ENV. CHAMBERS, A TEST TRACK, CLIMBING WALL, AND MULTIPLE OTHER HELPFUL FACILITIES. EXHIBIT TO PROVIDE A SPACE FOR LIVING, NESTED IN AN ENVIRONMENT CAPABLE OF FOSTERING CREATIVE AND INNOVATIVE IDEAS. PROVIDING THE FORWARD THINKING INDIVIDUAL WITH A SPACE FOR DREAMING.


SKY LOUNGE

RESTAURANT / BAR

HOTEL ENTRY

PARKING


INTEGRATION

HIGH-END / FAMILY UNITS

ENTREPRENEURS MILLENNIALS

INVESTORS MENTORS DESTINATION LIVING

INNOVATION CENTER

ATHLETES ENTREPRENEURS INVESTORS MENTORS

RETAIL CORE

HIGH-END

EXTENDED STAY HOTEL

POD / WORK-LIVE UNITS ROTATING ENTREPRENEURS ESTABLISHED COMPANIES

RETAIL CORE

STUDIO / LAB SPACE ACTIVE SPACE

EXHIBITION HALL

AUDITORIUM

PIONEER SQUARE

LONG SECTION


The heart of the development is expressed through the innovation center that connects all three sites and is integrated through an outdoor congregation space. The create phase is implemented through open studio + lab spaces designed to encourage interaction and cross contamination between firms. To facilitate the refine phase, Nike provides its tenants (business + residential) with testing labs equipped with the tools needed to refine and perfect ideas and bodies. The active floors inculde enironmental chambers, a test track, rock wall, and basketball courts. These floors also contain a wellness center, studios for classes, and gym for tenants that merge with the innovation center.


INNOVATION CENTER


AUDITORIUM After designers and engineers finish refining and perfecting their new innovations, they have the opportunity to show and present their ideas to the public and various entrepreneurs inside the NEXT Auditorium. At the end of each quarter, the cycle of new entrepreneurs present their items to an open event. At these events, the public can attend to expand their knowledge and gain inspiration on sustainability. Afterward, the innovators and guests move over to the Exhibition Hall to attend the showcase where the creations are displayed.


EXHIBITION HALL


PHOTOGRAPHY FROM THE WORLD / PERSONAL / varies A hobby of mine is photography. I enjoy capturing images of architecture as well as city scenes that speak to me. I am a beginner, but my hopes are to make my hobby into something I can exhibit to the public via internet or other means that come about. ONE TO EIGHT WEEKS / team(s) / 3rd & 4th year


SKETCHING FROM THE WORLD / PERSONAL / varies I was seriously introduced to pencil sketching when I traveled to Europe with the OSU School fo Architecture Europe Program. The professors who mentored us overseas taught us techinques and the importance of sketching as a means of capturing the essence a piece of architecture that photographs simply cannot get. AS DESIRED / self / varies


/ 01

03 potsdam

CITIES EXPLORED

04 sperlonga 02 belgium

01 rome

/ 02 / 03


/ 04 / 05

06 orvieto

05 evereaux

/ 06


CITIES EXPLORED 05 rome 03 rome 04 orvieto

02 interlaken

01 hadrian’s villa

/ 02

/ 01


/ 03

/ 04

/ 05


THANK YOU


Architecture Portfolio 2016