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03 2011

MARCH

Overlooked 2010 Stories

Suffering? For Art?

Kanye West

Status Updates: The New Headlines

Jesus, Pharaoh, or Jackass?

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Issue 3, March 2011

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Yeti Editorial Staff EDITOR IN CHIEF NEWS EDITOR ASSISTANT NEWS EDITOR ARTS & LIFE EDITOR ASSIST. ARTS & LIFE EDITOR

VIEWS EDITORS ASSISTANT VIEWS EDITOR DESIGN EDITOR

Morgan Kayser Rea Kyani Stefan Massol Vincent Dale Erika Sloop Phillip Garami Thomas Nudi Lurvin Miladis Jordan Staniscia

Letter from the Editor This issue of The Yeti is special. It’s The Yeti’s version of spiraling out of a boring, sepia-toned lifestyle, through a twister and landing in Technicolor Munchkinland. Finally, we’re in color. Due to an increase in our advertising revenue and our grant money, we’ve been able to make a design leap our team has dreamed about for years: full color! This will enable us to provide better quality pictures, more interesting layouts, and overall more innovative and eye-catching design. From featuring the work of local artists on the cover and within the issue to spotlighting photographs of art and demonstrations, pictures throughout this issue are worth more than 1,000 words. They can teach you about a new style of demonstration (Endurance Art on page 22), help you experience an international movement (Social Networking Sites on page 8) or show you what you missed this past year (2010 spread on page 12). So this issue, revel in the imagery. Welcome to a world of full color! Morgan Kayser Editor in Chief

Mission

FACULTY ADVISOR

Paul Rutkovsky

FRONT COVER ART

David Tarafa Erika Sloop

The Yeti is a student-run, conversation-driven media outlet in Tallahassee that serves our readership by providing an alternative to corporately funded, commercial media. We publish in print twice a semester and online twice a week. We focus on providing new perspectives on current events and investigating under-represented and under-reported local issues. Our aim is to convey the voice of the community in hopes of sparking a dialogue between students and community members, and to create an educated exchange of information that will motivate our readership to be aware and active members of society.

The Yeti operates only with the help of a dedicated staff of volunteer writers. We thank them for their hard work and support. If you’d like to get involved with The Yeti, e-mail fsuyeti@gmail.com or visit our website: www.theyetionline.com.

Campus Progress works to help young people — advocates, activists, journalists, artists — make their voices heard on issues that matter. Learn more at CampusProgress.org.

BACK COVER ART

Want to Advertise with The Yeti? We love supporting local businesses and Tallahassee events. Contact us at fsuyeti@gmail.com for pricing and other information.

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The opinions expressed in the Views section are those of the writers, and do not necessarily represent the views of The Yeti itself.


Table of Contents

News

Views

Arts & Life

04 Web ID

10

Boy Bands

18

Safe Should 05 How You Be? 12

Overlooked 2010 Stories

20 Reviews

Price of 06 The Spice

Tales From Tampa, FL

21

Kids Bop

22 Endurance Art

Does consolidating your web accounts mean your identity is safer?

Concealed weapons on campuses... For safety!

They still haven’t legalized pot yet? Really?

14

08 Social Networking 16 Sites Twitter, Facebook and Tumblr become obstacles for dictatorship.

The future is now! Look what happened to your favorite boy bands!

Here’s the shit you missed last year, putz.

Mysterious postcards we received in the mail... and they keep coming.

An academic analysis of the latest edition of kids covering pop songs.

Kanye West

Is he a strategic genius or just an asshole?

A review of one of the most distinguished and inspiring books ever written; and a Panda Bear album review.

Dubstep Rolls into the Mainstream

Take ecstasy and read this article.

Is a man crucifying himself to a Volkswagon Beetle art?

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News

Attention online shoppers:

National Web ID aims to prevent identity theft Jess Moody

STAFF WRITER

No thief should covet the measly pickings of a 20-year-old’s bank account. Although, as an age group who frequently transfer personal information online, students should worry the most about protecting their teeny fortunes and themselves from identity theft. In this wavering period in online security, the White House stepped in to create the “National Strategy for Trusted Identities in Cyberspace” (NSTIC). Headed by the Commerce Department, this group is designed to help keep that heart rate steady with the implementation of a universal Web ID. The Web ID will minimize the amount

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of identifying information a user must present to authenticate themselves online. The hope is that identity theft will decrease since users will not need to give as much personal or financial information, especially in the cyber marketplace. “Let’s be clear: We’re not talking about a national ID card,” said Secretary of Commerce Gary Locke during a speech at Stanford University. “We’re not talking about a governmentcontrolled system.” Americans can choose to receive one username and password for blanket access to all their accounts: e-mail, Facebook, medical records, online banking, etc. Although this may sound like a step in the wrong direction (i.e., if someone can access your Web ID, they

can access all your online accounts), Google’s Open Web advocate Chris Messina explains that its intended purpose is to keep information secure. “One username and password for everything is actually very bad ‘security hygiene,’” he tells WebProNews. “However, nothing in NSTIC advocates for a particular solution to the identity challenge – least of all supporting or advocating for a single username and password per person.” Thus, the WebID is completely voluntary. Internet surfers can choose to have the government-protected security ID, or continue to remember multiple passwords for each account they visit. Overall, drafts of the NSTIC say the strategy in creating this extensive identification service rests on four guiding principles: • The identity solutions must be secure and resilient. • They must be interoperable. • They will be voluntary. • They must be cost effective and user friendly. The efforts exerted by the Obama Administration for a secure internet are admirable, but it’s up to the user to decide if a Web ID is necessary. One side provides the opportunity to keep personal information protected, but still runs the risk of having all accounts simultaneously accessed if someone gets a hold of that password. According the NSTIC.gov, the policy draft released in June 2010 but the program implementation is still under heavy debate. The Commerce Department will release the program after receiving feedback during this public comment period. “The reality is that the Internet still faces something of a trust issue,” said Locke. “It will not reach its full potential until users and consumers feel more secure than they do today when they go online.”


How Safe Should You Be? Anibal A. Pacheco CONTRIBUTING WRITER With the amount of crime issues of campuses today The Florida Senate wants some students and faculty on campus to feel safer. They want to pass a bill called Senate Bill 234. Senate Bill 234 would allow people to carry concealed weapons onto college or university facilities if they have a concealed weapon permit. At a Congress of Graduate Students meeting, the Graduate Senators concluded that they would not stand by this bill. FSU Student Government President Dustin Daniels offered the undergraduate senate’s stance on the bill, stating that the university senate is against S.B. 234 due to the potential of students’ “irresponsible behavior.” Daniels also brought up a new security fee students may have to pay to help FSU provide higher security and safety, such as more staff in law enforcement. Currently FSU has stretched their resources to cover more than just its main

campus, like Innovation Park, Heritage Grove and The Magnetic Laboratory. The proposed security fee would be $0.97 per credit hour. Officer Perry from the FSU Police Department gave his reasoning of being against S.B. 234 saying that “it would be taking a step backwards.” . In 2010 alone there were five weapon-related arrests made by the FSUPD and in 2009 there were five more. Jesus Hernandez, a freshman Psychology major, said that he wouldn’t mind S.B. 234 if only they “amend it, it’s too easy to get a concealed weapons license in Florida.” Currently to be eligible for a concealed weapons permit you must be 21 or older, show competency with a firearm, be a U.S. citizen, and show proof of residency. When asked what should be changed when getting a permit Hernandez said showing proof of competency with a firearm. He believes the term to be “too broad.” Hernandez, supporting the security fee, believes that “it’s paramount to support and fund our police force

and staff.” The application for the concealed weapons permit asks for proof of competency from several sources, like a hunting course given by the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission or any National Rifle Association firearms safety/training course. Shantel Moten, a freshman majoring in Women’s Studies and Political Science, had only one thing to say in response to the effects of Senate bill 234 should it pass: “It would be terrifying.” What will happen to the bill while in committee is currently unknown. FSU is against the bill and, in turn, has suggested the security fee to help expand FSUPD and other safety organizations to eliminate the need for concealed weapons.

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News

The W Price of Spice Katherine Brennan CONTRIBUTING WRITER

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alk into some head shop, tobacco store or even gas station and you can buy substances called K2 or Spice for about 50 dollars a pack. The product resembles marijuana, but is labeled as herbal incense. The federal government is currently proposing legislation to ban products like K2 and Spice, which are composed of variant synthetic cannabinoids, and list them as Schedule I controlled substances. Cannabinoids are synthetically altered to produce THC, which is the primary psychoactive component of marijuana. However, some skeptics are afraid that this will not stop the problem because chemists will come up with new forms of synthetic marijuana by altering synthetic deviations of the cannabinoids that will not be covered by this particular bill. A local Tallahassee head shop sells its own “home brand” herbal incense. A posted sign states “our herbal incense will not be banned by the current legislation.” According to the shop, which asked not to be named, only five substances are covered by this ban and the form they use in their product is not included. As the federal government urges local and state authorities to pass their own legislation, one has to wonder if this will really solve the problem at hand. The reason for this urgent push for regulation is that these products are not intended to be smoked, labeled “not for human consumption” as they produce very high safety risks, much stronger than those of marijuana. Marijuana is currently a Schedule 1 narcotic, despite the fact that medical marijuana is sold to patients who have obtained a license, treating anything from multiple sclerosis to glaucoma. In 1988 the Drug Enforcement Administration’s very own Chief Administrative Law Judge Francis L. Young even stated that, “marijuana in its natural form is one of the most therapeutically active substances known to man.” Regardless of its medical use, marijuana still remains illegal while more harmful synthetic marijuana remains on local shelves. Not only is synthetic marijuana legal but it does not show up in drug tests, another reason for the recent surge in users who are looking for an undetectable high. Synthetic marijuana is also legal in another

form: Marinol, a pharmaceutical sold to treat anorexia and nausea. Coincidentally this pill capsule is another variant of synthetic marijuana. Many might ask if synthetic marijuana is so much worse for you than marijuana, then why is it legal? The answer: industry. These drugs, though potentially costing individuals a considerable amount of money, make pharmacies the wealthiest industry in America. Chemists take variants of drugs including methamphetamines and produce a product called Sudafed and market that it is the only solution to a common cough. After a recent study, George Washington University Medical Center alongside the support of other medical journals, there were over 100,000 annual deaths attributed to pharmaceuticals alone in the U.S. while, marijuana was credited with zero. Marijuana has the potential to become one of the most beneficial medicinal plants in the world, proven to be the most effective multipurpose plant found thus far. If utilized to the best of its abilities, it could be a main source of fuel, clothing, food and paper in America. This is only its potential however, because industrial marijuana, also known as hemp, is also prohibited from being grown on U.S. soil. Industrial marijuana is easily grown and cultivated and could thus make the United States a major exporter, increasing revenue. If America were to decide to alleviate the ban on not only industrial marijuana but the drug as well, the amount of money the U.S. government would save is endless. According to a study conducted by Bloomberg BusinessWeek, taxation alone would not only bring in anywhere from 10 to 14 billion dollars annually, but would bring an end to organized crime caused by marijuana prohibition (that would save law enforcement 7.7 billion dollars annually). Not having to pay prosecutors or house marijuana offenders in federal prisons would bring in additional savings, an example being the cost of prosecuting actor and comedian Tommy Chong. Singlehandedly this one prosecution cost the federal government 12 million dollars to arrest him on charges of conspiring to sell drug paraphernalia. Now while Tommy Chong was safely apprehended and placed behind bars, the government has yet to locate the whereabouts of other wanted


Marijuana in its natural form is one of the most therapeutically active substances known to man. and dangerous fugitives, like Osama Bin Laden. Even with unsubstantial evidence of containing carcinogenic substances, tobacco and alcohol remain legal and the two biggest causes of death in America. Though synthetic marijuana will soon be outlawed, whether by state or federal legislature, the production of different variations of THC will be soon underway and obtainable once again. If marijuana were legal, would people still smoke a more dangerous and harmful synthetic marijuana? Whatever the answer, the government regulates more harmful drugs like nicotine, alcohol and prescription pills, and stands strong on its stance against a natural growing plant.

Arthur (850) 980-3369 Issue 3, March 2011

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Social Networking Sites A New Kind of Protest

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Rea Kyani & Emma Thornton

NEWS EDITOR CONTRIBUTING WRITER


News

A protester of the Egyptian riots displays his opinion through a self-made poster, in which the icons of major social-networking sites are used to spell out "Egypt." The icons include Internet Explorer, Google, Yahoo, Pay-Pal and Twitter. Since their inception, social networking sites such as Facebook and Twitter have allowed users to communicate on a global level. News in Abingdon, Australia can reach Zamora, Zambia faster in a Tweet on Twitter or status update on Facebook than the amount of time needed to place a call on a cell phone. However, before believing this spread of information to be mutually beneficial to all involved, one should note that hardly any status update contains actual news. According to an analysis by Pear Analytics, the most common genre of Tweet is calculated to be “pointless babble” as 40.55% of Tweets, seconded by “conversational topics” at 37.55%, then “self-promotion” and “spam,” with “news” ending with only 3.60% of them all. Yet the fact remains that when the recent affairs concerning Egypt surfaced online, sites like Facebook and Twitter were on the forefront. Onlookers from any and all nations could comprehend the tension of Egypt’s government and the anxiety of her citizens by way of now famous tweets like “There are 1000 protesters still in tahrir, 100 people chanting the people want the square cleared” and “Even when u hear about a school where the children went protesting the principal, well, those children learned about freedom of expression.” To the Egyptian protestors, these networking sites became the greatest means of communication to the largest number of like-minded individuals. From innocent beginnings as this generations’ main source of social

interaction, came the means for the people of Egypt to collaborate marches, protests, and riots – a mobilization of those who wanted to use their voice. Sites like Facebook and Twitter were no longer just superfluous “babble.” They transformed into a reliable source of news – dependable, trustworthy, and unlimited in the right of free speech. On January 29, internet services in Egypt were shut down. As the rioting and protesting increased in severity, the Egyptian government felt they had to do something to put a dent in how quickly these events were growing and thus, contacted the four main internet service providers in the country to “turn off” the Internet. Egyptians were not only cut off from each other, but from the rest of the world. The only line that remained functional was the one used for the Egyptian Stock Market. While most Internet connections were restored on February 2nd, a debate about the rights of citizens in times of uncertainty is brought to the surface. The Internet is believed by most to be a right, not a privilege that can be revoked if the government is unhappy with the behavior of its citizens. “I didn’t realize Egypt could actually shut down the Internet,” said one Florida State Student, Kirstyn Ann Cataldo. “In fact, it’s scary to think about. Imagine how people would react in the United States if Obama made the same decision.” The main issue that critics draw from such actions is the denial of citizens’ freedom of expression. They believe that governments should not have the right to keep their citizens from utilizing the Internet and social mediums to contact their friends or loved ones, to surf the web, or check their bank account. Hillary Clinton was quoted by the Los Angeles times as saying, “The rights of individuals to express their views freely, petition their leaders, worship according to their beliefs – these rights are universal, whether they are exercised in a public square or on an individual blog. The freedoms to assemble and associate also apply in cyberspace.” The Egyptian riots also affect the reasoning and potential laws of other countries, and how they would handle such occurrences on their own soil. The “Protecting Cyberspace as a National Asset” bill was proposed by United

States Senator Joseph Lieberman in June of 2010. It would create the Office of Cyberspace Policy and National Center for Cybersecurity and Communications, a division of government which would be responsible for creating laws and regulations regarding the Internet and its uses. This bill also creates an “internet kill switch.” This center for Cyberspace Policy would have the ability, by allowance of the President, to shut off U.S citizens’ access to the internet, not unlike what occurred in Egypt. To another Florida State student, social networking sites like Twitter, Tumblr, and Youtube became the largest resources for news from Egypt. Vladimir Vicenty, an avid 21-year old blogger, shared his opinion on the subject, “You can’t take every opinion or post as credible, but I feel like social networks actually provide a better perspective. Wherever the news can’t be, people can. They don’t have the same limitations.” Such significant events allow for the social networking infrastructure to prosper and to become a creature more personal, more immediate and more advanced than any preceding organism. “Everyone has a Facebook, everyone gets a Twitter,” Said Vladimir. “I feel like a lot of the information that young people get now is on the Internet. Once the Internet goes down, everyone goes crazy.”

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Views

“Who Asked for Boy Bands Back?” or April Fools on New Year’s Eve Amanda Lackey CONTRIBUTING WRITER Confusion spread New Year’s Eve 2010 when during Dick Clark’s Rockin’ New Year’s Eve, Ryan Seacrest announced, “Here are New Kids on the Block… and the Backstreet Boys!” Those who did not immediately change the channel were aghast seeing both bands performing synchronized dance moves across the stage, singing their hits from more than ten years ago. I watched this myself and no doubt it was hard not to sing along, having been an avid Backstreet Boys fan in my younger years. As the “bands” began to sing and dance to a medley of their older songs, my mother raised the television’s volume in excitement. Above

the sounds of “Backstreet’s Back” she shouted, “If they are touring again, I want to see them in concert!” Although my mother was just as excited to see the Backstreet Boys perform as she was when she took me to see them many years ago, this cannot be said for most people. The performance was the kick-off of their 2011 tour, and all many could do was stare in disbelief. Americans’ (at the very least) perceptions have changed since the days in which boy bands were at the top of the popularity ladder. March of 1999. The Backstreet Boys’ album Millennium released, as well as *NSYNC’s album No Strings Attached; both eventually reach number one on the U.S. Billboard 200. The Backstreet Boys released another album only one year later, Black and Blue, breaking

Confusion spread New Year’s Eve 2010... When Ryan Seacrest announced, “Here are New Kids on the Block… and the Backstreet Boys!”

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records, selling nearly five million copies in its first week of sales. The era of the boy band was peaking. Prepubescent girls and mothers alike had a crush on one or two men from both bands and most little boys wanted to be them (never openly admitting it). The bands had it all: their hair was delicious and gelled, their lyrics were wholesome, and their dance moves were momapproved. Boy bands were the epitome of pop. After the extreme success of Black and Blue, The Backstreet Boys took a threeyear hiatus. Following suit, *NYSNC also went on “extended hiatus”. The Backstreet Boys returned in 2005, with their album Never Gone, which made it to the third spot on the Billboard 200. Their next album, which was released in 2009, only made it to the ninth. With each new album and each year passed, their place on the chart lowered, as did their popularity, and frankly, they will probably never reach that number one spot again. But, they keep returning. Their 2011 tour has wiped away any chance they may have had at respect and brought humiliation to new levels, for they have returned with an accomplice, New Kids on the Block. New Kids on the Block reached their peak nearly two decades ago. The fact that these two bands are going on tour together makes one wonder if the whole thing is a big joke. Their return is mindboggling. Perhaps the bands are clinging to a hope that they will one day make it to the top again. It would seem more likely their return is to exploit their few devoted fans still living in the nineties, all the aging Generation Y mothers clinging to the idea that their now adult children still like boy bands, and those who wouldn’t mind paying to mock them. Our likes and dislikes change day-today, and what was popular yesterday most likely won’t be popular a couple of months from now. This is the nature of trends. The pop of the nineties is drastically different than the pop of today, but one thing remains the same: youth


New Kids on the Block reached their peak nearly two decades ago. Students! 10% OFF Every Monday! 15% OFF EveryTuesday for Everyone!

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is what drives pop music. The boy bands of the nineties are no longer appealing to many who adored them. They have grown up and so has most of their audience. It seems interest in new music trends spans only about a decade, if that. An online news site, The Independent, published the secret formula of “the boy band” in 2004. According to the article, a boy band, on average, made up of 4.14 members. Of these members, one will be married, one will be extremely attractive, one will be supposedly gay, and one will have a boy-next-door air about him. The sometimes fifth member will attempt to start a solo career, or maybe even become an actor. Other key components to the boy band are its life span (no more than a decade) and this pedophiliac requirement: the band must attract little girls. All of these factors hold true for the boy bands of the nineties, as well as New Kids on the Block. In the end, most careers for the members of boy bands are duds. They slip into D-list celebrity status, host a game show or

become a cast member for a reality TV show. A few exceptions are Justin Timberlake (*NYSNC) and Mark Wahlberg (New Kids on the Block) who are still living in the spotlight and have found dignity since their boy band days. What now appeals to us who once adored *NYSNC and The Backstreet Boys is extremely different. We have grown older and have found solace in a very different kind of artist, one still absorbed in auto-tuning, but not so wholesome. The fact is everyone goes through a “boy band phase,” but it doesn’t last forever. Tastes change as time passes, and a lot of time has passed since both New Kids on the Block and the Backstreet Boys were popular. Although these bands are has-beens and never-going-to-be-agains, they will be touring this year. We cross our fingers and hope that this will truly be the last tour and wonder exactly who this strange and elaborate joke is on, the boy bands themselves or the general American audience.

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The Persistence of Memory:

A Look at the Unnoticed Headlines of 2010

Catalina Chiang CONTRIBUTING WRITER It seems the year 2010 has been shadowed by the stardom of teenage heartthrob Justin Bieber or details of Prince William’s fall wedding. While it may just be an issue of media coverage or public accessibility, there is definitely something to be said about the interests of the media’s general audiences. It seems like Americans are more likely to recall the events of the last episode of The Jersey Shore than the events of a fire in Bangladesh. With another year come and gone, we look to its news headlines and question what factors justified their permanence and pertinence in the media realm. We tend to reassure ourselves with the idea that time, magnitude of the event, and the excess of information that exists in the media play an important role in defining what matters to us. In the case of celebrities, many deaths are only deemed “notable” through the individual’s popularity and relevance to us, often rather than by the extent of their accomplishments. Science provides us with another similar explanation. In order for information to evolve from sensory memory to short term or long-term memory there has to be the appropriate amount of rehearsal. In other words, we must first consider whether the information is significant enough to occupy our thoughts in order to make it memorable. But the fact of the matter remains that the general public is missing out on a lot of important news. Within our complex sorting process, in which we separate significant news from insignificant news, there seems to be an answer

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to why some news goes unnoticed: our ideas of timeliness are seemingly overruled by a story’s potential impact. While this conclusion may vary from individual to individual, the grim reality is that we gravitate towards the concepts and ideas to which we can relate. It is because of this that we are generally only attentive to the things that rank higher in our hierarchy of importance, a chain of command dictated by our cultural values. The media, primarily in the twenty-first century, has played a significant role in shaping our immediate culture. It is a powerful force that can determine our identities and desires. And yet, the more we understand the scope of its influence, the more vulnerable we become. Some would even go as far as to suggest that the media is a primary component in constructing our ideas of social reality, which has contributed to the weakening of civic bonds. Even still, one thing is certain. There are a multitude of factors that influence our ability and decision to acknowledge or dismiss a news story. If we decide to disregard a story, the more likely it is that the story will be shadowed by another, more popular and culturally accessible story—like Lady Gaga’s newest outrageous outfit. It is a vicious and interconnected cycle, rooted fundamentally in our outlook of the world and our place in it. Today we are given another opportunity to re-examine a few of the many momentous, yet relatively unknown news headlines of the past year.

Notable Deaths #1: Frank Frazetta, Illustrator

News #2: Heinrich Boere, former SS member convicted for a 67-year-old murder charge.


NEWS

1

Fifth Deadly Attack on a School Haunts China

2

German court convicts Nazi of three 1944 Dutch murders

(The New York Times)

NOTABLE DEATHS

1

Frank Frazetta, Illustrator, Dies at 82; Helped Define Comic Book Heroes

SOCIETY & THE ARTS

1

Breakthrough documentary “House of Numbers” challenges conventional thinking on HIV, AIDs (Natural News)

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J. Irvin Dally, Despistado EP

4

Five masterpieces stolen from Paris modern art museum

(The New York Times)

(Associated Press)

3

Arsenic-loving bacteria may help in hunt for alien life

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90 May Be Dead in Ethiopian Airlines Crash (CBS News)

(BBC News)

BP admits it ‘Photoshopped’ official images as oil spill ‘cut and paste’ row escalates (The Telegraph)

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12 Ancient Landmarks on Verge of Vanishing

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Russia braces for terrorism’s return as 38 die in subway bombings (The Washington Post)

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Tropical storm leaves at least 115 dead in Central America

(National Geographic)

(CNN)

fire kills up to 150 in 9 Dhaka Bangladesh Has Bulged as 10 Yellowstone Magma Pocket Swells (Guardian.co.uk)

(National Geographic)

2

‘Empire Strikes Back’ Director Irvin Kershner Dies

3

Justin Mentell Dead: ‘Boston Legal’ Actor Dies in Car Crash At 27 (Huffington Post)

4

Peter Fernandez, Voice of Speed Racer in the U.S., Dies at 83 ( The New York Times)

5

‘Rosie the Riveter’ girl on ‘We Can Do It!’ WWII poster dead; Geraldine Doyle dead at age 86 (NY Daily News)

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(Pop Eater)

Ronnie James Dio, Rock Vocalist, Dies at 67 Lena Horne dies at 92; singer and civil rights activist who broke barriers (Los Angeles Times)

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Paul Gray Dead: Slipknot Bassist Dies At 38

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Gregory Isaacs, Jamaican Reggae Star, Dies at 59

(Associated Press)

(CBS News)

(Impose Magazine)

Problema: The Film of the Table of Free Voices (Dropping Knowledge)

(BBC News)

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Flying Lotus: Cosmogramma EP (Paste Magazine)

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About Elly Best Foreign Language Film, Iran (IMBD)

John Rabe: foreign Biopic War Film (Yahoo Movies) Gays fight back in ‘Stonewall Uprising’ (San Francisco Chronicle)

Everyone Else: A film of restoring and revisiting (New York Times)

Premiere: ‘Before 10 Album Today’ by Ariel Pink’s Haunted Graffiti

(LA Music)

Dean, Singer and 10 Jimmy Sausage Impresario, Dies (CBS News)

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Views

Tales from Tampa, FL We started receiving postcards to our home about a year ago. The return address line only read “Tales from Tampa, FL 33647” and each signed by a John Fisher with a simple drawing of a fish between his first and last name. Each postcard’s front was defaced in some manner, so our uneasiness was certainly not-without warrant; especially noting how strange they were. The “Tales” and vandalized artwork continued to become increasingly more and more disturbing as time went on. The postcards have since ceased and now there remains a collection of about at least sixty of these “Tales from Tampa, FL”.

1 I went to my local shooting range to purchase silver bullets… you know, to hunt werewolves. They were twenty five dollars apiece. I told the guy behind the counter, “I might be legally declared insane by the state of Florida, but I’m not crazy enough to fall for these prices.” He took off his “Vote McCain” hat and said, “Well I may sell dangerous weaponry capable of killing hundreds upon hundreds of innocent people to individuals not fit enough to own a butter knife, but I’m not sober.” We had a good laugh and talked about how socialism is ruining the country.

2 “You think you’re a special little N$#%@#, because you have pants and your daddy don’t?” My father asked me that Christmas Eve, wearing nothing but tighty-whities and a wife beater. I tried to look away when my daddy grabbed that canister of bear mace and jumped on the dinner table like there was a Gook in his foxhole. “I killed women and children, burned them up like Bagel Bites!” My mother leaned forward calmly and whispered, “Shut up Daryl, shut the fuck up. You weren’t in Vietnam, you crazy old bastard. Now go grab your water wings because we’re going to the YMCA for your water-aerobics class.“ My dad kind of let out this sad whimpering sound followed by a moist fart, stopped barking for a second and asked, “Do they take kindly to round eyes over there?”, “God dammit Daryl, how many times have I told you not to use that phrase.” My father took a deep breath and assumed a downward dog position, in the process breaking three vases. “This is why we can’t have nice things Daryl,” my mother said coldly, “This is why we can’t have nice fucking things.” I stared into my oyster stuffing and licked my lips; it was going to be a difficult childhood, I told myself.

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I was with my cousin Joey, from Brooklyn, at a Boston Red Socks game, because he prefers the Boston Red Socks over the New York Yankees and likes to meet new people. That particular day Joey was sittin’ next to what looked to me, at least, like a Mongoloid. He asked the kid, “You know, if you were at a nice barbeque place or somethin’ and they had like… people, on the menu. You know, like, real baby-back ribs or something… Would you try that shit?” He leaned forward and wrapped his arm around the kid’s shoulders and touched his face with sweaty palms, equally covered in mustard and ketchup and asked, “Well. Would ya!” The kid stared back at him, I swear, right into both his eyes at the same time, and said in a low and slow voice, “Fuck yeah I would.” Joey then stuck his hand down the boy’s pants, screaming, “You like that shit? You fuckin’ q$#%@” and then walked away, like nothing happened, shouting with his hands up in the air, “Never get yourself into anything you can’t get yourself out of in 30 seconds or less!”

4 “The fire of God is on your palette now boys!” Our father yelled at us, every night, while he poured “Toxic Waste” brand hot-sauce onto our tongues in excessive amounts while we were growing up, until about 12 when we could start to fight him off. The result of what you could call his “abuse” is our inability to taste food, of any kind, no matter what. No matter how much salt, ginger or any tantalizing seasonings! I damn him, now, in this courtroom, as he sits before us, your honor. He touched us… very emotionally and physically… with peppers.”, “Your honor!” Father screamed! “Listen, I didn’t do anything but demand the best of my children! I honed their abilities from an early age to stand up to the disease that is not being able to win The 19th Annual “Fire” Eating Contest!” Father glared at us. “Show them your tattoos!” He screamed directly at us! “Show them all your fucking tattoos!”, “Judge!” Someone screamed. “Overruled, or whatever, just show us these tattoos!” We took off our dresses and demanded the respect of the audience as the bees started flying out of our buttholes.

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The Yeti

Views

A Restrospective Review

Ev Malcolm CONTRIBUTING WRITER For nearly a decade now, Kidz Bop has been doing the world a service in compiling the yearly top hits from the hottest artists and dubbing them over with the melodious choruses of young children. In the past we’ve seen pop music legends such as Hilary Duff, Nick Lachey and The Jonas Brothers all assembled in one place like some kind of beautiful benefit concert that you could pop into your stereo. But truly they have outdone themselves with number 19, the most recent entry. Though the landscape of children’s music compilations will likely never be the same since the advent of the unforgettable mega-hit that was Kidz Bop 12, the latest iteration is about as close as we’ve come in the last half-decade. Having opted for more of a hip-hop vibe this time around over their common “touchy-feely” mush-aganzas has really brought the series into itself. And the exclusion of those screechy teens you might recall from 17 and 18 is a welcome relief to fans everywhere. Personally, I felt that La Roux’s “Bulletproof” was a tenfold improvement over Eleanor Jackson’s original and that the implications of “Animal” were much cuter when harmonized by young boys and girls. Okay, I can’t do this. I don’t care how much my editors said Kidz Bop would pay for a positive review, I won’t be able to sleep tonight knowing I stuffed that lie down your collective throats. Parents, probably the single best thing you could do for your children this year, aside from feeding them and sending them to school, would be to never buy them any Kidz Bop CD. Chances are you don’t know who Flo Rida is or why the club can’t handle him. Trust me when I say that this hulking, shirtless gangsta does not belong on or anywhere near a compilation of

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music intended for children between the ages of 5 and 12. He fits in there like Kimbo Slice fits in at a moonbounce birthday party. Kidz Bop has consistently proven itself to be a generational ear-sore since the days of Ricky Martin and Britney Spears. It’s never exactly been “on the money” with its propriety level, regularly firing off mature artists like Shania Twain and Mary J. Blige over the heads of kids, and occasionally drilling explicit ones like Kevin Rudolf and Li’l Wayne into their young verbal repertoires. The last few entries have boasted the likes of Lady Gaga and Justin Bieber (though why a song by a kid needs to be covered by more kids, I don’t quite grasp) and have changed the pace from tween drama to club banger. Either way, the end result has probably got to be the baldest insult to parental sensibility since Ren & Stimpy was considered children’s programming. I’m no censor, and I’m aware that one way or another, kids are going to get a hold of the things we don’t want them to have. What I’m opposed to is the handing of it to them readily before they’re even close to being able to understand what they’re singing along to. There’s an inherent flaw in the assumption that what is considered good by adults should be

allowed for kids just because they like it. My 6 year old sister would probably love a hazelnut Kahlua mudslide, but that does not mean I’m going to sneak her one in a corner booth of the nearest TGI Friday’s. You might be asking yourself “What should kids be listening to, what middle ground is there between Pooh Bear and Mike Posner?” Well, I accept that mainstream is everywhere, hence the name, and that kids are inevitably going to be bombarded with both the barrel-


bottom crap and the over-their-heads quality that should be respectively kept out of their reach. But I also recognize that there are tons of lighthearted, catchy music out there that kids can feel cool and grown up listening to without being steadily corrupted by shallow themes and brainless lyrics. (The man calls himself FLO RIDA and he is not clever!) I’m not talking about Radio Disney or that Nickelodeon pedophilia-facilitating garbage either. In a perfect world where ranters like myself were granted executive power over everything, I would see the likes of Vampire Weekend, more Black Eyed Peas, the Gorillaz, and No Doubt on Kidz Bop track listings. You want rap? Add some Lupe Fiasco. Reggae? Bedouin Soundclash is a fairly wholesome bunch (largely so in comparison to the more popular Beenie Man and Sean Paul). Granted, all of these artists have their share of mature songs, but their good stuff is glossed over because they’re not played on the radio 24/7 and that’s a shame. Kidz Bop is essentially a click-drag project whose M.O. targets kids that nag their parents into buying something neither of them understands. We are coming down from the era where cable was king, where no choices needed to be made because you could just flip on the tube and lose yourself in whatever the day’s programming provided. But now we find ourselves in a more proactive age of entertainment. DVR, Netflix, Red Box, all of these allow us to choose for ourselves, we no longer need to submit to projects like Kidz Bop, and Now! That’s What I Call Music. We have iTunes, we can make our own compilations and decide for

ourselves what is “good” and more importantly, what is appropriate. So friends, parents, pre-teen gangsters, we can all do better. Let’s postpone pouring the social-runoff soup into the next generation’s ears at least until they’re old enough to

make proper judgments for themselves. I know it takes effort to sift through the entertainment that isn’t tied to a brick and tossed through your window by passing moguls, but I assure you it’s worth the reward. Your children will appreciate it too, whether they know it or not.

My 6 year old sister would probably love a hazelnut Kahlua mudslide, but that does not mean I’m going to sneak her one in a corner booth of the nearest TGI Friday’s.

Scan this Code! Check out the commercial for the latest Kidz Bop album to see the absurdity with your own two eyes!

Issue 3, March 2011

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The Yeti

Kanye West

PHARAOH YEEZY BUILDS HIS TOMB Joel Bergholtz CONTRIBUTING WRITER

“IF YOU COULD SEE ME RIGHT NOWW!!!! SAY AHHHH!!” A Tweet like that from Kanye could only mean one thing: he’s back! With his latest effort achieving platinum status and another album set to release in March, it is safe to say Kanye is back to his old self. Yes, Kanye has resumed his obnoxious Twitter updates, replaced his bottom row of teeth with diamonds and, most importantly, is back to making hit songs. But before Kanye returned to America and musical dominance, the self-proclaimed “Culture Soldier” took a nine month hiatus living in Japan, Rome, and Hawaii. After a difficult 2009 campaign revolving around the infamous “Taylor Swift Incident,” along with legal issues and unwanted exposure from paparazzi, West took a break. Looking back through all of Kanye’s highs and lows from music to media, one thing has become increasingly clear: West has emerged not only as an iconic rapper, but as a man establishing himself as an artist and character in the American Canon. The American Canon is the attempt to put together a collection of works varying from literature to music to drama that have made the biggest impact on American culture. To earn a place in the American Canon is to be recognized for originality and exceptionality; to be recognized and discussed by every mind in America. Because this assembly of work aims to be accurate and precise, it constantly changes. Art, authors and characters in the American Canon’s legacy last forever.

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There is a general consensus that in order to be a character in the American Canon, you must be a fictional character like Huckleberry Finn. However, one must wonder if West’s public image is the true Kanye West or simply a façade he puts on to the world. While his controversies run rapid, his personal life remains vague, revolving only around what cannot be concealed to the public. My argument is simple: Kanye West balances his egotistical ranting public persona with his gifted and emotionally complex personal identity to create the controversial and exceptional megastar we know today. Looking first at West as an artist, it is easy to see his musical brilliance, as he has won an impressive 47 awards and 142 nominations. Throughout his career he continues to remain focused, releasing 5 albums in 6 years, all of which have gone platinum. He has created an impressive discography filled with articulate and powerful messages revolving around black culture, politics, and the life of an icon. Still, West prefers to focus on the bigger picture: hiding his deeper emotions in favor of a powerful and opinionated voice of the people. In 2008, 808s and Heartbreak saw West finally revealing his personal problems to the world, relying heavily on a voice-synthesizer to mask his voice and shroud his more intimate side. He balanced this career choice by returning to rap more villainous than ever with My Beautiful Dark Twisted Fantasy. The cover art depicts Kanye as a dark monster with red eyes and fangs holding a bottle of liquor and having sex with a harpy. One of the albums high points, “Blame Game” features a voice-altered West reflecting on his relationship, exclaiming, “You ain’t fitting to see a mogul get emotional.” This line reflects West’s inner-struggle, as the entire album reflects the struggle of balancing growth, wealth, fame, and

the power that comes with all three. Being a character in the American Canon isn’t achieved by just making good music. Kanye solidifies his character by combining his artistic ability with his outrageous public persona, forcing himself into virtually every mind in America. On a local level, FSU English Professor Matt Davis, who works in the Writing, Editing, and Media department, voices his opinion when asked about the rapper, “He combines his amazing talent with an impressive work ethic. He has a hell of an ego though,” emphasizing his own irritation. This comment reflects exactly what West wants and expects of people: The appreciation of his music and focus on his character. On a national scale, when former President Bush was asked about West’s accusations of Bush being a racist, Bush declared, “It was the lowest moment of my presidency.” The fact that a Kanye West comment is ranked highest on a list that included two wars and the largest recession since the Great Depression speaks volumes on how powerful Kanye West is as a character. At the 2009 VMA’s, the world again saw West act out on his emotions when taking the microphone from Taylor Swift during her acceptance speech, an act that prompted President Obama to call West a “jackass.” It isn’t a coincidence that these responses are from the most powerful positions in the nation. These strong reactions to a mere celebrity suggest that Kanye, for better or worse, really does hold a lot of power as an artist audiences invest their consideration in. The thought of somebody as talented as Kanye making such idiotic decisions time and time again point to the fact that he is merely playing his character, giving the audience what they want. And America has never wanted a peaceful and rational celebrity. When


ARTWORK BY

Kanye’s Controversies Timeline

Jessi Hamilton

November 2004 American Music Awards: Didn’t win and stormed out. “I refuse to give any politically correct bullshit ass comment, I was the Best New Artist this year,” Kanye says.

September 2005 Hurricane Katrina: “George Bush doesn’t care about black people.”

January 2006 Rollingstone cover as Jesus

November 2006 MTV Europe Music Awards: Rushed the stage after losing Best Music Video for “Touch the Sky.”

September 2007 MTV Video Music Awards: Pre-VMA performance he said, “I cant believe they let Britney Spears perform over me.She hasn’t had a hit record in years.” After not winning any categories- “That’s two years in a row man! Give a black man a chance. I am trying hard, I have the number one record man! Maybe my skins not right”

September 2008 Charged with one count of grand theft and one count of misdemeanor Vandalism for breaking a paparazzi camera man’s camera.

September 2009 MTV Video Music Awards: Took the microphone from Taylor Swift “Beyonce had one of the best videos of all time!” comparing Kevin Durant to Lebron James or Larry King to Bill O’Reilly, it becomes pretty obvious the villainous role consistently receives more attention. Controversy sells, and Kanye knows this. He keeps it mostly light hearted, focusing on materialism and media, stepping on toes but not crossing any lines, balancing this narcissistic image with his multi-layered artistic ability to create his place in the Canon.

People love Kanye for the same reason they hate Kanye, his indestructible multifaceted character. He is holding America’s attention, so when Mr. West exclaims, “Let’s have a toast to the douchebags,” realize you are all raising your glasses.

August 2010 The music video for his first single, Power off his new album depicts Kanye as a god.

November 2010 Kanye in the controversial MONSTER music video, which contained models who appeared to be dead.

Issue 3, March 2011

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The Yeti

Arts & Life

Music Review

Panda Bear’s Tomboy

Though there is still over a month until its release, Panda Bear’s Tomboy is already one of the most talked about albums of the year. Since the release of his 2007 masterpiece, Person Pitch, fans have been waiting anxiously for a follow up effort, and make them wait he has. Originally slated to drop in 2010, the release date for the new album is currently set for April 12th of this year. Panda Bear is the project of Noah Lennox, who is best known for his role as one of the founding members of Animal Collective. Lennox has said that on Tomboy, which will be his fourth solo release, he intended to overhaul his sound, limiting sampling and adding more live instrumentation. These specific changes are pretty subtle, largely because the guitar work that Lennox introduced to the album is very heavily warped, but overall, the album does differ from Person Pitch. Tomboy is harder to follow, taking

An Untimely Review of

Megan Heart CONTRIBUTING WRITER

listeners in a less obvious direction. The cuts on the album are still great, but they are more ambient and less experimental pop. On Tomboy, which he has said is darker than any of his previous releases, Lennox shies away from the inescapable melodies of Person Pitch in favor of more dense sounds. Luckily, Lennox doesn’t eliminate his Beach Boys-esque harmonies, which are clearly present on tracks like “Last Night At the Jetty.” The heavier cuts on the album, like the epic “Scheherazade,” require a little more patience, but are worth it in the end. As we have come to expect from Lennox, Tomboy is brilliantly produced. It’s difficult to listen to the album without becoming fully absorbed in its beautiful complexity. Tomboy will definitely be popular amongst fans of Animal Collective and of Panda Bear’s solo work, but in the end it may not be a big enough departure from his existing catalog to draw in much of a new audience.

Kitchen Confidential:

A D V E N T U R E S I N T H E C U L I N A R Y U N D E R B E L LY Catalina Chiang CONTRIBUTING WRITER Anthony Bourdain appears at first glance to be a character full of contradictions. He is: a long time recovered drug addict, vocal vegetarian condemner, challenger of celebrity chefs, poetic world traveler, and talented chef-at-large. When it comes to sharing his shocking experiences in the culinary world, Bourdain doesn’t hold anything back —he simply tells it like it is. Even as he shares his wild encounters with drugs, sex, and haute cuisine, Bourdain remains relaxed and comfortable in his rhetoric. This is the reason why Kitchen Confidential had such a prominent influence on the food world after its release. Bourdain’s candid autobiographical accounts force you to re-examine the meaning of food and the food industry in a very significant way by taking the pretension out of fine dining. He shows us that food can become

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a vehicle for human relationships—as chaotic and dysfunctional as they can sometimes be. Published in 2000, before Bourdain’s career with No Reservations, Kitchen Confidential touched on the undercurrents of contemporary culinary trends. While the world of cooking has changed, there is a lot that remains the same. Now eleven years later, the term “culinary” is colored by the influence of Food Network stars, but the hardworking and colorful characters that make up the internal structure of the kitchen are vaguely familiar to the ones that Bourdain describes. Ultimately, Kitchen Confidential is a book that introduces readers to a host of unforgettable characters, seedy kitchens, and insider information into the underbelly of the restaurant industry. This is a world that we come into contact with quite frequently yet understand very little about.


Dubstep Rolls into the Mainstream Michelle Lippman CONTRIBUTING WRITER America’s youth thrives on an updated hippie lifestyle of MDMA and the filthy beats of electronic music, a genre consisting of technology and instruments. The increased admiration for electro music, specifically dubstep, with intense bass and beat drops, is reinventing the original idea of rock festivals like Woodstock. “Electronic music generates all this energy that builds to amazing breaks or drops in songs. The driving beat just motivates me,” says Kaitlyn Downey, a Florida State University sophomore. While these new festivals attempt to maintain the general foundations of love, great music, outlandish clothing and impassioned dancing, they are morphing into an entirely unprecedented experience. Miami’s Ultra and Los Angeles’ Electric Daisy Carnival are two of the most famous electronic music festivals in the country. “The festivals now and in the past are similar because it’s the same idea of people gathering in one place to see artists they love,” said Timothy Porter, a Florida State University

junior and four year Ultra veteran. But while this “basshead” generation follows in the footsteps of hippie culture, it’s unavoidable that this new style of music will be generation defining. “Every generation has their own genre,” Porter said, “…ours is electronic music.” It is the electronic factor that is switching up the premise. Not only is the music and atmosphere modernized with colored and patterned light shows, LED hula-hoops, and musical technology, but the drugs have changed as well. “There’s definitely a relationship between drugs taken now and the style of music being played,” said Porter, “If you go to an electronic music festival, the drug of choice is going to MDMA, also known as ecstasy.” Similar to the baby boomer generation using LSD to boost their psychedelic rock experiences, electronic music listeners want to enhance their experience as well. Since electronic music often has high reliance on extreme lights and heavy beats, ecstasy is the go-to drug because those stimuli enhance the drug’s euphoric effects. Even though drugs are a music festival tradition, it’s often overlooked that they are a threat to the progression and success of electronic music. “Bands are tired of the droolers,” says Truewill Mashburn, the 34 year-old owner of The Engine Room, a Tallahassee venue, which frequently hosts electronic bands and deejays. While he does admit that it is possible that drug users can be genuine music lovers, he said, “The kids around who are only there for the drugs will screw up the scene, they are always what screws up the scene.”

Mashburn’s concerns for the stability and luster of the electronic music scene all stem from the idea that, like every other cycle of over popularized music, it’s getting too much attention from people who care solely about getting high and not the music. This is where he claims the deteriorating cycle starts, making the music go from good, to a fad, and then eventually molded into whatever is making money. “It’s sad because music is one of the last forms of communication and we’re turning it into a circus special,” said Mashburn, addressing this generation’s dilemma of letting electronic music progress to a movement or fall down the rabbit hole of trendy music fads.

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Issue 3, March 2011

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The Yeti

Arts & Life

Literally suffering for your art.

John David Ellis Jr. CONTRIBUTING WRITER There are two men standing roughly ten feet apart: one against the stark backdrop of an eggshell white wall with his left arm held delicately away from his body, the other poised with a .22 caliber hunting rifle in hand set to fire upon signal. Between the gritty quality of the 16mm film used to record the scene and the angle of the camera, neither of the men’s faces is distinguishable. There is silence, and then the man-as-a-target asks, “Are you ready?” Without any motion to show his acknowledgment the gunman squeezes the trigger and the shot rings out. The target’s cotton t-shirt ripples from the impact of the bullet as his whole body contracts in pain. The bullet enters the upper part of the man’s left arm, and then the segment is over. Eight seconds of video is all that exists of the spectacle. The stunt depicted is not from the latest Jackass movie nor is it staged in any regard— other than the fact that the shooting occurred in an art studio before a group of spectators. The “victim” Chris Burden, allowed himself to

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be shot in the arm on camera for his aptly titled 1971 performance piece, Shoot, not because he had a masochistic death wish. Burden endured the pain inflicted for the sake of a moderately new breed of art, an often violent yet entrancing evolution in art’s spectrum referred to by many as endurance art. Burden also subjected himself to acts of physical harm that included tying his arms behind his back and worming through 50 feet of broken glass, attempting to “breathe” water to near unconsciousness, and crucifying himself to the back of a Volkswagen among other disturbing oddities. Chris Burden is not the only one that has tested the physical boundaries of human existence for artistic expression. Serbian performance artist Marina Abramovic uses the body and its perceived limits as a means of creation as well. Abramovic emerged as a captivating artist following performances in which she, too, placed herself in harm’s way, and in one performance entitled Rhythm 0, it is at the hands of her own audience. A sign instructed participants to take any one of the seventy two items carefully selected by Abramovic, which included items that could evoke both pleasure

and pain such as a knife, a feather, lipstick, a bullet, and a gun, among other items, and interact with her in any manner they should choose. The artist allowed herself to become a blank canvas for which idle observers became actively involved with the performance. The result, however, was unsettling. By the end of the six hour performance at the Studio Morra in Naples, Abramovic had most of her clothes cut off, lacerations on her face and body, and at one point, a loaded gun was pointed directly at her head. Heather Cook, a former intern for the Smithsonian Institution’s Hirshhorn Museum and a senior Art History student at Florida State University, is well acquainted with Abramovic’s work, and she says that Rhythm 0 is Abramovic’s “most extreme physical work”. Cook delineates endurance art from other mediums because traditionally, forms such as painting and sculpture have been an attempt to express the inner self whereas, Cook says, “[endurance art] is more of an exploration of the physical self.” Other students have different views. “It’s a person doing something painful and stupid, it’s not art,” according to FSU


sophomore Lauren Nichols. Certainly far from a Monet watercolor or even the experimental splatter of Pollock, endurance art makes it difficult for one to even compare it to the traditionally accepted concepts of art. And for some, the indefinable nature of art’s progression may prove troubling. Is everyone that suffers through bodily duress suddenly an artist? What makes these physical feats different from, say, a grueling run like the Boston Marathon? To poetperformer Barrett Blank White, there is none. “They all possess potential to be art,” according to White, a local endurance artist upstart. “The difference between Abramovic and Burden and your hapless jogger is that they [the artists] are conscious of the potential for an action or a gesture to become an artistic piece or to possess artistic merit.” A Florida State student, White describes endurance art as “an exploration of the profundity of a gesture” and says that David Blaine’s 35 hour feat \, in which Blaine stands atop a pillar in the middle of New York was one of White’s first encounters with the art form. While not nearly as theatrical, White’s first gesture was indeed profound.

On Landis Green of the Florida State University campus on January 21st , he appeared barefoot wearing a blue-green sweater, black jeans, and a wooden mask depicting CroMagnon-like features as a part of a series he calls Immortal Death Technique. Subsequently, he turned a portable radio on, playing little more than static and laid down under a tree in much the way one would expect a corpse to be displayed. For the next hour he did little more than that, the only movements he made were to preserve the mask situated on his face and the uncontrollable tremors that began to take over him as a result of lying on the cold, damp ground. Amidst campus tours, students walking briskly to the residence halls, to class, or to the library, White maintained his position. While many continued past the demonstration, several inquisitive observers stopped to investigate. One young woman was more concerned with the artist’s comfort telling White to “Stay warm!” as she rushed off to class. When asked why White chooses to express himself through endurance art, he states, “Well, I never was much of a painter.”

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March 2011  

The Yeti's March 2011 Issue.