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The Wrangler Volume V, Issue 3 // May 2018 // FOR STUDENTS BY STUDENTS George Ranch High School

Photo by Katlynn McKenzie


To our readers,

Are you tired? I’m tired. Coziness and calm are often associated with winter. Cozy, by definition, means “giving a feeling of comfort, warmth, and relaxation.” If summer isn’t cozy, I don’t know what is. The Danish term for it is hygge: “a general quality of coziness and comfortable conviviality that engenders a feeling of contentment or well-being.” I champion that the summer months hold a homey, secure feeling of their own. That is exactly how we here at The Wrangler would describe the new edition, cozy. The combined efforts of our staff have inspired a reminiscent, warm volume published for your enjoyment. Articles like “How Technology Affects Our Relationship With Nature” and “Soma: The Moral Quandary” will take you on a journey though the nuanced environments of the human experience, specifically in regard to the advancement of technology and our increasing dependence on it, while pieces such as “A Love Letter to Literature”, “True Detective and Optimistic Nihilism” and “Beauty, Art and the Philosophy of Aesthetics” will expose you to poignant and refreshing philosophical interpretations of popular culture and high art. So, dear reader, lay back, grab a cold drink, flip on your sunglasses, and read yourself into blissful contentment with the newest edition of The Wrangler Magazine. The Wrangler Staff Check out more at www.thewrangleronline.com

@TheWranglerMag

THE WRANGLER EDITORS

COPY EDITOR | COGHLAN SMITH DESIGN EDITORS | CLAYTON KEELING & BAILEY HOLTON SOCIAL MEDIA EDITORS | KATLYNN MCKENZIE, ALEXIS GRIMALDO, BAILEY HOLTON ADVISER | COLLEEN KROEKER

ONLINE STAFF

PRINT STAFF NIA BOTTI MARIA GLEASON ALEXIS GRIMALDO BAILEY HOLTON CLAYTON KEELING AAMAYA KHAN KENSLY LANDRY

AMANDA MARTIN KATLYNN MCKENZIE ASHLEY MERINO REID PITTS COGHLAN SMITH SHERIDAN SMITH KYLER TELGE

DIAMOND BUTLER MARIA CANALITA JOSE DE LA FUENTE GAURANG DHINGRA HANNAH ESCOCHEA CALEB FOJTIK JAYSON GREEN EMILY HAWKINS

KOB’E HAY DANIELA HERNANDEZ ANNA KELLY JOSHUA MANUS ABBEY MCGEE JACLYN RODRIGUEZ

The Wrangler is the official school sponsored magazine of George Ranch High School, 8181 FM 762, Richmond, TX 77469. The Wrangler serves as an information and entertainment source for students, staff, and the community while providing an open forum for student expression. We provide our magazine free of charge to our school population of approximately 2800 students and to our community. Our staff is composed entirely of intensely passionate students who love to write and create. We make it a point to provide information that is interesting to our student body. Our motto is “by students, for students”, and it truly encapsulates all that we stand for. Our magazine is not just an outpouring of the journalism department; it’s the voice of our school. The Wrangler magazine is published three times a year. The Wrangler staff also produces a literary journal, The Twisted Wire, in the spring semester. Unsigned editorials are the opinions of the newspaper editorial staff and do not necessarily represent the opinions of the LCISD administration. Written comments are accepted provided they are signed. Advertising rates available on request. For questions or concerns contact the Newspaper office at 832-223-4251.


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Table of Contents 4-7 Class of 2018. Who Am I?

Can you guess who your classmates are from their baby photos?

8-9 Softball

Slugging for a homerun.

10-11 In Bloom

A collage of spring’s wonders.

12-13 Bones That Breathe

One of 150 pieces chosen to recieve a Gold Seal out of 35,000 in the VASE artwork competition.

14 Drown In It

Open yourself up to new genres of music this summer.

15 Beauty, Art and the

Philosophy of Aesthetics

Art is a desperate attempt to grasp at the world; not physically, but rather, emotionally and spiritually.

16-19 Houston Rodeo Art!

Artwork featured at the Houston Livestock Show and Rodeo

20 Answers for Class of 2018 Who Am I? 21 Summer Fun

Hunt for words in our Wrangler-themed word search.

Cover Photo by Katlynn McKenzie Table of Contents Picture by Reid Pitts


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WHO AM I? Find answers on page 20 M.

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S O F T B A L L

Hailey McDowell (12) has played softball for 14 years. Her mom was the president of RRGSA and put her on a team at age 4. She loved it and constantly played with older teams because people thought she was too good for her own age. As she heads to college, McDowell admits she will miss the friendships with not only students and teammates, but a lot of the teachers too. She is committed to Simpson College in Idianola, Iowa. McDowell met the coach at a softball camp in Louisiana and loved him. She is looking forward to playing, making new friends, and being able to be an actual adult. Photo by Katlynn McKenzie

Taylor Pesina (12) has played Softball for 11 years. Her dad played baseball and encouraged her to play softball. As soon as she got on the field, she immediately loved it. Now that she is heading to college, she stated that she will miss seeing her friends everyday. Pesina is committed to McNeege State University in Lake Charles, LA. As soon as she stepped on campus, she fell in love and it felt like home to her. She is looking forward to meeting new people and getting better everyday.

Photo by Katlynn McKenzie

Bekah Groppe (12) has played softball for 14 years. Her cousin got her interested in playing. She would go watch his games and her parents saw the interest and put her in softball. As she gets ready to graduate, Groppe states that she will miss her friends the most. She is committed to Oklahoma Wesleyan. Groppe chose this school because of the chapel, the coaches, and the food. She is looking forward to playing at the next level and is ready to make more memories.

By Amanda Martin Photos by Amanda Martin

Photo courtesy of Bekah Groppe 1. Destiny Walker (12) keeps her eye on the ball as it goes into the outfield. 2. Remme Loos (12) is getting ready to hit the ball. 3. Shelby Kvinta (12) runs for the ball to try to get an out. 4. Taylor Pesina (12) gets an out for the longhorns. 5. Nevada Dolnik (11) is ready to get someone out. 6. Jayden Smith (10) drives the ball to the outfield. 7. Reese Scott (10) tries her best to get a bunt for the Longhorns without getting an out. 8. Nevada Dolnik (11), Jayden Smith (10), Destiny Walker (12), and Mandy McDowell (10) talk as a group to discuss their strategies for the game.

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In Bloom Design and Photos by Katlynn McKenzie

With spring sprouting its leaves, flowers of different types bloom towards the sun.

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“Bones That Breathe”

Artwork by Favour Umeakvana The Wrangler | 12


One of 150 pieces chosen to recieve a Gold Seal out of 35,000 in the VASE artwork competition.

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Drown in It By Kyler Telge

With summer around the corner good music on your playlist is a must. The desire for a perfect song to play endlessly on loop is something we can all relate to. To some, music is just a pass time or nuisance that’s just another part of life, but to me music is sacred. Something about hearing that one bassline from that classic rock song we all know, the vocals to a sad song on a bad day, the melancholic cries for rebellion that some pursue, or the cool twang of some classic country music. Music doesn’t have to be a hobby or anything that you particularly enjoy to have a great time with it. The people you associate with may not share your tastes but you are never alone if you are determined. Pursuing music that you can love and share even if many don’t feel the same is the beauty of it. A lot of things in the world stop you from being that special snowflake people hyped us up to be in elementary school, but music can give you that sense of utter complexity about yourself. Who else listens to folk covers of Grindcore anthems on a playlist set to loop? Perhaps not many that would admit it, however the odd mix of genres and style make up a person who can understand and appreciate different aspects of art. This summer try spending time exploring genres you have never listened to or previously put off because of prejudice. Not all parts of a genre of music deserve the hate you hold for it. Subgenres, also known as the spice of life, give all aspects of music their flare. Country music isn’t all trucks, beer, guns and overflowing freedom. Sure, there is some country sounding more and more like pop music where the only defining feature is the fake twang in their copy-paste lyricism, but it is fun to listen to and that is all that matters. Every genre can cover any topic under the sun. Growing up with family in the music industry can definitely influence what you listen to. Instead of Mozart and Bach you were listening to Black Sabbath and Metallica as a born-to-be Rockstar your parents may force their tastes on you whether you like it or not. No one is required to like a type of music and if freestyles on Soundcloud are more your style so be it. Whatever works as an outlet or tool to effectively express and enjoy oneself should be used freely as much as one wants. Music tends to be that unifying symbol of remembrance that we can all tune into mentally: tragedies, celebrations, and hobbies all associated with sounds that fill a void that cannot otherwise be executed in such a way. Make your summer stand out with friends, family, and great memories and if music can do anything to help improve that experience all the better.

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Beauty, Art, and the Philosophy of Aesthetics Art is a desperate attempt to grasp at the world; not physically, but rather, emotionally and spiritually.

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By Coghlan Smith Artwork By Abd al-Rahman Mowakket

"Beauty, rather than being a measure of aesthetic pleasure, is one of affect, a measure of emotion."

rt is something we do, a verb. Or is it something we produce, a noun? Maybe it isn’t quite that simple. Art is the expression of human thoughts, emotions, intuitions and desires, but it’s even more personal than that: it’s about sharing our world-view, the way we experience life, which for many is an extension of personality. It is the communication of our most intimate conceptualizations that cannot be faithfully communicated through language in an unconvoluted manner. And because the simple vernacular of efficiency is not enough, we must find another vehicle to carry out our intent. But the expression of the content that we instill on or within our medium of choice is not in-and-of-itself art. Art is to be found in how the media is used, the way in which the content is expressed. What, then, is beauty? Beauty is much more than cosmetic; it is not about prettiness. There are plenty of pretty pictures afloat in the binary sea of the internet, but how many of these will we refer to as beautiful? It’s not difficult to find works of artistic expression that we might agree are beautiful that are not necessarily pretty. Beauty, rather than being a measure of aesthetic pleasure, is one of affect, a measure of emotion. Contextually, as I refer to art, beauty is the gauge of successful articulation between the aspect and the subject—the

conveyance of a concept between the perceived and perceiver. Beautiful art, as one physical and philosophical entity, is successful in conveying the artists mode of profundity, their most ardent intended emotions, the desired concepts, whether they be pretty and bright, or dark and sinister. But neither the observed nor the observer can be certain of successful communication in the end. So beauty in art is entirely and wholly subjective. Defining art based on its content is a doomed enterprise. The study of art begs the claim that there is a distinction between artistic expression and everyday life. Thusly, works of art rise like islands from a current of more pragmatic concerns. When you step out of the river and onto an island, you’ve reached your destination; it’s just you and the sand. Similarly, the aesthetic attitude requires you to treat artistic experience as an end-in-itself: art asks us to arrive empty of preconceptions and attend to the way in which we experience the piece. One can have an ‘aesthetic experience’ of a natural phenomenon, but art is different from nature in that it is produced. Therefore, art is the intentional communication of an idea as an end-in-itself. That is to say art has no other purpose than to simply be. The cultural context in which the content is communicated may have an effect on aesthetic value, but

whether it is deemed significant or trivial, if it evokes an emotion in someone, anyone, it is art. This approach might initially perceived as increasingly nonspecific. By this logic, wouldn’t a rousing declaration of love or an eloquent, reminiscent toast be, for all intents and purposes, art? Is the difference between these and a romantic movie or evocative novel simply one of degree? That’s the point. Art, beauty, aesthetic value; all of them are saturated in subjectivity. They’re positively dripping with it. The fact of the matter is, simply, aesthetic judgement never commands universal agreement, nor does a beautiful object or work of art engage homogeneously with any community. The value of art is located ‘within the eye of the beholder’, and while the cliche of utilizing a platitude to bolster my argument is absolutely disgusting, it brings with it the essence of artistic expression: art and beauty are nothing if they are not seen, but when they are observed, appreciated and devoured, they become something altogether different. They are no longer paint and canvas or pen and paper, but an ideal given physical form. The beauty of art lies in its ability to inspire the beholder. Not only to create their own art, but to explore the realm of their emotions, their intuitions, their desires and their dreams.

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Houston Rodeo Art!

Text by Jody Respondek Design by Alexis Grimaldo

The Houston Livestock Show & Rodeo Art Program is dedicated to continuing Western Heritage through art at the Elementary, Middle, Junior High, and High School levels. The art is executed in many different mediums, by artists all over the Greater Houston area. The Program is high-lighted by the auction when 64 pieces are sold to the highest bidder. The money received from these sales goes towards scholarship money for the student-artists as well as other students from different programs throughout the greater city of Houston. These 14 students from our school did an amazing job, producing stunning and creative pieces that they should be proud of.

1. Gabriella Salazar “Moro, pinto y careto”- Finalist 2. Marleen Nguyen “Ghost Town”- Special Merit The Wrangler | 16

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3. Golnaz Shokrollahi “Beau’s Adventure”- Special Merit 4. Lauren Buchwalter “Sunset Riders”- Finalist 5. Olivia Raymond “Hello, Old Friend”- Special Merit

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6 6. Chinyere Onyewuchi “High Noon in the Hay”Special Merit 7. Jessica Morcilla “Solitary”- Special Merit 8. Timmy Tran “Sunday Stroll”- Finalist 9. Emily Board “Triple Stack”- Finalist

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12 10. Favour Umeakvana “Rusty Sunrise”Special Merit 11. Oriana Jacoby “Going Home”Finalist 12. Megan Tran “Do You Know the Way”- Finalist 13. Mariam Habib “Stage Fright”Special Merit 14. Brittany Cherry “All Saddled Up”Special Merit

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YOUR SUGAR LAND DENTIST

EXPECT EXCELLENCE! Monday 8:00am-5:00pm Tuesday 7:00am-4:00pm Wednesday 7:00am-4:30pm Thursday 7:00am-5:30pm Friday 7:00am-3:00pm 1233 Crabb River Road Richmond, TX 77469 (281) 937-1671

www.harrelldentistry.com Who Am I? Answers

A. Alex Hernandez B. Ambar Beato C. Amy Bhatti D. Bailey Bass E. Belle Ibanez F. Austin Plunk G. Amy Cleetus H. Valerie Ayers I. Beaudy Carbajal J. Chester Sims III K. Dayne Corrallo L. Jewel Baticados M. Christian Davis N. Falynn Swain O. Alex and Andrew Garcia P. Kameron Campbell Q. Isabella Maldonado R. Braxton Bowden S. Julia Vivas T. Madison Meagher U. Elijah J. Walker V. Darrian Swanks W. Mason Scales X. Kelli Robison Y. Ashley Merino Z. Kyra Juma AA. Devin Rios

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BB. John Hance CC. Tayler Jasek DD. Guarang Dhingra EE. Ashlee Sterling FF. K risten Olmsted GG. Kelvin Murphy HH. Hannah Kendziora II. Joshua Triesch JJ. K risten Garcia-Rameau KK. Lauren Shultz LL. Matthew Mozingo MM. Malcolm Wright NN. Lily Swaren OO. Reid Rodriguez PP. Tayler Jasek QQ. Justin Dejean RR. Hylan Coffman SS. Brooke Knight TT. Kyler Telge UU. Arianna Kelly VV. Heather Croy WW. Sajjal Nayani XX. Nathalie Beato YY. Hannah Escochea ZZ. Elysa Meadows AAA. Ord Limbrick II BBB. Charlie Neff ccc. Chisom Ogbonna DDD. Chace Young


Summer Fun By Kensly Landry and Maria Gleason

Artwork Beaches Camping Fair Fun Literature Music PaddleBoat Relaxing Sand Soccer Summer Sunscreen Vacation Babies Boating Crawfish Favour Hot Love

Nature Pool Roadtrip Seniors Softball Sun Surf Beachball Campfire Detective Flowers Lake Movies Ocean Reading Rodeo Skincare Soma Sunburn Sweettreats

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The Wrangler Spring 2018  

The writing of the Newspaper Staff of George Ranch High School. For Students, by Students.

The Wrangler Spring 2018  

The writing of the Newspaper Staff of George Ranch High School. For Students, by Students.

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