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VOLLEYBALL VICTORY

Chief tells of NSA tracking procedures, A6

Southwestern tops Umpqua, B1

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 3, 2013

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Dunes are a victim of shutdown BY THOMAS MORIARTY The World

COOS BAY — The federal shutdown has resulted in the closure of public ATV access points leading to the Oregon Dunes, generating new business for some and sour grapes for others. Visitors to the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s website Wednesday were greeted with a plain white page, stating only that the website is closed due to lack of funding. The department houses the By Lou Sennick, The World U.S. Forest Service, which Staging areas inside the Oregon Dunes National Recreation Area are closed due to the federal govern- administers the Oregon Dunes ment shutdown. Access to the dunes themselves, such as the Bull Run access on the left, is open. National Recreation Area as

part of the Siuslaw National Forest. Under the shutdown — which took effect at midnight on Monday — the Forest Service has closed ranger stations, visitor centers and recreation sites throughout the country. Andrea Gross, whose family owns and operates Oregon Dunes KOA on U.S. Highway 101 near Hauser, said the closures have left many riders without a way to access the dunes. “Per the sheriff’s department, all the staging areas and the campgrounds are closed,” Gross said. She said that off-road

enthusiasts are still being allowed to ride the dunes — if they can find an access point on private land. Some public access points remain open,but without parking for vehicles and trailers. The KOA campground is the only campground actually located within the boundary of the national forest, and shares dunes access with Steve’s ATV Rental next door. Gross said the campground has started selling day passes to people who want to use the property solely to access the dunes. SEE SHUTDOWN | A8

Oregon Special Session

Circle of Friends

Lawmakers back pension, tax changes BY JONATHAN J. COOPER The Associated Press

Photos by Lou Sennick, The World

A new metal sculpture created by students in the metal shop class at Marshfield High School was installed in front of the gym Tuesday afternoon. Using metal scraps donated to the class for projects from American Bridge, the sculpture to promote togetherness on the campus was designed by shop teacher Tom Hull and built by 15 students. Shop teacher Tom Hull, left, and Duane Anderson guide a new metal sculpture created by students in the metal shop class at Marshfield High School was installed in front of the gym Tuesday afternoon. In the back guiding the boom crane is Joe Anderson.

SALEM — The Oregon Legislature on Wednesday approved a series of bills on pensions, taxes and genetically modified crops, then adjourned a special session after three days of work. The decision delivered a hardfought victory to Democratic Gov. John Kitzhaber, who has been working for a year to convince lawmakers to stem the growing costs of public-employee pensions. To gather support in the Legislature, the pension cuts were packaged with changes to the tax code and a bill prohibiting local governments from banning genetically modified crops. After days of tense negotiations, five bills cleared the House and Senate, most of them by the narrowest of margins. “We were able to do what I think a lot of people thought was impossible,” Kitzhaber told reporters afterward. He — and many in the Legislature — compared Oregon favorably with the partisan battle in Congress that’s led to a partial shutdown of the federal government. Kitzhaber, business leaders, education advocates and other

supporters say the rising cost of pensions is contributing to large class sizes and shortened school years and making it difficult for local governments to reinvest in services that were cut during the Great Recession. Critics took issue with all parts of the package. Some said it’s unfair and potentially illegal to take retirement benefits promised to public employees. Others objected to tax breaks for businesses or to the inclusion of an agriculture measure in a package that initially was targeted at budget matters. “Trading away environmental protections in unrelated legislative negotiations is an all too common practice that’s bad for not just democracy but also the people of Oregon,” six environmental groups wrote in a statement following the votes. Kitzhaber first proposed pension cuts in his budget released in December. Several attempts to marry them with a tax increase fell apart during the regular legislative session, which wrapped up in July. The agreement just approved was negotiated last month by Kitzhaber and the top Republicans and Democrats in the House and SEE OREGON | A8

Oregonian report: State is a haven for sex offenders

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Clatsop County and was sentenced to life for aggravated murder and assault eight months ago in Multnomah County. Among The Oregonian’s findings: ■ Oregon is two years behind entering names into its electronic database of registered sex offenders. It’s so out of date that local police don’t rely on it. “We don’t like where we’re at,” said Capt. Calvin Curths, commander of the State Police criminal investigation division. “We’re trying to fix it.”

The registration unit has 12 people, but retirements and job changes last summer turned over three quarters of the staff. Only one person is now qualified to log in more than 1,200 offenders registering for the first time since 2011. Also in the queue: More than 13,000 updated change-ofaddress or annual registrations. ■ Oregon is among four states that have done the least to comply with registration and community notification guidelines under the Adam Walsh Child Protection and Safety Act passed seven years ago

Deadly fire on ship Possibly hundreds of migrants from Africa have been killed when their ship caught fire and sank. 94 are confirmed dead, hundreds are missing.

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Police reports . . . . A2 What’s Up. . . . . . . . A2 South Coast. . . . . . A3 Opinion. . . . . . . . . . A4

or someone reports them, The Oregonian reported Wednesday. “Most of these cases, to be blunt, are dumb luck,” said Josh Marquis, the Clatsop County’s district attorney who handled one of the state’s most notable cases, that of sex offender Mark D. Beebout. Beebout moved from California to Oregon, never telling police where he was living as required. Once in Oregon, he beat up one woman and killed two others. He still isn’t in the state registry, even though he was convicted of failing to register in March 2012 in

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PORTLAND (AP) — Oregon has, per capita, more registered sex offenders than all but one other state. It also has one of the worst records in the country for following federal standards intended to keep sex offenders from moving to avoid supervision, and it has become a haven for offenders dodging stricter rules elsewhere, a newspaper investigation has concluded. Often, officers came across sex offenders violating the terms of their sentences only because the offenders commit another crime, they’re pulled over for a traffic stop

to tighten a patchwork of state laws. Only 19 states have substantially met the standards. A study by the U.S. Government Accountability Office showed Oregon has completed eight of the 14 guidelines. States that don’t comply either lose 10 percent of an annual federal crime-fighting grant or, as in Oregon’s case, must use the 10 percent in compliance efforts. ■ The names,photos and criminal SEE HAVEN | A8

Mostly sunny 62/44 Weather | A8

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A2 •The World • Thursday,October 3,2013

South Coast Executive Editor Larry Campbell • 541-269-1222, ext. 251

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Mural project recognized COOS BAY — Two South Coast downtown organizations have been recognized for innovative economic development at the state level. Coos Bay’s 2nd Court Mural Project received an Excellence in Downtown Revitalization Award for “Best Downtown Beautification Project” from Oregon Main Street on Wednesday during the Oregon Main Annual Conference in Astoria. Greater Bandon Association coordinator Harv Schubothe also received the “Main Street Manager of the Year” Award; Bandon’s Devon’s Boutique received an Excellence in Downtown Revitalization Award for Best Facade Renovation Under $7,500; and Bandon’s Old Town Marketplace

received an Excellence in Downtown Revitalization Award for a “Best Business Development” project. The “Best Downtown Beautification Project” award is given to the municipality or Main Street organization that has designed and implemented an attractive stand-alone beautification project in the downtown. The Coos Bay Downtown Association accepted the award. The “Main Street Manager of the Year” award is given to a Main Street manager from a Performing Main Street or Transforming Downtown community for the overall impact he or she has had on the local downtown revitalization program. The “Best Facade Reno-

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vation Under $7,500” award recognizes the best single exterior facade renovation project using $7,500 or less. The physical design of the facade should enhance the commercial district in appearance or function and encourage further design improvements. The “Best Business Development” project award is granted to the Main Street community that has created and implemented the best retention and/or business recruitment program for its downtown. The Port of Bandon accepted the award. Oregon Main Street is a program of the State Historic Preservation Office, Heritage Programs, Oregon Parks and Recreation Department.

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TODAY A Little Lunch Music noon1:30 p.m., Coos Bay Public Library Myrtlewood Room, 525 Anderson Ave., Coos Bay. Jz from North Bend High School under the direction of Ken Graber. BYO lunch or purchase soup and bread provided by Black Market Gourmet. Mahaffy Pumpkin Patch noon-5 p.m., Mahaffy’s, 10362 Highway 241-Coos River, Coos Bay.

FRIDAY Church Fundraiser Sale 9 a.m.-4 p.m., First United Methodist Church, 123 Ocean Blvd., Coos Bay. Mahaffy Pumpkin Patch 10 a.m.6 p.m., Mahaffy’s, 10362 Highway 241-Coos River, Coos Bay. A Little Lunch Music noon-1:30 p.m., Coos Bay Public Library Myrtlewood Room, 525 Anderson Ave., Coos Bay. Woodwind quartet Just Jensens. BYO lunch or purchase soup and bread provided by Black Market Gourmet. Oregon Coast Jazz Party 3:3010:30 p.m., various locations, most at Newport Performing Arts Center, 777 W. Olive, Newport. 888-701-7123 or oregoncoastjazzparty.org First Friday...Art is for Everyone 5-7 p.m., Reedsport Natural Food, 1891 Winchester Ave., Reedsport. Featured: Dave Teachout and Susan McConnell — stained glass. Downtown Coos Bay Wine Walk 5-7:30 p.m. Start at Park Avenue Dance Studio, 255 Park Ave. or Coos Bay Visitor Information Center, 50 Central Ave. Map & glass $10. Proceeds benefit Women’s Safety & Resource Center and Bree’s Foundation. 541-269-1222 ext. 248

Harvest Moon Festival 6 p.m., Coquille Community Building, 105 N. Birch, Coquille. Wes Whitman art exhibit and auction. Beer and wine samplings, hos d’oeuvres. Advance tickets or at the door, $15 or pair for $25. 541-396-3414 Sweet River in Concert 7 p.m., North Bend Public Library, 1800 Sherman Ave., North Bend. 541-501-2254

SATURDAY Port Orford Farmers Market 9noon, corner of Eighth and U.S. Highway 101, Port Orford. 541287-2000 Church Fundraiser Sale 9 a.m.-2 p.m., First United Methodist Church, 123 Ocean Blvd., Coos Bay. Bazaar and Rummage Sale 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Lakeside Senior Center, 915 North Lake Road, Lakeside. Walk for Wellness 10 a.m. Mingus Park, 600 N. 10th St., Coos Bay. Free health screenings, music and prizes. Registration starts at 9 a.m. Register on line at www.southcoastdiabetes.org Oregon Coast Jazz Party 1010:30 p.m., Newport Performing Arts Center, 777 W. Olive, Newport. Sets 2 and 6 are at the Shilo Inn, 536 SW Elizabeth St. 888-701-7123 or oregoncoastjazzparty.org Mahaffy Pumpkin Patch 10 a.m.6 p.m., Mahaffy’s, 10362 Highway 241-Coos River, Coos Bay. Oktoberfish Festival noon-6 p.m., Old Charleston School, 64065 Seven Devils Road, Charleston. Admission is $1 or three cans of food. Free shuttle from The Mill Casino. Tuna Guy meals $25 for family deal or $10 each. Hotdog meals, $5. Live music and adult bever-

ages. Proceeds benefit Charleston Food Bank. Star Wars Reads Day 2-4 p.m., Coos Bay Public Library, 525 Anderson Ave., Coos Bay. Games, activities, crafts, treats, all focused on Star Wars. 541269-1101 or www.CoosBayLibraries.org Free Roller Skating 3-5 p.m., Snoddy Memorial Gymnasium, Bay Area Church of the Nazarene, 1850 Clark St., North Bend. Skates provided for all ages. Children must be accompanied by parent or guardian. Insiders View of Lucas Films, 1979-1985 Presentation 4:30 p.m., Coos Bay Public Library, 525 Anderson Ave., Coos Bay. Star Wars costumes are encouraged. Bobcat Booster Club Hall of Fame Benefit Dinner and Auction 5 p.m., Oaks Pavillion at Coos County Fairgrounds, 770 Fourth St., Myrtle Point. Silent auction, Hall of Fame induction, no host bar and live auction. Tickets available at First Community Credit Union and Absolute Tanning in Myrtle Point. “Mischief, Mayhem and Matrimony” Little Theater on the Bay Benifit Show 7 p.m., Sawdust Theater, 71 E. First St., Coquille. Doors open at 6 p.m. Tickets are $15 each. $13 of each ticket will go to LTOB. Purchase tickets at www.ltob.net. Bandon Feeds the Hungry Variety Show and Silent Auction 7 p.m., Sprague Community Theater, 1202 11th St. SW, Bandon. Bring food donation to enter raffle. Proceeds from the event benefit five Bandon food agencies. 541-347-1585

What’s Up features one-time events and limited engagements in The World’s coverage area. To submit an event, email events@theworldlink.com.

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COOS BAY POLICE DEPARTMENT Oct. 1, 8:55 a.m., assault, 500 block of Taylor Street. Oct. 1, 10:23 a.m., theft of purse, 200 block of South Broadway Street. Oct. 1, 11:44 a.m., theft of funds from Social Security account, 1500 block of Redwood Avenue.

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COQUILLE POLICE DEPARTMENT Oct. 1, 3:24 a.m., woman arrested for second-degree criminal trespass and unlawful entry to a motor vehicle, 1100 block of North Collier Street.

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Oct. 1, 10:50 a.m., criminal mischief, 200 block of North Baxter Street.

NORTH BEND POLICE DEPARTMENT Oct. 1, 11:04 a.m., theft, 1600 block of Virginia Avenue. Oct. 1, 1:47 p.m., threats, 900 block of Virginia Avenue. Oct. 1, 2:18 p.m., theft, 1800 block of Madrona Street. Oct. 1, 2:21 p.m., criminal mischief, Sherman Avenue and Florida Street. Oct. 1, 4:09 p.m., criminal trespass, 2200 block of Marion Avenue.

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Thursday, October 3,2013 • The World • A3

South Coast

Coming Saturday

Executive Editor Larry Campbell • 541-269-1222, ext. 251

Weekend

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GO! TO THE MUSEUM

GO! FIND THE PERFECT PUMPKIN

GO! BLESS THE PETS

Three new exhibits at Coos Art Museum

Mahaffy Ranch opens pumpkin patch

‘Blessing of Our Animal Friends’ on Saturday

Powers homecoming

By Alysha Beck, The World

Clayton Stallard crowns senior Sierra Sotela as Powers High School Homecoming Queen at halftime during the game against Gilchrist on Friday.

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Sawdusters, LTOB join forces Meetings TODAY NORTH BEND — An allconsuming fire on July 19, 1994, destroyed the 28-year home of the Sawdust Theatre in Coquille. Little Theater on the Bay helped with Sawduster’s new building fund for rebuilding their theatre with proceeds from a fundraiser put on by Little Theatre on the Bay. Now it’s payback time. Little Theatre on the Bay needs to rebuild their historic home that was built in 1924 originally as a silent movie palace. Its history includes a well-known actors visit in the 1950s. Roy Schieder of

the “Jaws” movies, performed and directed at LTOB. Join area performers at 7 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 5, at the Sawdusters Theater in Coquille, for a benefit show for Little Theatre on the Bay. Doors open at 6 p.m., with a great show called “Mischief, Mayhem and Matrimony” or “Have Some Madeira, M'Dear.” Tickets will be $15 each, and $13 of each ticket will go to LTOB. Tickets are available to purchased at www.ltob.net. Janice Kendall, president of the LTOB board of directors, says, “Even after all the

repairs we do on the building Lakeside Planning Commission — 7 every year, we still have a p.m., city hall, 915 N. Lake Road, building that eventually Lakeside; regular meeting. needs to be replaced. The FRIDAY repairs are horribly expensive, and it's like the little Lakeside Water District — 1 p.m., Dutch boy putting his finger Lakeside Water District Office, in the dam.” 1000 N. Lake Road; workshop. The Sawdusters, all volunteers, come from many walks of life: teachers, lawyers, homemakers, merchants and many others comprise its casts and crews. Stay busy this These otherwise sane people weekend. practice for months memorizing scripts and rehearsing songs and dance steps for the summer-long performances. See Inside Saturday

Go!


A4 • The World • Thursday, October 3,2013

Editorial Board Jeff Precourt, Publisher Larry Campbell, Executive Editor

Les Bowen, Digital Editor Ron Jackimowicz, News Editor

Opinion theworldlink.com/news/opinion

PERS system needed to be fixed Our view We either fix PERS or it self-destructs.

What do you think? The World welcomes letters. Email us at letters@theworldlink.com.

We didn’t envy the task undertaken by the governor and the legislature in special session this week regarding the Public Employees Retirement System. Lawmakers approved legislation that will slow the rise in pensions and try to make a dent in $16 billion in unfunded pension liability. In this case, it’s absolutely necessary. With $16 billion in unfunded liability, the state pension system is, quite simply, currently out of control. How did it get like this? The pension system for public employees was creat-

ed in 1946. Individual contributions were combined with investment returns that matched contributions, allowing the state to calculate benefits based on earnings, not the lower rates of insurance companies. But by the late 1960s benefits were deemed inadequate. Lawmakers began enacting a series of enhancements that, by 1975, guaranteed that retirement accounts would grow by assumed earnings, no matter what actual investment returns were. The goal was to genereate benefits equal to about 50

to 60 percent of final average earnings for 30-year employees. Then came the stock market boom. Accounts grew at an accelerated rate. Benefits begin amounting to more than 100 percent of final earnings. Some people who left the public sector and kept their money in the system watched their pensions grow double or more. Why did everyone allow the system to expand like that? Simple. The nation was happy to share in the giddy Wall Street wealth of the 1990s. Hindsight being 20-20, we

all can guess what came next. The stock market crash erased 27 percent of the PERS fund in 2008. That forced a scramble to ratchet back. New employees got a reduced plan and contributions are directed to IRAtype accounts. Another boom-and-bust on Wall Street only aggravated the problem. There was no easy answer. Any solution will anger those receiving pensions and those still in the system. Yet something had to be done. A $16 billion deficit is irresponsible. It’s unfathomable.

Looking at Obama’s year September is over, and even though we have most of fall and a small part of winter to go, for some, the end of the year is nigh. For baseball and its fans, for instance, the year ends in October. And for my Jewish friends, the old year ended about three weeks ago and the new year is already here. I began thinking about year’s end when I reflected on President Barack Obama’s year so far — year one after re-election, year five of his presidency. There was the trifecta of fake scandals — what I call the “mock shock,” since there was no there, there. The economy’s remained an issue — modestly growing, but struggling. The countdown on immigration reform started, then stalled. Gun safety is an issue that just won’t go away because people keep getting massacred and Congress keeps dithering. Speaking of Congress, at this point, is it anything more than a bad reality TV show? How else can Sen. Ted Cruz’s performance be described? Voted off the island by his fellow Republicans. I don’t think DONNA any president has had to BRAZILE deal with a more donothing (only about 22 Columnist bills passed), hold-mybreath-till-my-face-turns-blue group of “representatives.” If you liked “The Phony Debt Ceiling Crisis, Part I,” you’ll love “Part II: Push America Off the Fiscal Cliff,” coming to a Congress near you this October. And competing for theater time is “The Sequestration” — which should frighten even Stephen King. Opening this week was “Let’s Slash Food Stamps,” or the “Starve the Working Poor and Struggling Middle Class Bill.” As Republican Rep. Tim Huelskamp of Kansas said, “You can no longer sit on your couch ... and expect the federal taxpayer to feed you.” This from a man who will work 126 days (how long the House will be in session) and do nothing — or at least, not do the people’s business — for 239 days, while being fed on $172,000 of taxpayer money. Finally, there’s Obamacare and the House Republicans’ vote to defund it. Again. And again. And again. And again. And again. It’s like a game show: “America’s Got Talent, Congress Doesn’t.” If this all seems a bit sardonic, well, it’s been that kind of year, too. But President Obama is an optimist. And despite the setbacks, when we look back, there will be moments we can point to and the president can say, because of that, “It was a very good year.” Presidents are like quarterbacks — getting harassed and hit are part of the job description. A quarterback has four quarters to manage and win a game. A president has four years in a term to define his vision, then manage and guide his agenda into law and policy. As any quarterback will tell you, all quarters are equally important, but the fourth quarter is the most important. That’s when the field general and the time manager excel. Sometimes, a quarterback has to make things happen in the fourth quarter — when the game is close, but especially when the team’s behind. But sometimes the best thing a quarterback can do is just bide his time — let his defense work, run some running plays, kill clock. When you’ve got a lead, the smart play is to keep the pressure on and run the high-percentage plays. We’re not into the final quarter of Obama’s term yet. That starts after the mid-term elections in 2014. But in the last quarter of this year, he may already be in control-the-clock mode — because he can still play and find bipartisan solutions to our problems. Donna Brazile is a senior Democratic strategist, a political commentator and contributor to CNN and ABC News.

Public Forum Reconciling guns and kindness A few days ago I was about to enter Bi-Mart when the door opened and a tall man emerged, leaving the store. The first thing I saw was a rifle slung over his right shoulder. My eyes shifted to his left hand which held a baby carrier, complete with baby. Seeing me, the man stuck out his foot and propped open the door for me to enter the store. Shocked, amazed, dumbfounded, I managed to thank him. The man, the rifle and the baby exited my life as quickly as they had entered it, but this 5-second encounter replays in my mind, challenging me to make sense of it. It’s obvious I am not used to seeing anyone sporting a rifle in public. When I recounted the incident to a friend, she explained, “It’s hunting season,” and really not such an unusual

sight in our small town. But it was the first time I had seen it, the man with a rifle and a baby. In the wake of the recent mass shooting in our country, It seems to me more than a sign of the arrival of hunting season. A man carrying a deadly weapon has become an image of mayhem. But my encounter with the man was utterly benign. He carried an infant. He went out of his way to do me a kindness. It is the paradox, the juxtaposition of the weapon and the infant that I cannot reconcile. The baby and the man’s kindness remind me that, as a whole, we Americans are a compassionate people who go out of our way to help others. Except when it comes to firearms. These objects bring out our insanity. Nothing can persuade our legislators that we owe the innocents already slaughtered by firearms laws to end further

slaughter: Laws requiring thorough background checks for gun purchases and laws banning assault weapons. Reason, logic and basic humanity must somehow overcome the misguided belief that gun rights trump all other rights, even the right to life. The baby symbolizes the future, as the man’s kindness to me perhaps signals hope. Or will the child become another gun owner who insists that gun rights are unlimitable? I love my country. I hate what we have let happen: The enshrinement of universal ownership of deadly weapons as our highest good. I thank the man with the rifle and the baby for making me think and write. Carol Sanders Coos Bay

Good stewards of the land I am sitting in my chair gazing

out of my living room window at an active timber harvest on the west slopes above Isthmus Slough. I came to Coos County in early 1975. At the time, that hillside was a recent clear-cut with no visible trees. Now, nearly 40 years later, Menasha is harvesting its crops of timber. In conjunction with their timber harvest, they are creating jobs for the loggers, log-truck drivers, longshoremen, mill workers and tree planters of Coos Bay. Those of us living in Coos County should be thankful that most of our local timber companies are good stewards of the land, loyal to the local community, and appreciate their continuing efforts in helping to maintain the economy of Coos County. Joel Robb Coos Bay

Cruel cost of cutting food stamps Last month Republicans in the House of Representatives voted to slash food stamp spending by $39 billion over 10 years. The next day, the Washington Post ran a picture of a job fair in suburban Maryland. The caption reported that “about 1,000 applicants an hour” streamed into the event searching for work. A few days later, Post columnist Petula Dvorak reported that when Wal-Mart opened a hiring center for six new stores in Washington, a line of job-seekers was “snaking down the sidewalk” at daybreak. One of them, 52-year-old Ronald Knight, said he was taking care of his dying mother: “A job is a job and I need a job. All I want is to work, and I’ll take anything.” These stories tell a cruel tale. Republicans say that cutting food stamps would reduce “dependency” and push recipients into the workforce. That’s a noble goal, but right now it’s also an ideological illusion. The official unemployment rate is 7.3 percent, but the real rate is double that. Many frustrated job-seekers have settled for part-time positions or dropped out of the market entirely. Even folks like Knight,

COKIE AND STEVEN V. ROBERTS Columnists

who will “take anything,” remain unemployed. The same Republicans who voted to cut food stamps acknowledge the problem when it suits their political purpose. Last June, Speaker John Boehner charged that the “American people are asking, ‘Where are the jobs?’” The Speaker can’t have it both ways. If jobs are that scarce, then food stamps are needed more than ever. One group of Republicans knows that to be true: governors. Under current law, able-bodied adults with no dependents can only receive food stamps for three months over three years. That limit can now be waived in times of economic hardship, and 45 states, including many red

ones, have applied for those waivers. But the House bill would eliminate that option. Legislators can afford selfdelusion; governors have to take responsibility and deal with reality. For many decades, agricultural subsidies and feeding programs were combined into one bill, cementing the cooperation of urban and rural legislators. As Bob Dole, a former Republican leader in the Senate, and Tom Daschle, a former Democratic leader, wrote in the Los Angeles Times last week, “We proudly count ourselves among a series of bipartisan teams of legislators who worked ... to address hunger through provisions in the farm bill.” But today, anything that smacks of bipartisanship is poison. That’s why Republican leaders took food stamps out of the farm bill and passed a standalone measure. They wanted to thwart any possibility of crossaisle cooperation. Cooperation is not the only casualty. So is compassion. The Reagan era was marked by a rhetorical war against the poor, a cascade of criticism about “welfare queens” buying beer and steaks on food stamps. The cur-

rent debate echoes with the same mean-spirited, wrongheaded stereotypes: The poor are shiftless moochers and Democrats want to raise taxes on hard-working Americans to buy the votes of those deadbeats. Rep. T im Huelskamp of Kansas told the House that slicing food stamps sent a harsh message: “You can no longer sit on your couch ... and expect the federal taxpayer to feed you.” Republicans used that line of attack very effectively for many years, winning five of six presidential elections between 1968 and 1988. But it hasn’t worked so well lately. Democrats have won the popular vote in five of the last six elections, and even some conservatives think the assault on food stamps will backfire. Most Americans who need help are not sitting on their couches waiting for a handout. They’re lining up at dawn, begging for a job and willing to “take anything.” And even when they get a job, they still often struggle to feed their families. They should not go hungry. Not here. Not in America. Steve and Cokie Roberts can be contacted by email at stevecokie@gmail.com.


Thursday, October 3,2013 • The World • A5

State Mr. right’s only wrong is hanging out with his exes DEAR ABBY: I have been dating Mr. Right for two years. “Phil” is the man I want to spend my life with. When we are together privately, everything is perfect. The problem is, Phil hangs out with his old college buddies every few weeks or months, and it often involves his ex-girlfriends. They don’t hang out a l o n e . DEAR There is always at least one other person there. The situations usually include drinking, which worries me. JEANNE In my PHILLIPS o p i n i o n , Phil should not be seeing his exes, even though his college friends are still buddies with them. Phil doesn’t understand why I think this is so wrong. I am uncomfortable and think he should avoid these situations. Am I overly jealous, or should I call it quits because he won’t respect my feelings on the matter? — HOME ALONE IN KOKOMO DE AR HOM E AL O N E: I don’t think you are overly jealous, but I do think you may be overly insecure. Has Phil given you any reason to think he has cheated on you? If not, you should trust that he is doing nothing more than hanging out occasionally with old friends. You say he is encountering exes (plural) when he sees his male friends. If it was just one, you might have cause to worry. Remember, these women are exes for a reason. Unless you want to be another ex, you should lighten up because insecurity and possessiveness are unattractive traits. D E A R A B B Y : We have lived next door to a couple, “Evie” and “Earl,” for five years. I thought we were good friends. Over the years, I vented to Evie about my relationship with my daughterin-law, “Cate.” I watch my two grandkids most of the week and have complained to her about Cate’s poor parenting skills. Last summer, my daughter-in-law made a concerted effort to befriend Evie, and they now socialize together — even though Cate flirted with Earl and Evie didn’t like it. This has pretty much killed my friendship with Evie and worsened my relationship with my D-I-L. This has affected me emotionally and physically to the point that I either want to cut off ties with my son and/or move — neither of which is really an option. I have tried talking to both parties to no avail. I don’t know what to do. Please help. — BETRAYED IN PENNSYLVANIA DEAR BETRAYED: If you had concerns about your daughter-in-law’s parenting skills, the person you should have discussed them with was Cate. And if Evie was as good a friend as you thought, she wouldn’t be hanging around with your daughterin-law to the exclusion of you. I assume that you, your son and Cate are still on speaking terms and you’re still watching the kids “most of the week.” If that’s not true and you have been cut off by everyone, then the most important thing you need to do is take care of your mental and physical health. Accept that Evie will never be your buddy again and start socializing with others. If you are no longer watching your grandchildren, your son and D-I-L will have to make alternative arrangements for childcare, which will cost them money they may be reluctant to spend. Then it will be in their interest as well as yours to make peace. Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.

ABBY

Day 2: Cover Oregon website still not up to speed BY JEFF BARNARD The Associated Press GRANTS PASS — Oregonians shopping for health insurance under the nation’s new health care law still could not sign up online Wednesday, but private insurance agents were taking calls, telling people about plans and premiums, and even signing up some people for coverage. Cover Oregon spokeswoman Amy Fauver said problems with a computer program that determines a person’s eligibility for Medicaid and tax credits that reduce premiums still has too high an error rate, but it’s

expected to be working correctly by the end of October. The deadline to enroll is Dec. 15 to qualify for coverage starting Jan. 1. “That’s been our plan all along,” she said. “With any IT rollout you know there are going to be glitches that didn’t get identified in our testing.” As of 11 a.m. Wednesday, about 146,000 people had visited the website http://www.coveroregon.com, and 3,500 had called the hotline, Fauver said. Hart Insurance co-owner Erinn Fralich in Grants Pass said it was getting calls referred from the Cover Oregon website and making

appointments to help people sign up in November, when the website is expected to be fully functional. People could sign up with a paper form and send it in, but it would take up to 45 days to be approved, so Fralich said his agency decided to wait until the website makes sign-ups instantaneous. “We had a few individuals trek in, frantic, afraid that Oct. 1 was the first and last day you could apply for it,” said Bisi Carter, Cover Oregon coordinator at the Urban League of Portland. Aflac agent Darrin Anselm in Grants Pass said he had received calls from 11 people who wanted to talk

about coverage since the website went up Tuesday. Most were people in their 60s without health insurance who want coverage for a year or two until they qualify for Medicare, or parents between 21 and 35 looking for coverage for themselves and their children. Anselm said he and other agents were able to use the website to go over plans with clients and calculate their premiums. The nonprofit insurer Oregon’s Health CO-OP had about 20 people sign up for coverage Tuesday morning. Bob Dickes, director of sales and marketing, said Wednesday he estimated

Columbia fishermen try out gillnet alternative

Fresh coat

The Associated Press

A snowplow scrapes packed snow and ice from a parking lot as clouds lift briefly to reveal Mount Hood with a fresh coat of snow from winter-like storms that passed through the state recently near Government Camp Wednesday.

Die-off of swallows blamed on foul weather STATE SALEM (AP) — Oregon scientists say thousands of swallows died during recent Willamette Valley rains, likely of starvation because the birds feed on insects while flying and they couldn’t get out in the weather to feed. Veterinarians said four days of steady rain and wind helped make September the wettest on record in the Valley. They came at a time when birds would have been feeding in preparation for winter migration to Central and South America. The Department of Fish and Wildlife says it got calls about dead and dying birds from residents ranging from the Port of Saint Helens on the Columbia River to Junction City north of Eugene. Groups of 10 to 200 barn and violet-green swallows were reported dead or dying in barns and other structures where they perch.

Group files suit to stop barred owl shooting GRANTS PASS (AP) — An animal rights group has sued to stop the federal government from killing thousands of barred owls in the Northwest to see if that will help the threatened northern spotted owl turn around its population declines. The lawsuit was filed Monday in U.S. District Court in Sacramento, Calif., by Friends of Animals. It claims the plan by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to kill 3,600 barred

D I G E S T owls violates the Migratory Bird Treaty Act. The group’s attorney, Michael Harris, says the act requires that any killing of birds for research must benefit the bird that is killed, and in this case the experiment benefits another bird, the spotted owl. The agency did not respond to a call for comment due to the government shutdown.

Towing company sues over undercover cars SALEM (AP) — The owner and two employees of a Salem towing company are suing three law enforcement agencies for $5 million, accusing them of wrongfully arresting workers who refused to release undercover police cars that were registered under fictitious names. The complaint was filed Sept. 19 in federal court by the men from Bales and Brady Towing West. It names the Salem and Keizer police departments, the federal Drug Enforcement Administration and six officers. The Statesman Journal reports three cars were towed in January 2012 from a private parking lot. The tow company refused to release them to police because they could not provide proof of

ownership. Police arrested two employees, took the keys and removed the cars. The employees were later acquitted of obstruction.

Stolen wheelchair returned to family ROSEBURG (AP) — The wheelchair stolen from a Roseburg home has been returned with a note of apology. Police had asked for help Monday in locating the chair, which is used by a boy with cerebral palsy. KVAL reports the family found the wheelchair at the end of the driveway Wednesday with a handwritten note of regret.

Injured turtle dies at Newport aquarium NEWPORT (AP) — An olive ridley sea turtle that was found in distress Monday on an Oregon beach died Wednesday at the Oregon Coast Aquarium in Newport. The aquarium says an examination showed the turtle suffered internal injuries while tumbling through the surf because it was too cold to swim. An endangered species, olive ridley sea turtles are typically found in tropical waters.

Prosecutor fired after DUI arrest EUGENE, Ore. (AP) — The Eugene, city manager has fired the city prosecutor, who was arrested for investi-

Funerals Saturday, Oct. 5 James “Jimmy” R. Rowe, celebration of life, 2 p.m., Sunset Bay State Park, gazebo, 89814 Cape Arago Highway, Coos Bay. Phyllis S. Moore, 2 p.m., memorial service, First Methodist Church, 123 Ocean Blvd., Coos Bay.

The World publishes death notices and service listings as a free public service.Obituaries and “Card of Thanks” items are supplied by families or funeral homes and are published for a fee.

that the total was probably still under 100. “We don’t expect people to actually enroll in October,” he said. “I expect people to shop and see what’s out there.” Dickes noted that customers have to make a month’s payment when they sign up, so he expects more to do that closer to the first of the year, when coverage starts. He noted that the monthly premium for plans offered on Oregon’s exchange range between $180 and $400, and he expects insurance shoppers to check out between three and five carriers before making a decision.

gation of drunken driving but has not been charged. The Register-Guard reports that state officials reviewing Dan Barkovic’s arrest have not yet decided whether he will be charged. His job duties included prosecuting people accused of drunken driving. City Manager Jon Ruiz acted Wednesday. City spokeswoman Jan Bohman says Barkovic was fired “in light of his arrest for driving under the influence and his refusal to take the alcohol breath test.” The 60-year-old prosecutor says he made “a very bad decision to drive that evening” and accepts responsibility for the decision.

Hazardous flare blown up on Depoe Bay beach DEPOE BAY (AP) — A beach walker came across a cylinder on a Depoe Bay beach Wednesday that was labeled to “call police or military.” KPTV reports the object was a marine flare that is usually dropped from planes or helicopters to mark a location at sea. Because potentially hazardous chemicals may have remained inside, authorities moved it to a remote area of Gleneden Beach and blew it up.

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ASTORIA (AP) — Some commercial fishermen on the Columbia River are experimenting with alternative gear to avoid being shunted to side channels for using gillnets, which have been criticized as damaging to salmon restoration. But even though regulators have given them a chance at late-returning coho salmon this fall, only a few commercial gillnet fishermen are expected to bear the cost of going out with tangle nets in the next two weeks, the Daily Astorian reported. Fishermen have to pay for the gear themselves to test it out, and many are skeptical that the investment will be worthwhile in the long run. Mike Wullger, however, is giving the new net a try. Wullger, a commercial fishermen for 37 years, replaced his traditional gillnet Tuesday with a tangle net with a smaller mesh, sized to catch fish with their teeth instead of gills and priced at $2,000. “We’ve gone to pretty great extents to adapt,” said Wullger. “A lot of guys are waiting to see if it works.” Wullger said he joined the trial tangle net fishery because he can still fish without a crew and doesn’t have to buy equipment other than the new net. “With this boat I can make some money,” he said. Gillnets are the primary tool that about 200 commercial fishers use to catch salmon on the Columbia. They snag fish by the gills, preventing them from breaking free. Critics say they aren’t selective and kill many fish that would otherwise be returned to the water. Fishermen, however, say they can be selective through their practices, such as choosing times and places. New regulations championed by Gov. John Kitzhaber move gillnet fishing to areas off the main channel of the Columbia. They’re being challenged in court. Under Kitzhaber’s proposed plan for lower Columbia River management overhauls, seine nets that encircle rather than snag the fish could soon be set for testing as an alternative. Seine nets would allow fishermen to sort fish. Gillnetters say that fishing method would mean only a few big operations would be viable because of the investment required for bigger boats, crews and nets.

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A6 •The World • Thursday, October 3,2013

Nation Shutdown casualties shatter stereotypes WASHINGTON (AP) — Taking out a mortgage. Getting married in a park. Going for a fall foliage drive. Cashing a check. Who knew that so many random activities of daily life could be imperiled by a shutdown of the federal government? Americans are finding that “the government” entails a lot more than the stereotype of faceless D.C. bureaucrats cranking out red tape. And so it is that two dozen October weddings, including nine this week, are in jeopardy because they’re scheduled for monument sites on the National Mall. Ditto for a New Jersey couple planning to marry at the Grand Canyon. Mike Cassesso and MaiLien Le’s permit to get married Saturday on the lawn near the Jefferson Memorial looks to be among the casualties, giving rise to a new Twitter hashtag for their #shutdownwedding. They’re looking at alternate sites, including the restaurant booked for their reception. Also canceled: a weekend Ku Klux Klan rally at Gettysburg National Military Park in Pennsylvania. Want to take a drive along Virginia’s popular Skyline Drive to take in the fall colors in Shenandoah National Park? Not till the government reopens. It’s not just romance, tourism and public events that are in jeopardy. Consider the Wisconsin farmer who can’t cash a check for a cow he sold. Ben Brancel, the state’s agriculture secretary, said that because the farmer has a loan from the Farm Service Agency, he can’t cash the check without both his own signature and one from an FSA official, unavailable during the shutdown.

Ready to buy your first house? Borrowers applying for a mortgage can expect delays, especially if the shutdown is prolonged. That’s because many lenders need government confirmation of applicants’ income tax returns and Social Security data. Mortgage industry officials say they expect bottlenecks on closing loans if the shutdown stretches on for more than a few days. In addition,low- to moderate-income borrowers and first-time homebuyers seeking government-insured mortgages for single-family homes from the Federal Housing Administration can expect longer waits because of sharp reductions in FHA staffing. Even workers who get their paychecks from a state government aren’t safe from the ripple effects of a federal shutdown. Want to escape the shutdown worries with a bike ride on the C&O Canal, a popular 184-mile trail and national park between Washington and Cumberland, Md.? Closed. Those thinking of ignoring the closure notice and going anyway should consider this: Restrooms will be locked and handles removed from water pumps along the way. One possible silver lining to shutdown annoyances writ small and large: The whole thing could serve as a teachable moment for all those people who tell pollsters that they want budget cuts — as long as they aren’t directly affected. He said the shutdown could serve as a reminder that “you’re not going to be able to the balance the budget just by cutting spending in Washington that doesn’t affect people.”

NSA admits testing U.S. cellphone tracking

The Associated Press

Emergency workers respond to a crash involving a church bus and a tractor-trailer near Dandridge, Tenn., on Wednesday. Authorities say a tire on the bus blew out and the bus hit the tractor-trailer and a sport utility vehicle, killing eight people.

8 dead in Tenn. bus crash belonged to tightknit group DANDRIDGE, Tenn. (AP) — For months, a tight-knit group of seniors at a North Carolina church had been looking forward to the road trip. It was a tradition for members of the Young at Heart Ministry to attend the annual Fall Jubilee in Gatlinburg, Tenn., an event featuring gospel singers and speakers. The event’s website described the gathering as “three days of singing, laughing and preaching” for “mature and senior believers.” But on the way back to Statesville, N.C., on Wednesday, the bus carrying the Front Street Baptist Church group blew a tire, veered across a highway median and crashed into a sport utility vehicle and tractor-trailer in a fiery wreck that killed eight people. Fourteen other people were hurt in the accident in northeastern Tennessee, including two who were in critical condition. Church members on Wednesday night were waiting for more details. None of the victims have been identified. “This is hard,” said Jerry Wright, whose 73-year-old brother, John, and his wife were on the bus. “You try not to think the worst, but it gets to you.” He believes his brother may have been driving the church bus because he had done so in the past. Inside the Statesville church, people were

crying and hugging each other. One woman whispered, “It’s going to be all right” while hugging another woman. A service was held Wednesday evening. Police cordoned off the church to prevent reporters from talking to those who attended. Authorities said the bus crossed the median and the cable barriers that divide the interstate around 2 p.m., clipped the oncoming SUV and slammed into the tractor-trailer, which burst into flames. Several hours after the crash, clouds of smoke still rose from the tractor-trailer and tree branches that lined the highway were charred. The bus was on its side next to the tractortrailer, lying across two lanes of traffic and extending partially into the median. The bus itself didn’t actually catch on fire, but there was some “heat exposure,” Jefferson County Emergency Management Director Brad Phillips said. Emergency responders were able to remove people who were alive rapidly to get them away from the flames and other Good Samaritans provided assistance. The SUV was about 50 yards away from the tractor-trailer. It was still upright, but the back half had been completely ripped off. The interstate was completely shut down in both directions, and the scene was eerily quiet, despite the presence of many emergency workers.

WASHINGTON (AP) — National Security Agency chief Gen. Keith Alexander revealed Wednesday that his spy agency once tested whether it could track Americans’ cellphone locations, in addition to its practice of sweeping broad information about calls made. Alexander and Director of National Intelligence James Clapper testified at a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing on proposed reforms to the NSA’s surveillance of phone and Internet usage around the world, exposed in June by former NSA analyst Edward Snowden.But neither spy chief spent much time discussing proposed reforms; instead they were questioned about new potential abuses that have come to light since then. Alexander denied a New York Times report published Saturday that said NSA searched social networks of Americans searching for foreign terror connections, and detailed 12 previously revealed cases of abuse by NSA employees who used the network for unsanctioned missions like spying on a spouse. He said all employees were caught and most were disciplined. Alexander and Clapper also told lawmakers that the government shutdown that began Tuesday over a budget impasse is seriously damaging the intelligence community’s ability to guard against threats.They said they’re keeping counterterrorism staff at work as well as those providing intelligence to troops in Afghanistan, but that some 70 percent of the civilian workforce has been furloughed.Any details on the jobs held by the furloughed employees is classified.

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Thursday, October 3,2013 • The World • A7

Nation and World U.S., Japan to deploy new radar, drones in next year TOKYO (AP) — The United States and Japan moved Thursday to modernize and expand their defense alliance to counter new 21st century challenges including the continuing threat from nucleararmed North Korea and potential aggression from China over disputed territory. Revamping the guidelines of their defense partnership for the first time in 16 years, the allies agreed to position a second early-warning radar in Japan within the next year to help protect against North Korea. And by next spring, they will deploy new longrange surveillance drones to help monitor disputed islands in the East China Sea, a move that may well raise tensions with Beijing. The foreign and defense ministers of the two countries also, for the first time, put a price on what Japan will contribute to the relocation of Marines out of Okinawa to Guam and other locations in the Asia-Pacific region. Japan will pay up to $3.1 billion of the move, which includes development of new facilities in Guam and the Northern Mariana Islands. U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry and U.S. Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel met with Japanese Foreign Minister Fumio K ishida and Defense Minister Itsunori Onodera and afterward laid out the details of the session. The talks, ahead of President Barack Obama’s visits to Indonesia and Brunei next week, were aimed at modernizing the American-Japanese alliance that both sides maintain is a cornerstone of peace and stability in North Asia. “Japan is changing and so is its neighborhood,” Kerry said. “So we’re coming together now to modernize our deep cooperation, through both our military alliances and our diplomatic partnerships, and that is so we can better prevent and respond to the ever-changing threats of the 21st century.”

Calif. man charged in $1B drugs website SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — because it can’t take on the FBI agents found him in a Afghan security forces in branch of the San Francisco open battle. Now they are public library, chatting online. equipping Afghan forces D I G E S T The man known as Dread with metal detectors and Pirate Roberts — 29-year-old Louisiana to Florida. specialized vehicles to clear Ross William Ulbricht — was The U.S. National Hurri- roads, and running a school on his personal laptop Tuesday cane Center in Miami says the for bomb squads. afternoon, authorities said, late-season storm formed China’s recycling talking about the vast black Thursday morning. It was market bazaar that is believed about 500 miles south of the reforms jolts industry BEIJING (AP) — China for to have brokered more than $1 mouth of the Mississippi River billion in transactions for ille- and already had maximum years has welcomed the sustained winds of 60 mph. world’s trash, creating a roargal drugs and services. The Associated Press Karen could be at or near ing business in recycling and Ulbricht was later charged Bodies of drowned migrants are lined up in the port of Lampedusa on in criminal complaints in hurricane strength by Friday. livelihoods for tens of thouThursday. The ship carrying African migrants toward Italy caught fire sands. Now authorities are federal courts in New York Surge in Afghan IEDs and sank off the Sicilian island of Lampedusa officials said Thursday. clamping down on an indusand Maryland. He’s accused try that has helped the rich of making millions of dollars as withdrawal looms GARDEZ, Afghanistan West dispose of its waste but operating the secret Silk Road website and of a failed (AP) — After 12 years of war, also added to the degradation murder-for-hire scheme, all roadside bombs are the No. 1 of China’s environment. The Chinese campaign is while living anonymously killer, claiming thousands of with two roommates whom lives every year. And as for- aimed at enforcing standards he paid $1,000 to rent a room eign troops wind down oper- for waste imports after Beijing ations in preparation for their decided too many were unusROME (AP) — A ship land — a mere 70 miles off in a modest neighborhood. withdrawal in 15 months, able or even dangerous and carrying African migrants the coast of Tunisia — and is insurgents are using an ever would end up in its landfills. to Europe caught fire and the frequent destination for Tropical Storm Karen forms in Gulf of Mexico larger number of these Under the crackdown dubbed capsized Thursday off the smugglers’ boats. Rescue crews hauled body southern Italian island of MIAMI (AP) — Tropical explosives to assert their grip Green Fence, China has Lampedusa, killing at least bags by the dozens off coast Storm Karen has formed in and recapture territory. rejected hundreds of containAfghan and coalition mili- ers of waste it said were con94 people as hundreds guard ships Thursday and the Gulf of Mexico, and a were dumped into the sea, Italian coast guard ships, hurricane watch is in effect tary officials say their enemy taminated or that improperly officials said. Over 150 local fishing boats and heli- along the Gulf Coast from is resorting to hidden bombs mixed different types of scrap. people were rescued but copters from across the some 200 others were still region combed the waters, trying to find survivors. unaccounted for. Only three of the estimatIt was one of the deadliest recent accidents in the per- ed 100 women on board have ilous Mediterranean Sea been rescued so far and none ® crossing for African migrants of the 10 children believed ® seeking a new life in the on board were saved, she European Union. Smugglers said. Two of the dead were charge thousands of dollars a pregnant. According to Interior head to smuggle people to Europe aboard overcrowded, Minister Angelino Alfano, Husqvarna Blowers Husqvarna Chainsaws barely seaworthy fishing the ship began taking on $ Rebate* $ boats, providing no life vests water during the night after 500 Series Rebate* the motor was cut as it or other safety features. Backpack Blowers 100-300 Series “We need only caskets, neared Conigli island off Husqvarna Blowers Up to certainly not ambulances,” Lampedusa, a tiny speck of $ 50 Pietro Bartolo, chief of an island closer to Africa Trade-In Reward* health services on Lampe- than the Italian mainland. Usually smugglers have dusa, told Radio 24. He gave Extended Warranty the death toll at 94 but said it cellphones or satellite Get up to a 4 year extended warranty on your new handheld equipment when would certainly rise as search phones to call for help when you purchase at least 3 bottles of the 32oz Husqvarna pre-mix fuel on the they near shore or run into operations continued. same invoice/receipt as a qualifying handheld product. The 66-foot boat was trouble, but this time they *Mail-in rebate offer valid on select models between October 1 and October 31, 2013 at participating dealers. Visit your local Husqvarna dealer for complete details.While supplies last. believed to be carrying 450 to didn’t. Instead, someone on 500 people, according to an board set fire to a piece of expert with the International material to attract the attenOrganization for Migration. tion of passing ships, only to The boat left from Tripoli have the fire spread to the with migrants from Eritrea, ship itself. The passengers all moved Ghana and Somalia, Italian coast guard spokesman to one side to avoid the fire, Marco Di Milla told flipping the ship and spilling hundreds of men, reporters. 11 2 0 F i l l m o r e , B a n d o n (Entrance at 11th & Elmira) • 5 4 1 - 3 4 7 - 2 6 6 2 Lampedusa is closer to women and children into Mon.–Fri. 8am–5:30pm • Sat 9am-4pm Africa than the Italian main- the sea, he said.

WORLD

Migrant ship sinks off Italy, killing at least 94

Husqvarna D Husqvarna Days ays October 1-31, 1-31, 2013 2013 October

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Palestinians reclaim settlement land BURKA, West Bank (AP) — After a long court battle, Palestinian farmers have reclaimed land they lost to an Israeli settlement in the 1970s. Israel dismantled Homesh and three other West Bank settlements in 2005, in connection with a wider withdrawal from the Gaza Strip, but refused to let the original Palestinian landowners return to the Homesh area. The Israeli group Yesh Din says it fought a successful

40

20

legal battle to restore the land to the farmers. On Thursday, farmers from the village of Burka returned to their nearby land for the first time. Fathallah Hajjeh says he “never felt such joy.” Since capturing the West Bank, Gaza and east Jerusalem in 1967, Israel built and expanded settlements, now home to more than half a million Israelis. The Palestinians seek a state in those territories.

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A8•The World • Thursday, October 3,2013

Weather South Coast

National forecast Forecast highs for Friday, Oct. 4

Sunny

Pt. Cloudy

Cloudy

Seattle 41° | 59° Billings 34° | 46°

San Francisco 57° | 84°

Minneapolis 52° | 61°

Denver 36° | 46°

Curry County Coast Chicago 70° | 82°

New York 66° | 81°

Detroit 64° | 75°

Washington D.C. 63° | 86°

Los Angeles 63° | 86°

Atlanta 64° | 84°

El Paso 59° | 88° Houston 75° | 91°

Fronts Cold

-0s

0s

10s

20s 30s 40s

50s 60s

Warm Stationary

70s

80s

Pressure Low

90s 100s 110s

Tornado Outbreak In The Midwest, Blizzard To Its West

Guidelines are not followed Continued from Page A1 histories of only 649 of Oregon’s 25,354 sex offenders appear on the state’s public website. Oregon law limits the list to sex offenders designated as predatory and includes other qualifications. Federal law calls for states to publicize all registered sex offender’s photos, names, address-

SHUTDOWN Continued from Page A1 Don Amador, founder of The Trail PAC,said leaving the dunes open for riding but closing staging areas and support facilities sends too much of a mixed message to riders. I’d rather them leave it

Willamette Valley Tonight: Areas of fog. Otherwise, increasing clouds, with a low around 36. North wind 8 to 13 mph. Friday: Areas of fog. Gradually becoming sunny, with a high near 65. Calm wind. Friday Night: Areas of fog. Increasing clouds, with a low around 38. North northeast wind around 6 mph. Saturday: Areas of fog. Otherwise, partly sunny, with a high near 67. Light and variable wind.

Portland area Tonight: Areas of fog. Increasing clouds, with a low around 43. North northwest wind around 6 mph. Friday: Areas of fog. Gradually becoming sunny, with a high near 65. East wind around 5 mph. Friday Night: Areas of fog. Increasing clouds, with a low around 44. East wind around 5 mph. Saturday: Areas of fog . Otherwise, mostly sunny, with a high near 67. Light and variable wind.

Stock . . . . . . . . . Close 8:30 Frontier. . . . . . . . . . . 4.29 4.29 Intel . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22.89 22.59 Kroger. . . . . . . . . . . 40.57 40.08 Lee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.78 2.85

Eugene 37° | 64° North Bend Coos Bay 45° | 65° Klamath Falls

CALIF. 28° | 59°

Cloudy Partly Cloudy

Oregon Temps

Local high, low, rainfall

Temperature extremes and precipitation for the 24 hours ending at 5 a.m. today. Hi Lo Prec Astoria 54 38 0.72 Brookings 60 45 T Corvallis 57 37 0.15 Eugene 54 38 0.33 Klamath Falls 55 29 0 La Grande 52 43 0.02 Medford 61 45 0.01 Newport 59 41 0.35 Pendleton 56 42 0.01 Portland 54 45 0.27 Redmond 52 31 0.01 Roseburg 59 45 0.20 Salem 57 41 0.22

Wednesday: High 61, low 43 Rain: 0.04 Total rainfall to date: 24.18 inches Rainfall to date last year: 28.80 inches Average rainfall to date: 38.99 inches

SUNDAY

MONDAY

Mostly sunny 71/49

Chance of rain 66/49

open, but try to find away to allow those facilities to stay open,” Amador said. “I know it’s difficult, but I just think this whole thing is a giant cabal.” He said the shutdown has also affected the ability of riders to get basic information about the closed staging areas.

“With the agency shut down, I can’t call the Oregon Dunes to find out what’s shut down because all the offices are shut down,” he said. Reporter Thomas Moriarty can be reached at 541-2691222, ext. 240, or by email at t h o m a s . m o r i a rt y @ t h e worldlink.com. Follow him on Twitter: @ThomasDMoriarty.

Senate. Democrats agreed to throw in the genetically modified foods bill when they were unable to meet Republican demands for steeper pension cuts or more generous tax cuts for small businesses. Fearing a growing effort by environmental groups to seek local regulations on genetically modified foods, the agriculture industry has pushed for a statewide preemption. Retired government workers will see their pensions grow at a slower rate. For decades, pension checks have increased at a rate of 2 percent annually. Now, the first $60,000 will increase by 1.25 percent per year and the rest will grow by 0.15 percent. The lowest-income

Snow Weather Underground• AP

Central Oregon

Continued from Page A1

Ice

Flurries Rain

Showers

Tonight: Mostly clear, with a low around 32 Friday: Sunny, with a high near 57. West wind 7 to 11 mph becoming southeast in the morning. Friday Night: Mostly clear, with a low around 33. South wind 8 to 10 mph. Saturday: Sunny, with a high near 69. Southwest wind 5 to 9 mph.

PERS cuts will be challenged

© 2013 Wunderground.com

Thunderstorms

Sunny 67/48

OREGON

IDAHO Ontario 37° | 63°

Sunny 66/48

Tonight: Areas of fog. Otherwise, partly cloudy, with a low around 48. North northwest wind 5 to 9 mph. Friday: Areas of fog. Otherwise, mostly sunny, with a high near 61. East northeast wind around 6 mph. Friday Night: Areas of fog. Partly cloudy, with a low around 52. North northwest wind around 6 mph. Saturday: Areas of fog. Otherwise, mostly sunny, with a high near 62. Light and variable wind.

ing too large to follow and focusing on those posing the greatest risk will be more effective. Risk assessments have been done for about 16,000 of Oregon’s offenders. The state parole board could finish the rest in another four years if it gets two additional staffers, said Jay Scroggin, who recently served as the board’s executive director. ■ Oregon has 496 registered sex offenders for each 100,000 people. The highest proportion in the nation is in Delaware, 537 offenders per 100,000 people.

33.72 71.53 41.33 31.70 14.02 76.73

Bend 34° | 54°

Salem 41° | 68°

SATURDAY

es and places of employment, except for those convicted of misdemeanor sex offenses that involve an adult victim. ■ Oregon is out of step with federal classification rules that call for offenders to be put in one of three categories based on convictions. The Legislature passed a law this year setting up a three-tiered registration system based on risk and making it easier for some offenders to petition for relief from registration. Defenders of the bill say the list of offenders is grow-

Microsoft . . . . . . . . . 33.91 Nike . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71.87 NW Natural. . . . . . . 41.80 Safeway . . . . . . . . . . 32.11 SkyWest . . . . . . . . . 14.40 Starbucks. . . . . . . . . 77.19

Newport 45° | 63°

Pendleton 36° | 64°

FRIDAY

The Tide Tables To find the tide prediction for your area, add or subtract minutes as indicated. To find your estimated tidal height, multiply the listed height by the high or low ratio for your area.

Location High time Bandon -0:18 Brookings -0:40 -0:11 Charleston +1:20 Coos Bay +0:38 Florence Port Orford -0:28 Reedsport +1:05 Umpqua River -0:01

Date 3-Oct 4-Oct 5-Oct 6-Oct 7-Oct Date 3-Oct 4-Oct 5-Oct 6-Oct 7-Oct

ratio Low time .81 -0:06 .81 -0:30 .89 -0:04 .86 +1:24 .77 +0:54 .86 -0:23 .79 +1:20 .81 -0:01

A.M.

HIGH TIDE

time 11:58 12:19 1:03 1:47 2:32

LOW TIDE

retirees will temporarily get supplemental payments to help mitigate the loss. Beneficiaries in the Public Employee Retirement System and unions that represent government workers have vowed to challenge the cuts in court. Many of the lawmakers who voted for the PERS cuts said they didn’t want to take benefits from workers, but the system’s massive unfunded liabilities require action. Together with cuts adopted earlier this year, the changes approved Wednesday would erase about a quarter of the system’s unfunded liabilities, which were created when investment losses erased 27 percent of the PERS fund in 2008. Kitzhaber sought to reassure retirees that he was done pushing for cuts to their pension checks, saying PERS “is off the table for this governor.” “We are done,” he said. “We’re going to move on to

NORTHWEST STOCKS Closing and 8:30 a.m. quotations:

WASH. Portland 39° | 68°

Extended outlook

North Coast

Friday, Oct. 4

City/Region Lowtemperatures | High temps Weather Underground for daytime conditions, low/high Oct. 4 Forecast for Friday,forecast

Medford 36° | 68°

Tonight: Patchy fog. Otherwise, mostly clear, with a low around 33. North northwest wind 5 to 9 mph. Friday: Patchy fog. Otherwise, sunny, with a high near 71. Calm wind. Friday Night: Mostly clear, with a low around 39. Calm wind becoming east southeast around 5 mph. Saturday: Sunny, with a high near 78. Light east southeast wind.

High

Temperatures indicate Wednesday’s high Fairbanks 48 32 cdy Philadelphia 84 63 pcdy and overnight low to 5 a.m. Fargo 42 cdy Phoenix 95Ice70 clr Rain T-storms 67 Flurries Snow Showers Hi Lo Prc Otlk Flagstaff 66 37 clr Pittsburgh 80 58 cdy Albuquerque 79 52 clr Fresno 84 59 clr Pocatello 55 36 .13 rn Anchorage 48 42 .12 rn Green Bay 74 46 rn Portland,Maine 80 47 pcdy Atlanta 82 65 clr Hartford Spgfld 81 50 pcdy Providence 81 52 pcdy A major severe weather outbreak is likely across the Corn Belt Atlantic City 85 58 pcdy Honolulu 86 76 clr Raleigh-Durham 85 59 pcdy Austin Friday. Meanwhile, 91 75 pcdy heavy will combine Houstonsnow and 83 strong 72 .03 winds cdy Reno 73 to 41 clr Baltimore 86 60 pcdy Indianapolis 77 of 66 the Rockies rn Richmond 87 59 pcdy create blizzard conditions over parts and High Billings 57 40 .36 sno Jackson,Miss. 85 70 cdy Sacramento 80 56 clr Plains. Fire increase nearStthe Birmingham 84 65weather pcdy concerns Jacksonville will 82 64 pcdy Louis West Coast. 85 70 .19 pcdy Boise 57 41 .01 clr Kansas City 82 70 cdy Salt Lake City 68 53 rn Boston 82 61 pcdy Key West 87 76 cdy Weather San AngeloUnderground 88 68• AP pcdy Buffalo 72 50 cdy Las Vegas 91 69 clr San Diego 70 63 cdy 80 47 pcdy Lexington Burlington,Vt. 82 68 rn San Francisco 69 54 clr Casper 58 40 .04 rn Little Rock 87 68 .13 cdy San Jose 76 51 clr 87 61 pcdy Los Angeles Charleston,S.C. 76 62 pcdy Santa Fe 75 48 clr Charleston,W.Va. 82 59 cdy Louisville 81 69 .04 cdy Seattle 55 49 .24 cdy Charlotte,N.C. 84 58 pcdy Madison 76 55 rn Sioux Falls 80 54 .10 rn Cheyenne 66 36 cdy Memphis 85 68 cdy Spokane 51 35 cdy Chicago 76 60 rn Miami Beach 86 73 5.53 rn Syracuse 77 47 pcdy Cincinnati 78 67 .06 rn Midland-Odessa 94 69 clr Tampa 90 74 cdy Cleveland 79 61 rn Milwaukee 73 58 rn Toledo 82 58 rn Colorado Springs 78 46 pcdy Mpls-St Paul 77 57 .90 rn Tucson 91 71 clr Columbus,Ohio 83 68 cdy Missoula 55 39 rn Tulsa 86 72 pcdy Concord,N.H. 79 43 pcdy Nashville 79 69 .16 cdy Washington,D.C. 88 65 pcdy Dallas-Ft Worth 90 75 cdy New Orleans 83 73 .20 cdy W. Palm Beach 88 81 cdy Daytona Beach 84 68 cdy New York City 83 63 pcdy Wichita 85 71 clr Denver 75 40 cdy Norfolk,Va. 81 60 pcdy Wilmington,Del. 84 58 pcdy Des Moines 86 67 rn Oklahoma City 87 71 clr National Temperature Extremes Detroit 80 58 rn Omaha 86 62 .87 rn High Wednesday 99 at Gila Bend, Ariz. El Paso 88 60 clr Orlando cdy Low Thursday 21 at Truckee, Calif. 88 70

HAVEN

Tonight: Mostly clear, with a low around 48. Northeast wind 6 to 14 mph, with gusts to 22 mph. Friday: Sunny, with a high near 68. East northeast wind 8 to 10 mph. Friday Night: Mostly clear, with a low around 50. East northeast wind around 11 mph. Saturday: Sunny, with a high near 67. East northeast wind 5 to 7 mph becoming calm in the morning.

Oregon weather Tonight/Friday

Rogue Valley

Miami Miami 77° | 87° 88° 78°

-10s

Tonight: Mostly clear, with a low around 44. Northeast wind 5 to 14 mph, with gusts to 21 mph. Friday: Sunny, with a high near 66. East northeast wind 5 to 8 mph. Friday Night: Mostly clear, with a low around 48. Northeast wind 6 to 9 mph. Saturday: Sunny, with a high near 67. Northeast wind 3 to 7 mph.

ft. 8.1 7.8 7.9 7.9 7.7

A.M.

P.M. time ft. 12:30 8.5 1:03 8.8 1:38 9.0 2:15 9.1

P.M.

time ft. time ft. 5:38 1.0 6:06 0.7 6:14 1.0 6:44 0.1 6:49 1.2 7:23 -0.5 7:25 1.5 8:04 -0.8 8:04 1.8 8:48 -1.0 Sunrise, sunset Oct. 1-9 — 7:15, 6:57 Moon watch New Moon — Oct. 4

other things that are important to Oregonians, put this behind us.” Some higher-income individuals and businesses will see a higher tax bill. Individuals earning at least $100,000 — couples more than $200,000 — won’t be able to claim the $183 personal tax exemption. Use of a tax deduction for seniors’medical expenses has been restricted based on age and income, but more people will qualify because taxpayers who don’t itemize their deductions will be able to claim it. Businesses — known as pass-through entities because their profits are taxed on the owners’ individual tax return — would pay a lower rate under certain circumstances. The Earned Income Tax Credit, which benefits low-income workers, would be expanded. Some Democrats criticized the business tax breaks, which they fear will balloon into an expensive giveaway to rich people.

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Sports

Presidents Cup | B2 College Picks | B4

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 3, 2013

theworldlink.com/sports ■ Sports Editor John Gunther ■ 541-269-1222, ext. 241

Civil War showdown is Friday Teams reverse Miss Flame ceremony is fortunes BY GEORGE ARTSITAS The World

A look at this week’s games Far West League Marshfield at North Bend Time: 7 p.m. Radio: K-Light (98.7 FM) and KMHS (91.3 FM) Outlook: The Pirates and Bulldogs meet as league foes for the first time since North Bend dropped down to the Far West League back in 2002. North Bend has rolled to road wins in its first two league games, while Marshfield is 1-2 in league play with losses to Douglas and, last week, Siuslaw. The Pirates need a win Friday to guarantee a chance of finishing in the top three and advancing to the Class 4A play-in round. North Bend, meanwhile, needs a victory to keep pace with Siuslaw and Douglas in the race for the league title. The Pirates will need to find success moving the ball and avoid turnovers against an opportunistic North Bend team that intercepted six passes at Sutherlin last week. The contest also is the annual Miss Flame game in North Bend.

Douglas at Siuslaw Time: 7 p.m. Radio: KCST (106.9 FM) Outlook: The Far West League’s first big showdown will help sort out the league’s hierarchy. The Vikings have been rolling with quarterback Joseph Dotson running the veer offense. They struggled some against South Umpqua in the league opener, but dominated Sutherlin and Marshfield. Siuslaw’s defense has been as impressive as its offense, but will get a test against a Douglas team that also is capable of putting up a lot of points. Siuslaw averages 40 points a game and Douglas is scoring nearly 34. Siuslaw’s defense has given up just 68 points in five games, best in the Far West League and among the better squads for Class 4A. (Seaside has pitched four shutouts and allowed just 14 points in its five wins, making it best in the state.)

NORTH BEND — It’s that time of year again. Civil War time. Friday night, the Bay Area’s oldest and most storied and vicious football rivalry continues when Marshfield travels over to Vic Adams field to take on North Bend. Kickoff is set for 7 p.m. The Bulldogs have taken the game the past three years and the two teams are trending in different directions. North Bend sits at 4-1 with an undefeated 2-0 record in the Far West League while Marshfield sits at 1-3 and 1-2 in league. Gary Prince has been coaching at North Bend since 2001 but hasn’t lost the Civil War since he took over as head coach three years ago. His first two years at the reins he’s gone home with bragging rights. But he also remembers what it’s like to be on the losing end of things from back when Marshfield was at prominence. “I’ve been on both sides,” Prince said. “It is what it is. It’s a big game for community pride, but it’s just another game on the

at halftime In addition to being the Civil War, Friday night also is the annual Miss Flame game at North Bend as the Bulldogs celebrate their ties with the North Bend Fire Department. During halftime, Miss Flame will be crowned from among court members Jennifer Coleman, Shalah Collicott, Chelsea Fults and Rylie Waddington.

schedule. We just have to take care of business.” While up North they’ve got Mannion vs. Mariota, here in town we’ll have the quarterback battle of Howerton vs. Lucero. The Bulldogs’ Cam Lucero has shown glimpses of brilliance throughout the year. The junior, who transitioned from wideout to quarterback this season, has

proven to be a dual threat through the air and on the ground. Howerton has more been inconsistent, but has had flashes showing he can handle the load. In Marshfield’s win against Brookings-Harbor, Howerton tossed a touchdown and looked good leading the offense. Howerton has been sharing time with sophomore Jake Miles, who is still healing after hurting his back last week lifting weights. “They got some good skill kids,” Prince said. “We’re hoping to match up with the things they’re trying to do and figure out a way to shut those things down.” Two playmakers who will play a huge role if the Pirates can pull the upset will be Andrew Sharp and Alex Brown. Sharp has proven to be a special teams savant, finding any nook and/or cranny to roll off big, gamechanging returns as well as playing both ways on offense and defense. Brown is a bruising runner who barrels through the line but shows a pristine ability to cut back inside when sweeping to the sideline. SEE CIVIL WAR | B3

Brookings-Harbor vs. Clatskanie

Sunset Conference Gold Beach at Bandon

By Alysha Beck, The World

Southwestern’s Christine McCready, right, and Tori Foutz block at the net against Umpqua’s Kathryn Epler during the match on Wednesday. The Lakers swept the Riverhawks for their first NWAACC South Region win.

SWOCC sweeps Umpqua

Coquille at Reedsport

BY GEORGE ARTSITAS

Time: 7 p.m. Radio: No local radio Outlook: The records for the two teams are reversed from what they have been in recent years. Reedsport is 3-1, riding a three-game win streak and coming off a victory at Riddle that might have been the team’s best outing of the young season. Coquille, on the other hand, is 0-4 after advancing to the playoffs the past few seasons. The Red Devils have faced a much tougher schedule, though, and were impressive holding defending Class 2A state champion Oakland to just 21 points on a muddy field last Friday. Coquille’s big problem has been offense, which is a symptom of a beat up offensive line that was missing four of its original starters last week. The Red Devils are healthier now, which is good news for sophomore quarterback Zach Breitkreutz. Reedsport has been efficient on offense with quarterback Haden Sams and running backs Joey Herr, Hayden Hinshaw and Matthew Rohde, and the Braves are playing in front of their home fans.

The World

Myrtle Point at Glide Time: 7 p.m. Radio: No local radio Outlook: Like for Bandon and Reedsport, this game will be a chance to see how much better Myrtle Point is this fall. The Bobcats had a 3-1 preseason a year after winning just one game. Myrtle Point lost to a talented St. Mary’s squad last weekend at Medford’s Spiegelberg Stadium, and will look to get its confidence back quickly. The Bobcats feature one of the most explosive players on the South Coast in Thomas Nathan, who scored all five touchdowns in last week’s loss. Glide, meanwhile, is 2-2 with wins over Oakridge and Rogue River and losses to Harrisburg and Illinois Valley. The Wildcats have had two weeks to improve since the latter loss, having a bye in the schedule last weekend.

Skyline League Powers at Hosanna Christian Time: 6 p.m. Radio: No local radio Outlook: The Cruisers begin a stretch of four straight road games with momentum, having beaten Gilchrist soundly during homecoming last week. They need to keep winning to have a shot at working their way back into the playoff picture and have to overcome the first of those long trips, this one 230 miles one way — Hosanna Christian is located in Klamath Falls. The Lions are just 1-4 on the season, their win coming against North Lake. They have losses to two of the teams Powers beat — Gilchrist and Prospect. But Powers still will need to play well, like the squad that had just one turnover last week instead of the one that had seven turnovers in a loss at Elkton.

Last fall, the Reedsport, Myrtle Point and Bandon football teams combined for a total of four wins — three coming in games against each other. What a difference a year makes. Entering Sunset Conference play Friday night, all three teams have winning records. Reedsport and Myrtle Point are 3-1 and Bandon is 2-1. It’s probably in part due to scheduling. But it’s also due to hard work, both by players and by coaches. Simple circumstances suggested things should be better this fall. Myrtle Point began its first practice of 2012 with fewer than a dozen players, a factor of an awkward coaching transition: One coach left and his replacement didn’t work out. The end result, though, was the Bobcats hiring longtime girls basketball coach Marty Stallard on SPORTS the eve of practice. I’ve known Marty for years, and was pretty sure if he established the program his way, success would follow. He JOHN asks a lot of GUNTHER his players, instilling a sense of discipline. The players bought in, and the roster has grown considerably — it’s still the smallest of the area’s 11-man programs, but much better than it had been. And they are all getting lots of playing time, since the Bobcats had healthy leads in two of their three wins. Meanwhile, up the coast at Reedsport, the Braves also are enjoying a strong season despite injuries that have limited their roster. Reedsport coach Shane Nelson isn’t new to the program like Stallard, but he has done a great job passing on the school’s pride to the players. All of Reedsport’s coaches also played for the Braves, and I got a better sense of the coaching tradition when talking with Nelson after his coach, Jim Akre, died last month. Nelson has tried to follow in Akre’s footsteps with the primary goal of teaching the players to be better men. It’s not a new concept, but it is a good one. If the players take care of business like they are supposed to and have a commitment to their teammates, success will take care of itself. The Braves also won three games last year, but two of them came at the hands of the Bobcats and Tigers. As for those Tigers, Bandon didn’t have any wins last year. That was largely due to inexperience, the price the Tigers paid for having a huge senior class on the team that reached the playoffs the year before. Only a handful of the Bandon players had any varsity experience. Now all the guys who were thrust into action are veterans, and their hard work is paying off. Like in Myrtle Point and Reedsport, Bandon has a head coach committed to improving the players beyond just their football skills. The good news for Silia Polamalu, like his counterparts with the Bobcats and Braves, is that the message is probably a little easier to pass on since the team is winning games. Things get tougher now. Sunset Conference foes Gold Beach, Coquille and Glide should be a bit more imposing than Glendale, Riddle, North Douglas, Culver and Chiloquin — the victims of Reedsport, Myrtle Point and Bandon. The Braves, Bobcats and Tigers might all lose Friday. They might suffer a few losses in the next five weeks. But I hope they keep the same attitude that they have had after their wins in September. At each of the schools, a number of players stuck it out through long seasons last year and have enjoyed the fruits of thier labor on Friday nights this year. They have a lot to be proud of.

EDITOR

Time: 2 p.m. Saturday Location: Pleasant Hill Radio: KURY (93.5 FM) Outlook: The Bruins found a game against the Tigers for their bye in the league schedule, and will play on the neutral field — the location made travel much easier for the schools near Oregon’s borders with Washington and California. Clatskanie, which is a Class 3A team, might be just the recipe for BrookingsHarbor to get its first win of the season. But the Tigers are talented, with wins over Class 4A Tillamook and traditional Class 3A power Horizon Christian and their only loss against Cascade, one of the top Class 4A schools.

Time: 7 p.m. Radio: KTEE (94.9 FM and 95.7 FM) and KGBR (92.7 FM) Outlook: The league season finally begins after a month of preseason contests, and Bandon will get an early test to see how much it has improved since its winless 2012 campaign. The Tigers are 2-1 and coming off a 150 shutout win over Chiloquin last week, but haven’t seen any team as good as Gold Beach. The Panthers are 3-2, and coming off a loss against Cascade Christian. Gold Beach responded to its first loss, to Regis, with a pair of dominant wins. And the Panthers are trying to win the league title for the fourth straight year. Bandon will need a big night for quarterback Shawn Peters, who directs the Tigers’ option attack. And they will need a good defensive night against Gold Beach’s veer offense.

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COOS BAY — The Southwestern Oregon Community College volleyball team wanted to beat Umpqua Community College and breast cancer on the same night on Wednesday. They beat one and put a dent in the other. The Lakers swept Umpqua 2519, 25-20, 25-18 for their first league win of the season. The win pushes the Lakers to 5-8 overall and 1-2 in league. Wednesday was SWOCC’s Dig Pink night to show support for breast cancer awareness. The crowd was flooded in pink Tshirts with some zealous students going full-hooligan in pink boxing gloves and hot pink short-shorts. Head coach Stephanie Willett

wishes every crowd could be like Wednesday, but can take solace knowing the Laker faithful could come out in droves for a cause she wholeheartedly believes in. “The crowd was awesome tonight. If it’s like that every game, it would be awesome,” Willett said. “It was our Dig Pink night and everyone was aware of that. It’s good to see everybody in pink and showing their support. It’s always a good cause to support.” Alyssa Jones, a setter for the Lakers from Anchorage, Alaska, had a stellar night in the middle along with Briana Gutierrez setting their teammates. Guitierrez — who finished with a team high 15 assists — and Jones did a great job spreading out the ball to the hitters to connect on spikes. Jones finished with 14 assists of her own and set up her teammates after the game just as much as when

they were on the court. “We all have our moments, and it’s a team sport, so you can’t do one thing without the other,” Jones said. “I feel like we played great. We really stuck together. When someone was down we picked them back up. I feel like we played great together as a team.” Individually, Kara Potts (formerly Kara Young) finished with three aces, nine kills and nine digs. Tori Foutz finished with seven kills and three solo blocks while Alyssa Sprague contributed 10 digs. The only moment of adversity the Lakers faced the entire night was when they were already up two sets to none. Staring at a 6-8 deficit, the Lakers went toe-totoe with the Riverhawks for about 10 points until pulling away for a 25-18 set win and the match. SEE LAKERS | B3

Tampa Bay earns shot at Red Sox CLEVELAND (AP) — The Tampa Bay Rays’ road show rolls on. Next stop: Boston. Alex Cobb dodged trouble for nearly seven innings and the Rays pitched their way to another must-have win on the road, beating the Cleveland Indians 4-0 Wednesday night in the AL wildcard game. Cobb, who missed a chunk of the regular season after he was hit in the head by a line drive, quieted a thundering Cleveland crowd and ended the Indians’ unexpected season. “Can’t put into words the appreciation I have celebrating on this field,” Cobb said. “I knew how close it was to not coming back. Sitting on the couch watching these games, I knew we had a good chance. We have a great team. I was going to do everything I could to get back and be a part of it.” Delmon Young homered in the

The Associated Press

Tampa Bay celebrates after beating the Cleveland Indians 4-0 in the AL wild-card game Wednesday. third inning off rookie Danny Salazar as the Rays, playing in their third city over four days, advanced to face the AL East

champion Red Sox in the division series starting Friday. SEE RAYS | B2


B2 •The World • Thursday,October 3,2013

Sports RAYS From Page B1

The Associated Press

United States player Jordan Spieth hits out of a bunker on the eighth hole during a practice round for the Presidents Cup on Wednesday.

Rookie hopes to make splash at Cup DUBLIN, Ohio (AP) — Every step of the way in the amazing rookie season of Jordan Spieth brings more than he could have imagined. And then he stepped to the 12th tee Wednesday at Muirfield Village. It got even better. Spieth and Steve Stricker, his partner for the opening session of the Presidents Cup, were already behind in an abbreviated match against Tiger Woods and Matt Kuchar, who had made two eagles in the tough alternate-shot format. Woods blasted an 8-iron into the par 3. Typical of his year, Spieth wasn’t about to be outdone. He tracked the flight of a smooth 7iron, watched it bounce short and then disappear into the cup for a hole-in-one that sent cheers reverberating across the golf course. “Everybody’s hands went up, so our arms went up, and it was really cool,” Spieth said. Can it get any better? He started the season without status on any tour. He assured himself a PGA

Tour card in four months. He won the John Deere Classic in July. Only one of the best shots of the year kept him from winning again in August. Playing with Phil Mickelson for the first time, he shot 62 in the final round at the TPC Boston, such an impressive display that Mickelson sent a text message to Presidents Cup captain Fred Couples that said, “Dude, you’ve got to pick this guy.” Couples did, and Spieth made it look even better by nearly winning the Tour Championship. The International team is rallying around the energy of seven newcomers to the Presidents Cup. The Americans are getting plenty of that from one rookie — a 20-year-old from Dallas who first showed poise on the big stage when he was on the fringe of contention at the Byron Nelson Championship at age 16. The next big chance starts today when Spieth makes his debut as the youngest American ever in the Presidents Cup. He plays with Stricker — at 46, the oldest player on this team —

4D

against Ernie Els and Brendon de Jonge. Spieth had not celebrated his first birthday when Els won his first major championship. The two days of practice leading up to the Presidents Cup have been relatively calm. Most of the players know this course from the Memorial, and most are still taking it easy after such a long stretch to end the 2013 tour season. Leave it to Spieth to deliver the first “wow” moment of the week. Davis Love III, an assistant to Couples this week, was standing by the 12th green when Spieth made his ace. “Every time I’ve been around him, great things happen,” Love said. “I’ve been kind of watching him since he was real young — like four years ago. He came through the junior ranks barely ahead of my son, so I’ve always been impressed with everything he’s done. He says the right thing, does the right thing.” Perhaps the strongest assessment came from Love’s wife when she told him, “He just walked in the room like he belongs.”

Academies will play Saturday games

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THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

WN WN

CONTEST

GAME GAME PICKS PICKS WEEK WEEK 5 5

1st Down John Gunther, Sports Editor

2nd Down George Artsitas, Sports Reporter

3rd Down Jeff Precourt, Publisher

4th Down – Rob Miles, Coos Bay

THURSDAY, OCT. 3 1. Buffalo at Cleveland

Cleveland

Cleveland

Buffalo

Cleveland

SUNDAY, OCT. 6 2. Detroit at Green Bay

Green Bay

Green Bay

Green Bay

3. New Orleans at Chicago

Chicago

Chicago

New Orleans New Orleans

4. Kansas City at Tennessee

Tennessee

Kansas City

Tennessee

Kansas City

5. Jacksonville at St. Louis

St. Louis

St. Louis

St. Louis

St. Louis

Green Bay

6. New England at Cincinnati New England Cincinnati

New England New England

7. Seattle at Indianapolis

Seattle

Seattle

Seattle

Seattle

8. Baltimore at Miami

Miami

Miami

Miami

Miami

9. Philadelphia at N.Y. Giants N.Y. Giants

Philadelphia

Philadelphia N.Y. Giants

10. Carolina at Arizona

Arizona

Carolina

Carolina

Carolina

11. San Diego at Oakland

San Diego

Oakland

San Diego

San Diego

12. Denver at Dallas

Denver

Denver

Denver

Denver

13. Houston at San Francisco

San Francisco San Francisco Houston

San Francisco

Atlanta

Atlanta

MONDAY, OCT. 7 14. N.Y. Jets at Atlanta

“I felt like we’ve done it and been here before,” said Desmond Jennings, who hit a two-run double. “The road we took to get here was pretty tough going to New York, Toronto, playing a game in Texas.” Cobb’s comeback in August from his frightening injury helped stabilize the Rays, who have spent the past two weeks winning crucial games to reach the postseason for the fourth time in six years. Cobb pitched out of massive jams in the fourth and fifth, and allowed two runners to reach in the seventh before turning it over to Tampa Bay’s dependable bullpen. Joel Peralta struck out Nick Swisher on three pitches, ending Cleveland’s last real chance. Fernando Rodney worked a perfect ninth, striking out Lonnie Chisenhall to end it. Rodney dropped to one knee, pointed skyward and soon was mobbed by all the Rays, who may be a little homesick but are Boston-bound. “Go out and play our game,” Jennings said. “It’s going to be tough anytime you play Boston.” Unfazed by a raucous, red-clad, towel-waving crowd of 43,579 that roared like a jet engine inside Progressive Field, the Rays handled the Indians and will now face their division nemesis, the Red Sox, who went 12-7 against Tampa Bay this season. David Price set the tone for the Rays’ postseason run by throwing a complete game to beat Texas in the wild-card tiebreaker Monday night, and Cobb picked up where his teammate left off. After he was pulled in the seventh, Cobb walked to the dugout where he was first greeted with a high-five from Price. “The adrenaline was going pretty fast there in the early going,” Cobb said. “Once Delmon hit that home

run, I tried to fill up the strike zone. My stuff wasn’t the best, but I made my defense work. They were awesome.” There was a time when Cobb wasn’t even sure he would pitch again this season. On June 15, he suffered a concussion when he was struck in the right ear by a line drive hit by Kansas City’s Eric Hosmer. Cobb was sidelined for 50 games and Tuesday he recalled lying on his sofa and wondering if he would be able to help the Rays contend for a playoff spot. He didn’t want a repeat of 2011, when he couldn’t pitch in the playoffs after undergoing surgery to remove a blood clot in his ribs. But not only did Cobb go 5-1 after his scary moment, the 25-year-old finished 11-3 in 22 starts and manager Joe Maddon didn’t hesitate giving him the ball for the winner-take-all wild-card game. The Indians went from 94 losses a year ago to 92 wins under first-year manager Terry Francona and won their last 10 games to make the postseason for the first time since 2007. But it was one and done for Cleveland, which didn’t capitalize on scoring opportunities. The first three hitters, Michael Bourn, Swisher and Jason Kipnis, went a combined 0 for 12. The road-tested Rays, who have traveled 3,627 miles since leaving home on Sept. 23, took a 3-0 lead in the fourth on Jennings’ tworun double. James Loney and Evan Longoria hit one-out singles before Salazar retired Ben Zobrist on a fly to right, sending Loney to third. Jennings, who recently missed time with a hamstring injury, pulled Salazar’s pitch past diving a diving Chisenhall at third, and by the time left fielder Michael Brantley, who had been shading Jennings toward center, ran it down, Loney and Longoria scored to give Cobb a three-run cushion.

Atlanta

Atlanta

Email your first name, city of residence and a photo of yourself wearing your favorite team’s colors along with your picks each week. You can win bragging rights with your friends, plus a chance to win prizes. Watch the Sports section for weekly updates. Entries must be received or postmarked by the Wednesday prior to game start. Mailed entry forms may also be sent along with a scanable photo to: 4th Down Contest, c/o The World, PO BOX 1840, Coos Bay, OR, 97420

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Ha Clinton-Dix indefinitely for violating unspecified U.S. military academy team rules. Saban announced the football teams will play this weekend, despite the gov- suspension of one of the topranked Crimson Tide’s top ernment shutdown. defensive players after A senior Wednesday’s practice. Saban defense offiwouldn’t say what Clintoncial said the Dix did wrong. decision affects this BASEBALL weekend’s games only, Braves leave Uggla off and future games will be roster for playoff series evaluated as events unfold. ATLANTA — Slumping The official was not authorized to discuss the matter second baseman Dan Uggla publicly so spoke on condi- was left off the Atlanta Braves’ roster for the NL tion of anonymity. Navy later confirmed its division series against the home game against Air Force Los Angeles Dodgers. The Braves announced in Annapolis, Md., would be played as scheduled Saturday. their roster Wednesday, a day The game is sold out and is before the series opener. Outfielder B.J. Upton, the most notable one on the Midshipmen’s home sched- who is hitting only .184, is on ule. The Army-Navy game at the roster. the end of the season is played PRO HOCKEY at a neutral site. The Navy-AFA game and Parros is out of hospital Army’s game at Boston following head injury College were in jeopardy after MONTREAL — Montreal the Defense Department Canadiens enforcer George temporarily suspended Parros was released from the sports competition at the hospital after being treated service academies as a result overnight for a head injury of the budget impasse in suffered in a season-opening Congress. loss to Toronto.

Sports Shorts

Parros was knocked Former Duck sues NCAA unconscious early in the over concussions

SKIING Vonn says rehab on knee is ahead of schedule PARK CITY, Utah — Lindsey Vonn’s surgically repaired right knee feels so good she could be racing again by the end of the month, five weeks earlier than she originally expected. Vonn “reopened” the idea of competing in the seasonopening World Cup event in Soelden, Austria, after returning to the slopes last month in Portillo, Chile. The World Cup in Soelden is Oct. 26-27. “It’s definitely a possibility at this point,” she said. “I have to get over there and see how I feel.”

AUTO RACING Penske signs Keselowski to contract extension CHARLOTTE, N.C. — Penske Racing signed Brad Keselowski and Miller Lite to contract extensions through the 2017 season. It’s the second contract extension for the defending Sprint Cup Series champion in less than two years. Keselowski signed an extension after the 2011 season that ran through next year. That contract was redone to put the driver and sponsor in concurrent deals.

third period Tuesday after his face slammed into the ice during a fight with Maple Leafs tough guy Colton Orr. TRACK & FIELD Parros spent several minutes Jamaican panel ends motionless on the ice before suspension for sprinter he was taken off on a stretchKINGSTON, Jamaica — A er. Jamaican disciplinary panel gave sprinting star Veronica COLLEGE BASKETBALL Campbell-Brown a public Boheim says athletes warning Wednesday and should not be paid cleared her to return to comSYRACUSE, N.Y. — petition some five months Syracuse basketball coach after she returned a positive Jim Boeheim isn’t on board doping test on the Caribbean with paying college athletes. island. The three-time Olympic Speaking Wednesday in Syracuse at an annual gold medalist, one of the corAssociated Press meeting of nerstones of Jamaica’s wideNew York newspaper editors, ranging sprinting success, Boeheim said he’s heard the returned a positive test for a most recent talk about pay- banned diuretic at the International ing college athletes and Jamaica doesn’t agree with it one bit. Invitational meet in May. She “That’s really the most was suspended from compeidiotic suggestion of all tition while the disciplinary Saban suspends top time,” Boeheim said. “I don’t committee reviewed the case defensive back believe players should be and missed the island’s TUSCALOOSA, Ala. — paid. I believe they are get- national championships to Alabama coach Nick Saban ting a tremendous opportu- try and qualify for this sumhas suspended star safety Ha nity.” mer’s worlds in Moscow. INDIANAPOLIS — Two more former college football players have filed a lawsuit against the NCAA stemming from concussions and brain injuries. John DuRocher, a quarterback at Washington and Oregon, and Darin Harris, a safety at Washington, are seeking more than $5 million in damages. Both say they sustained repeated head injuries, despite promises that they would be competing in a protected college environment. The class-action suit was filed Tuesday in the U.S. District Court of Southern Indiana. Helmet-manufacturer Riddell and its parent company, Easton-Bell Sports, are also named in the complaint.


Thursday,October 3,2013 • The World • B3

Sports LAKERS Soccer teams both lose at home From Page B1 “It was a slow start for them at the beginning but they pulled it out,” Willett said. Adversity didn’t come in spades for SWOCC Wednesday, but one Laker is still playing through some of her own. Christie McCready had surgery for a torn ACL last December and is trying to play through after just nine months of rehab. The injury comes just three years after tearing her other ACL and she said she doesn’t quite feel at 100 percent because of the truncated rehab time. McCready wears a knee brace now and finished the match with 11 kills to go with six digs, but she never got the hot knife through butter kill she looks for. “I like to hit and have a really awesome kill. It happened maybe once or twice,” McCready said. Continuing her modesty she added, “I did all right. Not my best. I didn’t really feel like I had a good game.”

Even though the Lakers swept the Riverhawks, Willett sees plenty of opportunity for the team to get better. She said the Lakers could improve on serve accuracy and work out a few “little kinks,” they’re struggling with. But all-in-all, she said she was pleased to go home with another notch in the win column. “I feel like we did well, but there’s always room for improvement,” Willett said. “Either way, its an awesome feeling to get that win.” SWOCC hits the court again when it hosts College of the Redwoods next Tuesday.

SOCCER SWOCC’s soccer teams both came up short at home against Clark on Wednesday. The women fell by a 4-0 margin, with Clark scoring two goals in each half. Clark’s men, shut out the Lakers 11-0. Christian Desir had a hat trick in the first half and scored four goals in all for Clark, which led 7-0 by halftime. Last weekend, the Laker men topped Rogue, a club team from Medford.

CIVIL WAR From Page B1 Brown also is one of the leaders on defense at linebacker. The significance of the game on the community isn’t lost on him. “It’s a huge game for the community, “ Brown said, “It’s probably one of the biggest things that the people of the community look forward too. It’s one of those games that bring a lot of hype to both schools and town. That’s honestly one of the best rewards of the game.” North Bend’s Mason Laird, who was voted defensive MVP of the Far West last season, has been spending more time on offense toting the ball in the backfield. Laird, along with speedster Zack Hawk, offer what Prince calls their “slasher and a MAC truck” attack that has proven to be effective in the past two By Alysha Beck, The World Bulldog wins. That isn’t all Kayley Thorsen spikes the ball past Umpqua’s Mariah Prince has up his sleeve. Gladden during the match on Wednesday. “You’ll see some new

things,” Prince said. “Our focus is always going to be that we want to play the game at the highest level we can no matter who we’re playing.” The North Bend offensive line, anchored by Colin Mallory and Zach Wallace, who call themselves “Big Uglies,” will try to control things up front and give space for Hawk, Laird and even Lucero to get into the secondary. For Marshfield, it’ll take their new spread offense coming together at the perfect time along with a couple timely turnovers to take down their crosstown rival. A win here is the type of thing that could catapult the Pirates on top of Bay Area bragging rights. “We could still have a chance to make it to the playoffs,” Brown said. “It’s a big boost for the rest of the season because it’s clear that North Bend is a good football team. And it would feel really nice to have the football crown back at Marshfield."

Scoreboard On The Air Today High School Volleyball — Marshfield at South Umpqua, 6 p.m., KMHS (1420 AM). Major League Baseball — Division Series, Pittsburgh at St. Louis, 2 p.m., TBS; Los Angeles at Atlanta, 5:30 p.m., TBS. NFL Football — Buffalo at Cleveland, 5:25 p.m., NFL Network. College Football — Texas at Iowa State, 4:30 p.m., ESPN; UCLA at Utah, 7 p.m., Fox Sports 1. Hockey — Los Angeles at Minnesota, 5 p.m., NBC Sports Network. Golf — Presidents Cup, 9 a.m., Golf Channel; LPGA Rainwood Classic, 1 a.m., Golf Channel; European Tour Seve Trophy, 6 a.m., Golf Channel. Friday, Oct. 4 High School Football — Marshfield at North Bend, 7 p.m., K-Light (98.7 FM) an KMHS (91.3 FM); Gold Beach at Bandon, 7 p.m., KTEE (94.9 FM and 95.7 FM) and KGBR (92.7 FM); Douglas at Siuslaw, 7 p.m., KCST (106.9 FM). College Football — Nevada at San Diego State, 6 p.m., ESPN. Major League Baseball — Division Series, Pittsburgh at St. Louis, 10 a.m., MLB Network; Tampa Bay at Boston, noon, TBS; Los Angeles at Atlanta, 3 p.m., TBS; Detroit at Oakland, 6:30 p.m., TBS. Golf — Presidents Cup, 10 a.m., Golf Channel; LPGA Rainwood Classic, 1 a.m., Golf Channel; European Tour Seve Trophy, 6 a.m., Golf Channel. Auto Racing — NASCAR Sprint Cup Hollywood Casino 400 qualifying, 2 p.m., ESPN2; Formula One Korean Grand Prix qualifying, 4 p.m., NBC Sports Network. Major League Soccer — Chicago at D.C. United, 5 p.m., NBC Sports Network. Saturday, Oct. 5 College Football — Air Force at Navy, 8:30 a.m., CBS; Maryland at Florida State, 9 a.m., ESPN; Michigan State at Iowa, 9 a.m., ESPN2; Texas Tech at Kansas, 9 a.m., Fox Sports 1; Ball State at Virginia, 9 a.m., Root Sports; Georgia at Tennesee, 12:30 p.m., CBS; Portland State at Montana, 12:30 p.m., Root Sports; Minnesota at Michigan, 12:30 p.m., ABC or ESPN2; Clemson at Syracuse, 12:30 p.m., ABC or ESPN2; Washington State at California, 1 p.m., Fox Sports 1; Oregon at Colorado, 3 p.m., Pac-12 Network and KWRO (630 AM and 100.3 FM); Texas Christian at Oklahoma, 4 p.m., Fox; LSU at Mississippi State, 4 p.m., ESPN; Arkansas at Florida, 4 p.m., ESPN2; New Mexico State at New Mexico, 4 p.m., Root Sports; Arizona State vs. Notre Dame, 4:30 p.m., NBC; Ohio State at Northwestern, 5 p.m., ABC; West Virginia at Baylor, 5 p.m., Fox Sports 1; Washington at Stanford, 7:30 p.m., ESPN; North Carolina State at Wake Forest, 7:30 p.m., Root Sports. Major League Baseball — Playoffs, Tampa Bay at Boston, 2:30 p.m., TBS; Detroit at Oakland, 6 p.m., TBS. Golf — Presidents Cup, 5 a.m., NBC; LPGA Rainwood Classic, noon, Golf Channel; European Tour Seve Trophy, 5 a.m., Golf Channel. Auto Racing — IndyCar Grand Prix of Houston Race 1, noon, NBC Sports Network; NASCAR Nationwide Series Kansas Lotery 300, 12:30 p.m., ESPN; Formula One Korean Grand Prix, 11 p.m., NBC Sports Network; NHRA Auto-Plus Nationals qualiyfing, 12:30 p.m., ESPN2. Major League Soccer — Seattle at Colorado, 7 p.m., NBC Sports Network.

Cincinnati 2 2 0 .500 81 81 Pittsburgh 0 4 0 .000 69 110 West W L T Pct PF PA Denver 4 0 0 1.000 179 91 Kansas City 4 0 0 1.000 102 41 San Diego 2 2 0 .500 108 102 Oakland 1 3 0 .250 71 91 NATIONAL CONFERENCE East W L T Pct PF PA Dallas 2 2 0 .500 104 85 Philadelphia 1 3 0 .250 99 138 1 3 0 .250 91 112 Washington N.Y. Giants 0 4 0 .000 61 146 South W L T Pct PF PA New Orleans 4 0 0 1.000 108 55 Carolina 1 2 0 .333 68 36 Atlanta 1 3 0 .250 94 104 Tampa Bay 0 4 0 .000 44 70 North W L T Pct PF PA Detroit 3 1 0 .750 122 101 Chicago 3 1 0 .750 127 114 Green Bay 1 2 0 .333 96 88 1 3 0 .250 115 123 Minnesota West W L T Pct PF PA Seattle 4 0 0 1.000 109 47 San Francisco 2 2 0 .500 79 95 2 2 0 .500 69 89 Arizona St. Louis 1 3 0 .250 69 121 Today Buffalo at Cleveland, 5:25 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 6 Detroit at Green Bay, 10 a.m. New Orleans at Chicago, 10 a.m. Kansas City at Tennessee, 10 a.m. Jacksonville at St. Louis, 10 a.m. New England at Cincinnati, 10 a.m. Seattle at Indianapolis, 10 a.m. Baltimore at Miami, 10 a.m. Philadelphia at N.Y. Giants, 10 a.m. Carolina at Arizona, 1:05 p.m. San Diego at Oakland, 1:25 p.m. Denver at Dallas, 1:25 p.m. Houston at San Francisco, 5:30 p.m. Open: Minnesota, Pittsburgh, Tampa Bay, Washington Monday, Oct. 7 N.Y. Jets at Atlanta, 5:40 p.m.

Pro Baseball Wild-Card Playoffs Tuesday, Oct. 1 Pittsburgh 6, Cincinnati 2 Wednesday, Oct. 2 Tampa Bay 4, Cleveland 0

Division Series Thursday, Oct. 3 Pittsburgh (Burnett 10-11) at St. Louis (Wainwright 19-9), 2:07 p.m. (TBS) Los Angeles (Kershaw 16-9) at Atlanta (Medlen 15-12), 5:37 p.m. (TBS) Friday, Oct. 4 Pittsburgh at St. Louis (Lynn 15-10), 10:07 a.m. (MLB) Tampa Bay (Moore 17-4) at Boston (Lester 158), 12:07 p.m. (TBS) Los Angeles (Greinke 15-4) at Atlanta (Minor 13-9 or Teheran 14-8), 3:07 p.m. (TBS) Detroit (Scherzer 21-3) at Oakland (Colon 186), 6:37 p.m. (TBS) Saturday, Oct. 4 Tampa Bay (Price 10-8) at Boston (Lackey 1013), 2:37 p.m. (TBS) Detroit (Verlander 13-12) at Oakland (Gray 53), 6:07 p.m. (TBS)

Local Schedule

Wednesday’s Linescore

Today High School Volleyball — Far West League: Douglas at North Bend, 6 p.m.; Siuslaw at Sutherlin, 6 p.m.; Marshfield at South Umpqua, 6 p.m. Sunset Conference: Glide at Reedsport, 6:30 p.m.; Bandon at Coquille, 6:30 p.m.; Myrtle Point at Gold Beach, 6:30 p.m. Skyline League: Marshfield freshmen at Powers, 6 p.m. High School Girls Soccer — Far West League: South Umpqua at Coquille, 5 p.m.; Douglas at Brookings-Harbor, 5 p.m. High School Boys Soccer — Far West League: South Umpqua at Coquille, 3 p.m.; North Bend at Sutherlin, 3 p.m.; Marshfield at Pacific, 4:30 p.m.; Douglas at Brookings-Harbor, 3 p.m. Friday, Oct. 4 High School Football — Far West League: Marshfield at North Bend, 7 p.m.; Douglas at Siuslaw, 7 p.m.; Sutherlin at South Umpqua, 7 p.m. Sunset Conference: Coquille at Reedsport, 7 p.m.; Gold Beach at Bandon, 7 p.m.; Myrtle Point at Glide, 7 p.m. Skyline League: Powers at Hosanna Christian, 6 p.m. High School Volleyball — Skyline League: Yoncalla at Pacific, 5:30 p.m.; Powers at New Hope, 6 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 5 High School Football — Brookings-Harbor vs. Clatskanie at Pleasant Hill, 2 p.m. Men’s College Soccer — Highline at SWOCC, 2:15 p.m. Women’s College Soccer — Highline at SWOCC, 12:15 p.m. South Coast Youth Football League — At North Bend: North Bend Ravens vs. North Bend Colts, 9 a.m.; Gold Beach Packers vs. Coos Bay Chargers, 9 a.m.; Gold Beach Lions vs. North Bend Broncos, 11 a.m.; North Bend Steelers vs. North Bend Titans, 1 p.m. At Reedsport: Coquille 49ers vs. Reedsport Redskins, 9 a.m.; Bandon Cardinals vs. Coos Bay Jaguars, 9 a.m.; Coquille Chiefs vs. Coos Bay Raiders, 11 a.m.; Coos Bay Vikings vs. Bandon Saints, 1 p.m.; Coos Bay Jets vs. Reedsport Falcons, 3 p.m.

Tampa Bay 001 200 001 — 4 8 0 Cleveland 000 000 000 — 0 9 1 Cobb, Jo.Peralta (7), McGee (8), Rodney (9) and J.Molina; Salazar, Rzepczynski (5), Shaw (5), Masterson (7), Allen (9), J.Smith (9) and Y.Gomes. W—Cobb 1-0. L—Salazar 0-1. HRs— Tampa Bay, D.Young (1).

Rays 4, Indians 0

Pro Football NFL AMERICAN CONFERENCE East W L 4 0 New England Miami 3 1 2 2 N.Y. Jets 2 2 Buffalo South W L 3 1 Indianapolis Tennessee 3 1 2 2 Houston 0 4 Jacksonville North W L Baltimore 2 2 Cleveland 2 2

T 0 0 0 0 T 0 0 0 0 T 0 0

Pct PF 1.000 89 .750 91 .500 68 .500 88 Pct PF .750 105 .750 98 .500 90 .000 31 Pct PF .500 91 .500 64

PA 57 91 88 93 PA 51 69 105 129 PA 87 70

Final Standings American League East Division W L 97 65 x-Boston 92 71 y-Tampa Bay Baltimore 85 77 New York 85 77 Toronto 74 88 Central Division W L x-Detroit 93 69 y-Cleveland 92 70 86 76 Kansas City Minnesota 66 96 63 99 Chicago West Division W L x-Oakland 96 66 Texas 91 72 78 84 Los Angeles Seattle 71 91 Houston 51 111 x-clinched division y-clinched wild card National League East Division W L 96 66 x-Atlanta 86 76 Washington 74 88 New York Philadelphia 73 89 Miami 62 100 Central Division W L x-St. Louis 97 65 y-Pittsburgh 94 68 90 72 y-Cincinnati 74 88 Milwaukee 66 96 Chicago West Division W L x-Los Angeles 92 70 Arizona 81 81 San Diego 76 86 76 86 San Francisco Colorado 74 88 x-clinched division y-clinched wild card

Pct .599 .564 .525 .525 .457 Pct .574 .568 .531 .407 .389 Pct .593 .558 .481 .438 .315

GB — 5 1/2 12 12 23 GB — 1 7 27 30 GB — 5 1/2 18 25 45

Pct .593 .531 .457 .451 .383 Pct .599 .580 .556 .457 .407 Pct .568 .500 .469 .469 .457

GB — 10 22 23 34 GB — 3 7 23 31 GB — 11 16 16 18

Final Statistics AMERICAN LEAGUE TEAM BATTING AB R H HR Detroit 5735 796 1625 176 Boston 5651 853 1566 178 Los Angeles 5588 733 1476 164 5585 730 1465 176 Texas Kansas City 5549 648 1443 112 Baltimore 5620 745 1460 212 Tampa Bay 5538 700 1421 165 5465 745 1391 171 Cleveland

RBI 767 819 696 691 620 719 670 711

Avg .283 .277 .264 .262 .260 .260 .257 .255

Oakland 5521 767 Toronto 5537 712 Chicago 5563 598 5449 650 New York Minnesota 5564 614 Houston 5457 610 Seattle 5558 624 INDIVIDUAL BATTING AB R MiCabrera Det 555 103 Mauer Min 445 62 Trout LAA 589 109 ABeltre Tex 631 88 Cano NYY 605 81 DOrtiz Bos 518 84 TorHunter Det 606 90 Nava Bos 458 77 Hosmer KC 623 86 Pedroia Bos 641 91 VMartinez Det 605 68 Donaldson Oak 579 89 Loney TB 549 54 Ellsbury Bos 577 92 HKendrick LAA 478 55 Victorino Bos 477 82 496 48 SPerez KC Lowrie Oak 603 80 BButler KC 582 62 465 67 Lind Tor CDavis Bal 584 103 AJones Bal 653 100 Brantley Cle 556 66 AlRamirez CWS 637 68 564 86 Kipnis Cle Machado Bal 667 88 Altuve Hou 626 64 624 82 Fielder Det Rios Tex 616 83 KMorales Sea 602 64 Kinsler Tex 545 85 Zobrist TB 612 77 Gardner NYY 539 81 Pierzynski Tex 503 48 AJackson Det 552 99 Encarnacion Tor 530 90 Markakis Bal 634 89 620 91 Andrus Tex Aybar LAA 550 68 Longoria TB 614 91 CSantana Cle 541 75 AGordon KC 633 90 De Aza CWS 607 84 Hardy Bal 601 66 525 75 Bourn Cle ISuzuki NYY 520 57 Crisp Oak 513 93 LMartin Tex 457 66 Seager Sea 615 79 Napoli Bos 498 79 Bautista Tor 452 82 Morneau Min 495 56 Callaspo Oak 453 52 McLouth Bal 531 76 YEscobar TB 508 61 Moss Oak 446 73 Plouffe Min 477 44 DeJennings TB 527 82 JHamilton LAA 576 73 Doumit Min 485 49 Swisher Cle 549 74 Konerko CWS 467 41 558 72 Dozier Min AsCabrera Cle 508 66 Dominguez Hou 543 56 Cespedes Oak 529 74 Smoak Sea 454 53 Wieters Bal 523 59 AEscobar KC 607 57 Trumbo LAA 620 85 Moustakas KC 472 42 Moreland Tex 462 60 Carter Hou 506 64 MarReynolds NYY445 55 ADunn CWS 525 60 TEAM PITCHING ERA Kansas City 3.45 3.56 Oakland Detroit 3.61 Texas 3.62 Tampa Bay 3.74 Boston 3.79 Cleveland 3.82 New York 3.94 Chicago 3.98 Baltimore 4.20 Los Angeles 4.23 Toronto 4.25 Seattle 4.31 Minnesota 4.55 Houston 4.79

H 1366 1339 1369 1370 1315 1366 1359 1452 1424 1438 1475 1451 1467 1591 1530

1403 1398 1385 1321 1346 1307 1318

186 185 148 144 151 148 188

725 669 574 614 590 566 597

.254 .252 .249 .242 .242 .240 .237

H 193 144 190 199 190 160 184 139 188 193 182 174 164 172 142 140 145 175 168 134 167 186 158 181 160 189 177 174 171 167 151 168 147 137 150 144 172 168 149 165 145 168 160 158 138 136 134 119 160 129 117 128 117 137 130 114 121 133 144 120 135 114 136 123 131 127 108 123 142 145 110 107 113 98 115

HR 44 11 27 30 27 30 17 12 17 9 14 24 13 9 13 15 13 15 15 23 53 33 10 6 17 14 5 25 18 23 13 12 8 17 12 36 10 4 6 32 20 20 17 25 6 7 22 8 22 23 28 17 10 12 9 30 14 14 21 14 22 12 18 14 21 26 20 22 4 34 12 23 29 21 34

RBI 137 47 97 92 107 103 84 66 79 84 83 93 75 53 54 61 79 75 82 67 138 108 73 48 84 71 52 106 81 80 72 71 52 70 49 104 59 67 54 88 74 81 62 76 50 35 66 49 69 92 73 74 58 36 56 87 52 54 79 55 63 54 66 64 77 80 50 79 52 100 42 60 82 67 86

Avg .348 .324 .323 .315 .314 .309 .304 .303 .302 .301 .301 .301 .299 .298 .297 .294 .292 .290 .289 .288 .286 .285 .284 .284 .284 .283 .283 .279 .278 .277 .277 .275 .273 .272 .272 .272 .271 .271 .271 .269 .268 .265 .264 .263 .263 .262 .261 .260 .260 .259 .259 .259 .258 .258 .256 .256 .254 .252 .250 .247 .246 .244 .244 .242 .241 .240 .238 .235 .234 .234 .233 .232 .223 .220 .219

ER BB 555 469 574 428 587 462 589 498 608 482 613 524 611 554 633 437 643 509 678 473 685 533 685 500 702 478 733 458 766 616

INDIVIDUAL PITCHING IP H AniSanchez Det 182 156 Colon Oak 190 193 Iwakuma Sea 220 179 Darvish Tex 210 145 Scherzer Det 214 152 FHernandez Sea 204 185 Sale CWS 214 184 229 215 Shields KC ESantana KC 211 190 UJimenez Cle 183 163 Kuroda NYY 201 191 Price TB 187 178 CWilson LAA 212 200 DHolland Tex 213 210 Masterson Cle 193 156 Verlander Det 218 212 Quintana CWS 200 188 Lackey Bos 189 179 Fister Det 209 229 Tillman Bal 206 184 185 198 Pettitte NYY 213 209 Lester Bos MigGonzalez Bal 171 157 Griffin Oak 200 171 197 178 JParker Oak Guthrie KC 212 236 Buehrle Tor 204 223 185 218 Correia Min BNorris Bal 177 196 Dickey Tor 225 207 177 185 Porcello Det Doubront Bos 162 161 Dempster Bos 171 170 Williams LAA 169 181 Sabathia NYY 211 224 Hellickson TB 174 185 JSaunders Sea 183 232

BB 54 29 42 80 56 46 46 68 51 80 43 27 85 64 76 75 56 40 44 68 48 67 53 54 63 59 51 45 67 71 42 71 79 55 65 50 61

SO 1208 1183 1428 1309 1310 1294 1379 1233 1249 1169 1200 1208 1297 985 1084

SO W 202 14 117 18 185 14 277 13 240 21 216 12 226 11 196 13 161 9 194 13 150 11 151 10 188 17 189 10 195 14 217 13 164 9 161 10 159 14 179 16 128 11 177 15 120 11 171 14 134 12 111 15 139 12 101 9 147 10 177 14 142 13 139 11 157 8 107 9 175 14 135 12 107 11

Sh 12 13 12 10 17 8 16 10 5 6 12 11 14 7 5

Sv 52 46 39 46 42 33 38 49 40 57 41 39 43 40 32

L ERA 8 2.57 6 2.65 6 2.66 9 2.83 3 2.90 103.04 14 3.07 9 3.15 103.24 9 3.30 13 3.31 8 3.33 7 3.39 9 3.42 10 3.45 123.46 7 3.51 13 3.52 9 3.67 7 3.71 11 3.74 8 3.75 8 3.78 103.83 8 3.97 124.04 10 4.15 13 4.18 12 4.18 13 4.21 8 4.32 6 4.32 9 4.57 104.57 134.78 10 5.17 165.26

NATIONAL LEAGUE TEAM BATTING AB R H HR RBI Avg Colorado 5599 706 1511 159 673 .270 St. Louis 5557 783 1494 125 745 .269 Los Angeles 5491 649 1447 138 618 .264 San Francisco 5552 629 1446 107 596 .260 Arizona 5676 685 1468 130 647 .259 Milwaukee 5474 640 1381 157 610 .252 Washington 5436 656 1365 161 621 .251 Cincinnati 5499 698 1370 155 664 .249 Atlanta 5441 688 1354 181 656 .249 Philadelphia 5456 610 1355 140 578 .248 Pittsburgh 5486 634 1345 161 603 .245 San Diego 5517 618 1349 146 578 .245 5498 602 1307 172 576 .238 Chicago New York 5559 619 1318 130 593 .237 Miami 5449 513 1257 95 485 .231 INDIVIDUAL BATTING AB R H HR RBI Avg Cuddyer Col 489 74 162 20 84 .331 CJohnson Atl 514 54 165 12 68 .321 FFreeman Atl 551 89 176 23 109 .319 YMolina StL 505 68 161 12 80 .319 462 84 147 25 82 .318 Werth Was MCarpenter StL626 126 199 11 78 .318 McCutchen Pit 583 97 185 21 84 .317 508 71 160 13 97 .315 Craig StL Tulowitzki Col 446 72 139 25 82 .312 Votto Cin 581 101 177 24 73 .305 Goldschmidt Ari 602 103 182 36 125 .302 Holliday StL 520 103 156 22 94 .300 488 57 145 2 31 .297 Scutaro SF 554 79 164 24 84 .296 Beltran StL Posey SF 520 61 153 15 72 .294 Segura Mil 588 74 173 12 49 .294 AdGonzalez LAD 583 69 171 22 100 .293 Byrd Pit 532 75 155 24 88 .291 Belt SF 509 76 147 17 67 .289 597 80 171 8 37 .286 Aoki Mil D.Murphy NYM 658 92 188 13 78 .286 569 107 162 21 54 .285 Choo Cin Utley Phi 476 73 135 18 69 .284 CGomez Mil 536 80 152 24 73 .284 Pence SF 629 91 178 27 99 .283 Prado Ari 609 70 172 14 82 .282 SMarte Pit 510 83 143 12 35 .280 521 59 146 18 82 .280 Lucroy Mil Desmond Was 600 77 168 20 80 .280 MYoung LAD 519 52 145 8 46 .279 Denorfia SD 473 67 132 10 47 .279 Span Was 610 75 170 4 47 .279 Sandoval SF 525 52 146 14 79 .278 Jay StL 548 75 151 7 67 .276 Zimmerman Was 568 84 156 26 79 .275 DBrown Phi 496 65 135 27 83 .272 482 54 131 12 52 .272 Ethier LAD Venable SD 481 64 129 22 53 .268 601 79 161 10 48 .268 GParra Ari Arenado Col 486 49 130 10 52 .267 GBlanco SF 452 50 120 3 41 .265 JUpton Atl 558 94 147 27 70 .263 626 89 164 30 109 .262 Bruce Cin Freese StL 462 53 121 9 60 .262 BPhillips Cin 606 80 158 18 103 .261 Cozart Cin 567 74 144 12 63 .254 Rollins Phi 600 65 151 6 39 .252 Schierholtz ChC 462 56 116 21 68 .251 NWalker Pit 478 62 120 16 53 .251 Headley SD 520 59 130 13 50 .250 Stanton Mia 425 62 106 24 62 .249 Gyorko SD 486 62 121 23 63 .249 EYoung NYM 539 70 134 2 32 .249 BCrawford SF 499 52 124 9 43 .248 Simmons Atl 606 76 150 17 59 .248 StCastro ChC 666 59 163 10 44 .245 AdLaRoche Was 511 70 121 20 62 .237 Frazier Cin 531 63 124 19 73 .234 PAlvarez Pit 558 70 130 36 100 .233 Rizzo ChC 606 71 141 23 80 .233 Hechavarria Mia 543 30 123 3 42 .227 RMartin Pit 438 51 99 15 55 .226 Barney ChC 501 49 104 7 41 .208 Uggla Atl 448 60 80 22 55 .179 TEAM PITCHING ERA H ER BB SO Sh Sv 3.18 1326 512 409 1232 12 53 Atlanta Los Angeles 3.25 1321 524 460 1292 22 46 Pittsburgh 3.26 1299 533 515 1261 16 55 Cincinnati 3.38 1293 554 435 1296 17 43 St. Louis 3.42 1366 555 451 1254 15 44 Washington 3.59 1367 576 405 1236 13 47 Miami 3.71 1376 602 526 1177 13 36

New York 3.77 1442 618 458 1209 10 40 Milwaukee 3.84 1401 615 466 1125 15 40 Arizona 3.92 1460 651 485 1218 7 38 San Diego 3.98 1407 643 525 1171 6 40 Chicago 4.00 1332 643 540 1184 6 39 S. Francisco 4.00 1380 643 521 1256 13 41 Philadelphia 4.32 1465 689 506 1199 3 32 Colorado 4.44 1545 708 517 1064 5 35 INDIVIDUAL PITCHING IP H BB SO W L ERA Kershaw LAD 236 164 52 232 16 9 1.83 Fernandez Mia 173 111 58 187 12 6 2.19 Harvey NYM 178 135 31 191 9 5 2.27 Greinke LAD 178 152 46 148 15 4 2.63 Bumgarner SF 201 146 62 199 13 9 2.77 ClLee Phi 223 193 32 222 14 8 2.87 Wainwright StL 242 223 35 219 19 9 2.94 Strasburg Was 183 136 56 191 8 9 3.00 Ryu LAD 192 182 49 154 14 8 3.00 SMiller StL 173 152 57 169 15 9 3.06 175 151 47 128 10 9 3.09 Cashner SD 200 163 66 144 9 12 3.11 TWood ChC Medlen Atl 197 194 47 157 15 12 3.11 Latos Cin 211 197 58 187 14 7 3.16 Teheran Atl 186 173 45 170 14 8 3.20 Minor Atl 205 177 46 181 13 9 3.21 Zmmermann Was 213 192 40 161 19 9 3.25 AJBurnett Pit 191 165 67 209 10 11 3.30 Lohse Mil 199 196 36 125 11 10 3.35 GGonzalez Was 196 169 76 192 11 8 3.36 Leake Cin 192 193 48 122 14 7 3.37 Corbin Ari 208 189 54 178 14 8 3.41 Chacin Col 197 188 61 126 14 10 3.47 HBailey Cin 209 181 54 199 11 12 3.49 JDe La Rosa Col 168 170 62 112 16 6 3.49 Locke Pit 166 146 84 125 10 7 3.52 203 201 66 147 10 10 3.55 Miley Ari 220 205 50 202 8 14 3.60 Hamels Phi Gee NYM 199 208 47 142 12 11 3.62 Nolasco LAD 199 195 46 165 13 11 3.70 Arroyo Cin 202 199 34 124 14 12 3.79 Stults SD 204 219 40 131 11 13 3.93 Lynn StL 202 189 76 198 15 10 3.97 184 158 55 158 8 10 4.00 MCain SF Gallardo Mil 181 180 66 144 12 10 4.18 Samardzija ChC 214 210 78 214 8 13 4.34 WPeralta Mil 183 187 73 129 11 15 4.37 Lincecum SF 198 184 76 193 10 14 4.37 Haren Was 170 179 31 151 10 14 4.67 KKendrick Phi 182 207 47 110 10 13 4.70 Kennedy SD 181 180 73 163 7 10 4.91 EJackson ChC 175 197 59 135 8 18 4.98 Volquez LAD 170 193 77 142 9 12 5.71

Pro Soccer Major League Soccer EASTERN CONFERENCE W L T Pts GF GA New York 15 9 7 52 48 37 14 10 6 48 43 29 Sporting KC Montreal 13 9 7 46 48 44 Houston 12 10 8 44 38 37 Philadelphia 11 10 9 42 38 39 12 14 5 41 40 41 Columbus New England 11 11 8 41 42 34 Chicago 11 12 7 40 38 45 Toronto FC 5 15 11 26 29 45 D.C. United 3 21 6 15 20 52 WESTERN CONFERENCE W L T Pts GF GA Real Salt Lake 15 10 6 51 54 39 Seattle 15 8 6 51 39 29 Portland 12 5 13 49 46 31 13 11 6 45 46 37 Los Angeles Colorado 12 9 9 45 37 31 San Jose 12 11 8 44 32 41 Vancouver 11 11 8 41 42 39 FC Dallas 10 10 10 40 42 46 Chivas USA 6 17 8 26 29 55 NOTE: Three points for victory, one point for tie. Friday, Oct. 4 Chicago at D.C. United, 5 p.m. Montreal at Houston, 5:30 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 5 New England at New York, 4 p.m. Sporting Kansas City at Columbus, 4:30 p.m. Toronto FC at Philadelphia, 4:30 p.m. FC Dallas at Real Salt Lake, 6 p.m. Seattle FC at Colorado, 7 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 6 Chivas USA at Los Angeles, 2 p.m. Portland at Vancouver, 5 p.m.

Hockey NHL Wednesday’s Games Toronto 3, Philadelphia 1 Detroit 2, Buffalo 1 Colorado 6, Anaheim 1 Today’s Games Tampa Bay at Boston, 4 p.m. New Jersey at Pittsburgh, 4 p.m. Calgary at Washington, 4 p.m. Los Angeles at Minnesota, 5 p.m. Nashville at St. Louis, 5:30 p.m. Florida at Dallas, 5:30 p.m. N.Y. Rangers at Phoenix, 7 p.m. Vancouver at San Jose, 7 p.m. Friday’s Games Ottawa at Buffalo, 4 p.m. N.Y. Islanders at New Jersey, 4 p.m. Detroit at Carolina, 4 p.m. Calgary at Columbus, 4 p.m. Los Angeles at Winnipeg, 5 p.m. Nashville at Colorado, 6 p.m.

Transactions BASEBALL COMMISSIONER’S OFFICE—Suspended Milwaukee RHP Dylan Brock 50 games for a violation of the Minor League Drug Prevention and Treatment Program. American League HOUSTON ASTROS—Selected 1B Jon Singleton to the major league 40-man roster. Claimed LHP Raul Valdes from the Philadelphia Phillies. Sent RHP Philip Humber, C Cody Clark, INF Brandon Laird and C Matt Pagnozzi outright to their minor league camp. TEXAS RANGERS—Announced the contracts of first base coach Dave Anderson and bench coach Jackie Moore will not be renewed. BASKETBALL National Basketball Association CHICAGO BULLS—Released Gs Kalin Lucas and Patrick Christopher. NEW YORK KNICKS—Signed G Chris DouglasRoberts. Released F Justin Brownlee. SAN ANTONIO SPURS—Named Dave Telep draft scouting coordinator. FOOTBALL National Football League ARIZONA CARDINALS—Placed LB Vic So’oto on injured reserve. Signed LB Marcus Benard. Traded OT Levi Brown to Pittsburgh for a conditional draft pick. CINCINNATI BENGALS—Released DB Curtis Marsh. Signed LB Michael Boley. INDIANAPOLIS COLTS—Released G Thomas Austin from the practice squad. JACKSONVILLE JAGUARS—Traded OT Eugene Monroe to Baltimore for two undisclosed draft picks. KANSAS CITY CHIEFS—Released LB Darin Drakeford from the practice squad. Signed G Chandler Burden to the practice squad. MIAMI DOLPHINS—Released S Kelcie McCray and FB Tyler Clutts. Signed LB Austin Spitler. NEW ENGLAND PATRIOTS—Re-signed S Kanorris Davis to the practice squad. NEW YORK GIANTS—Released OT Steven Baker from the practice squad. Signed WR Marcus Harris to the practice squad. NEW YORK JETS—Signed WR David Nelson. ST. LOUIS RAMS—Signed WR Emory Blake to the practice squad. SAN FRANCISCO 49ERS—Signed QB John Skelton to a one-year contract and LB Jermaine Cunningham. Released QB B.J. Daniels and RB Owen Marecic. SEATTLE SEAHAWKS—Released LB John Lotulelei. Released FB Jameson Konz from the practice squad. Claimed QB B.J. Daniels off waivers from San Francisco. Signed WR Arceto Clark to the practice squad. TAMPA BAY BUCCANEERS—Signed WR Chris Owusu. Claimed S Kelcie McCray off waivers from Miami. COLLEGE ALABAMA—Suspended S Ha Ha Clinton-Dix indefinitely for violating team rules. PURDUE—Suspended WRs B.J. Knauf two games and Jordan Woods indefinitely.

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B4 •The World • Thursday, October 3,2013

Sports

More Pac-12 teams embrace speedy play BY ANNE M. PETERSON The Associated Press

Taking a cue from Oregon’s success with the blur offense, a majority of the Pac-12 has moved to some type of hurry-up, no-huddle system. Washington and Utah installed up-tempo offenses this season, joining the other teams that had already jumped on the bandwagon. Cal brought in new head coach Sonny Dykes, whose Bear Raid is peeling off more than 90 plays per game. Holdouts still running largely pro-style offenses include Oregon State, Stanford and USC — and there’s no telling where the Trojans are headed now that Lane Kiffin is gone. The two contrasting styles will be on display this Saturday night when the No. 15 Huskies visit the No. 5 Cardinal at Stanford Stadium. Washington coach Steve Sarkisian has seen success going to the no-huddle this season. The Huskies (4-0, 1-0) are off to their best start since 2001. Washington has not started 5-0 since 1992. Stanford coach David Shaw has taken note. “It’s all about being efficient,” Shaw said. “There are teams that are doing the hurry-up that are not having the same success that Washington is. Washington’s having great success, it fits their quarterback, it fits their personnel.” The Cardinal (4-0, 2-0) ran a quicker offense when Andrew Luck was quarterback, Shaw said, but they’re really sticking with their own style, which places an emphasis on tough, physical play. Because it works for them.

The Associated Press

California’s Jared Goff throws a pass against Northwestern during a game in September.The Bears run more than 90 plays per game. “I only laugh because it’s not like this (the hurry-up) was just invented,” he said. “Whereas I remember Mouse Davis’ teams, the K-gun offense in Buffalo, and watching Warren Moon down in Houston running fast-paced,no-huddle offenses. So this is not a completely new thing. It’s just a lot more teams are doing it.” Utah has gone up-tempo under new co-offensive coordinator Dennis Erickson. Last season, the Utes ranked 73rd nationally with an average of 25.9 points and 105th with an average of 324.42 yards in total offense per game. This year, the Utes (3-1, 0-1) are

averaging 42 points per game and 504.8 yards in total offense per game. “I think it’s going well so far,” Utes coach Kyle Whittingham said. “We obviously made the move because we felt it would help us. We didn’t snap the ball a whole lot of times last year, we were very deliberate, we huddled up virtually every snap. When Dennis came on board, the primary reasons for the hire was to jump-start the offense. He’s done a very nice job of that, and part of the jump-start was changing the tempo. “We don’t go so fast that we sac-

rifice execution. I think that’s important.” Along with Dykes introducing the Bear Raid, new Colorado coach Mike MacIntyre has re-built the Buffaloes’ complicated former proset attack. Speed is emphasized in practice for the Buffaloes. Colorado, which at 2-1 has already improved on last season, hosts the league’s speed masters, the No. 2 Oregon Ducks. (4-0, 1-0) on Saturday. Former coach Chip Kelly has moved on to the Philadelphia Eagles, but the Ducks haven’t changed under former offensive

coordinator Mark Helfrich. Twenty-six of Oregon’s 31 offensive touchdown drives have taken less than two minutes. Oregon has scored 50 or more points in four straight games for the first time in history, yet the team’s time of possession ranks 122nd among the FBSlevel schools (23:53). “You might be better off if they have the ball a long time. With longer drives, there’s more chances for turnovers, there’s more possibilities of making them have to do more third downs. So, if you come out of it and they got it 30 minutes you might have played better,” MacIntyre said. “I’m being serious because then they’d have to put drives together and there’d more times they might turn the ball over. They’ll have more third downs. That’s more long down situations where you can kind of go after them.” Oregon State’s Mike Riley, the Pac-12’s longest-tenured coach, is staying old school and sticking with the offense he’s always run. Quarterback Sean Mannion is thriving in the system. Mannion was the Pac-12 player of the week for the second time this season after he threw for 414 yards and a school-record six touchdowns in a 44-17 victory last weekend over the Buffaloes. The junior leads the nation with an average of 403.6 yards passing a game and is on pace to throw 50 touchdown passes. “We have examined it for ourselves and messed around with it a little bit,” Riley said of going to the no-huddle. “Because of what we do and how we play, we just couldn’t make it fit comfortably with our system of calling plays and how we do it. So, we’re still doing it the oldfashioned way.”

Notre Dame may get mediocre bowl BY RALPH D. RUSSO The Associated Press

As alluring as the holiday season in New York City can be, it’s not exactly what Notre Dame had in mind for a postseason destination. The Fighting Irish (3-2), out of the rankings after last week’s loss to Oklahoma, face No. 22 Arizona State on Saturday at the lavish stadium in Arlington, Texas, that the Dallas Cowboys call home. It is part of Notre Dame’s Shamrock Series, what Irish officials like to call “off-site games” that help the program maintain its national appeal. Another loss would put a return to the Bowl Championship Series in serious doubt for the Fighting Irish and could leave them with only third-tier bowl options when the postseason invites go out in December. After this game, Notre Dame’s schedule relents a bit. The Irish get their first week off before a home game against Southern California on Oct. 19. Hard to predict what type of team USC will bring to South Bend, Ind. Then the Irish play at Air Force, Navy, at Pittsburgh and BYU before closing the season at No. 5 Stanford. To get an automatic bid to the BCS, Notre Dame must finish in the top eight of the standings. If the Irish run the table and finish 10-2, that shouldn’t be a problem. Nine wins and a top-14 finish would make Notre Dame eligible for an at-large BCS bid. And with Notre Dame being Notre Dame, BCS bowl organizers would certainly be tempted to take the Irish. But if the BCS isn’t a possibility for the Irish — and assuming they get to six wins and bowl eligibility — Notre Dame will be picking through the bowl leftovers and hoping for the best. The Pinstripe Bowl at Yankee Stadium on Dec. 28 could grab Notre Dame to replace a Big 12 team. The Poinsettia Bowl on Dec. 26 has a deal to take Army this season if the Cadets (2-3) can get bowl-eligible. If not, the bowl organizers in San Diego can go shopping for a free agent, and Notre Dame would no doubt be the most compelling one on the market. The picks: MAIN EVENTS No. 4 Ohio State (minus 7) at No. 16 Northwestern: Buckeyes have won last four meetings by average score of 51-9 ... OHIO STATE 38-17.

College Picks

The Associated Press

Buffalo running back Fred Jackson scores a touchdown against Baltimore during the Bills’ win Sunday.

Browns and Bills face off tonight BY BARRY WILNER The Associated Press The Browns might be for real. So might the Bills. Or neither of them should be believed. Hard to tell, and regardless of their credentials, Cleveland and Buffalo enter Thursday night’s game with 2-2 records and off impressive victories. The Browns beat division favorite Cincinnati last Sunday, while the Bills stunned defending Super Bowl champion Baltimore. Cleveland — which got both of its victories after trading away its best offensive player, running back Trent 1 Richardson — is a 4 ⁄2-point favorite. Credit a stingy defense that ranks third overall for the Browns’ turnaround. The Browns are allowing just 2.9 yards per carry, a league low. “No one is going to be able to run on us this year,” linebacker D’Qwell

Pro Picks

Jackson said. “As long as we stay healthy and continue to grind the tape out and do what we need to do on Sunday, I don’t think anyone will be able to run on us.” Buffalo might not be the best test. Starter C.J. Spiller is battling an ankle problem and fellow running back Fred Jackson has a knee injury. That should be enough to give Cleveland a third straight victory ... BROWNS, 20-17. Denver (minus 7) at Dallas: Can’t see the Cowboys slowing down Peyton and gang ... BEST BET: BRONCOS, 33-23. 1 New England (plus 1 ⁄ 2) at Cincinnati: Shouldn’t the Patriots be favored? ... UPSET SPECIAL: PATRIOTS, 27-20. New Orleans (pick’em) at Chicago: Great at home, Saints must show they are at least good on road ... SAINTS, 31-26. Seattle (minus 21⁄2) at Indianapolis: Delicious matchup of Luck vs. Wilson, but defense decides this one ... SEAHAWKS, 20-16. Houston (plus 7) at San Francisco: First Seahawks beat Texans, now Niners

match it ... 49ERS, 23-20. Kansas City (minus 3) at Tennessee: Chiefs need to be better than in last week’s win ... CHIEFS, 20-19. Baltimore (plus 3) at Miami: Don’t like how Ravens have played away from Baltimore ... DOLPHINS, 21-17. 1 New York Jets (plus 9 ⁄2) at Atlanta, Monday night: A loss here makes Falcons an also-ran. They aren’t ... FALCONS, 24-13. Detroit (plus 7) at Green Bay: Back from bye, time for Pack to assert itself in division ... PACKERS, 37-34. Carolina (minus 2) at Arizona: Back from bye, Panthers do not assert themselves ... CARDINALS, 17-13. Philadelphia (plus 2) at New York Giants: Giants have to win at some point ...GIANTS, 24-21. 1 San Diego (minus 4 ⁄2) at Oakland: Baseball playoffs force change in kickoff time. Not in result, though ... CHARGERS, 30-13. 1 Jacksonville (plus 11 ⁄2) at St. Louis: Rams were awful last week. Jaguars wish they could get to awful ... RAMS, 27-9.

Line’s struggles have hurt Philadelphia PHILADELPHIA (AP) — The Pro Bowl left tackle was coming back from injury, as were the solid, versatile veteran guard and the young, promising center. Add in the first-round draft pick, the fourth overall selection last April, and a guard with Pro Bowl aspirations, and you have the makings of what was supposed to be a good offensive line. So what happened? Four weeks into the season, with their entire offensive line intact, the Philadelphia Eagles have allowed 14 sacks, third worst

in the league, and have come under fire from first-year head coach Chip Kelly. “There’s not one thing,” Kelly said of the team’s protection issues. “And there’s not one answer that it’s this, and if we make this adjustment, then we are going to be good.” The return to health of left tackle Jason Peters, back from a twice-torn Achilles tendon; guard Todd Herremans, from a foot injury; and center Jason Kelce from a torn ACL, was supposed to make the Eagles strong on the line. The addition of first-round pick Lane

Johnson from Oklahoma to man the right tackle spot was supposed to make them better. Instead, the almost always reliable Peters has allowed a sack and 14 pressures in four games, or just three fewer than he allowed in all 16 games in 2011. Johnson has yielded four sacks and 13 pressures in his first four games. “It’s quite a change,” Johnson said of going from college to the NFL.“I was talking to Donald Stephenson (his former college teammate now with Kansas City). He told me you’re going to get beat at

times. It’s how you do the next play. You have to be resilient.” The Eagles’ 14 sacks allowed have come with Michael Vick at quarterback. Vick’s ability to run has probably allowed him to escape at least another three potential sacks. “I think when we’re throwing the football, there are a lot of elements involved,” Eagles offensive coordinator Pat Shurmur said. “The first one starts with protection. I think when you look at it, the last two weeks we played against some pretty good fronts.”

No. 15 Washington (plus 1 7 ⁄ 2) at No. 5 Stanford: Huskies out to prove there is a Big Three in Pac-12 North ... STANFORD 31-20. MARQUEE MATCHUPS No. 12 UCLA (minus 51⁄2) at Utah, today: Utes could emerge as contenders in Pac12 South ... UCLA 35-31. No. 25 Maryland (plus 151⁄2) at No. 8 Florida State: Unbeaten Terps try to make a statement ... FLORIDA STATE 42-21. No. 22 Arizona State (minus 51⁄2) vs. Notre Dame at Arlington, Texas: Sun Devils got Lane Kiffin fired last week; can give Brian Kelly heartburn this week ... NOTRE DAME 28-27. Georgia Tech (plus 5) at No. 14 Miami: Hurricanes have won four straight against Yellow Jackets ... MIAMI 31-24. TCU (plus 101⁄2) at No. 11 Oklahoma: Sooners QB Blake Bell, aka the Belldozer, has shown he can throw it, too ... OKLAHOMA 34-21. Kansas State (plus 14) at No. 21 Oklahoma State: Cowboys coming off rare poor offensive performance ... OKLAHOMA STATE 45-17. UPSET SPECIAL No. 24 Mississippi (minus 1 2 ⁄2 ) at Auburn: Members of SEC’s new up-tempo caucus ... AUBURN 35-28. BEST BET 1 No. 10 LSU (minus 9 ⁄2) at Mississippi State: Tigers have won 13 straight in series ... LSU 35-14. PLUCKY UNDERDOGS No. 3 Clemson (minus 1 13 ⁄2) at Syracuse ... CLEMSON 37-14. No. 6 Georgia (minus 1 10 ⁄2) at Tennessee ... GEORGIA 42-20. West Virginia (plus 271⁄2) at No. 17 Baylor ... BAYLOR 62-31. Arkansas (plus 11) at No. 18 Florida ... FLORIDA 28-14. 1 Minnesota (plus 19 ⁄2) at No. 19 Michigan ... MICHIGAN 34-17. No. 20 Texas Tech (minus 1 17 ⁄2) at Kansas ... TEXAS TECH 24-20. File the Clemson, Georgia and Texas Tech games under: road trips can be tricky. Mountaineers will be best team Baylor has faced so far. Razorbacks have enough weapons to push Gators. Has Michigan solved its turnover problem? MISMATCHES Georgia State (no line) at No. 1 Alabama ...ALABAMA 48-3. 1 No. 2 Oregon (minus 38 ⁄2) at Colorado ... OREGON 58-17. No. 7 Louisville (minus ... 34) at Temple LOUISVILLE 55-13. Kentucky (plus 21) at No. 13 South Carolina ... SOUTH CAROLINA 41-14.


Thursday, October 3,2013 • The World •CC1

Classifieds Theworldlink.com/classifieds

Employment FREE 200 $5.00

201 Accounting $7.00 JOBS, JOBS and MORE JOBS! No Resume? No Problem!

205 Construction ROOFER OR ROOFER APPRENTICE WANTED: $12.00 Valid Driver’s License $12.00 required. Must have the ability to work hard, must be a fast learner $17.00 and have good comprehensive skills. Apprentice pay starts at $10 per hr. Highly skilled journeyman $16 per hr. 541-267-0208

211 Health Care

Monster Match assigns a professional to hand-match each job seeker with each employer! This is a FREE service! Simply create your profile by phone or online and, for the next 90-days, our professionals will match your profile to employers who are hiring right now! CREATE YOUR PROFILE NOW BY PHONE OR WEB FREE!

1-888-491-9029 or

Thewo-www2.theworld link.com/topads/job/top _jobs/ No Resume Needed! Call the automated phone profiling system or use our convenient Online form today so our professionals can get started matching you with employers that are hiring NOW! Choose from one of the following main job codes to enter your information: #10: Accounting / Finance #11: Airline/Airport #12: Arts #13: Banking #14: Call Center/Customer Service #15: Childcare #16: Computers / IT #17: Counseling & Social Services #55: Dental #45: Drivers/Transportation #18: Education #19: Engineering #20: Environmental #24: Factory & Warehouse #57: Health Care Assistants #44: Hotel & Hospitality #23: Human Resources #21: Insurance/Financial Services #25: Janitorial & Grounds Maintenance #26: Legal #27: Management #28: Materials & Logistics #29: Mechanics #30: Media & Advertising #58: Medical Records #56: Medical Technicians #53: Medical Therapists #52: Nursing #31: Office Administration #32: Operations #33: Personal Care #54: Pharmacy #46: Printing #34: Protective Services #35: Quality Control #48: Real Estate #36: Research & Development #37: Restaurant #38: Retail #39: Sales #51: Skilled Trades: Building General #47: Skilled Trades: Construction #40: Skilled Trades: Building Prof. #41: Skilled Trades: Manufacturing #50: Specialty Services #42: Telephone/Cable #49: Travel and Recreation #43: Trucking

204 Banking We are excited to announce available positions for a

Financial Services Representative in Myrtle Point and Coquille, Oregon. Salary Range: $ 10.00 - $17.00 EOE For more details please apply online: www.myfirstccu.org

Your daily classifieds are ON-LINE AT www.theworldlink.com

Currently accepting applications for the following positions: ΠRespiratory Therapy Manager ΠRespiratory Therapist ΠRegistered Nurses ΠCertified Nursing Assistants ΠBilling Posting Clerk ΠChief Financial Officer ΠGeneral Surgeon ΠFamily Practice Physician Please visit our website at www.cvhospital.org or contact Margie Cooper at 541-396-1069 or margiec@cvhospital.org Live in Companion/ Caregiver. Room & Board w/ monthly wage. Negotiable. 541-888-2575

Public Notices Value406Ads

217 Technology

Small hospital in Reedsport seeks

Assistant IT Department Manager

541-267-6278

Responsible for assisting with the installation and support of computers, computer operating systems, network operating systems, and application software at the hospital and medical clinics. Will be assisting with managerial duties in the absence of the IT Manager and working with vendors. Minimum 3 years experience working in an Active Directory network environment. Must know Microsoft Windows operating systems and Microsoft Office applications. Understanding AIX UNIX, Linux, and MS Exchange a plus. To apply go to www.lowerumpquahospital.com

IT Helpdesk Support Technician - Tier one North Bend Medical Center in Coos Bay. Helpdesk Support Position functions as the first line of contact to the IT department. Answer phone calls, create tickets, remotely access workstations, troubleshoot problems and provide end user training. Two years IT helpdesk experience preferred. No certification required. Mon-Fri Fulltime with benefits

213 General Coos Bay Reload Maintenance/ Operator

Millwright - Gilchrist, OR 5 years industry experience Machinery repair and PM exp. required. Please apply to debb.kraft@interfor.com Interfor offers a competitive salary and benefits package. All applicants offered a position must complete a pre-employment drug screen. EOE

Care Giving 225 227 Elderly Care CAREGIVER/ CNA WORK. Experienced, 541-297-0073.

CORRECTIONS DEPUTYFEMALE ONLY: Salary: $18.90 - $24.20 Hourly. Closing date 10/6/13 Positions includes excellent benefits package. For more information & on-line application visit our website at: www.co.douglas.or.us/hr. Douglas County Human Resources Dept, Courthouse, Room 322, Roseburg, OR 97470. (541) 440-4405, TDD (541) 440-6041. EOE.

COOS COUNTY MENTAL HEALTH ADULT SERVICES MANAGER MHSIII Supervision, development, operational oversight of clinical programs for adults with significant mental health needs. Starting salary $3,981 p/mo Masters in psychology, social work, related field required. Minimum 5 yrs post-graduate experience in MH services incl work with chronic mental illness, 2 yrs supervising staff. Billingual/CADC a plus. Open until filled **EOE** County application required. Visit www.co.coos.or.us for application, or contact HR at 250 Baxter, Coquille, OR 97423 (541) 396-7580

SEEKING references.

HARMONY HOMECARE “Quality Caregivers provide Assisted living in your home”. 541-260-1788

Business 300 304 Financing

306 Jobs Wanted Interest List for future openings: Independent Contract Newspaper Carrier. Contact Susana Norton at 541-269-1222 ext. 255

ONCE A WEEK DELIVERY The World Link- Free Paper. Contact Susana Norton at 541-269-1222 ext. 255

If your World newspaper fails to arrive by 5 p.m. Monday through Thursday or 8 a.m. on Saturday, please call your carrier. If you are unable to reach your carrier, telephone The World at 541-269-9999. RURAL SUBSCRIBERS: Due to The World’ s expansive daily delivery area, rural or remote motor route customers may receive regular delivery later than the times above. Missed deliveries may be replaced the following delivery day. To report missed deliveries, please call 541-269-9999.

$35.00

Free Ads

$45.00

All free ads must fit the $15.00 criteria listed below. They also include free photo.

$20.00 $55.00 Myrtle Point, Clean 2 bedroom, 1 bath home, garage, outside$59.95 building for workshop/garden tools, No smoking property, No pets allowed. Good rental references. $650 month plus $750 security deposit. Call 541-404-5075 Rural 5 bdrm, 2 bth, approx 2700 sq ft. 8 miles from town. Located on 150 acre farm. Refs, lease req’d $1250/mo, first, last & security. 916-296-8525.

Merchandise for Sale under $500 total. 4 lines - 1 week in The World, Bandon Western World, Umpqua Post, The World link, theworldlink.com and Smart Mobiles.

Small 3 bdr. 1 bth, Stove, Fridge, Pellet Stove, Large Garage, 1 pet OK, on Sherman near Newmark, $750 mo. $300 dep. 1st and last. 541-756-0568 - Days. LEASE WITH OPTION. NEW studio 2 story 900 sq ft., plus garage. Lake front / ocean view. Covered RV with hook-ups. References 1155 13th St. Port Orford. Call 541-660-8080

605 Lots/Spaces Oceanside RV Park Perm. monthly spaces $350. per mo. Includes F/H/U WIFI and Cable. Electric is seperate. 541-888-2598 RV Space Rental Quite County Setting, close to beach, ideal for year round living. Yearly Special $275mth + electric. Call Sleepy Hollow 541-572-5494

Found & Found Pets 4 lines - 1 week in The World, Bandon Western World, Umpqua Post, The World link, theworldlink.com and Smart Mobile.

Lost & Lost Pets 6 lines - 3 week in The World, Bandon Western World, Umpqua Post, and The World and link, theworldlink.com Smart Mobile.

606 Manufactured

RECENTLY REDUCED! 1996 Manufactured home. Large living Room w/ Sunporch. Formal Dinning Room- 3 Bedrooms/ 2 Bth, open kitchen. 2 car Garage plus Shop. Was $179,000 NOW $165,000. Call 541-267-3639. FOR SALE: 3 bedroom 1 bath house with large unattached shop. 62254 Olive Barber Rd. Coos Bay. 1.18 Acres. as is $135,000. 541-294-6890 or 541-297-9086

WANTED:HOUSE Coos Bay or North Bend area for under $50,000, in any condition. Have cash and can close quickly. Call Howard

541-297-4834

REEDSPORT FOR SALE BY OWNER. Duplex 1 & 2 bedroom. 362 North 9th St. $70,000. Cash Clear Title 541-361-6274

Notices 400

Rentals / Real Estate 1 1 week - 6 lines,

Rentals / Real Estate 2 2 week - 6 lines,

$45.00

$55.00

Free Ads

Rentals / Real Estate 4

All free ads must fit the criteria listed below. They also include free photo.

4 week - 6 lines,

4 lines - 1 week in The World, Bandon Western World, Umpqua Post, The World link, theworldlink.com and Smart Mobiles.

$59.95 All specials will appear in The World, Bandon Western World, Umpqua Post, Wednesday Weekly, Online & Smart Mobile. All specials are category specific. There are no refunds on specials.

541-267-6278

Rentals 600 3 bed. Townhouse in a park like setting. Stove/Fridge/Drapes. W/D Hook ups W/G pd. $530. Apply at 324 Ackerman 541-888-4762

Found & Found Pets

APARTMENTS AVAILABLE

4 lines - 1 week in The World, Bandon Western World, Umpqua Post, The World link, theworldlink.com and Smart Mobile.

Large Studio C.B. $450. Studio C.B. $395. 1 bedroom C.B 525. 3 bdrm House-Lakeside $750. Call for info.

6 lines - 3 week in The World, Bandon Western World, Umpqua Post, and The World link, theworldlink.com and Smart Mobile.

an advertising proof is requested in writing and clearly marked for corrections. If the error is not corrected by the Publisher, its liability, if any, shall not exceed the space occupied by the error. Further, the Publisher will reschedule and run the omitted advertisement at advertiser’s cost. All claims for adjustment must be made within seven (7) days of date of publication. In no case shall the Publisher be liable for any general, special or consequential damages.

ADVERTISING POLICY The Publisher, Southwestern Oregon Publishing Co., shall not be liable for any error in published advertising unless 8-27-12

610 2-4-6 Plexes

541-297-4834 Willett Investment Properties

604 Homes Unfurnished CB Clean 3 bedroom, 1 bath home. New carpet, Wood Stove, Dishwasher & disposal, appliances Garage. No smoking/ Animals. $875/mo. + deposit. Call 541-756-3957. Coos Bay: Downtown 2 bedroom, 2 bath, water and garbage paid, deck with bay view. No pets. $650/ mo. Call after 3 pm. 541-266-7235 2 bed, 1 bath home. Fenced Yards, small shop. No smoking/pets. $750 mo. 1st, last and dep. 293 S. 9th St. Coos Bay. 541-297-7580

Good Ad - $5.00 3 lines - 1 week in The World, Bandon Western World, Umpqua Post, The World link, theworldlink.com and Smart Mobiles.

Better Ad - $7.00 4 lines - 2 week in The World, Bandon Western World, Umpqua Post, The World link, theworldlink.com and Smart Mobile.

“Clean”

Best Ad - $12.00 (includes a photo & boxing) 6 lines - 3 week in The World, Bandon Western World, Umpqua Post, and The World and link, theworldlink.com Smart Mobile.

COQUILLE: 2 Brdm. Impressive complex, Tile, Appliances, Newer Carpet, Deck, Laundry, Storage, very clean, quiet dead end street. No smoking/pets, References required. $509 plus $500 Dep. 541-267-5238

703 Lawn/Garden FOR SALE: Black & Decker 19 in. elec Lawn Hog mulching mower. $225. As good as new. 541-347-5176

710 Miscellaneous Five Hundred egg incubator cabinet $150 or trade for a refrigerator or stove in good condition. 541-808-4411 FOR SALE: Several Wood Pallets. $4.00 Each. Call 541-756-5123. Newly Remodeled! Nice & quiet, large 2 bedroom duplex, appliances, laundry room, fenced yard, garage, Trash paid. Possible RV storage, Great for retirees! $775/mo. 541-269-7328.

614 Warehouses RENTALS & REAL ESTATE SPECIALS Choose any of these specials and add a photo for $5.00 extra.

Rentals / Real Estate 1 1 week - 6 lines,

$35.00 Rentals / Real Estate 2 2 week - 6 lines,

$45.00 Rentals / Real Estate 3 3 week - 6 lines,

Rentals / Real Estate 4 4 week - 6 lines,

$59.95 All specials will appear in The World, Bandon Western World, Umpqua Post, Wednesday Weekly, Online & Smart Mobile. All specials are category specific. There are no refunds on specials.

541-267-6278

Other Stuff 700 701 Furniture 2 6 ft. Glass China Cabinets full of lots of stuff $500 each. Imtarsia Fruit basket picture in an Antique Frame $300. Antique vanity $100. Doll collection w/ shelving $1000. 11 Musical Instruments for sale. Carved Jade Chess game. Large old mirror on a stand and Clock collection. Call 541-572-0134

GET YOUR BUSINESS ADVERTISEMENT IN THE BULLETIN BOARD TODAY!!

3 Bdrm, 1 1/2 bath, carport, Milner Crest, Coos Bay, approved pets, no smoking, $750 mth, $500 dep. (541) 252-1697. Shown by appointment. North Bend: 3 Bed 2 Bath, Large yard and Garage. Nice area! Pets Neg. $1075 per mo. Plus $1075 cleaning dep. 541-756-5429

Merchandise All merchandise ads must be classified in categories 700 to 710 & 775 to 799

One bedroom 1 bath Duplex. Near Wendy’s in Coos Bay, with single car garage and storage. $435/mo + $500 dep. No smoking/no pet. 1- 541-761-8741.

$55.00

601 Apartments

Lost & Lost Pets

New professional office space in Coquille. 1000 Sq. Ft., pre-wired for data, phone and cable. $790 month plus move in specials. 541-396-3682 or 541-297-5446.

Choose any of these specials and add a photo for $5.00 extra.

3 week - 6 lines,

Merchandise for Sale under $500 total.

608 Office Space

RENTALS & REAL ESTATE SPECIALS

Rentals / Real Estate 3

403 Found

COQUILLE: Immaculate 3 bd. 2 bath home. Close to town. Includes refrig, stove, dishwasher. Nice deck off back and separate small shop/storage. Room to park RV or boat. No Smoking allowed. No pets allowed. Good rental references. $800 month/$900 sec dep. Call 541-404-5075.

510 Wanted

$35.00

Serving Oregon’s South Coast Since 1878 HOME DELIVERY SERVICE: For Customer Service call 541-269-1222 Ext. 247 Office hours: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday-Friday.

PUBLISHER’S NOTICE All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitations or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention, to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination.” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-669-9777. The toll-free telephone number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275.

507 2-4-6 Plexes

$$EASY QUALIFYING real estate equity loans. Credit no problem. Oregon Land Mortgage. 541-267-2776. ML-4645.

216 Law Enforcement PATROL DEPUTY: Douglas County Sheriff’s Office. Salary: $20.26 - $25.83 Hourly. Open until sufficient applications received.

501 Commercial

$15.00

701 Furniture

504 Homes for Sale

Maintenance Technician Part Time Community Housing, a division of Pacific Retirement Services, Inc., is seeking a part time experienced Maintenance Technician to join our talented and hard working team at Timber Ridge Retirement Center. For more information about this position and to apply visit www.pacificretirement.com/careers. Please contact Cindy Tepa at 541.857.7059 if you have questions

Real Estate 500

Please send resume to Susan Molzahn/HR Coordinator, 1900 Woodland Drive, Coos Bay, OR 97420 Visit us online at NBMCONLINE.COM.

Georgia- Pacific has an immediate opening for a Maintenance/Operator at its Coos Bay Wood Chip Reload Facility in Coos Bay, Oregon. Responsibilities include, but are not limited to: ΠOperation of dozer pushing wood chips. ΠOperation of truck weigh scales, including computer entry ΠIdentification of Chip species ΠOperation of chip ovens for moisture samples ΠOperation of rail car chip loader, track mobile, and small front end loaders ΠStrict adherence to safety rules and regulations, including participation in safety meetings ΠStrict adherence to company compliance standards. To apply, go to www.gp.com/careers. We are an equal opportunity employers. M/F/D/V

LIFE CHAIN:

Coos Bay/North Bend Sunday October 6 from 2:00-3:30 along Highway 101. 541-267-8315

604 Homes Unfurnished

WANTED: All unwanted scrap metal items. Free pick-up. Small fee for diesel. 541-297-0271. Whitfield Fireplace Insert Stove, good condition. $800. 541-756-4707 or 541-404-4709

Recreation/ Sports 725 726 Biking MoutainSmith Backpack, hardly used $125. 2 Yakima bike racks fits any roof rack $150. 541-297-8102. obo

734 Misc. Goods Golf Cart (tilt) Trailer w/ Gravel shield, excellent condition. $400. Call 541-271-0622

Market Place 750 754 Garage Sales Coquille: Garage Sale at 455 S. Irving St. Saturday only 8-4pm. Maytag Dryer, Queen Size Memory foam, Oak Clawsoot table w/ six chairs excellent. condition. Lots of misc, no junk..Lunch available. Empire Garage Sale 6 blocks south of McKay’s in Empire, turn left on Webster one block. Thursday 8-3 and Friday 9-3. Quality items reasonable. Port Orford Public Library Friends’ Fall Book Sale, 15th & Hwy. 101. 10/5 from 9am-3pm; 10/6 from 11am-2pm. Sunday: Bag of books just $3.00. Great selection, low prices!

O ! UTSMART YOUR COMPETITION Place your ad here and give your business the boost it needs. Call

541-269-1222 Ext. 269 Call CallMichelle Valerie atat 541-269-1222 293 541-269-1222 ext. Ext.269

for details


C2 • The World •Thursday, October 3,2013

754 Garage Sales

803 Dogs

909 Misc. Auto HONDA WORLD

$13,990 2006 Honda Pilot EXL 4x4, Moonroof, Leather, More. #B3401/518677

Garage Sales All garage sale ads includes Photos and must be classified in categories 751 to 756 & 826 to 830

Good Ad - $12.00 4 lines - 1 day in The World, Bandon Western World, Umpqua Post, The World link, theworldlink.com and Smart Mobiles.

Better Ad - $17.00 (includes boxing) 5 lines - 2 days in The World, 1 day in Bandon Western World, Umpqua Post, The World link, 7 days on theworldlink.com and Smart Mobile.

Best Ad - $20.00 (includes boxing) 5 lines - 1 week in The World, Bandon Western World, Umpqua Post, and The World and link, theworldlink.com Smart Mobile.

755 Market Basket Farm fresh eggs 12-$3.00 / 18-$4.00 call Carol at 541-297-4000

756 Wood/Heating

Pets All pet ads includes Photos and must be classified in categories 801 to 824

$12,990 2012 Mazda 2 4Dr, Hatchback, Low Miles, Well Equipped. #B3405/145596

Good Ad - $10.00 3 lines - 1 week in The World, Bandon Western World, Umpqua Post, The World link, theworldlink.com and Smart Mobiles.

Better Ad - $12.00 4 lines - 2 week in The World, Bandon Western World, Umpqua Post, The World link, theworldlink.com and Smart Mobile.

Best Ad - $17.00 (includes boxing) 6 lines - 3 week in The World, Bandon Western World, Umpqua Post, and The World link, theworldlink.com and Smart Mobile.

806 Livestock Young bull for sale, Red Angus Long yearling, underweight, low Birth Weight. $1200. 541-294-5397.

808 Pet Care Pet Cremation 541-267-3131

$24,990 2006 Dodge 1500 4x4 Mega Cab, Hemi, Laramie, Leather, More. #B3399/178163

$8,990 2004 Nissan Frontier ExCab Auto, Low Miles. #13219C/161313

FIREWOOD FOR SALE

901 ATVs

The very best SEASONED HARDWOOD, no green wood. $210 cord, includes delivery. 4x4x8. 541-751-0766.

$19,990 2011 Ford Transit Connect XLT 4 Cyl, Well Equipped! #13226A/931771

$8,990 2006 Chevy Malibu LT 4 Cyl, Auto, Well Equipped #B3323B/117299

2006 Honda Civic Hybrid 4Dr, Auto, Nav System, Low Miles. #B3295/026797

$14,990

1350 Ocean Blvd., Coos Bay

776 Appliances MAYTAG DRYER, excellent condition, $250. 541-347-2377.

777 Computers I Pod Touch, 5th Generation. 32 GB, Black, excellent shape $250 obo. Call 541-396-3396 I will pick up & safely recycle your old computers, printers & monitors, CB, NB, CQ. No charge. 541-294-9107

Pets/Animals 800 802 Cats FOUND: Cat at Recycling center in Coos Bay. Yellow & White, Tabby, short Hair. Call Kohl’s Cat House 541-294-3876 DID you know you could FAX The World your ad at 541-267-0294.

All Auto ads must be classified in categories 901 to 946

Good Ad - $12.00 3 lines - 1 week in The World, Bandon Western World, Umpqua Post, The World link, theworldlink.com and Smart Mobiles.

Better Ad - $15.00

HondaWorld.com 541-888-5588 • 1-800-634-1054

911 RV/Motor Homes Snow Birds! 36 ft. Alpenite w/3 slides. Villa Portaphino. One owner, well maintained with 2004 Dodge 4 door Larame, diesel, 46K miles. New tires, $44,995. For more info. Call 541-315-0036. Roseburg Oregon.

914 Travel Trailers

(includes a photo) 6 lines - 2 week in The World, Bandon Western World, Umpqua Post, The World link, theworldlink.com and Smart Mobile.

Best Ad - $25.00 (includes a photo & boxing) 6 lines - 3 week in The World, Bandon Western World, Umpqua Post, and The World and link, theworldlink.com Smart Mobile.

906 4X4

For Sale: 30’ 2005 Open Road travel trailer with 14’ tip-out; walk around bed; two 12.5 gallon propane tanks; leveler jacks; furnace; sleeps 4; like new, used only 3 times. See to appreciate. $18,000 obo. 541-267-2678

Legals 100

803 Dogs Found: Small black and white Dog. Empire Blvd. and Newmark area CB. Call PCHS 541-756-6522

NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE

FOR SALE: 2005 Ford STX 4x4 pickup, well maintained, 100,000 miles. $9000 or best offer. 541-269-2413, Evenings

909 Misc. Auto New Factory Rubber Floor Matts, for 2002 Dodge Caravan $100 541-756-4707 or 541-404-4709

NOTICE TO DEFENDANTS: READ THESE PAPERS CAREFULLY! A lawsuit has been started against you in the above-entitled court by CitiMortgage, Inc., plaintiff. Plaintiff’s claims are stated in the written complaint, a copy of which was filed with the above-entitled Court. You must “appear” in this case or the other side will win automatically. To “appear” you must file with the court a legal document called a “motion” or “answer.” The “motion” or “answer” (or “reply”) must be given to the court clerk or administrator within 30 days of the date of first publication specified herein along with the required filing fee. It must be in proper form and have proof of service on the plaintiff’s attorney or, if the plaintiff does not have an attorney, proof of service on the plaintiff. If you have any questions, you should see an attorney immediately. If you need help in finding an attorney, you may contact the Oregon State Bar’s Lawyer Referral Service online at www.oregonstatebar.org or by calling (503) 684-3763 (in the Portland metropolitan area) or toll-free elsewhere in Oregon at (800) 452-7636. This summons is issued pursuant to ORCP 7.

Michael Botthof, OSB #113337 mbotthof@rcolegal.com Attorney for Plaintiff 511 SW 10th Ave., Ste. 400 Portland, OR 97205 P: (503) 977-7840 F: (503) 977-7963 PUBLISHED: The Word- October 03, 10, 17 and 24, 2013 (ID-20239810)

2009 Honda Civic Hybrid Certified Pre-Owned. #BB3337

AUTO / VEHICLES / BOATS & TRAILERS

Commonly known as: 2164 State Street, North Bend, Oregon 97459.

RCO LEGAL, P.C.

$11,990 2 cords of pine in Lakeside $225 firm. You haul. Contact Amanda, 541-429-1396

FEET OF LOT 20, BLOCK 5, MIDLAND ADDITION TO NORTH BEND, COOS COUNTY, OREGON

On November 18, 2013 at the hour of 10:00 a.m. at the Front Door of the Coos County Courthouse, 250 North Baxter St. Coquille, Oregon, the defendant’s interest will be sold, subject to redemption, in the real property commonly known as: 2755 33rd St Coos Bay OR 97420. The court case number is 13CV0273, where JPMorgan Chase Bank, NA, is plaintiff, and Joseph W. Nelson; State of Oregon, Department of Justice; Occupants of the Property is defendant. The sale is a public auction to the highest bidder for cash or cashier’s check, in hand, made out to Coos County Sheriff’s Office. For more information on this sale go to: www.oregonsheriffs.com/sales.htm PUBLISHED: The World- October 03, 10, 17 and 24, 2013 (ID-20239882) IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE STATE OF OREGON IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF COOS Case No. 12CV0860 SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION CITIMORTGAGE, INC., its successors in interest and/or assigns, Plaintiff, v. MARY E. ALARCON AKA MARY ELLEN ALARCON; MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS INC., SOLELY AS NOMINEE FOR CITIBANK, N.A.; STATE OF OREGON; WESTERN MERCANTILE AGENCY, INC.; AND OCCUPANTS OF THE PREMISES, Defendants. TO THE DEFENDANTS: MARY E. ALARCON AKA MARY ELLEN ALARCON: In the name of the State of Oregon, you are hereby required to appear and answer the complaint filed against you in the above-entitled Court and cause on or before the expiration of 30 days from the date of the first publication of this summons. The date of first publication in this matter is October 03, 2013. If you fail timely to appear and answer, plaintiff will apply to the above-entitled court for the relief prayed for in its complaint. This is a judicial foreclosure of a deed of trust in which the plaintiff requests that the plaintiff be allowed to foreclose your interest in the following described real property: LOTS 18, 19 AND THE WEST 10

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE STATE OF OREGON IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF COOS BANK OF AMERICA, N.A, its successors in interest and/or assigns, Plaintiff v. BRAD VANLANDINGHAM, TAMMI VANLANDINGHAM, COOS COUNTY and CITIBANK, N.A., Defendants. Case No. 13CV0657 SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION TO DEFENDANT: BRAD VANLANDINGHAM: In the name of the State of Oregon, you are hereby required to appear and defend the complaint filed against you in the above entitled Court within thirty (30) days from the date of the first publication of this summons. The date of first publication in this matter is September 26, 2013. If you fail timely to appear and answer, for want thereof, plaintiff(s) will apply to the court for relief demanded in the complaint. This is a judicial foreclosure of a deed of trust in which the plaintiff requests that the plaintiff be allowed to foreclose your interest in the following described real property: PARCEL 3 PARTITION PLAT 2002 #14 FILED AND RECORDED OCTOBER 31, 2002 CAB C/359 BEARING MICROFILM REEL NO. 2002-14392, RECORDS OF COOS COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 63503 WALLACE RD, COOS BAY, OR 97420. NOTICE TO THE DEFENDANT: READ THESE PAPERS CAREFULLY! You must “appear” to protect your rights in this matter. To “appear” you must file with the court a legal paper called a “motion” or “reply.” The “motion” or “reply” must be given to the court clerk or administrator within 30 days along with the required filing fee. It must be in proper form and have proof of service on the Plaintiff’s attorney or, if the Plaintiff does not have an attorney, proof of service on the Plaintiff. If you have questions, you should see an attorney immediately. If you need help in finding an attorney, you may call the Oregon State

Bar’s Lawyer Referral Service at (503) 684-3763 or toll-free in Oregon at (800) 452-7636. The Oregon State Bar`s web address is http://www.osbar.org. This summons is issued pursuant to ORCP 7. Malcolm  Cisneros, A Law Corporation, Nathan F. Smith, OSB #120112, Nathan@mclaw.org Attorneys for Plaintiff 2112 Business Center Drive, Second Floor, Irvine, CA 92612, P: (949) 252-9400, F: (949) 252-1032 PUBLISHED: The World - September 26, October 03, 10 and 17, 2013. (ID-20239252) IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE STATE OF OREGON FOR THE COUNTY OF COOS Case No.: 13PB0228 Notice to Interested Persons In the Matter of the Estate of: Ian Keith Sellards, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed personal representative of the above estate. All persons having claims against the estate are required to present them, within four months after the date of first publication of this notice, to the personal representative at the address of the attorneys for the personal representative set forth below, or the claims may be barred. All persons whose rights may be affected by the proceeding may obtain additional information from the records of the court, the personal representative, or the attorneys for the personal representative. Dated and first published: September 26, 2013. Mark E. McCulley, Personal Representative c/o Andrew E. Combs Whitty, McDaniel, Bodkin & Combs, LLP 444 N. 4th Street P. O. Box 1120 Coos Bay, OR 97420 Publish: September 26, October 3, and October 10, 2013. PUBLISHED: The World- September 26, October 03 and 10, 2013 (ID-20239119) IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE STATE OF OREGON FOR THE COUNTY OF COOS No. 13CV0692 CIVIL SUMMONS

NOTICE TO DEFENDANT: READ THESE PAPERS CAREFULLY! A lawsuit has been started against you in the above-entitled Court by PHH Mortgage Corporation, Plaintiff. Plaintiff’s claim is stated in the written Complaint, a copy of which is on file at the Coos County Courthouse. You must “appear” in this case or the other side will win automatically. To “appear” you must file with the court a legal paper called a “motion” or “answer.” The “motion” or “answer” must be given to the court clerk or administrator within 30 days along with the required filing fee. It must be in proper form and have proof of service on the plaintiff’s attorney or, if the plaintiff does not have an attorney, proof of service on the plaintiff. The object of the complaint is to foreclose a deed of trust dated September 14, 1998 and recorded as Instrument No. 1998-56681 given by Georgia Gunther Knudsen as Trustee of, a single person, The Georgia Gunther Knudsen Trust, Agreement, Dated September 8, 1994 on property commonly known as 1624 Ivy Street, Coquille, OR 97423 and legally described as: Lot 4, Block 3, Coquille Park, Coos County, Oregon. The complaint seeks to foreclose and terminate all interest of Eileen Marie Gunther and all other interests in the property. The “motion” or “answer” (or “reply”) must be given to the court clerk or administrator within 30 days of the date of first publication specified herein along with the required filing fee. The date of first publication of the summons is September 26, 2013. If you have questions, you should see an attorney immediately. If you need help in finding an attorney, you may contact the Oregon State Bar’s Lawyer Referral Service online at www.oregonstatebar.org or by calling (503) 684-3763 (in the Portland metropolitan area) or toll-free elsewhere in Oregon at (800) 452-7636. Attorney for Plaintiff, /s/ Cara J. Richter Cara J. Richter #094855 [crichter@logs.com] SHAPIRO & SUTHERLAND, LLC 1499 SE Tech Center Place, Suite 255 Vancouver, WA 98683 (360)260-2253; Fax (360)260-2285 S&S No. 13-111549 PUBLISHED: The World- September 26, October 03, 10 and 17, 2013 (ID-20239324)

PHH Mortgage Corporation,

NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE

Plaintiff,

On Monday October 28, 2013 at the hour of 10:00 a.m. at the Front Door of the Coos County Courthouse, 250 North Baxter St. Coquille, Oregon, the defendant’s interest will be sold, subject to redemption, in the real property commonly known as:68309 Collier Road, North Bend OR 97459,. The court case number is 12CV0408, where Wells Fargo Bank, NA is plaintiff, and Carlos Herrera; Dawn R. Herrera aka Dawn R Gillum; State of Oregon; Occupants of the Premises is defendant. The sale is a public auction to the highest bidder for cash or cashier’s check, in hand, made out to Coos County Sheriff’s Office. For more information on this sale go to: www.oregonsheriffs.com/sales.htm

vs. LOUISE CATHERINE MOORE; EILEEN MARIE GUNTHER; JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, SUCCESSOR IN INTEREST BY PURCHASE FROM THE FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION AS RECEIVER OF WASHINGTON MUTUAL BANK F/K/A WASHINGTON MUTUAL BANK, FA; STATE OF OREGON; WESTERN MERCANTILE AGENCY, INCORPORATED, OTHER PERSONS OR PARTIES, including OCCUPANTS, UNKNOWN CLAIMING ANY RIGHT, TITLE, LIEN, OR INTEREST IN THE PROPERTY DESCRIBED IN THE COMPLAINT HEREIN

PUBLISHED: The World- September 26, October 03, 10 and 17, 2013 (ID-20238920) NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE

Defendants. TO THE DEFENDANTS: Marie Gunther

Eileen

On Monday October 28, 2013 at the hour of 10:00 a.m. at the Front Door of the Coos County Courthouse, 250 North Baxter St. Coquille, Oregon, the


Thursday, October 3,2013 • The World •CC3 defendant’s interest will be sold, subject to redemption, in the real property commonly known as: 93766 Bay Park Lane Coos Bay OR 97420,. The court case number is 12CV0413 , where Wells Fargo Bank, NA is plaintiff, and Scott A. Gallagher-Starr; Shaay C. Gallagher-Starr; Oregon First Community Credit Union; and Occupants of the Premises is defendant. The sale is a public auction to the highest bidder for cash or cashier’s check, in hand, made out to Coos County Sheriff’s Office. For more information on this sale go to: www.oregonsheriffs.com/sales.htm PUBLISHED: The World- September 26, October 03, 10 and 17, 2013 (ID-20238899) NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE On Monday October 21, 2013 at the hour of 10:00 a.m. at the Front Door of the Coos County Courthouse, 250 North Baxter St. Coquille, Oregon, the defendant’s interest will be sold, subject to redemption, in the real property commonly known as: 587 N. Baxter St. Coquille, OR 97423,. The court case number is 13CV0535, where First Community Credit Union is plaintiff, and Robert E. Sprague, Michelle Duval aka Michelle Sprague, Jackie Lynn Sprague aka Jackie Lynn Stump, Sheila Sprague aka Sheila Cline aka Sheila Smith, Ruth Marie Dodge aka Ruth M. Sprague, State of Oregon Department of Human Services, All Other Unknown Heirs of Persons Claiming an Interest in the Property and Occupants and Parties in Possession, are defendants. The sale is a public auction to the highest bidder for cash or cashier’s check, in hand, made out to Coos County Sheriff’s Office. For more information on this sale go to: www.oregonsheriffs.com/sales.htm PUBLISHED: The World - September 19, 26 October 03 and 10, 2013 (ID-20238441) TIMBER FOR SALE, UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR, BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, ORAL AUCTION as hereinafter designated will be conducted by the District Manager, Bureau of Land Management at the COOS BAY DISTRICT OFFICE, 1300 Airport Lane, North Bend, Oregon 97459-2000, on October 25, 2013 for all timber marked or designated for cutting. Sale will commence at 10:00 a.m. Before bids are submitted, full information concerning the timber, the conditions of sale and submission of bids, including the appraised price per species, should be obtained from the above District Manager. The prospectus is available online at www.blm.gov/or/districts/coosbay/timbersales/i ndex.php. The right is hereby reserved to waive technical defects in this advertisement and to reject any or all bids. The United States reserves the right to waive any informality in bids received whenever such waiver is in the interest of the United States. Environmental Assessment No. C030-2010-0001, Fairview NWFP Project EA was prepared for this sale and a Finding of No Significant Impact has been signed. These documents are available for review at the Coos Bay District Office or online at www.blm.gov/or/districts/coosbay/plans/index.p hp. This sale notice, first published on September 26, 2013, constitutes the decision document for purposes of protests under 43 CFR Subpart 5003 - Administrative Remedies. Protests of any sale listed below must be filed within 15 days after the first publication of this notice. In COOS COUNTY: OREGON: CBWR: ORAL AUCTION: SBA SET ASIDE SALE NO. 14-01, PATHFINDER CT. All timber designated for cutting on certain Federal lands in T. 26 S., R. 12 W., Section 25, SW¼SW¼, Section 26, SE¼SW¼, S½SE¼, Section 25, N½, Will. Mer. estimated for the purpose of this sale to be 2470 MBF. No written bid for less than $381,288.00 will be considered. Minimum deposit with written bid $38,200.00. PUBLISHED: The World- September 26 and October 03, 2013 (ID-20239161) Notification of Request for Proposal Proposals due 4:00 pm, October 30, 2013 The Port of Gold Beach is requesting proposals from firms with expertise in planning and economic consulting services related to Port and Airport activities, including development and/or redevelopment of port related properties. The Port will retain the professional services of a qualified consulting firm to assist the Port in formatting their priorities as well as preparing a Strategic Business Plan that conforms to the Oregon Business Development Department Port Strategic Plan Template. The Request for Proposal and Scope of Work can be obtained by contacting Port office at:

Gold Beach, OR 97444 portmanager@portofgoldbeach.com 541-247-6269 PUBLISHED: The World- October 03, 2013 (ID-20239824) Legal Notice-Public Sale On October 11, 2013 starting at 10:00 at Circle H, 1190 Newmark, Coos Bay, Oregon 97420 A public sale will be held by E.L. Edwards Realty II, Inc. 541-756-0347 UNIT NAME Dunes V Englewood 45 Englewood 43 Troy A 13 Circle H 270

Corina Comstock Virgil Comstock Bob Nolan Wendy Hohn Melody Smith

PUBLISHED: The World- September 26 and October 03, 2013 (ID-20239239)

must “appear” in this case or the other side will win automatically. To “appear” you must file with the court a legal document called a “motion” or “answer.” The “motion” or “answer” must be given to the court clerk or administrator within 30 days of the date of first publication specified herein along with the required filing fee. It must be in proper form and have proof of service on the plaintiff’s attorney or, if the plaintiff does not have an attorney, proof of service on the plaintiff. You may be liable for attorney fees in this case. Should plaintiff in this case prevail, a judgment for reasonable attorney fees may be entered against you. If you have questions, you should see an attorney immediately. If you need help in finding an attorney, you may call the Oregon State Bar’s Lawyer Referral Service at (503) 684-3763 or toll-free in Oregon at (800) 452.7636. Patrick M. Terry, OSB# 025730, Attorney for Plaintiff, PO Box 547, North Bend, OR 97459 (541) 756-2056

REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS CITY OF COOS BAY 500 Central Ave Coos Bay, Oregon 97420

PUBLISHED: The World - September 12, 19, 26 and October 03, 2013. (ID-20237386)

Proposals to Provide Construction Manager/General Contractor Services for Wastewater Treatment Plant 2 Project will be received by the City of Coos Bay until November 6, 2013 at 3:00 p.m. The RFP is available online at the City’s website: http://coosbay.org/government/rfp-list. This value engineering project is being funded by a loan obtained through the Oregon Infrastructure Finance Authority (IFA) in conjunction with the project titled, Coos Bay Initial Wastewater System Repairs Design & Construction. Questions can be addressed by calling (541) 269-1181 ext. 2247.

TRUSTEE’S NOTICE OF SALE

PUBLISHED: The World- October 03, and 10, 2013 (ID-20239276) NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE On Monday November 04, 2013, at the hour of 10:00 a.m. at the Front Door of the Coos County Courthouse, 250 North Baxter St. Coquille, Oregon, the defendant’s interest will be sold, subject to redemption, in the real property commonly known as:844 N Dean St. Coquille, OR 97423,. The court case number is 13CV0314, where Nationstar is plaintiff, and Roy E. Lake; Susan R. Lake; Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc.; Corestrar Financial Group, LLC; The Bank of New York Mellon fka The Bank of New York, as successor Trustee to JPMorgan Chase Bank, NA as Trustee on behalf of the certificate holders of the CWHEQ Inc., CWHEQ Revolving Home Equity Loan Trust, series 2005-M; Western Mercantile Agency, Inc; Dave Winningham Corporation fdba Henry A Schroeder and Sons; GE Capital Retail Bank fka GE Money Bank; Cavalry Investments, LLC; Discover Bank; Unifund CCR Partners; Midland Funding, LLC, Other Persons or Parties including Occupants, Unknown claiming any Right, Title, Lien, or Interest in the Property Described in the Complaint Herein, is defendant. The sale is a public auction to the highest bidder for cash or cashier’s check, in hand, made out to Coos County Sheriff’s Office. For more information on this sale go to: www.oregonsheriffs.com/sales.htm PUBLISHED: The World- September 26, October 03, 10 and 17, 2013 (ID-20239241) IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE STATE OF OREGON FOR THE COUNTY OF COOS Summons by Publication Case No. 13CV0653 Marilou Smith, Plaintiff v. Daniel & Naedean Cunningham, US Bank National Assoc., Occupants, and Any & All Other Person or Parties Unknown Claiming Any Right, Title, Lien or Interest in the Real Property Commonly known as 413 Marple St., Coos Bay, OR, Defendants. TO: Any & All Other Person or Parties Unknown Claiming Any Right, Title, Lien or Interest in the Real Property Commonly known as 413 Marple St., Coos Bay, OR. YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED and required to appear and defend the complaint filed against you in the above-entitled action within 30 days after the date of the first publication of this summons. If you fail to so appear and answer, plaintiff will apply for the relief demanded in the complaint to wit: Judgment requiring Defendants to pay Plaintiff $132,650.65 plus interest at 8%, together will all taxes, costs, and attorney fees. If such amounts are paid Plaintiff shall deed the aforementioned property to Defendants Cunningham. If such amounts are not paid all Defendants shall be forever foreclosed of all interest in the aforementioned property.

Reference is made to a certain trust deed (“Trust Deed”) made, executed and delivered by John D. Henderson, as grantor, to First American Title Company, as trustee, in favor of Oregon First Community Credit Union, as beneficiary, dated November 7, 2006, and recorded on November 16, 2006, as Recording No. 2006-15509, in the mortgage records of Coos County, Oregon. Oregon First Community Credit Union is now known as First Community Credit Union. The Trust Deed covers the following described real property (“Property”) situated in said county and state, to-wit: See attached Exhibit A. Exhibit A Legal Description Real property in the County of Coos, State of Oregon, described as follows: PARCEL I Beginning at a point which is South 18° 39’ 15” East a distance of 116.62 feet from the Center 1/4 corner of Section 2, Township 26 South, Range 12 West of the Willamette Meridian, Coos County, Oregon, thence South 40° 37’ 38” West a distance of 1614.67 feet to the South boundary of the Northeast 1/4 Southwest 1/4; thence West a distance of 87.00 feet; thence North along the West line of the Northeast 1/4 Southwest 1/4; a distance of 1010.00 feet to the right bank of Daniels Creek; thence downstream along the right bank of Daniels Creek; North 46° 0’ East a distance of 69.0 feet, South 78° 15’ East a distance of 154.0 feet, North 76° 15’ East a distance of 117.0 feet, North 42° 30’ East a distance of 366.0 feet, South 88° 30’ East a distance of 83.0 feet, North 59° 30’ East a distance of 252.0 feet, North 42° 30’ East a distance of 125.0 feet, South 66° 0’ East a distance of 80.0 feet to a 3/4 inch iron pipe which bears South 42° 19’ 40” East a distance of 59.9 feet from a 1 1/2 inch bolt sticking out of the North side of a concrete bridge; thence North 41° East a distance of 108.0 feet to a 1/4 inch iron rod; thence North 74° East a distance of 470.00 feet; thence South 40° 37’ 38” West a distance of 612.20 feet to a 1/2 inch iron rod being the point of beginning. Account No. 4619.03 PARCEL II A parcel of land situated in the West 1/2 of Section 2, Township 26 South, of Range 12 West of the Willamette Meridian, Coos County, Oregon, being more particularly described as follows: Beginning at the intersection of the Southerly boundary of the Daniels Creek County road and the West line of the Northeast 1/4 of the Southwest 1/4 of Section 2, Township 26 South, Range 12 West of the Willamette Meridian, thence North 67° East 300.00 feet along the South boundary of the Daniels Creek County Road; thence South 23° East to the Daniels Creek; thence Southwesterly along Daniels

Date of First Publication: September 12, 2013

Debbie Collins, Port Manager Port of Gold Beach P.O. Box 1126 29891 Harbor Way

NOTICE TO DEFENDANTS: READ THESE PAPERS CAREFULLY! You

BRIDGE Jane Goodall said, “Every individual matters. Every individual has a role to play. Every individual makes a difference.” A bridge player might add the word “card” after each “individual.” However, sometimes the role of a particular card may be difficult to discern. In this deal, South is in four spades. West leads the club king. How should declarer plan the play? What is the role of South’s heart king? South opens two clubs, strong, artificial and forcing. His hand is a min-

imum because, when unbalanced, opener will usually have at least nine winners. This hand has only eight and a half: five spades, two diamonds, one club and half a heart. But it is a sensible opening bid. However, when North raises spades, promising some points, South has to settle for four spades to announce his minimum. If North has a good hand, he can bid higher. When dummy tables with the spade ace, declarer has nine tricks. Probably his first thought is that he needs East to have the heart ace. Then, after getting to dummy with a trump, a heart lead through East would generate a trick for South’s king. Here, though, you will notice that West has the heart ace. What can South do? Declarer must realize that the heart king is a red herring. He should play to ruff a heart on the board, which generates a seventh trump trick. He takes the first trick (otherwise, West might shift to a trump) and plays a heart. When South wins the next trick, he leads another heart. And in a moment, declarer gains that key ruff.

FRIDAY, October 4, 2013 Emotions will be close to the surface this year. It will be important for you to size up your personal situation and make the changes that will keep you moving in a positive direction. Don’t let anyone bully you or take advantage of you. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) — Put emotional differences aside and get along with others in order to reach a greater goal. Compromise will help bring about change as well as show your flexibility and ability to contribute. SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) — Expand your interests and look for enlightenment. Indulge in interesting challenges and travel to places that will leave an impression. The experience you have will improve your home and family life. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23Dec. 21) — Good fortune is within reach. Steady progress is all that’s required to improve your position, giving you greater access to a multitude of lifestyles that will keep you entertained. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) — Don’t give in to someone making idle threats or causing uncertainty and emotional instability. A partnership should be formed with someone having equal talent and the ability to work without supervision. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) — Line up your agenda and look over your expenses. Taking care of the fine, but important,

Creek to the West line of the Northeast 1/4 of the Southwest 1/4; thence North to the point of beginning. Account No. 4619.06 PARCEL III Beginning at a point which is South 18° 39’ 15” distance of 116.62 feet from the Center 1/4 corner of Section 2 Township 26 South, Range 12 West of the Willamette Meridian, Coos County, Oregon, thence North 40° 37’ 38” East a distance of 612.20 feet; thence North 74° East a distance of 365.00 feet; thence South 34° West a distance of 2160.00 feet; thence West along the South boundary of the Northeast 1/4 Southwest 1/4 a distance of 593.00 feet; thence North 40° 37’ 38” East a distance of 1614.67 feet to the point of beginning. Reference is also made to that security agreement set forth in the same Trust Deed referenced above, whereby grantor granted to beneficiary (and its successors and assigns) a security instrument in all improvements located on the real property, including, but not limited to, the following described personal property currently located on the real property (the real property and personal property are hereinafter referred to as “Property”): 2005 Fleetwood Champion Manufactured Home, VIN Nos. ORFL448A30204-FE13 and ORFL448B30204-FE13, Home ID No. 300889. There are defaults by the grantor or other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by the Trust Deed, with respect to provisions therein which authorize sale in the event of default of such provision; the defaults for which foreclosure is made is grantor’s failure to pay when due the following sums: Arrearage in the sum of $23,396.03 as of June 25, 2013, plus additional payments, property expenditures, taxes, liens, assessments, insurance, late fees, attorney’s and trustee’s fees and costs, and interest due at the time of reinstatement or sale. By reason of said defaults, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligations secured by said Trust Deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: Payoff in the sum of $185,352.67 as of June 25, 2013, plus taxes, liens, assessments, property expenditures, insurance, accruing interest, late fees, attorney’s and trustee’s fees and costs incurred by beneficiary or its assigns. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on November 21, 2013, at the hour of 11:00 a.m., in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at the following place: West Front Entrance of the Coos County Courthouse, 250 N. Baxter Street, Coquille, Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the above-described Property, which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by grantor of the said Trust Deed, together with any interest which the grantor or grantor’s successors in interest acquired after the execution of the Trust Deed, to satisfy the obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or Trust Deed, and in addition to paying said sum or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and Trust Deed, together with trustee’s and attorney’s fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the singular includes the plural, the word “grantor” includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Trust Deed, and the words “trustee” and “beneficiary” include their respective successors in interest, if any.

details will help you avoid criticism from a controlling individual. Make changes in an unyielding manner. PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) — Network, socialize and oversee any matters that can influence your position or your financial future. The schedule you set will ensure your ability to enjoy good friends and personal pampering. ARIES (March 21-April 19) — Do what you say, and be consistent in the way you handle others. Emotional problems will surface if you discuss feelings or what you expect from others. Discretion will be necessary. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) — Protect against injury or harsh encounters with someone prone to bullying. Travel to destinations that will provide you with interesting information that enhance your beliefs. Nurture important partnerships. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) — Getting involved in activities that are new to you will lift your spirits and encourage you to participate in upcoming events that can lead to new acquaintances and interests. CANCER (June 21-July 22) — Reconnect with someone or attend a reunion that encourages you to get back to hobbies or activities you used to enjoy. Don’t let the changes others make throw you off guard. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) — Don’t overstep your bounds or overstay your welcome. Make changes that will ensure your happiness. Additional responsibilities must be dealt with quickly so you can get on with your life. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) — What you do for others will ensure that you receive the help

The NOTICE TO RESIDENTIAL TENANTS, attached hereto as Exhibit B, is incorporated herein by reference. [Exhibit B, NOTICE TO RESIDENTIAL TENANTS, is not published pursuant to 86.750(2)(b).]

Trust Deed No. 1: Payoff in the sum of $75,276.14 as of July 15, 2013, plus taxes, liens, assessments, property expenditures, insurance, accruing interest, late fees, attorney’s and trustee’s fees and costs incurred by beneficiary or its assigns.

THIS COMMUNICATION IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. UNLESS YOU NOTIFY US WITHIN 30 DAYS AFTER RECEIVING THIS NOTICE THAT YOU DISPUTE THE VALIDITY OF THE DEBT, OR ANY PORTION OF IT, WE WILL ASSUME THE DEBT IS VALID. IF YOU NOTIFY US, IN WRITING, WITHIN 30 DAYS AFTER RECEIPT OF THIS NOTICE THAT YOU DO DISPUTE THE DEBT OR ANY PORTION OF IT, WE WILL PROVIDE VERIFICATION BY MAILING YOU A COPY OF THE RECORDS. IF YOU SO REQUEST, IN WRITING, WITHIN 30 DAYS AFTER RECEIPT OF THIS NOTICE, WE WILL PROVIDE YOU WITH THE NAME AND ADDRESS OF THE ORIGINAL CREDITOR IF DIFFERENT FROM THE CURRENT CREDITOR.

Trust Deed No. 2: Payoff in the sum of $13,182.16 as of July 15, 2013, plus taxes, liens, assessments, property expenditures, insurance, accruing interest, late fees, attorney’s and trustee’s fees and costs incurred by beneficiary or its assigns.

DATED: June 28, 2013. Valerie A. Tomasi, Successor Trustee Tomasi Salyer Baroway 121 SW Morrison, Suite 1850 Portland, OR 97204 Phone: 503-894-9900; fax: 971-544-7236 PUBLISHED: The World- September , 12,19, 26 and October 03, 2013 (ID-20238075) TRUSTEE’S NOTICE OF SALE Reference is made to a certain trust deed (“Trust Deed No. 1”) made, executed and delivered by Rex A. Campbell and Debora Campbell, husband and wife, as grantor, to First American Title Co., as trustee, in favor of Oregon First Community Credit Union, as beneficiary, dated April 25, 2005, and recorded on April 27, 2005, as Recording No. 2005-6008, in the mortgage records of Coos County, Oregon. Oregon First Community Credit Union is now known as First Community Credit Union.

WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on December 19, 2013, at the hour of 11:00 a.m., in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at the following place: West Front Entrance of the Coos County Courthouse, 250 N. Baxter St., Coquille, Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the above-described Property, which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by grantor of the said Trust Deeds, together with any interest which the grantor or grantor’s successors in interest acquired after the execution of the Trust Deeds, to satisfy the obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the Trust Deeds reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or Trust Deeds, and in addition to paying said sum or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and Trust Deeds, together with trustee’s and attorney’s fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753.

Reference is also made to a certain trust deed (“Trust Deed No. 2”) made, executed and delivered Rex A. Campbell and Debora Campbell, husband and wife, as grantor to First American Title Co., as trustee, in favor of Oregon First Community Credit Union, as beneficiary, dated February 13, 2006, and recorded on February 21, 2006, as Recording No. 2006-2298, in the mortgage records of Coos County, Oregon. Oregon First Community Credit Union is now known as First Community Credit Union. Trust Deed No. 1 and Trust Deed No. 2 are collectively referred to herein as the “Trust Deeds.”

In construing this notice, the singular includes the plural, the word “grantor” includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Trust Deeds, and the words “trustee” and “beneficiary” include their respective successors in interest, if any.

The Trust Deeds covers the following described real property (“Property”) situated in said county and state, to-wit:

THIS COMMUNICATION IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. UNLESS YOU NOTIFY US WITHIN 30 DAYS AFTER RECEIVING THIS NOTICE THAT YOU DISPUTE THE VALIDITY OF THE DEBT, OR ANY PORTION OF IT, WE WILL ASSUME THE DEBT IS VALID. IF YOU NOTIFY US, IN WRITING, WITHIN 30 DAYS AFTER RECEIPT OF THIS NOTICE THAT YOU DO DISPUTE THE DEBT OR ANY PORTION OF IT, WE WILL PROVIDE VERIFICATION BY MAILING YOU A COPY OF THE RECORDS. IF YOU SO REQUEST, IN WRITING, WITHIN 30 DAYS AFTER RECEIPT OF THIS NOTICE, WE WILL PROVIDE YOU WITH THE NAME AND ADDRESS OF THE ORIGINAL CREDITOR IF DIFFERENT FROM THE CURRENT CREDITOR.

Lots 17, 18 and the west half of Lot 19, Block 31, FIRST ADDITION TO MARSH FIELD, Coos County, Oregon. There are defaults by the grantor or other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by the Trust Deeds, with respect to provisions therein which authorize sale in the event of default of such provision; the defaults for which foreclosure is made are: 1. Grantor’s failure to pay real property taxes when due; 2. Grantor’s failure to avoid having junior liens encumber the Property; 3. Grantor’s failure to pay when due the following sums secured by Trust Deed No. 1: arrearage in the sum of $5,087.33 as of July 15, 2013, plus additional payments, property expenditures, taxes, liens, assessments, insurance, late fees, attorney’s and trustee’s fees and costs, and interest due at the time of reinstatement or sale; and 4. Grantor’s failure to pay when due the following sums secured by Trust Deed No. 2: arrearage in the sum of $256.68 as of July 15, 2013, plus additional payments, property expenditures, taxes, liens, assessments, insurance, late fees, attorney’s and trustee’s fees and costs, and interest due at the time of reinstatement or sale. By reason of said defaults, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligations secured by said Trust Deeds immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit:

you need when it comes to accomplishing your goals. Personal opportunities will develop through an unusual relationship. SATURDAY, Oct.5, 2013 Strive to enforce practicality and moderation in your life. Too much of anything will work against you. Put more time and effort into your career and building up your reputation, skills and allies, and less time trying to appease someone who isn’t worth your while. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) — Keep your emotions in check even if someone is putting pressure on you or trying to make changes you don’t want. Accept the inevitable and get on with your day. SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) — Explore, research and expand your interests and your knowledge. Take on projects that will alter your living space and lift your spirits. Love and romance will ease your stress. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23Dec. 21) — Uncertainty must not be allowed to ruin your plans. A challenge will allow you to show off. Travel plans or entertaining friends will help you embrace a new beginning. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) — A unique twist to the way you earn your living or handle your money will surprise someone close to you.Your system and set budget will be impressive and teach someone a lesson. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) — A financial gain will be yours due to a settlement, winning or gift. Be grateful for what you receive, but don’t let someone take advantage of your good

The NOTICE TO RESIDENTIAL TENANTS, attached hereto as Exhibit A, is incorporated herein by reference. [Exhibit A, NOTICE TO RESIDENTIAL TENANTS, is not published pursuant to 86.750(2)(b).]

DATED: July 31, 2013. Valerie A. Tomasi, Successor Trustee Tomasi Salyer Baroway 121 SW Morrison, Suite 1850 Portland, OR 97204 Phone: 503-894-9900; fax: 971-544-7236 PUBLISHED: The World- October 03, 10, 17 and 24, 2013 (ID-20239794)

fortune. PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) — Share your ideas and put your plans into motion. Socializing will lead to greater options and meeting new people. Expand your awareness and make personal improvements. ARIES (March 21-April 19) — Problems will surface with regard to your home or an important relationship. Don’t be too quick to judge someone who appears to be in an unfortunate situation. Offer patience and understanding. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) — Plan to have fun, but be cautious when engaging in physical activity. An interesting concept or project will intrigue you. The people you meet will influence your future. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) — Mix business with pleasure, but don’t believe everything you hear. Promises may be revoked. Ask for any offer you receive in writing. A shrewd strategy will help you get ahead. CANCER (June 21-July 22) — Put more faith in the people you love. Avoid criticism and moodiness when what’s required is tolerance and support. An unexpected change will affect your status. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) — Travel about, and enjoy exciting events happening in your community. Engage in activities that bring you in contact with new people. Problems at home or with a lover must be avoided. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) — Let your feelings be known. Making special plans and visiting destinations that allow you to feel carefree will be conducive to love and romance.You’ll make a good impression.


Thursday, October 3,2013 • The World • C4

Thursday

Friday

DILBERT

DILBERT

FRANK AND ERNEST

FRANK AND ERNEST

THE BORN LOSER

THE BORN LOSER

ZITS

ZITS

CLASSIC PEANUTS

CLASSIC PEANUTS

FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE

FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE

ROSE IS ROSE

ROSE IS ROSE

LUANN

LUANN

GRIZZWELLS

GRIZZWELLS

KIT ’N’ CARLYLE

THE FAMILY CIRCUS

HERMAN


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