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Government shutdown is over * BY ANDREW TAYLOR

*The new ‘deal’

The Associated Press

It’s a date 7 Devils Brewery will open Oct. 30 BY THOMAS MORIARTY The World

COOS BAY — Coos County’s first craft brewery in more than a decade is set to formally open Oct. 30, and it’s already started selling beer. Annie Pollard, who co-owns 7 Devils Brewing Co. with her husband Carmen, said the brewery’s soft opening at the end of the month will be followed by a grand opening once construction is finished. That is, if everything goes smoothly. “Which it never does,” she said, laughing. The brewery, located in the former Bay Area Enterprise building in downtown Coos Bay, will be the area’s first since the

Bank Brewery closed its doors on Central Avenue. The couple are currently brewing three beers: a pale ale, a session ale and a winter seasonal. Starting this Monday, local beer connoisseurs have been able to purchase 64-ounce growlers filled with their choice of brew. This week only, the pair are charging $5 per fill for customersupplied growlers. “What you’re drinking are our test batches,” Matthews said apologetically. “We hope that people understand that.” Their customers certainly don’t seem to be complaining about the quality — the brewery sold out of its logoed growlers within a day. Currently, only the brewery’s session ale is on tap at Sharkbites

Seafood Cafe in Coos Bay, but the couple plan to expand keg sales to other area establishments in short order. Wednesday afternoon, the couple were busily scurrying about the brew room, taking turns stirring the contents of a giant, steaming stainless steel kettle. “It’s been pretty intense. We’re making mistakes and trying to get rid of the batches,” Matthews said. “But we’re trying to brew at the same time.” A giant basin of grains, leftover from the brewing process, sat in the corner of the brew room. Matthews said the grains are being donated to a local farmer for use as cattle and turkey feed. SEE OPENING | A10

One man’s gift keeps on giving Greenhouse at Myrtle Point school provides ‘growth’ ■

BY TIM NOVOTNY By Lou Sennick, The World

The World

Standing in the afternoon sun Wednesday, the greenhouse built for students at MYRTLE POINT — A single Myrtle Crest Elementary School finished up its second growing season. Built with seed of hope, planted at Myrtle the help of Dr. Mike Lanza, the structure has been used by students in the Myrtle Crest Elementary School, is bear- Point district.

Police reports . . . . A2 What’s Up. . . . . . . . A3 South Coast. . . . . . A3 Opinion. . . . . . . . . . A4

were going to arrive one way or the other, things didn’t really start to take off until one man decided to donate a greenhouse to the school. In May 2012, Dr. Mike Lanza, a Coos Bay pediatrician, was looking to combat childhood health prob-

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DEATHS

INSIDE

ing much fruit these days for the entire Myrtle Point community. Those involved with some of the educational and community programs sprouting up around town say the last year and a half has been an amazing period of growth. While some of the programs

lems by getting students to make better choices about the food they eat. He thought a greenhouse would help the students learn about growing their own healthy SEE GROWING | A10

Jane Muffett, North Bend Cecilia Pena, North Bend Dorothy Mason, Myrtle Point Kathleen Ansbro, North Bend Frederick Russell, Bandon Tom Main, Coos Bay

The legislation would temporarily fund the government through Jan. 15 and permit it to borrow normally through Feb. 7

approved government funding only through mid-January. And the nation’s borrowing limit will need another increase shortly after that. In the meantime, lawmakers will try to find agreement on how to replace this year’s across-theboard spending cuts with more orderly deficit reduction. “We’re back from the #shutdown!” the Smithsonian Institution crowed on Twitter, announcing that museums would reopen Thursday. The U.S. Capitol’s visitor center planned to resume tours. “Closed” signs started coming down at national parks and offices across the nation, hours after the deal was sealed in Washington. Congress agreed to pay federal workers for the missed time. No such luck for contractors and all sorts of other workers whose livelihoods were disrupted. “More business. More money,” cab driver Osman Naimyar said happily, noting the growing crowds of commuters on Washington streets. He lost about a fifth of his normal fares during the shutdown. Standard & Poor’s estimated the shutdown has taken $24 billion out of the economy, and the Fitch credit rating agency warned Tuesday that it was reviewing its AAA rating on U.S. government debt for a possible downgrade. Obama and his Democratic allies SEE SHUTDOWN | A10

Relief around world as US avoids default BEIJING (AP) — Political leaders, investors and ordinary people Thursday welcomed the end of a government shutdown but already were looking ahead to the next round of a budget battle that brought the world’s biggest economy close to default and threatens Washington’s international standing. The standoff rattled global markets and threatened the image of U.S. Treasury debt as a risk-free place for governments and investors to store trillions of dollars in reserve. Few expected a default but some investors sold Treasurys over concern about possible payment delays and put off buying stocks that might be exposed to an American economic downturn. IMF managing director Christine Lagarde welcomed the deal but said the shaky American economy needs more stable long-term finances. “It will be essential to reduce uncertainty surrounding the conduct of fiscal policy by raising the debt limit in a more durable manner,” Lagarde said in a statement. The Tokyo stock market, Asia’s heavyweight, gained 0.8 percent

FORECAST

By Alysha Beck, The World

Annie Pollard and Carmen Matthews, co-owners of 7 Devils Brewing Co. in Coos Bay, brew their first big batch of India pale ale on Wednesday.

WASHINGTON — The government unlocked office doors, carried away barriers and lifted entrance gates at parks across the country Thursday after a battle-weary Congress approved a bipartisan deal to end 16 days of partial shutdown and guarantee that the United States would pay its debts, at least for this year. In hopes of averting another standoff early next year when the temporary measure runs out, Congress’ four top budget writers met over breakfast Thursday to begin two months of budget talks. It’s a tough project, and they offered no promises. House Budget Committee Chairman Paul Ryan, R-Wis., said the group’s goals were “to get this debt under control, to do smart deficit reduction, and to do things that we think will grow the economy and get people back to work.” “We believe there is common ground,” Senate Budget Committee Chairman Patty Murray, D-Wash., said afterward. The House and Senate voted late Wednesday night to end the showdown that began when Republicans tried unsuccessfully to use mustpass funding legislation to derail the president’s landmark health care law. Early Thursday, President Barack Obama signed the measure and directed all agencies to reopen promptly. The relief felt by furloughed federal employees was tempered by worry that the truce might not last much past the holidays. Congress

Gary Angeloff, Aumsville Penny Selfors, North Bend Joseph Brent, Coos Bay

Obituaries | A5

Thursday. Markets in South Korea, Australia also rose. Such relief might be only temporary without a long-term settlement, said Standard Chartered economist Samiran Chakraborty in Mumbai. Also, the congressional cliffhanger might dent longer-term confidence in American government debt, a cornerstone of global credit markets, prompting creditors to demand higher interest. “With the U.S. government’s antics, the risks go up, so the cost of money could go up too,” said Nick Chen, managing partner of Taipei law firm Pamir Law Group. China’s government, Washington’s biggest foreign creditor with $1.3 trillion invested in Treasurys, welcomed the end to the standoff. “This issue concerns many countries in the world,” said a foreign ministry spokeswoman, Hua Chunyin, speaking at a regular briefing. “The United States is the biggest economy in the world. For them to handle the issue properly is to their own interest and beneficial to their own development. We welcome their decision.”

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A2 •The World • Thursday,October 17,2013

South Coast Executive Editor Larry Campbell • 541-269-1222, ext. 251

theworldlink.com/news/local

Volunteers needed at South Coast Gospel Mission Accused gunman seeks release SOUTH COAST Do you have a passion to help those who are lost, hungry and homeless? Would you like to help those who need a friendly face and caring heart while guiding them on a path to healthy living again? The South Coast Gospel Mission needs volunteer receptionists to answer phones, greet residents and assist them with general needs. Receptionists

Meetings TODAY Coos County Airport District — 7:30 a.m., Southwest Oregon Regional Airport terminal building, 1100 Airport Lane, North Bend; regular meeting.

MONDAY North Bend City Council — 4:30 p.m., city hall, 835 California St., North Bend; regular meeting.

provide an invaluable service to give the mission’s two employees time to work on training programs for residents. These programs will be geared towards providing each resident with specific training to change their habits and learn new skills. The ultimate goal is to transform them into happy and productive citizens and end the homeless cycle. Volunteers work four hours a week and can choose a day between Tuesday and Friday, 1–5 p.m.To volunteer,call 541269-5017 or email gospelmission2@frontier.com.

Care quilts raffled Local quilters Mary Graham, Betty Means, Shirley Lee, Dottie Tucker and Sandy Collins are raffling off a quilt to purchase more supplies for the Care Quilt project. The group meets every Wednesday at the Coquille Valley Art Center to work on projects. Anyone

O OPEN PEN H HOUSE OUSE

R E P O R T S interested in learning more about quilting or seeking help on a current project, is invited to drop by between 10 a.m. and noon. Each March the Coquille Valley Quilters hold a oneday, community-wide Quilta-thon to produce small quilts that are given to the Court Appointed Special Advocates program and to the Sheriff’s Department. The quilts are then given to children. This quilt was pieced by Nancy Bartlett and the quilting was done by Shirley Lee. Tickets are available at the Art Center, Woof and Warp and The Emporium in Coquille. The group will fill the walls of the art center with colorful handmade quilts during the month of October. The public is invited to drop bybetween 10 a.m. and 3 p.m. weekdays or attend the open house 10

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a.m.-4 p.m. Oct. 19. The raffle quilt will be on display and tickets may be purchased then. The raffle will end Dec. 7 when the art center holds its holiday open house.

Poker run for all The North Bend High School Booster Club will hold a Poker Run from 9:30-11 a.m. Oct. 19 at Highway 101 Harley-Davidson, 536 S. Second St., Coos Bay. High hand will have a $150 cash prize. Cost is $20 per person to enter. Stops will be at local businesses around town where players will collect up to seven cards for their poker hand and head back at Highway 101 Harley-Davidson. If the weather is bad, and participants don't want to do the run, they may purchase their entire hand. Additional poker cards will be available for $5. Following the poker run there will be fall festivities and fundraisers for various other charities. The Booster Club will be selling raffle tickets to win a new HarleyDavidson. North Bend High School Culinary Program will have a dessert fundraiser, and Mr. Bulldog contestants will be selling 50-50 drawing tickets. Registration will take place 9-9:30 a.m. For more information, contact North Bend Booster Club Secretary Julie Reed at 541-290-1270 or by email at mjareed_3@charter.net.

Judge questions sending suspect to mother’s house ■

BY THOMAS MORIARTY The World

COOS BAY — A 23-yearold attempted murder suspect had his first postindictment hearing Wednesday in Coos County Circuit Court. Gerald Boone’s attorney, Ronald Cox, asked Judge Richard Baron to release Boone into the custody of his mother, who lives in Coos Bay. Baron said he would need proof that Boone would be under responsible adult supervision — and without any access to firearms — before he could consider his release. A grand jury had indicted Gerald Boone of attempted murder, five counts of unlawful use of a weapon and five counts of menacing. According to a probable cause statement filed by the Myrtle Point Police Department, Boone was arrested after officers were sent to a reported shooting in the parking lot of McKay’s

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market the evening of Oct. 7. A woman told officers that an intoxicated Boone had drawn a weapon and fired at her head after she refused to give him a ride out of town. He is also alleged to have brandished the gun at other people, including three teenagers. Coos County Assistant District Attorney Sarah Lundstedt described the victims as casual bystanders. “They were people that happened to be in front of McKay’s and Highway 42 when he was drunk and had a firearm,” she said. Officers found .40-caliber pistol rounds in Boone’s pockets, and a High Point semi-automatic pistol in the alley where he was arrested at gunpoint. If convicted on the attempted murder charge, Boone could face a minimum of seven years in prison under Measure 11 sentencing guidelines. Reporter Thomas Moriarty can be reached at 541-269-1222, ext. 240, or by email at thomas.moriarty@theworldlink.com . Follow him on Twitter: @ThomasDMoriarty.

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Completely remodeled home, large windows, newer roof, new electrical, new flooring. Comfortable and inviting home, lots of room for garden. Hillside setting with valley view, located across from greenbelt on quiet dead end street. Nice garage/shop. Appliances included in sale, including washer, dryer, stove and refrigerator.

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Thursday,October 17,2013 • The World • A3

South Coast

Weekend

Coming Saturday

Executive Editor Larry Campbell • 541-269-1222, ext. 251

theworldlink.com/news/local

GO! SEE RED

GO! TO THE CHAIR EXHIBIT

GO! HELP KIDS GET A RIDE

Simply Red exhibit at Pacific Park Gallery

Chair-ity event for N2N

Bikes for Tyles fundraiser

WSRC asks for donated items TODAY Mahaffy Pumpkin Patch noon5 p.m., Mahaffy’s, 10362 Highway 241, Coos Bay. Meet and Greet CONNECT the Boardwalk 5:30-8 p.m. North Bend Public Library, 1800 Sherman Ave., North Bend. Support Coos Waterfront Walkway. mzconnect@charter.net or 541-297-5101 Interesting Langlois 6 p.m., Langlois Public Library, 48234 U.S. Highway 101, Langlois. Presentation by Anne Guerin.

FRIDAY Coffee for a Cause 5 a.m.-8:30 p.m., The Human Bean, 62993 U.S. Highway 101, Coos Bay and The Human Bean, 1509 Virginia Ave., North Bend. Proceeds go toward women's health services at Coos County Public Health. Mahaffy Pumpkin Patch 10 a.m.-6 p.m., Mahaffy’s, 10362 Highway 241-Coos River, Coos Bay. Friends of Mingus Park 1 p.m. Moncia’s Coastal Gourmet Coffee and Bakery, 273 Curtis Ave., Coos Bay. Help keep park wildlife safe and healthy. 541-888-9728 Walk-in Shot Clinic 1-4 p.m., Lakeside Lions Club, 890 Bowron Road., Lakeside. Flu and whooping cough vaccines. Prices will vary depending on coverage. Some insurance billing will be available. Bring insurance cards. 541-756-2020 For the Birds Exhibition Reception 5-7 p.m., Coos Art Museum, 235 Anderson Ave., Coos Bay. Coos Art Museum will be featuring For the Birds: Bird Art in its Uno Richter Atrium Gallery. 541267-3901. Alive After Five Art Walk 5-7 p.m., Art by the Sea Gallery and Studio, Continuum Building, 175 Second St., Suite C, Bandon. Featured artist: David Woof. Presentation begins at 6 p.m. The Gary

Robertson Trio will play and refreshments will be provided by Pacific Blues. “Twentieth Century” 7 p.m. The Dolphin Playhouse, 580 Newmark Ave., Coos Bay. General admission, $10 and seniors or students, $8. 541808-2611

SATURDAY NBHS Booster Club Poker Run 9 a.m., Harley-Davidson 101, 536 S. Second St., Coos Bay. Registration 9-9:30 a.m. Anyone is welcome, vehicle or not. Cost is $20. Additional cards, $5 or purchase your entire hand. Winning hand, $150. Following the poker run, 11 a.m.-2 p.m. fall festivities and other fundraiser events for various NBHS organizations. 541-290-1270 Holiday Lights Volunteers Stringing 10-3 p.m., Shore Acres State Park, 89309 Cape Arago Highway, Charleston. New volunteers call 541-7565401. Quilters Open House 10 a.m.-3 p.m., Coquille Valley Art Center, 10144 state Highway 42, Coquille. Mahaffy Pumpkin Patch 10 a.m.-6 p.m., Mahaffy’s, 10362 Highway 241-Coos River, Coos Bay. Harvest Party noon-2 p.m., Coos Bay Public Library, 525 Anderson Ave., Coos Bay. Fun activities, pumpkin decorating and treats. No Lazy Kates 1 p.m., Wool Company, 990 U.S. Highway 101, Bandon. Yarn projects welcome. 541-347-3115 Oregon Oldtime Fiddlers, District 5 1-3 p.m., Winchester Bay Community Center, 625 Broadway, Winchester Bay. Featured musician, Dawn Vonderlin. Circle jam follows 3-4 p.m. 541-759-3419 Sara Lea Pisan Booksigning 1:30 p.m., Books By the Bay, 1875 Sherman Ave., North Bend. Author of Sarah’s Story, Target of a Serial Killer.

What’s Up features one-time events and limited engagements in The World’s coverage area. To submit an event, email events@theworldlink.com.

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Items for ‘Bless Your Heart’ bags accepted till Nov. 8 ■

October marks the second annual collection to fill Maria’s handmade “Bless Your Heart” bags. “The bags are an invaluable resource when we welcome women and their families as they start new lives.” Hallie Espinosa of the Women’s Safety and Resource Center said. Contributed photo Each bag holds deodorant, Jan Kerbo watches Maria Neill stitch another “Bless Your Heart” bag for shampoo, conditioner, a hair

the Women’s Safety and Resource Center.

brush, toothbrush, toothpaste, socks, soap or body wash, a washcloth, feminine hygiene products and disposable razors. Donations, including bright cotton print fabric, may be dropped off at the Electric Hospital, 988 S. Broadway Ave., Coos Bay, through Nov. 8. Instructions for making bags can be found at http://www.electrichospital.com/. More information about the Women’s Safety and Resource Center can be found at the center’s website, http://www.womensafety.org/.


A4 • The World • Thursday, October 17,2013

Editorial Board Jeff Precourt, Publisher Larry Campbell, Executive Editor

Opinion

Les Bowen, Digital Editor Ron Jackimowicz, News Editor

theworldlink.com/news/opinion

Making a reasoned decision on fish Our view Science — not politics or practicality — should dictate fisheries policy.

What do you think? The World welcomes letters. Email us at letters@theworldlink.com.

What would you get if you mixed a feral dog with a wolf in the wild? What would the offspring be like? And what if you did that again and again and again . . . That’s basically what state fish biologists and fishery user groups are arguing about, and will be until the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife Commission makes a decision early next year whether to curb or curtail salmon hatcheries. Biologists are concerned about breeding between hatchery fish and wild stocks. Lots of research suggests the mingling produces

a strain of wild offspring that are less hardy. That means human intervention – the hatchery – has harmed the natural species. Of course, there’s research that says just the opposite. That’s why user groups, such as the South Coast Angler’s Salmon Trout Enhancement Program (S.T.E.P.) are troubled by the hatchery shut-down proposals being considered. “That’s the whole problem,” South Coast Anglers S.T.E.P. President Bruce Bertrand told us earlier this week. “They say there’s a chance it might cause a

problem. But where’s the science to back it up?” There are other reasons the group is concerned, too, starting with an estimated $4.6 million per year that salmon and steelhead harvests bring to South Coast communities, according to the visitor promotional organization Travel Oregon. A quite different concern comes from fisheries biologist James Lichatowich. He’s studied salmon for 40 years and recently published “Salmon, People, and Place: A Biologist’s Search for Salmon Recovery.” Lichatowich sees validity

in the state’s plans to restrict mixing of wild and hatchery stocks. The plan calls for establishing strict ratios of wild versus hatchery stock in the rivers. But he thinks the state’s plan falls short because there’s no clear plan to evaluate the health of the salmon after the hatcheries are closed. “Basically, we’re trying to get by on the cheap,” Lichatowich told us. Our concern is that once again in the conflict between conservation and desire to use the land may come down to politics and practicality, not science.

More abortion not the answer This January, we will mark 41 years of the Supreme Court’s decision to legalize abortion.Just this year,we heard gruesome,inhumane details from a Philadelphia abortion clinic, though the mainstream media had to be shamed into covering the trial of Kermit Gosnell, the abortionist behind that tragic house of horrors. And now, California has an answer to the Gosnell problem: Increased access to abortion. Non-doctors — nurses, midwives and physicians’ assistants — are now legal abortion providers in California; the Early Access to Abortion Bill allows them to perform a certain kind of first-trimester abortion. While advocates of the bill dismiss reasonable concerns,Dr.Elissa Sanchez-Speach worries: “Supporters of this bill are missing the point. If we truly want to see (fewer) abortions ... we need to (provide) better support for women to bear children and raise their families.” While the California move has been suggested as a remedy to the Gosnells of the world, the conscience of a nation demands a deeper reflection. “Lowering medical professionalism is precisely what produced Kermit Gosnell,” J.D. Mullane, a local Pennsylvania reporter who sat in on the Gosnell trial points out. Gosnell was providing an increasingly unpopular procedure. The state did KATHRYN not act on health-inspecLOPEZ tion violations, “and so Gosnell was able to have a Columnist 15-year-old kid, and other marginally trained staff, administer powerful sedatives and birth-inducing drugs.” During a year when the president of the United States called upon God himself to bless the work of Planned Parenthood, the organization’s advocacy arm assures us that the new law “reaffirms California’s leadership on women’s health issues as anti-choice legislation sweeps the nation.” This new law isn’t about women’s health, but old-school abortion politics. Kristan Hawkins, executive director of Students for Life, calls California’s abortionexpansion moves “a slap in the face to women across America.” Women and their health deserve better. Susanne Metaxas, of the Midtown Pregnancy Support Center in New York City, worries that the California move “preys on the most vulnerable in society and creates a false impression of what an abortion is and minimizes the physical, spiritual and emotional consequences of an abortion.” Abortion exists because our culture believes it is necessary. Why does Planned Parenthood advocate for increased abortion access? Why would anyone believe that loosened standards would prevent more tragedies? Why is California considered a trailblazer for women’s health and safety? Because abortion makes certain lifestyles possible, and is easier than trying to overhaul culture and find better solutions for women, children and men, easier than expecting more of our families and our country. It’s ugly. It’s painful. So we try to look away. It’s even easier to look away in California now. Which is even more of a reason to refuse to do so. “The creation of the unlimited abortion license — at any time,for any reason — works to isolate women in their decision about abortion,” Clarke Forsythe writes in his new book on the history of Roe v.Wade,“Abuse of Discretion.” “Choice is the public mantra,” he continues, “autonomy is supposedly the principle, but the dark side of autonomy is isolation and loneliness.” That darkness is spreading, and it’s doing so in plain sight, under the aegis of law and government. Doctors are making choices about whether to be purveyors of a culture of death, while women too often feel they have no choice, the pressures of society being so greatly biased in favor of an abortion, a supposed quick fix. We must do better. Kathryn Lopez is the editor-at-large of National Review Online www.nationalreview.com. She can be contacted at klopez@nationalreview.com.

Public Forum Accept the cross for what it is Mr. Mayfield is right that the cross is a symbol of light; also, of truth. Scriptures are of value to believers but it is foolishness to unbelievers. If memory serves, the intent of the cross in this instance was not placed as a sign of Christianity so there may be another answer. As believers, we would like to hold up the cross exclusively for ourselves and this is the view taken by our detractors, but if it holds other meanings for other peoples that does not lessen the value to myself or other Christians. For some, the cross is simply a symbol for the many lives that have been lost in support of our great country and I believe this was the intent for this memorial, since this is the stated reason. From this view we can acknowledge that the cross can also have meaning for others. There are white crosses by the thousands on the graves in veteran cemeteries around the

world and they have been respected and honored by many people; believers and unbelievers; religious and irreligious. Why can we not accept the cross as it was intended and stop the polarization demanded by those persons who claim to be nonreligious? Ed Moon Myrtle Point

Who’s really pays the tax? The tax structure at both the State and Federal levels is complex and hard to understand, and there is one kind of tax that we all need to be paying a lot of attention to. I refer to the passthrough taxes that seem to be taxing somebody else, but which in reality, you pay. The corporate income tax is the leading example of this kind of tax. It looks like a tax on business but dig deeper to see who really pays it. Let’s say you are in business, making a product for sale to the public, something like a lawn

mower. It costs you money to manufacture, ship, advertise and sell this lawnmower you make. All of these costs affect the final price you set for the lawnmower, the price the consumer will pay. When you decide how much you will charge the consumer for the lawn mower, you will have to inflate the cost by about 5 percent to cover income tax. So who really pays this tax? This is the sad fact of life — no company is going to sell their product for the cost to make it and go broke paying the taxes on it. Quite simply, they pass these taxes on to the next level of purchaser. In the end, that is YOU. The “Obamacare” medical device tax is in the news a lot as of late. This is another passthrough tax. A pernicious one. Let’s say you make a metal knee joint replacement, and out of a sense of generosity and civic duty you decide to sell them at cost and make no profit whatsoever. You sell a million dollars worth to clinics that serve the disadvantaged. This new tax means you have to give the Fed-

Write to us The World welcomes your letter. Write to letters@theworldlink.com, or P.O. Box 1840, Coos Bay, 97420. ■ Please use your real name. ■ 400 words maximum. ■ No defamation, vulgarity, business complaints, poetry or religious testimony. ■ Please list your address and daytime phone for verification.

eral Government 2.3 percent of that million dollars, or $23,000. It is a targeted sales tax, something the government would love to expand. And who pays it? YOU when you need a new knee joint, YOU when you pay for healthcare insurance that covers the cost of knee joint replacement. The next time you are asked to tax somebody else to fund the state or federal government, take a good look at it. You are probably voting to increase your own taxes. Ted Hunt North Bend

The $3.5 million question “I don’t think $3.5 million is a heck of a lot of money,” Justice Antonin Scalia opined during arguments before the Supreme Court about whether there should be limits on how much money individuals can give to candidates for federal office. Current law limits the total amount an individual can give to candidates and party committees to $123,200; of that amount, a maximum of $48,600 ($2,600 per candidate) can go directly to those running for federal office. Shaun McCutcheon brought suit arguing that under the First Amendment he should be allowed to give more — and depending on which side you believe, more might be as much as $3.5 million per two-year cycle. And even though billions get spent in campaigns, that is still a lot of money. Congress imposed limits on campaign contributions back in 1974, in the wake of Watergate. The Supreme Court upheld most of those limits on the grounds that allowing unlimited contributions could lead to corruption. And it most certainly can. As

anyone who has held a senior position in a campaign knows, big donations buy influence. The candidate may or may not switch his SUSAN p o s i t i o n ESTRICH because a big donor asks, Columnist but they’ll certainly get an audience. When I was running campaigns, I kept a list of the big donors in my top drawer. I took their calls. I listened. As Justice Elena Kagan put it, big donors get “a very, very special place at the table.” But here’s the problem. In principle, I believe candidates should not be for sale. In principle, I believe Congress has a compelling interest in at least trying to limit the corrupting influence of money in politics. In practice, every campaign is in the loophole business, and thanks to the current Supreme Court, and especially its 2010 decision in Citizens United,

which lifted all limits on what corporations and unions can spend, that business has gotten both bigger and easier. In the last cycle, sophisticated donors were able to set up special committees that allowed for unlimited spending — without even disclosing publicly who was behind the spending. While some of these committees, in theory, operated independently of the candidate’s campaign, that’s a joke, as well. You don’t have to be a rocket scientist to figure out how to help a candidate you support, and, believe me, candidates know about and are grateful for such help. The saddest part of Tuesday’s argument before the court was not that a majority of justices appeared skeptical of the limits, or even that if these aggregate limits are thrown out, the limits on contributing to an individual campaign (the $2,600 limit) may be the next to go. No, the saddest part was that absent fundamental change in the constitutional framework — that is, limits on everyone, including all the supposed grassroots and/or inde-

pendent committees — it may not matter. My friend and law partner Kathleen Sullivan has argued for years in favor of disclosure of contributions and spending, rather than trying to impose other limits. And for years, I’ve responded that of course disclosure should be required (under the latest loophole, even that has been avoided), but contributor lists are at most a one-day story, and disclosure alone is a license for corruption. So, my argument went, even ineffective, partial and loophole-ridden limitations are better than no limitations at all. I continue to hope that is true. But if inadequate regulation is still better than none at all, the fact is that it is not much better. However the court rules, the political arms race, as journalist Elizabeth Drew described it years ago, is spiraling out of control, and I’m not sure anyone knows how to stop it, at least absent fundamental changes in the court.


Thursday, October 17,2013 • The World • A5

State Firm limits on cellphone use should curb girl’s compulsion DEAR ABBY: I am upset with myself for getting my granddaughter the cellphone she begged me for. I wish the phone companies would put restrictions on them. I wondered why she was feeling tired in the mornings until I caught her on the phone at 4 a.m.She can’t get dressed in the morning because she’s texting every two minutes. When her friend, who she was always very active with, came over, the girl DEAR wound up watching a movie with me because my granddaughter would not stop texting in her bedroom. She wasn’t like JEANNE until she PHILLIPS this got this new boyfriend, and he must have no life at all. Should I talk to his parents? It is consuming her life, morning, noon and night. I have told her she can’t have the phone until her homework is done. — FRUSTRATED GRANDMA IN NORTH CAROLINA D E A R G R A N D M A : You shouldn’t expect the phone company to decide what is acceptable in your home.As the adult in your household, it’s up to you to assert control. If your granddaughter lives with you, by all means talk to the boyfriend’s parents about this. But equally important, enforce cellphone limits. If you think she can’t be trusted not to use it after lights-out, see that she gives you her phone at bedtime. In the morning, return it to her once she’s dressed and ready for school. And when she invites friends over, make sure she understands it is HER responsibility — not yours — to entertain them, because what she did was rude. DEAR ABBY: I have met a darling man I’m compatible with in every way.We have similar tastes in just about everything from decorating and landscaping to entertainment. My problem is his past.From what he says,he has never had a monogamous relationship, even during his marriage. After the divorce he pursued anything female. When we are out at a club or a concert, I constantly encounter women he has been with.He tells me he is happy for the first time in his life and he would never cheat on me. I have never been the jealous type, and I’m really not now. I just don’t want to be the woman everyone is laughing at because they know his history. As I said, we are content and happy, but I need to move past this or move on, I guess. — THE CURRENT WOMAN DEAR CURRENT WOMAN: You say this “darling” man has never had a monogamous relationship — before, during or after his marriage. Therefore, the odds aren’t great that he’ll have one with you. It’s time to ask yourself (not me) if you would be willing to tolerate his fooling around if you were his wife. Some women — the wives of attractive or powerful men — are open-minded about it if their husbands are discreet. The real question is, are you? DEAR ABBY: I wrote to you three years ago about throwing parties on unique days, such as 7-7-07, 9-9-09, etc., and you printed my letter. Well, I’m still at it, even though the special numbers have run out.I planned a brunch on 11-11-11. Everyone who attended chipped in $11 apiece. The money that was left over I donated to a hunger program. Twelve of us met for lunch at noon on 12-12-12, and this time each person paid — guess how much -- $12. This year, we’ll be having brunch at 10:00 on 11-12-13, and I’m already planning ahead for next year’s celebration, which will be on 12-13-14 at 1500 hours.Any suggestions? — CLAIRE (AGAIN) IN BETHLEHEM, PA. DEAR CLAIRE: You appear to be a fun,clever woman with a zest for life. And yes, I do have a suggestion. How about making next year’s celebration a tea with a holiday theme? After all, “‘tis the season,” and any leftover money could be donated to a children’s charity.

ABBY

Woodshop ember sparks brief UO building fire EUGENE (AP) — Fire officials in Eugene say students were briefly evacuated from Lawrence Hall on the University of Oregon campus after an ember caused a fire in the building’s exterior duct work system. Fire Capt. Ray Smith tells The Register-Guard that the Wednesday night fire apparently started with a student using a router to cut a piece of wood in a woodshop. Smith says a dust collection system apparently sucked up a spark or ember that then floated onto exterior heating and ventilation duct work.

Dingfelder leaving Legislature PORTLAND (AP) — State Sen. Jackie Dingfelder is resigning from the Legislature to take a job as senior policy director for

Portland Mayor Charlie Hales. The mayor said in a statement Wednesday that Dingfelder will bring expertise in areas such as planning, the environment and social justice. Dingfelder, a Democrat, was appointed to the Oregon House of Representatives in 2001 and was elected to the Senate seven years later. She starts her new job in November.

Bigham named Teacher of the Year PORTLAND (AP) — A Portland special education teacher has been named Oregon’s Teacher of the Year. Brett Bigham teaches a life skills class for older special needs students, helping them transition from school into the real world.

STATE

Explosive pest control device in classroom

D I G E S T

NEWPORT (AP) — A Lincoln County sheriff’s officer says an explosive that a teacher found in a classroom at the junior-senior high school in Toledo, turned out to be a commercially made pest-control device. Sgt. Adam Shanks says students and staff were temporarily evacuated Wednesday after the teacher reported the discovery. With the help of the Oregon State Police bomb squad, deputies were able to confirm that the item was what’s called an Explosive Pest Control Device, also known as a “seal bomb.” It was safely removed. No other explosive devices were found. The federal Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives says the

Rob Saxton, the deputy superintendent of Oregon schools, announced the award Wednesday, saying Bigham is a master teacher and an incredibly caring individual. Bigham describes his job is part teacher, part parent and part social worker. In a given class, he may work with one student who can do algebra, and another who has trouble counting to five. But his work extends beyond numbers and letters. Bigham, for example, created a daytime prom for special needs students who can’t attend nighttime events. In his free time, he hand-made 70 corsages so every girl would have flowers.

devices are used to minimize crop damage and interference from pests, birds and seals in such areas as landfills, farmlands and fishing areas.

Police kill injured cougar in S. Ore. town TALENT (AP) — Police in the small southern Oregon community of Talent have killed a cougar that was spotted twice in one day and appeared to be severely injured. The Ashland Daily Tidings reports that the big cat was spotted Tuesday near two apartment complexes. On the second call, witnesses said the animal was leaning against a house. Sgt. Jennifer Snook says police responded and saw that the animal’s hindquarters were bloodied and scraped, possibly from being hit by a car.

Obituaries

Kathleen Ansbro

Kathleen Mary Ansbro June 6, 1935 - Oct.12, 2013

An urnside committal will be held for Kathleen Mary Ansbro, 78, of North Bend at 1:30 p.m. on Friday, Oct. 18, at Ocean View Memory Gardens, 1525 Ocean Blvd., in

Dorothy Dean Mason Feb. 7, 1933 - Oct. 10, 2013

Our beloved mother, Dorothy Dean Mason, 80, of Myrtle Point, passed away peacefully at her home Thursday, Oct. 10, 2013, surrounded by her family. Dorothy was born Feb. 7, 1933, in Hood River, to Arnold Leroy Lambert and Dolly Elaine Eisele. She met the love of her life, Curtis Dean Mason Sr., in Powers, where Dean was working for the railroad and Dorothy was working as a waitress in the Powers Café. They married Oct. 15, 1949. They lived for a short time in Cottage Grove before putting down roots in Myrtle Point, where Dean worked as a telegrapher for the railroad. They lived in Myrtle Point for more 50 years before retiring in Gold Beach. Dorothy worked for several years at the veterinary offices in Myrtle Point, first with Dr. Whittaker and then with Dr. Haug. In June 1965, Dean and Dot purchased a former small grocery store building on Main Street from Emma Schneider and Lena Warner. That building became the original insurance and tax business of C. D. Mason Agency where Dean and Dot worked for more than 40 years before transitioning the business to their son, Ronald Mason, and daughter-in-law, Judy, in 2002. Dorothy enjoyed travel-

Coos Bay with Father Robert Wolf of Saint Monica Catholic Church officiating. Kathy was born June 6, 1935,in Dublin,Ireland to John and Mary Fenlon. She passed away Oct. 12, 2013, at home with her family by her side. On March 26, 1955 Kathy married the love of her life James “Jim” Christopher Ansbro in Edmonton, England. In 1962, they immigrated to the United States, landing in Portland where they learned and mastered the trade of making pizza. In 1967 Jim and Kathy settled their family in North Bend and opened Gino’s Pizza. Kathy was an intricate part of the family business for the next 39 years. Gino’s was the eatery of choice for many local families. Kathy was a loving wife, mother, grandmother and friend. She will be missed,

but not forgotten by the many who knew her. She is survived by her sons, Stephen and Kevin Ansbro of North Bend; and daughter, Jacqueline Mashburn of St. Croix, U.S. Virgin Island. She was preceded in death by her parents, John and Mary Fenlon; husband, James “Jim” Christopher Ansbro; and granddaughter, Audrey Ansbro. The family suggests memorial contributions be made to the American Cancer Society, Coos County Unit, 36 West 6th St., Medford, OR 97501. Arrangements are under the care of Coos Bay Chapel, 541-267-3131. Friends and family are encouraged to sign the online guest book at www.coosbayareafunerals.com and www.theworldlink.com.

ling the world with her husband Dean. They were fortunate to be able to visit several different countries during their lifetime, as well as travel across and around the United States. They also enjoyed many wonderful years on the Hilo side of the big island in Hawaii where they established lifelong friendships with many individuals. Dorothy was a warm, giving soul who brought love into our lives and surrounded us all with her gracious hospitality. She was her happiest when surrounded by family and friends and having her babies to cuddle. She welcomed them all with open arms and her love for them never waivered. She enjoyed many family Christmas gatherings, Easters watching grandchildren and then great-grandchildren hunting for Easter eggs, family gatherings at Powers Park, annual family camping trips at Huntley Park on the Rogue River, and many family camp-outs at the cabins in Lakeside eating freshly caught seafood. She especially enjoyed all the boat rides on the Rogue River and around Lakeside. One of her favorite things to do when family got together, was to sit down in the evenings and play pinochle with her “boys.” She also enjoyed going to garage sales with the girls and playing at the casinos, as well as all the girl trips to Hawaii.

Dorothy was a den mother in Cub Scouts for several years, active in her church and the church social life, a volunteer counselor at several church camps, and always lending a helping hand with many community and civic functions. She loved to crochet and do crafts and her delicate handiwork is treasured by all who were gifted with those items. Dorothy is survived by her children, Ronald Mason and wife, Judy of Myrtle Point, Eleanor (Mason) Kistner of Camas Valley, Curtis Mason of Milwaukee, and Mark Mason and wife, Vickie of Myrtle Point; 10 grandchildren; 16 great-grandchildren; brothers and sisters, Richard Lambert and wife, Patricia of Eugene, Robert Lambert and wife, Linda of Oak Ridge, Louis Lambert of Portland, and Judy McCulloch Kinyon and husband, Bob of Sutherlin. She was preceded in death by her husband, Curtis Dean Mason Sr. who passed away Aug. 31, 2009; her parents; two sisters, Shirley Holtti and Anita Erickson; and two brothers, Arnold Lambert Jr. and Charles Nelson Lambert. A celebration of life is planned for 1 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 26, at the Oaks Pavillion Building, Myrtle Point Fairgrounds in Myrtle Point. Food and refreshments to follow. Sign the guestbook at www.theworldlink.com.

2013, in North Bend. Arrangements are pending with North Bend Chapel, 541-756-0440. Joseph N. Brent — 60,

of Coos Bay, passed away Oct. 16, 2013, in Coos Bay. Arrangements are pending with Coos Bay Chapel, 541267-3131.

Death Notices Frederick “Fritz” K. Russell — 86, of Bandon, died Oct. 15, 2013, in Bandon. Arrangements are pending with Coos Bay Chapel, 541-267-3131. Tom J. Main — 65, of Coos Bay, died Oct. 16, 2013, in Coos Bay. Arrangements are pending with Coos Bay Chapel, 541267-3131. Gary Angeloff — 54, of Aumsville, died Sept. 24, 2013, in Aumsville. Arrangements are pending with Crown Memorial, 503581-6265. Penny Jo Selfors — 58, of North Bend, died Oct. 15,

Funeral Saturday, Oct. 19 Gayle C. Bultmann, celebration of life, 1-3 p.m., Coos Bay Eagles Hall, 568 S. Second St.

Cecilia C. Pena Nov. 25, 1947 - Oct. 10, 2013

A funeral Mass will be held for Cecilia C. Pena, 65, of North Bend at 10 a.m. Saturday, Oct. 19, at Holy Redeemer Catholic Church, 2250 16th St., in North Bend with Father Graham officiating. Cremation rites were held at Ocean View Crematory in Coos Bay. Cecilia was born Nov. 25, 1947, in Lodi, Calif., to German Castro and Martha Hernandez. She passed away at Oct. 10, 2013, at home in North Bend. She graduated from Pittsburg Senior High School in 1965. Cecilia was married to Edward A. Pena for 46 years. They had met and lived in Pittsburg, Calif., all

Jane M. Muffett April 3, 1953 - Oct. 12, 2013

A celebration of life service will be held for Jane M. Muffett, 60, a resident of the North Bend community at 1 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 19, at Beautiful Savior Lutheran Church, 2160 Elm Ave., in Reedsport with Pastor Quintin Cundiff officiating. Family and friends are welcome to stay for a luncheon reception following the service. Private cremation rites have been held. J a n e M a r i e Muffett was Jane Muffett born April 3, 1953, in Silverton, to Lloyd and Sylvia Kruse Bystrom. She died Oct. 12, 2013, at her home surrounded by her loving family. She was raised and educated in Molalla, having graduated from Molalla High School. Jane received an associate degree in nursing from Lane Community College in 1976 and in 1997 earned her second associate degree in accounting from Southwestern Oregon Community College. Jane was united in marriage to Dean Muffett June 9, 1973, at the Grace Lutheran Church in Molalla. Together they celebrated 40 years of life together and raised two daughters and one son. Over the years they made their home in Eugene, Richland, Wash., and most recently North Bend. Jane worked at Briggs & Thompson and Menasha in

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their lives until retiring to North Bend in 2009. She was a preschool teacher with the Pittsburg Unified School District for 28 years. Cecilia was active in her parish at Holy Redeemer Catholic Church and enjoyed painting and traveling. Cecilia is survived by her husband, Edward Pena of North Bend; daughter, Maria Elena Pena of Portland; son, Jason Pena of Antioch, Calif.; 10 grandchildren; five greatgrandchildren; three sisters; and two brothers. Arrangements are under the direction of North Bend Chapel, 541-756-0440. Sign the guestbook at www.coosbayareafunerals.co m and www.theworldlink.com. the accounting departments. She also worked at the Bay Area Hospital on the nursing staff. She was very active in her community attending the Beautiful Savior Lutheran Church where she served as the treasurer. She was a past president of the Coos/Curry Chapter of the Oregon Small Woodlands Association. Among her personal interests she loved cooking. Her favorites were homemade potato-leek soup and ice cream. Jane enjoyed gardening, photography and spending time with her family. Jane was a wonderful wife, mother, sister, grandmother and friend. She was cherished by her family and friends, and will be missed by all who knew her. Jane is survived by her husband, Dean; son, Leif Muffett Coos Bay; two daughters and sons-in-law, Anna and Jason Warner of North Bend and Beth and Aaron Real of Bandon; brothers, David and Dorothy Bystrom of Westerville, Ohio and Dale and Julie Bystrom of Molalla; and her grandchildren, Everitt, Ella, Calvin and Chris. Services entrusted to Dunes Memorial Chapel, 541-271-2822. Sign the guestbook at www.theworldlink.com. The World publishes death notices and service listings as a free public service. Obituaries and “Card of Thanks” items are supplied by families or funeral homes and are published for a fee. For details, contact Amanda at ajohnson@theworldlink.com, or 541-269-1222 ext. 269.

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A6 •The World • Thursday, October 17,2013

Nation Facebook puts seldomused data in ‘cold storage’

Obama health target: 500,000 signups by Oct. 3

PRINEVILLE (AP) — The newest addition to Facebook’s data center campus is all about cold storage. But it has nothing to do with temperature. For Facebook, cold storage means data that’s no longer in high demand. Think billions of photos added around the world, since Facebook created the photo upload The Associated Press feature in October 2005. Chuck Goolsbee, site director for Facebook’s Prineville data centers, shows the computer servers that store Many of them haven’t users’ photos and other data at the Facebook site in Prineville on Tuesday. been accessed in months or years. But they have to go its Prineville site. stored, said Chuck Goolsbee, square-foot cold storage somewhere. Facebook users upload 350 site director for the building would be able to Last week, the social hold thousands of petabytes media giant started operating million photos every day, Prineville data centers. That makes separate stor- of data, Goolsbee said. Geta cold storage facility next to Michael Kirkland, a commuits two 338,000-square-foot nications manager for the age for older photos crucial. ting it to capacity should take company, said during a tour “Our whole focus here is several years, he said. Prineville data centers. of the cold storage building on minimizing the use of The company could also The cold storage building add two additional wings to will allow Facebook to store Tuesday. Users have added energy,” Goolsbee said. Shifting old photos to the the cold storage building as old photos and data from its about 250 billion photos since Facebook started allowing cold storage servers frees up the first wing nears capacity, 1.15 billion users on separate its other servers to handle the adding 32,000 square feet of servers from hot data, new photo uploads, he said. More than 80 percent of new photos uploaded daily. space for servers in the comphotos and tags being added Less than a week into its ing years. daily and accessed frequently. Facebook’s online traffic Facebook officials The result is far lower centers around just 9 percent operation, the cold storage of the total photos being facility is already storing declined to disclose the total energy costs for Facebook at nine petabytes of user data. cost of the cold storage projThat’s equal to nearly 9.7 bil- ect. Permits issued by Crook lion megabytes. A typical County put the project cost uploaded photo ranges from for the first wing at $6.8 mil2 to 10 megabytes. lion, including mechanical When it’s full, the 16,000- and electrical work.

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WASHINGTON (AP) — For the first month alone, the Obama administration projected that nearly a half million people would sign up for the new health insurance markets, according to an internal memo obtained by The Associated Press. But that was before the markets opened to a cascade of computer problems. If the glitches persist and frustrated consumers give up trying, that initial goal, described as modest in the memo, could slip out of reach. The Sept. 5 memo, for Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius, lists monthly enrollment targets for each state and Washington, D.C., through March 31, the last day of the initial open enrollment period under President Barack Obama’s health care overhaul. The new online insurance markets, called exchanges in some states, are supposed to be the portals to coverage for most of the nation’s nearly 50 million uninsured people. Middle-class people without job-based coverage can shop for subsidized private plans, while low-income people are steered to an expanded version of Medicaid in states that have agreed to expand that safety net program. Although the Oct. 1 launch of the markets was a top priority for the White House, the rollout was quickly overwhelmed by computer problems, and many potential customers still have not been able to enroll. Insurers say signups are coming through, but slowly. A surge of interest by consumers going online appeared to trigger the problems, which also seem to involve underlying software flaws and design shortcom-

ings undetected or overlooked in testing. The administration is holding the explanation close, while working feverishly to fix the glitches — with incomplete results so far. In the memo, officials estimated that 494,620 people would sign up for health insurance under the program by Oct. 31. And that was portrayed as a slow start. “We expect enrollment in the initial months to be low,” said the memo titled “Projected Monthly Enrollment Targets for Health Insurance Marketplaces in 2014.” A big jump was expected after Thanksgiving, since Dec. 15 is the last day people can sign up so their coverage will take effect Jan. 1. Starting in the new year, the health care law requires virtually all Americans to have insurance or face fines.At the same time, insurance companies will be forbidden from turning away people in poor health. The memo projected enrollment would reach 3.3 million nationally by Dec. 31. Signups were expected to spike again in March, as procrastinators noticed the approaching end of open enrollment season. “We anticipate a surge of enrollment in December and March,” the memo said. By the end of March, total enrollment through the markets was expected to surpass 7 million, an estimate originally from the nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office and then used by the administration as the foundation for its projections. With 15 days to go this month, the Obama administration has not released any enrollment numbers for the 36 states where the federal government is taking the lead in running the markets.

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Rare whale found dead in California LOS ANGELES (AP) — A rare whale that has a dolphin-shaped head and saber-like teeth has been found dead on Los Angeles’ Venice Beach, even though it prefers frigid subarctic waters. The roughly 15-foot-long female Stejneger’s beaked whale washed ashore Tuesday night, the Los Angeles Times reported. A truck hauled away the mammal, which was being examined at the Los Angeles County Natural History Museum to

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determine how it died. The Stejneger’s beaked whale is rarely seen in the wild. The species typically dives deep in subarctic waters to feed on squid and small fish. It is believed to migrate as far south as Northern California, and how the whale ended up so far south will probably remain a mystery. “This is the best,” said Nick Fash, an education specialist for the Santa Monicabased environmental group Heal the Bay. “(Previous finds) aren’t anything like this. This is a treat.” Males are known for their saber teeth that stick up midway from each side of the lower jaw. However, the teeth of females and their offspring remain hidden beneath the gum tissue. The whale was alive when it washed ashore, said Peter Wallerstein of Marine Animal Rescue. Its body was covered in bites from socalled cookie-cutter sharks that feed by gouging round pieces of flesh from larger animals. Because the species isn’t seen much anywhere, the autopsies of washed-up carcasses are the best source for scientists to gather information.


Thursday, October 17,2013 • The World • A7

Nation and World

WORLD

NSA and CIA collaborate on drone strikes

D I G E S T Five new members for UN Security Council

UNITED NATIONS (AP) — The U.N. General Assembly elects five new members to the Security Council on Thursday and the winners are virtually certain because there are no contested races WASHINGTON (AP) — newspaper said. — Nigeria, Chad, Saudi AraThe NSA created a secret The National Security bia, Lithuania and Chile. Agency has been extensively unit known as the CounterChad, Saudi Arabia and involved in the U.S. govern- Terrorism Mission Aligned Lithuania have never served ment’s targeted killing pro- Cell, or CT MAC, to concenon the U.N.’s most powerful gram, collaborating closely trate the agency’s vast body while Nigeria and Chile with the CIA in the use of resources on hard-to-find have both been on the coundrone strikes against terror- terrorism targets, the Post cil four times previously. ists abroad, The Washington reported. Security Council seats are The documents provided by Post reported after a review highly coveted because they The Associated Press of documents provided by Snowden don’t explain how give countries a strong voice former NSA systems analyst the bin Laden associate’s email in matters dealing with inter- Only 27 states require or allow epinephrine, a drug used to treat anaphylactic shock, to be available in was obtained or whether it was Edward Snowden. national peace and security, schools. In one instance, an email obtained through the controsuch as Syria, sanctions sent by the wife of an Osama versial NSA programs recently against Iran and North Korea bin Laden associate contained made public, including its and the U.N.’s far-flung clues as to her husband’s metadata collection of numpeacekeeping operations. whereabouts and led to a CIA bers dialed by nearly every The 15-member council drone strike that killed him in person in the United States. includes five permanent Instead, the Post said its Pakistan in October 2012, the members with veto power — Post reported in its online review of the documents the U.S., Russia, China, indicates that the agency edition Wednesday night. Britain and France — and 10 While citing documents depends heavily on highly nonpermanent members NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — When a third- ginia first-grader who had an allergic reaction provided by Snowden — the targeted network penetraelected for two-year terms. grade student who had been stung by a wasp on a playground after eating a nut. She went American is hiding out in Rus- tions to gather information developed welts on his neck and had trouble into cardiac arrest and died at a local hospital. sia after being granted asylum that wouldn’t otherwise be Syrian rebels claim Medical experts have said the little girl, breathing, school nurse Amanda Williams new split in opposition had the necessary dose of epinephrine to who had a peanut allergy, would probably be there — the Post reported that trapped in surveillance nets it was withholding many that the NSA has set at key BEIRUT (AP) — Several counter the allergic reaction. alive if her elementary school had been able details about the drone-strike Internet gateways. dozen rebel groups in southA law Tennessee enacted this year makes it to give her an epinephrine injection. The U.S. has never publicly missions at the request of U.S. ern Syria have broken with easier for schools to stock the life-saving “Epinephrine is the first line treatment for intelligence officials. They acknowledged killing bin the main political opposition drug. Williams said the emergency room doc- these severe reactions,” said Dr. Michael cited potential damage to Laden associate Hassan Ghul, group in exile, a local com- tor told the boy’s parents that he probably Pistiner, a pediatric allergist. “Studies show ongoing operations and according to the Post. The almander said in a video posted wouldn’t have survived without the injection that delays in treatment with epinephrine national security for their Qaida operative had been Wednesday, dealing a poten- at Tellico Plains Elementary because it’s a 30- increase risk of death.” captured in 2004 and helped request, the paper reported. tial new setback to Western minute drive to the nearest hospital. Shortly after the girl’s death, Virginia The documents make expose bin Laden’s courier efforts to unify moderates passed a law requiring all its schools to stock clear that the CIA-operated network, a key development “It would have been tragic,” she said. battling President Bashar Fifteen other states enacted similar laws in the medication. drone campaign relies heavi- in the effort to locate bin Assad’s regime. Fifteen other states followed suit, mostly ly on the NSA’s ability to vac- Laden. Ghul then spent two 2013, joining 11 others that already had them, The Turkey-based Syrian according to the Asthma and Allergy Founda- with legislation that allows schools to have uum up enormous quantities years in a secret CIA prison National Coalition, the polittion of America. While only four of the states the epinephrine. Bills are also pending in of email, phone calls and and returned to al-Qaida after ical arm of the Free Syrian other fragments of signals the U.S. sent him to his native require schools to have the medication on hand, Ohio and Michigan. Army rebel group, has long intelligence, or SIGINT, the Pakistan in 2006. Nebraska and Maryland, Virginia, far So it without a stock to schools allow all the laws struggled to win respect and Nevada are the only states to require it. prescription for an individual person — a legal recognition from the fighters. In July, the U.S. House passed legislation It is widely seen as cut off hurdle in many places — and provide legal prothat would give states that come up with poliit. administer who members for staff tection from events on the ground The most common form of the medication is cies to make epinephrine available in schools NEWARK, N.J. (AP) — defeating Republican Steve and ineffective in funneling aid and weapons to the rebels. packaged inside a device called an auto injector. special preference when they apply for asth- U.S. senator-elect Cory Lonegan. His win came after The rebel in the video said The tip of the device is placed firmly against the ma-related grants. The law could give states Booker said Thursday he’s an aggressive two-month ready to go to Washington race to finish the term of political opposition leaders thigh, which releases a short, spring activated further incentive to pass such laws. The bill was sponsored by Rep. Phil Roe, a and is not afraid if he “breaks Sen. Frank Lautenberg, who have failed to represent those needle that injects the epinephrine. Charlotte Collins is senior vice president of Tennessee Republican and doctor, and Rep. dishes” trying to serve his died in office in June at age trying to bring down Assad. public policy and advocacy for the allergy Steny Hoyer of Maryland, the House’s sec- constituents in New Jersey. 89. JPMorgan pays $100M foundation and has been keeping track of ond-ranked Democrat. One requirement for a Booker said he wants to Booker, 44, the Democrain $6B loss settlement which states are enacting laws to encourage state to qualify for a preference is to make sure tic mayor of Newark, made channel Americans’ frustraWASHINGTON (AP) — schools to stock the devices. She believes the adequate legal protection is provided to per- the rounds on the morning tion with Congress into JPMorgan Chase & Co. has trend was sparked by last year’s death of a Vir- sonnel trained to administer the epinephrine. talk shows a day after energy for change. agreed to pay a $100 million penalty and admitted that its traders acted “recklessly” during a series of London trades that ultimately cost the bank $6 billion. The settlement announced Wednesday by the Commod, ity Futures Trading Commisestern World nk, Bandon W Li ld or W . e sion comes less than a month ile Th Mob orld, MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — A The petition and other e & The World pear in The W after JPMorgan, the nation’s e World Onlin All ads will ap Th , 7 days 24/7 st ile Po ob 9-year-old who eluded air- statements by his father and ua M & dsport Umpq largest bank, agreed to pay Online 7 days . . . . ee . . . R . . . . . . . 14 days 24/7 . . ile ds port security and stowed officials over the past two days & Mob ,412 househol 14 e 44 lin = t On in . 24/7 . $920 million and admit fault . pr . . . . in . . . .. Mobile 21 days away on a flight from Min- weeks described an escalat1 week – 6 times print = 88,824 households... line 21 days & On . 24/7 . . . in a deal with the Securities . . ys in . . . da . es . . 24 tim ds 2 ol ile neapolis to Las Vegas should ing pattern of misbehavior 2 week –1 24 days & Mob 133,236 househ e = lin t in On . . pr . . . in . and Exchange Commission . . . . es . useholds. 3 week – 18 tim int = 177,648 ho A PHOTO) and other U.S. and British live away from his parents for since this summer. It started – 24 times in pr ek we PETS (INCLUDES 4 now while he and his family with running away and stayweek - $10.00 1 – regulators. G o o d – 3 lines get therapy and other servicHANDISE ITEM RC ing out overnight, suspenME 2 week - $12.00 The stunning trading ek - $5.00 B e t t e r – 4 lines – 3 weeks - $17.00 es, a judge ruled Wednesday. o d – 3 lines – 1 we o G g ) – 6 lines – sions from school for aggresn i x o b .00 s e $7 d losses that surfaced in April s inclu ( ek t s we e 2 B – es 0 $12.0 Hennepin County District sive behavior and other B e t t e r – 4 lin 6 lines –3 weeks ES PHOTO) 2012 shook the financial oto & boxing) – ENTALS (INCLUD B e s t (includes a ph Klein granted the Joseph Judge REAL ESTATE/R issues, and sneaking into a world and damaged JPMor.00 35 –$ L IN CLUDES PHOTO) 1 w e e k– 6 lines CAL CIAL 0 gan’s reputation. The CFTC county’s petition to declare the YWCA swimming pool. 5.0 GARAGE SALE (IN - $12.00 $4 – es lin 6 E – s 2 week 1 day SP LY! deal differs from the previ- boy a “child in need of protec- Then, on Oct. 1, he stole a G o o d – 4 lines – –$ 55.00 ON 2 days -$15.00 g ) –5 lines – 3 w e e k s – 6 lines tion or services, ” starting the (includes boxin r e t 0 t e .95 large delivery truck and dam0.0 B 59 $2 ous agreement because –$ ek es lin we 6 1 – – s es k e lin 4 we g) – 5 B e s t (includes boxin JPMorgan is formally protection process under court aged other vehicles, includUDES PHOTOS) ordered also He supervision. ing a squad car, as he drove acknowledging that its FREE ADS (INCL 4 lines – 1 week RS der $500 total – LE n AI u e TR for the boy therapy individual s i / d S n a AT h c r BO e / M ES traders recklessly distorted around town. The next day he week – Free AUTO / VEHICL P e t s - 4 lines – 1 ound & Found week $12.00 F 1 – Free – ek es prices to reduce the banks’ and family therapy for his par- went to the Minneapolis-St. lin we 3 1 0 – – d 5.0 es o Go es – 2 weeks $1 o s t P e t s – 4 lin L lin 6 & ents while county and school t – s o ) o L t o h p s e d u l 0 losses at the expense of other 5.0 Paul International Airport, B e t t e r (inc lines – 3 weeks $2 & b o x i n g) – 6 market participants. In the officials work with them to where he stole a bag off a lugB e s t (includes photo SEC agreement, JPMorgan determine what kind of help gage carousel, went to a ifieds admitted only that it failed to the boy needs. Klein also restaurant where he ordered k.com/class theworldlin granted the parents liberal vissupervise those traders. food and drinks, then said he According to the agency, itation privileges. had to go to the bathroom. He Exactly where the boy is JPMorgan traders in London left without paying and sold off $7 billion in deriva- staying was left unclear. The abandoned the bag. tives tied to a price index of judge and attorneys referred corporate bonds in one day — only to an “out-of-home including $4.6 billion worth placement” and did not discuss when he might return in a three-hour span. home. After the hearing, Govt: Employees aided county officials declined to Madoff in swindle be more specific, saying simNEW YORK (AP) — ply that the boy was safe. Attorneys for the parents Bernard Madoff could not have pulled off history’s and the boy did not object to biggest Ponzi scheme with- the arrangement. “She wants to get her out assistance from five greedy employees who family back together and helped him lie to thousands have her son returned of investors and federal regu- home,” said Robert Paule, lators, a prosecutor told the mother’s lawyer. The parents attended the jurors at the opening of a five-month criminal fraud hearing but the boy did not. trial, the first to result from a He’s too young to be lengthy probe of the charged with a crime under Minnesota law. financier’s fallen empire. Great G “Nobody is going to disift pute that Bernard Madoff Give Fri idea... en told a ton of lies — of course, or Fami ds he did,” Assistant U.S. Attorly Hometo ney Matthew Schwartz told w n N jurors in an opening stateews ment at the Manhattan trial Z LU of five ex-Madoff employees. DO “But the evidence will show & C DES G ift ATERIN that these defendants knew ur gu while O t exactly what they were PORTLAND BAGEL to yoplies las doing. ... They did it because COMPANY Bernard Madoff encouraged sup 3385 Broadway, North Bend 541-756-2221 it and they were getting rich www.portlandbagelcompany.com in the process.”

States enact laws to stock epinephrine at schools

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A8•The World • Thursday, October 17,2013

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Thursday, October 17,2013 • The World • A9

World Bodies recovered in Mekong from Laos crash

Evidence suggests early Britons ate roasted toads BY RAPHAEL SATTER The Associated Press

LONDON — Britons sometimes make fun of the French for feasting on frog. But now a new discovery suggests their prehistoric ancestors may have had a taste for toad. The University of Buckingham said Wednesday that a promising excavation near Stonehenge has unearthed a host of clues about the diet of prehistoric Britons. Among them: A tiny, partially burnt leg bone which suggests the hunter-gatherers living in what’s now known as the United K ingdom snacked on amphibians. The charred bone was found alongside the remains of fish and aurochs — the wild ancestor of today’s cattle — at a site called Blick

Mead in the town of Amesbury, about 85 miles west of London. Natural History Museum and University College, London, researcher Simon Parfitt said that the dig had provided experts a glimpse of a Mesolithic menu that also included fish, hazelnuts, berries, deer, and boar. He called the discovery of what appeared to be leftovers from a meal of roast toad “really intriguing.” “Being English, we don’t eat frogs,” he noted. The toad finding has yet to be peer-reviewed, and one expert — Bournemouth University archaeologist Tim Darvill — expressed skepticism over what he called “the frog story.” Still, he and other outside experts voiced excitement about the dig where the bone

The Associated Press

Artifacts gathered from an archaeological site known as Blick Mead are cleaned and sorted in Amesbury, about 85 miles west of London, England. Archaeologists said Wednesday that an excavation about a mile from Stonehenge has unearthed a host of clues about the diet of prehistoric Britons. was found, with Darvill calling it “the most significant find in the Stonehenge landscape for many years.” Andy Rhind-Tutt, a former mayor of Amesbury and the chairman of the Amesbury Museum and Heritage Trust, said the dig was turning up thousands of flint tools and animal bones, pointing to what he said may turn out to be a major prehistoric settlement just over a mile from the world-

famous circle of standing stones. Parfitt said the find suggests “that there’s more to the site than just Stonehenge. “There’s a much deeper history to the specialness of that place,” he said.

PAKSE, Laos (AP) — Rescuers in fishing boats pulled bodies from the muddy Mekong River on Thursday as officials in Laos ruled out finding survivors from a plane that crashed in stormy weather, killing 49 people from 11 countries. Backpacks, two broken airplane propellers and passports were among the debris scattered on the riverbank where the Lao Airlines turboprop plane left deep skid marks in the ground before disappearing into the water Wednesday. Thai Foreign Ministry spokesman Sek Wannamethee said search teams had recovered the bodies of 15 crash victims by the time their operations ended Thursday because

of the strong current and darkness. He said they were unable to immediately identify them or their nationalities. Thailand, which lost five nationals in the crash, is deeply involved in the search, providing skilled manpower and technology. Yakao Lopangkao, director-general of Lao’s Department of Civil Aviation, who was at the crash site in Pakse in southern Laos, ruled out finding survivors. He said the plane’s fuselage had not yet been found, but was underwater and divers were trying to locate it. Some of the bodies were found by fishermen floating downstream as far as 12 miles from the crash site, he said.

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A10 •The World • Thursday, October 17,2013

Weather South Coast

National forecast Forecast highs for Friday, Oct. 18

Sunny

Pt. Cloudy

Cloudy

Seattle 45° | 68° Billings 34° | 57°

San Francisco 52° | 75°

Minneapolis 34° | 48°

Denver 28° | 50°

Chicago 46° | 54°

New York 55° | 68°

Detroit 45° | 59°

Washington D.C. 48° | 64°

El Paso 48° | 75° Houston 59° | 73°

Miami Miami 73° | 87° 88° 77°

Fronts Cold

-0s

0s

10s

20s 30s 40s

Warm Stationary

50s 60s

70s

80s

Pressure Low

High

90s 100s 110s

Temperatures indicate Wednesday’s high Fairbanks 53 39 cdy Philadelphia 72 63 rn and overnight low to 5 a.m. Fargo 45 cdy Phoenix 83Ice60 clr Rain T-storms 60 Flurries Snow Showers Hi Lo Prc Otlk Flagstaff 58 20 clr Pittsburgh 65 52 .12 rn Albuquerque 62 36 clr Fresno 85 51 clr Pocatello 56 30 clr Anchorage 57 45 rn Green Bay 54 45 pcdy Portland,Maine 58 53 pcdy Atlanta 74 65 .01 rn Hartford Spgfld 61 53 cdy Providence 63 52 pcdy ridge high pressure sunny and AtlanticAn City upper-level 70 59 cdy of Honolulu 87 72will maintain pcdy Raleigh-Durham 70 mild 60 cdy Austin weather61throughout 51 .83 clr the West. A developing system Houston 73 60 .04 low clr pressure Reno 68 37 clr Baltimore 69 58 rain over rn Indianapolis 62 41southern rn Plains. Richmond Lighter 76 60 cdy will generate the central and Billings 52 35 .08 cdy Jackson,Miss. 77 61 .19 cdy Sacramento 81 47 clr rainfall amounts Birmingham 74 67 .44 are rn expected Jacksonville over 83 the 62 northern pcdy StPlains. Louis 60 49 .02 cdy Boise 64 36 clr Kansas City 59 39 .02 clr Salt Lake City 59 39 clr Boston 62 54 pcdy Key West 86 76 pcdy Weather San AngeloUnderground 63 44• AP clr Buffalo 69 51 .29 rn Las Vegas 72 52 clr San Diego 84 60 clr 66 56 .24 cdy Lexington Burlington,Vt. 66 53 .19 cdy San Francisco 80 55 clr Casper 51 30 cdy Little Rock 64 55 .04 pcdy San Jose 82 50 clr 76 60 cdy Los Angeles Charleston,S.C. 86 58 clr Santa Fe 56 32 clr Charleston,W.Va. 70 60 .12 rn Louisville 65 48 .01 rn Seattle 55 48 cdy Charlotte,N.C. 74 61 rn Madison 55 46 .04 cdy Sioux Falls 55 33 cdy Cheyenne 49 31 sno Memphis 62 56 .12 cdy Spokane 59 36 pcdy Chicago 54 49 .04 rn Miami Beach 87 75 pcdy Syracuse 67 49 .17 cdy Cincinnati 65 43 .04 rn Midland-Odessa 57 51 clr Tampa 82 71 pcdy Cleveland 70 44 .17 rn Milwaukee 55 48 .01 rn Toledo 62 40 rn Colorado Springs 51 30 cdy Mpls-St Paul 55 41 rn Tucson 80 50 clr Columbus,Ohio 67 44 .19 rn Missoula 51 29 pcdy Tulsa 61 43 .01 clr Concord,N.H. 64 45 pcdy Nashville 70 56 .26 cdy Washington,D.C. 73 63 rn Dallas-Ft Worth 66 47 .01 clr New Orleans 83 73 cdy W. Palm Beach 87 72 pcdy Daytona Beach 84 67 clr New York City 67 61 cdy Wichita 56 37 .01 clr Denver 53 30 cdy Norfolk,Va. 70 60 cdy Wilmington,Del. 69 61 rn Des Moines 52 38 pcdy Oklahoma City 59 39 clr National Temperature Extremes Detroit 63 46 rn Omaha 58 38 pcdy High Wednesday 94 at Harlingen, Texas El Paso 76 46 clr Orlando pcdy Low Thursday 16 at Stanley, Idaho 87 67

Sunshine And Warmth Continue In The West

GROWING Continued from Page A1 snacks. At Myrtle Crest, Irene Logan, a fifth-grade teacher, was fighting that same fight. The two found each other. Lanza decided to donate the greenhouse to Myrtle Crest. “If the kids grow their own food they’re going to try it,” Logan said. The community also got involved with the project. The greenhouse they built could have run Lanza about $6,000, but with help from Hennick’s in Bandon giving them a break on lumber, and contractor Jerry Stedler donating services, the overall

SHUTDOWN Continued from Page A1 on Capitol Hill were the decisive winners in the fight, which was sparked by tea party Republicans like Sen. Ted Cruz of Texas. They prevailed upon skeptical GOP

WASH. Portland 45° | 72° Newport 50° | 68°

Tonight: Clear, with a low around 59. North wind around 8 mph becoming east after midnight. Friday: Sunny, with a high near 78. East northeast wind 5 to 7 mph becoming calm in the morning. Friday Night: Clear, with a low around 50. Calm wind. Saturday: Sunny, with a high near 70. Light and variable wind.

Tonight: Clear, with a low around 38. Light and variable wind. Friday: Sunny, with a high near 76. East wind around 6 mph becoming calm in the morning. Friday Night: Clear, with a low around 38. Light and variable wind. Saturday: Sunny, with a high near 76. East southeast wind around 5 mph becoming calm in the morning.

Stock . . . . . . . . . Close 8:30 Frontier . . . . . . . . . . . 4.41 4.45 Intel . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23.70 23.77 Kroger . . . . . . . . . . . 41.86 41.70 Lee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.98 2.96

Bend 30° | 61°

Salem 39° | 68°

Medford 41° | 73°

Klamath Falls

Ice

Flurries Rain

Showers

Snow Weather Underground• AP

Willamette Valley

Oregon Temps

Local high, low, rainfall

Tonight: Patchy fog. Otherwise, mostly clear, with a low around 35. North wind 5 to 9 mph. Friday: Patchy fog. Otherwise, sunny, with a high near 66. Light and variable wind. Friday Night: Patchy. Otherwise, mostly clear, with a low around 36. North wind around 6 mph. Saturday: Patchy fog. Otherwise, sunny, with a high near 66. Calm wind becoming north 5 to 7 mph.

Temperature extremes and precipitation for the 24 hours ending at 5 a.m. today. Hi Lo Prec Astoria 64 43 0 Brookings 74 47 0 Corvallis 67 39 0 Eugene 66 37 0 Klamath Falls 67 25 0 La Grande 64 28 0 Medford 72 39 0 Newport 55 43 0 Pendleton 62 36 0 Portland 65 47 0 Redmond 63 24 0 Roseburg 69 42 0 Salem 67 39 0

Wednesday: High 63, low 41 Rain: none Total rainfall to date: 24.62 inches Rainfall to date last year: 30.52 inches Average rainfall to date: 40.59 inches

Portland area Tonight: Patchy fog. Otherwise, mostly clear, with a low around 43. Northeast wind 3 to 6 mph. Friday: Patchy fog. Otherwise, sunny, with a high near 68. Calm wind. Friday Night: Clear, with a low around 44. Northeast wind 5 to 8 mph becoming calm in the evening. Saturday: Sunny, with a high near 66. Calm wind becoming north northwest around 5 mph.

Extended outlook

North Coast Tonight: Mostly clear, with a low around 46. Northeast wind around 9 mph. Friday: Sunny, with a high near 66. North northeast wind 9 to 13 mph, with gusts as high as 18 mph. Friday Night: Patchy fog. Mostly clear, with a low around 44. East northeast wind around 9 mph. Saturday: Patchy fog. Otherwise, sunny, with a high near 62. North northeast wind around 8 mph.

FRIDAY

SATURDAY

Sunny 69/44

Sunny 68/44

SUNDAY

MONDAY

Mostly sunny 65/45

Mostly sunny 66/45

Central Oregon Tonight: Clear, with a low around 29. North wind 5 to 9 mph becoming calm after midnight. Friday: Sunny, with a high near 65. Southeast wind 3 to 6 mph. Friday Night: Clear, with a low around 34. Northeast wind around 6 mph. Saturday: Sunny, with a high near 67. South wind around 6 mph.

important addition to the learning process because it provided an educational outlet during the summer months. “The students have that touchstone that is out of school but where they can still keep involved.” Involvement is also provided courtesy of the OSU Extension Office. Heather Lilienthal, 4-H Program Assistant, said the greenhouse was an awesome gift that sparked a lot of interest. “This was a huge thing to have schools focus on this area, where we at OSU can come in and assist.” One way they are assisting is through the Oregon Natural Resource Education Pro-

gram. ONREP fosters handson interactive learning for students. Lilienthal added that while this program is currently underway in Myrtle Point other schools are trying to come on board with these types of hands-on programs. “OSU Extension is there for us and they will be there for other schools, too,” Logan said. Smith said there are positive results on display on a daily basis. “It’s real to the students and they engage in it and, when they get back to the classroom, they have a frame of reference.” It all adds up to a series of opportunities that continue to grow and evolve in the

school and around the community. Opportunities, they all agree, that can be traced back to one man’s gift. “(These programs) help us with training and show us how to better utilize natural resources in our area and to draw students to our programs, with the greenhouse as a corner stone,” Smith said, while looking at the expanding garden area next to their playground. Nine new raised garden beds and some grant-funded fans in the side of the greenhouse have recently been added to the outdoor classroom. “In the end, our 340 kids have access to things they didn’t have two years ago.”

leaders to use a normally routine short-term funding bill in an attempt to “defund” the 2010 health care law known as “Obamacare.” “We fought the good fight. We just didn’t win,” House Speaker John Boehner, ROhio, conceded in a radio interview.

Republican Sen. John McCain of Arizona said the American people disapproved of how Republicans, and also Democrats and the president, handled the budget gridlock. “Hopefully, the lesson is to stop this foolish childishness,” McCain said on CNN. The Senate approved the

legislation by an 81-18 vote. The House followed suit by a tally of 285-144, with 87 Republicans in favor and 144 against. “All this does is delay this fight four months,” Rep. Mo Brooks, R-Ala., said. “We need to get to the underlying cause of the problem, which is

our out-of-control spending and deficits, and fix it before it’s too late and we go down the toilet to bankruptcy because that’s where America is headed.” It’s the second time this year that Congress has passed legislation to increase the government’s borrowing cap.

34.81 74.43 42.38 33.08 14.53 78.07

© 2013 Wunderground.com

Thunderstorms

cost ended up at about $3,400. That kind of collaboration was an early sign of things to come. School Principal Ken Smith said it started a snowball rolling through the community, down to the Oregon State University Extension Office, which ultimately lead to a stewardship program for the students. At about that time, the community also created Earthworm Acres — a community garden that sits at the corner of Fourth and Maple streets in downtown Myrtle Point. Sixth-grade teacher Sue Powrie said that was an

Microsoft . . . . . . . . 34.64 Nike . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74.49 NW Natural . . . . . . . 42.12 Safeway . . . . . . . . . 33.08 SkyWest. . . . . . . . . . 14.34 Starbucks . . . . . . . . 78.04

IDAHO Ontario 32° | 61°

CALIF. 36° | 64°

Cloudy Partly Cloudy

NORTHWEST STOCKS Closing and 8:30 a.m. quotations:

Pendleton 36° | 68°

Eugene 39° | 66° North Bend Coos Bay 44° | 69°

Rogue Valley

Atlanta 54° | 72°

Friday, Oct. 18

City/Region Lowtemperatures | High temps Weather Underground for daytime conditions, low/high Oct. 18 Forecast for Friday,forecast

Curry County Coast

Los Angeles 59° | 82°

-10s

Oregon weather Tonight/Friday

Tonight: Clear, with a low around 44. North northeast wind 6 to 11 mph. Friday: Sunny, with a high near 69. North northeast wind 6 to 8 mph. Friday Night: Clear, with a low around 44. Northeast wind 6 to 8 mph. Saturday: Sunny, with a high near 68. North wind around 6 mph.

The Tide Tables To find the tide prediction for your area, add or subtract minutes as indicated. To find your estimated tidal height, multiply the listed height by the high or low ratio for your area.

Location High time Bandon -0:18 Brookings -0:40 -0:11 Charleston +1:20 Coos Bay +0:38 Florence Port Orford -0:28 Reedsport +1:05 Umpqua River -0:01

A.M.

HIGH TIDE Date 17-Oct 18-Oct 19-Oct 20-Oct 21-Oct

time ft. 11:45 9.0 12:26 7.9 1:13 8.0 1:57 7.9 2:40 7.7

LOW TIDE Date 17-Oct 18-Oct 19-Oct 20-Oct 21-Oct

ratio Low time .81 -0:06 .81 -0:30 .89 -0:04 .86 +1:24 .77 +0:54 .86 -0:23 .79 +1:20 .81 -0:01

ratio .84 .91 .91 .84 .75 .99 .75 .91

P.M. time 12:21 12:57 1:32 2:07

A.M.

ft. 9.2 9.3 9.1 8.9

P.M.

time ft. time 5:24 1.0 6:04 6:06 1.4 6:46 6:46 1.8 7:26 7:25 2.2 8:05 8:03 2.7 8:44 Sunrise, sunset Oct. 17-23 — 7:34, 6:30 Moon watch Full Moon — Oct. 18

ft. -0.2 -0.6 -0.8 -0.7 -0.5

OPENING Kitchen staff is already hired Continued from Page A1 7 Devils will offer a full menu in its taproom, and has already hired a kitchen staff. The taproom expansion in the south end of the building is still under construction. Matthews said they’re planning to use the temporary wall between the two rooms as a giant chalkboard. The couple plan to cover it with the names of community members who’ve contributed to getting the business off the ground. “There’s a huge list,” he said, smiling. Reporter Thomas Moriarty can be reached at 541-2691222, ext. 240, or by email at thomas.moriarty@theworldlink.com.

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Sports

Baseball playoffs | B2 College picks | B4

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 17, 2013

theworldlink.com/sports ■ Sports Editor John Gunther ■ 541-269-1222, ext. 241

OSAA ponders playoff changes

A look at Friday’s games Far West League League Overall W L W L Siuslaw 5 0 7 0 North Bend 4 0 6 1 Douglas 2 2 4 3 South Umpqua 2 2 4 3 Marshfield 1 4 1 5 Sutherlin 1 3 1 6 Brookings-Harbor 0 4 0 7 Friday’s Games Brookings-Harbor at North Bend Sutherlin at Marshfield South Umpqua at Douglas

Brookings-Harbor at North Bend Time: 7 p.m. Radio: K-Light (98.7 FM) and KURY (95.3 FM) Outlook: The Bulldogs are heavy favorites against the Bruins, but need to avoid looking ahead to next week’s huge game against Siuslaw. North Bend has been soaring on both offense and defense the past few weeks, including last week’s dominant win over Douglas at Winston, a site the Bulldogs’ traditionally have struggled. Brookings-Harbor, meanwhile, still is seeking its first win. The Bulldogs have scored at least 40 points in every game but their lone loss, a 39-38 defeat to Cottage Grove. And North Bend has won every league game by at least 30 points. The Bruins, meanwhile, had a great passing game last week, but only managed eight points against Siuslaw.

South Umpqua at Douglas Time: 7 p.m. Radio: No local radio Outlook: The Lancers and Trojans battle for third place in Winston. South Umpqua is trying to break into the top three that has been dominated in recent years by North Bend, Siuslaw and Douglas. South Umpqua has a high enough power ranking that it likely would make the postseason even with a loss, but Douglas might not have that luxury.

Sunset Conference League W L 2 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 2

Gold Beach Myrtle Point Reedsport Glide Coquille Bandon Friday’s Games Coquille at Myrtle Point Bandon at Reedsport Gold Beach at Glide

Overall W L 5 2 4 2 4 2 3 3 1 5 2 3

Coquille at Myrtle Point Time: 7 p.m. Radio: KTEE (94.9 FM and 95.7 FM) Outlook: The Red Devils and Bobcats play their annual rivalry game with records reversed from recent years. Myrtle Point is 42 after a comeback win against Bandon last week. Coquille, meanwhile, got its first win a week ago by pounding Glide at home. That game put the Red Devils on the cusp of a Class 3A playoff berth, if they are able to beat Bandon next week. While Coquille is trying to maintain momentum for that game, Myrtle Point is trying to keep its power ranking up in the hopes of reaching the Class 2A playoffs. Plus, the Bobcats would like to beat their rivals for the first time in recent years.

Bandon at Reedsport Time: 7 p.m. Radio: No local radio Outlook: The Tigers and Braves battle in Reedsport’s homecoming game, each trying to get back on the winning track. Bandon has suffered two close losses, first pushing Gold Beach into the fourth quarter and then seeing Myrtle Point score the winning touchdown in the final minute last week. Reedsport, meanwhile, opened league play with a win over Coquille before getting blown out last week by Gold Beach. The good news for the Braves is they are healthy. The bad news is they struggled tackling against Gold Beach’s veer attack and now face Bandon’s option.

Gold Beach at Glide Time: 7 p.m. Radio: KGBR (92.7 FM) Outlook: The Panthers are coming off a big win over Reedsport as they continue pursuit of fourth straight league title. They also already beat Bandon, like Glide one of the hybrid league’s three Class 3A schools. Glide opened league play with a close win over Myrtle Point, but then was blown out by Coquille.

Skyline League League W L 4 0 Camas Valley Elkton 3 1 Triad 3 1 Powers 3 2 3 2 Prospect Gilchrist 2 3 Hosanna Christian 2 4 1 4 North Lake 0 5 Butte Fallls Friday’s Games Powers at Butte Falls North Lake at Gilchrist Saturday’s Games Prospect at Camas Valley Elkton at Triad

Overall W L 6 0 4 2 3 2 3 3 4 3 2 3 2 5 2 4 0 6

Powers at Butte Falls Time: 3 p.m. Radio: No local radio Outlook: Powers lost a nonleague game to Days Creek last week and now returns to league play with the road game against the Loggers. On the surface, the game is a big mismatch. Butte Falls has scored just 38 points in seven games and given up 345. Powers would love to see that trend continue as the Cruisers continue to seek a playoff berth. The Cruisers have scored at least 34 points each of the past four weeks.

We’ve spent a lot of time this year watching the actions of the Oregon School Activities Association’s Classification and Districting Committee. The group spent the past year plotting the league alignment for the four-year time block that starts next fall. The OSAA Executive Board will make a final decision on that matter later this month. Meanwhile, another OSAA committee also has been shaping the future, this one for the various playoffs and state championships. And two weeks ago, the State Championship Committee made a few SPORTS big decisions. And what the committee decided about volleyball and basketball was a big win for kids, at least in the eyes of North Bend athletic director Mike Forrester. The group’s latest proposal does not change the format for either JOHN team sport. G UNTHER In an earlier proposal, the committee recommended eliminating consolation games at basketball tournaments in the upper three classifications, while keeping them for the smaller three. The logic was that at the larger tournaments, consolation games are poorly attended. For example, in the Class 4A tournament, a small crowd for a 9 a.m. consolation game looks tiny in cavernous Gill Coliseum. In contrast, the consolation games are well-attended in tournaments at Baker City (Class 1A), Pendleton (Class 2A) and the Bay Area (Class 3A). And with how far teams have to travel to get to those sites, it makes sense to give them at least two games. But Forrester argued to the committee that getting rid of the consolation games would be another step in a process that started with dropping the number of teams advancing to the tournament from 16 to eight. Every reduction takes away from the experience for kids. He also said it would be best if the Class 4A tournament moved from Corvallis to a more intimate, and less expensive location, something the committee plans to do. In volleyball, the earlier proposal was to eliminate all consolation games and the third place games, instead making the tournaments single-elimination affairs at two sites — they currently are held in three locations. While the team sports won’t change in the current proposal, the individual sports would see dramatic changes, moving to a regional format. OSAA already has switched to regional qualifying in wrestling — for example the Far West League and Skyline League are treated as one region to determine which wrestlers advance to the state tournament. Similarly among the smaller schools, swimming and tennis districts extend across several leagues since not all schools offer those programs. The new proposal expands the regional concept to other sports. In Class 4A cross country, wrestling and track and field, there would be four regions instead of seven leagues. Interestingly, Marshfield and North Bend would be in a region with Cascade, Cottage Grove, Elmira, Junction City, Newport, Philomath, Stayton, Sweet Home and Yamhill-Carlton while the rest of the Far West League would end up in a region with the schools in the Skyline League in the southern part of the state. The goal of regional qualifying isn’t necessarily to cut down on the number of athletes who advance to state, but to make sure the best ones get there. In Class 4A cross country, the top three teams in each region and the top five individuals not on those teams would advance to state, making it less likely a top runner will be left home, which can happen in the league format. But it also might spell the end to traditional league championships in track and field and some other sports. It also will require some adjustments, such as central locations in some sports. While Coquille celebrated not being in the same league with Lakeview during the final proposal by the Classification and Districting Committee, in the regional proposal Coquille would be in with not just Lakeview, but also Vale and Nyssa near the Idaho border and Riverside and Umatilla near the Columbia River for both wrestling and track and field. At least they’d only all get together one time, for the regional meet, probably somewhere in the Bend area. The Championship Committee won’t make its final proposal until early next year.

EDITOR

Sutherlin at Marshfield Time: 7 p.m. Radio: KMHS (91.3 FM) Outlook: The Pirates finish their league schedule at home against the other team with one league win — both squads beat Brookings-Harbor. Marshfield had some strong individual performances last week in its homecoming loss to South Umpqua. Sutherlin, meanwhile, scored 22 points but lost to Class 5A Ashland. Both teams have struggled to stop foes. Aside form a 24-22 loss to Scio, Sutherlin has given up at least five touchdowns every game. Marshfield, meanwhile, had one strong defensive game in its win over Brookings-Harbor. The Pirates finish the regular season next week with a game at Crook County.

B

By Alysha Beck, The World

Marshfield’s Hailee Woolsey hits the ball for a kill against Siuslaw’s Hannah Bartlett during an early season match. The Pirates host Sutherlin in the final game of the league season tonight.

Volleyball showdown is tonight BY GEORGE ARTSITAS The World

COOS BAY — For Marshfield’s volleyball team, this is it. It all comes down to tonight for the Pirates when they host Sutherlin for the Far West League title. Sutherlin won the first match in four sets, handing Marshfield its first league loss — the Pirates also later lost at Siuslaw. “We haven’t openly talked about it, but it’s definitely the elephant in the room,” Marshfield’s Tracee Scott said. Both teams are tied with a 92 league record coming into tonight. In the first match, Marshfield took the first set easily and then dropped the next three sets. “We kind of let them win a little bit. We didn’t really want it as bad as they did,” junior Pirate Abby Clough said. It wasn’t like the Pirates were short on solid performances against Sutherlin the first time. Hailee Woolsey finished with 15 kills and 12 digs while Shaylynn Jensen added four

win tonight away from meeting aces and 23 assists. The players said desire was their own preseason aspirations. the difference. “(The win) would definitely “It definitely came down to that, who wanted it more,” said be a confidence boost for this young squad going Scott — the only honinto playoffs,” Montiel oree at tonight’s Senior said. “Going into the Night said. “Sometime season their goal was teams come out real See related video at to be league champs. fired up. I think we just www.theworldlink.com. This game will do that lost our fire.” The prize tonight is big. The for them.” Marshfield is offering a spewinner skips past the play-in round directly into the Class 4A cial price for fans tonight. Two 16-team final bracket, with a adults get in for $5, while the home game guaranteed provid- admission for one adult is $3. The Pirates also host the ed the team is in the top 16 of the final power rankings Marshfield Invitational on (Marshfield currently is 18th Saturday. The 16-team field for that event includes Marshfield, but can move up some). The loser will face Siuslaw on North Bend, Siuslaw, South Monday in a tiebreaker at Umpqua and BrookingsReedsport to determine the Harbor of the Far West League league’s No. 2 an No. 3 seeds for and Reedsport, Coquille, the play-in round (second place Myrtle Point and Bandon of the gets a home game and third place Sunset Conference. The other schools are Grants Pass, Hidden means a match on the road). Marshfield head coach Valley, Henley, Phoenix, Tammie Montiel wants to keep Tillamook Valley Catholic and the focus simple and just cut Del Norte of California. Admission for all day is $5 down unforced and mental for adults and $3 for students. errors. As much as momentum Morning pool play starts at 8 going into the playoffs would be a.m. and the quarterfinals great for Montiel, her team is a should begin about 2 p.m.

Rules protect players who lose helmets BY MARK STEPHENS SWOFOA Official

For many seasons, if a player carrying the ball (a “runner”) loses his helmet during a play, the whistle immediately sounds and the play is dead. By rule, if any other player’s helmet comes off, action will continue until the end of the play. These rules remain in force this season. Last season the National Federation of State High School Associations added a rule that requires a player whose helmet comes off during a down to be removed for one play. A rule added this year requires that if a player’s helmet comes off due to action that occurs immediately after the play has ended, an official’s time out is called and that player is removed for one play. These rules have motivated coaches and players to make sure chin straps are properly fastened, and that the buckles and clips are in good condition. Even with this attention to safety, players will occasionally lose their helmet during a play. This year the NFHS added several more rules related to the helmetless player. One of these changes is that it is illegal for a player who has lost his helmet to continue participating in the play beyond the imme-

diate action he is engaged in. For example, a player who loses his helmet during a block can continue that block, but cannot then block another player, try to IT’S THE recover a fumble, or be involved in any other action on the field during the play. Even if the player puts his helmet back on during the play he cannot no longer parMARK ticipate in that STEPHENS play. The penalty is 15 yards for illegal participation. The final rule change to protect the helmetless player is to make it illegal for any player to make new contact with a player whose helmet has come completely off. To do so is a 15-yard penalty for illegal personal contact. Watch for the final It’s the Rule article of the 2013 season that will discuss rule changes related to blocking on free kicks, who can score on a try after a touchdown, and kick-catching interference. Mark Stephens is a veteran official with the Southwestern Oregon Football Officials Association.

RULE

NB Booster Club poker run is Saturday THE WORLD The North Bend Booster Club is holding a poker run on Saturday. The event starts and ends at Highway 101 Harley Davidson in Coos Bay. People don’t need to ride motorcycles to participate in the event. The cost is $20 and registration runs from 9 to 9:30 a.m. The poker run begins at 9:30 and participants will visit at least five businesses in the Bay Area to collect poker cards, trying to get the best poker hand possible. Additional poker cards can be purchased for $5 each. The cash prize is $150 for the winning poker hand. For more information, contact Julie Reed at 541-2901270.


B2 •The World • Thursday,October 17,2013

Sports

Pitching, power surge keep Dodgers alive Los Angeles wins to send NLCS back to St. Louis ■

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Zack Greinke came out shaky against the St. Louis Cardinals, getting in early trouble with the Dodgers’ season hanging in the balance. He faced a bases-loaded, no-out jam in the first inning and gave up four straight hits in a two-run third that tied the game. After that, Greinke was stellar. He retired 13 consecutive batters and Los Angeles went on to a 6-4 victory Wednesday that trimmed the Cardinals’ lead to 3-2 in the best-of-seven NL championship series. “Even in that first inning, bases loaded, no outs,” Dodgers infielder Adrian Gonzalez said, “he just knew if he kept making his pitches, he was going to get out of it, and he did. That just shows he’s got the whole package.” The Dodgers earned themselves a trip back to St. Louis for Game 6 on Friday night, with ace Clayton Kershaw scheduled to start for them against rookie Michael Wacha. When those two squared

off in Game 2, the Cardinals won 1-0 on an unearned run. “He’s a bright star, that kid,” Dodgers utility man Skip Schumaker said of Wacha. “He’s an Adam Wainwright in the making, and that’s a scary thing.” The Dodgers got a scare in the ninth, when St. Louis scored twice off closer Kenley Jansen before he struck out pinch-hitter Adron Chambers with two on to end it. “We had a couple of opportunities to do something, and we just couldn’t make it happen,” Cardinals manager Mike Matheny said. “These guys have done a tremendous job in those exact same situations all season long. You’re going to have games where you just can’t make it happen, and we’ve got to figure out a way to get it done the next time we get a chance.” The Dodgers needed five games to hit a home run in the series. Once Adrian Gonzalez powered up for the first one, their dormant offense broke loose. Gonzalez homered twice, and Carl Crawford and A.J. Ellis added solo shots to help preserve the Dodgers’ season. “Guys weren’t ready to lose today,” Crawford said. The Cardinals also led last year’s NLCS 3-1 before losing

three straight games to the eventual World Series champion San Francisco Giants. “We’re looking to do the same thing,” Gonzalez said. Greinke settled down on the mound, and even delivered an RBI single. “That was big,” he said about his eventful first inning. “I was real nervous out there with that situation and trying to make a good pitch.” The Dodgers regrouped after Greinke squandered an early 2-0 lead just as he did in Game 1, which Los Angeles lost 3-2 in 13 innings on the road. After neither team homered in the first three games for the first time in NLCS history, the big bats came out. The Cardinals used a two-run homer by Matt Holliday and a solo shot from pinch-hitter Shane Robinson to win 4-2 on Tuesday night. This time, Gonzalez went 3-for-4 with two solo homers and three runs scored. His two-out shot in the eighth made it 6-2. “We have a team that can bounce back and do some pretty incredible things out there,” he said. The Cardinals tied it at 2 in the third on Carlos Beltran’s RBI triple and Holliday’s run-scoring double before Yadier Molina grounded into his second

The Associated Press

Carl Crawford hits a home run for the Los Angeles Dodgers during the fifth inning Wednesday. inning-ending double play against Greinke. Los Angeles answered in the bottom of the third. Mark Ellis singled leading off, but was erased when Hanley Ramirez grounded into a double play. Gonzalez followed with the Dodgers’ first homer of the NLCS, slugging the ball an estimated 428 feet into the right-field pavilion for a 3-2 lead.

After wriggling out of big trouble in the first when Molina bounced into a double play, Greinke allowed two runs and six hits. He struck out four and walked one. “He made his pitches, we made the plays, got out of it,” Gonzalez said. “We were able to get run support for him. All he needed was a few runs.” Jansen gave up RBI singles to Matt Adams and Pete Kozma in the ninth.

Joe Kelly gave up four runs and seven hits in five innings. He struck out three and walked none. “I made a few bad pitches on heaters and didn’t locate that well, and they turned into home runs,” he said. “With guys on base, I was going after them and attacking them with the fastball, but they’re good hitters and they put good swings on them and hit them out of the park.”

Tigers win with revamped lineup DETROIT (AP) — Jim Leyland had no big plans for Detroit’s oddest lineup card of the year. “I’ll throw it away, unless I can sell it to some bar on the way home,” the Detroit manager said. Torii Hunter batting leadoff and Miguel Cabrera hitting second worked well enough Wednesday night for the Tigers, who beat the Boston Red Sox 7-3 to even the AL championship series 2-all.

Leyland used his new lineup in an effort to boost the offense after the Tigers lost 1-0 in Game 3. Slumping leadoff hitter Austin Jackson was dropped to eighth in the order, and he responded with two hits and two walks. Detroit scored five runs in the second inning, the first coming home on a basesloaded walk by Jackson. Hunter had a two-run double and Cabrera drove in two runs.

4D

Jackson was 3 for 33 with 18 strikeouts in this postseason before Wednesday. He said the walk in the second inning that brought home a run put him at ease a bit. “It was a big situation right there to try to get something done,” Jackson said. “I think after I’d seen a couple of pitches I was able to kind of just take some deep breaths and relax a little bit — and not worry so much about the result, just try to get a

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good pitch.” Leyland was quick to deflect credit for the lineup switch. “This has nothing to do with Jim Leyland, this is about the players,” Leyland said. “They executed, they came out, they played well.” Doug Fister provided another fine outing for Detroit. He allowed a run in six innings, and the Tigers’ starting pitchers have yielded only three runs in 27 ALCS innings while striking out 42. After blowing a 5-0 lead in Game 2, Detroit kept the Red Sox at bay Wednesday. Game 5 is tonight in Detroit. The Tigers’ Anibal Sanchez faces Boston’s Jon Lester in a rematch of Game 1, which was won by Detroit 1-0. Jacoby Ellsbury had four hits for the Red Sox on Wednesday, finishing a homer shy of the cycle, but now it’s Boston manager John Farrell fielding questions about whether a lineup shake-up is in order after another tough night against Detroit’s pitching. “The one thing that we’ve maintained is a constant approach with the lineup and not creating further uncertainty,” Farrell said. “I think our guys have responded well to that.” The Tigers lost Games 2 and 3, wasting gems by Max and Justin Scherzer Verlander. Leyland left Jackson in the lineup but

The Associated Press

Detroit starter Doug Fister fires a pitch in the first inning Wednesday. changed the batting order. Jackson hit eighth, and other hitters moved up a spot. That left Hunter hitting leadoff for the first time since 1999, and Cabrera was second for only the third time in his career — first since 2004. Leyland indicated his batting order would remain the same in Game 5. Jackson found himself batting in a crucial situation right away in the second. Peavy walked him to force home the game’s first run. The Red Sox had a chance

to halt that rally when Jose Iglesias hit a potential double play grounder to second, but Dustin Pedroia couldn’t field it cleanly and Boston had to settle for a forceout at second that brought another run home. “That was my fault. We’ve got to turn that double play,” Pedroia said. “That ball was smoked. If I catch it, we’re getting two.” Hunter followed with a double down the line in left to make it 4-0, and Cabrera added an RBI single.

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Thursday,November 17,2013 • The World • B3

Sports Timbers are all business in pursuit of playoff spot BY ANNE M. PETERSON The Associated Press

PORTLAND — The Portland Timbers mirror the personality of first-year coach Caleb Porter. With two matches left and a playoff berth within grasp, the team is all business. The Timbers are in first place in Major League Soccer’s heated Western Conference, a point ahead of Real Salt Lake and two points in front of the Seattle Sounders. Portland and New York are atop the race for the Supporter’s Shield for the team with 53 points in 32 games, although the Red Bulls hold the tiebreaker with more wins. The even-keeled Porter has his team believing that it’s not “if” but “when” the Timbers earn their first postseason berth since joining Major League Soccer in 2011. “We’re locked in,” Porter said. “We’re very businesslike right now and we’re not getting ahead of ourselves.” Echoed midfielder Will Johnson: “Everybody’s dialed in and on board.” And certainly, it appears that it is only a matter of time until Portland clinches a spot in the crowded race. They need just one point to be in,

either Saturday night at home against Real Salt Lake, or on the road against lastplace Chivas USA on Oct. 26. The Timbers (13-5-14) have not lost in six straight matches overall, and they have not lost in 14 straight at Jeld-Wen Field this season. In their previous meetings with Real Salt Lake, the Timbers played to a 3-all draw at home before losing 4-2 in Salt Lake. “We know we’re two games away from doing something special, but we’re going to focus on Salt Lake, that’s it,” Porter said. “We’re going to focus on getting three points, that’s absolutely it.” Porter has led the Timbers on a dramatic turnaround from last season, when they finished 8-10-16 for eighth place in the conference and 17th in the league. Portland axed fiery coach John Spencer midseason and replaced him in the interim with general manager Gavin Wilkinson. The team hired new coach Porter last August, but he didn’t immediately join the Timbers so that he could finish out his seventh season as the coach at the University of Akron. Porter led the Zips to an 18-1-3 record, the MidAmerica Conference championship and into the third

round of the NCAA tournament. It was the sixth straight season Akron made it to the postseason; the team won the national championship in 2010. The Timbers are led by Darlington Nagbe — who played for Porter at Akron — with nine goals and four assists. Diego Valeri of Argentina, a designated player for Portland, has eight goals and a team-record 12 assists. Goalkeeper Donovan Ricketts has a career-high 12 shutouts this season. “I think overall, it’s just that our mentality is good. We’re a cohesive team. These guys fight for each other, they work for each other, they have great chemistry,” Porter said. “That’s a common thread in every successful team at any level. You look at the best teams in the world, teams that raise trophies are teams that have good chemistry, teams that remain humble.” The Timbers are coming off a signature 1-0 win over the rival Sounders on Saturday night. Kalif Alhassan scored just before the break and Portland held on for the victory. “It’s a big win obviously,” Johnson said. “We get closer to our goal: Get in the playoffs and get the highest seed possible.”

The Associated Press

Portland’s Damian Lillard shoots over Utah’s Lester Hudson in the first half Wednesday.

Lillard leads Blazers to win SALT LAKE CITY (AP) — Damian Lillard scored 22 points and Mo Williams came off the bench to add 17 to help the Portland Trail Blazers rally from a 12-point second-half deficit for a 9992 victory over the Utah Jazz in a preseason game Wednesday night. LaMarcus Aldridge added 16 points for the Blazers (2-2) and Robin Lopez had 13 points and 13 rebounds. Both of the team’s preseason victories have come against Utah. Enes Kanter scored 23 points and Gordon Hayward

added 20 to lead the Jazz (1-3), who have lost three straight. The Blazers outrebounded the Jazz 57-43. Utah also struggled to find consistency on offense against Portland’s defense. The Jazz shot 31 of 80 from the field (38.8 percent) and had only two players shoot better than 50 percent from the floor. Kanter turned the first quarter into a personal layup drill. He made eight straight baskets in the quarter before missing a shot. Kanter’s 16 first-quarter points helped shore up a sagging offensive

effort from the rest of Utah’s starters. The Jazz took a 27-24 lead when Hayward converted a fast-break layup and a free throw in the final second of the first quarter. But the Blazers went ahead for good on a layup by Williams early in the fourth. Utah rallied at different points, getting to 91-89 on Favors’ layup with 2:58 left. But the Blazers pulled away by holding the Jazz without another field goal until Favors scored with 20 seconds left.

Big hit on Weeden costs Detroit lineman Suh another NFL fine THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

reserve. The two-time Pro Bowl standout hurt his chest in the ALLEN PARK, Mich. — fourth quarter of the Patriots’ 30Ndamukong Suh has been fined 27 win over the New Orleans Saints again by the NFL. on Sunday. The Detroit Cowboys release DT Ratliff Lions defensive tackle was IRVING, Texas — The Dallas docked $31,500 Cowboys released defensive tackle by the league for a Jay Ratliff, saying he failed a physihit on Cleveland Browns quarter- cal after spending the first six back Brandon Weeden, a person weeks of the season on the physifamiliar with the decision told The cally unable to perform list. Ratliff missed the last six games Associated Press. The person spoke on condition of anonymity because of the 2012 season with a sports hernia injury and never made it on the fine had not been announced. Since Detroit selected Suh No. 2 the field this year after getting overall in 2010, he has been fined injured during the conditioning test seven times for more than before training camp in July. $200,000.

Sports Shorts

1,000-yard season on his resume. He has played for Denver, Cleveland and Kansas City, and has 2,470 yards and 21 touchdowns for his career.

Franklin takes top honor

Angels to be their hitting coach. The Angels hired Baylor to replace Jim Eppard, who wasn’t retained by manager M ike Scioscia. The 64-year-old Baylor had been Arizona’s hitting coach for the past three years. The former manager of the Rockies and Cubs should be a respected veteran voice on Scioscia’s coaching staff, which is undergoing an overhaul after the big-budget Angels’ worst season in a decade.

Jurors side with Mark Cuban

DALLAS — Mark Cuban won a yearslong fight with the federal government when jurors decided that the billionaire basketball team owner did not commit insidertrading when he sold his stake in an Internet company in 2004. The jury in federal district court in Dallas said that the Securities and Exchange Commission failed to prove the key elements of its case, including the claim that Cuban agreed to keep certain information Giants sign running back Hillis confidential and not trade on it. Patriots lose Mayo to injury EAST RUTHERFORD, N.J. — FOXBOROUGH, Mass. — New The New York Giants signed veter- Angels hire Don Baylor England linebacker Jerod Mayo was an running back Peyton Hillis. ANAHEIM, Calif. — Don Baylor placed on season-ending injured Hillis is a six-year veteran with a is returning to the Los Angeles

NEW YORK — Missy Franklin keeps piling up the awards. The 18-year-old swimmer won the Sportswoman of the Year award presented by the Women’s Sports Foundation. Franklin won four gold medals and a bronze at the 2012 London Olympics. She won a record six gold medals at the world championships two months ago in Barcelona, Spain. The freshman at California was nominated along with Serena Williams, figure skater Mao Asada and wheelchair athlete Tatyana McFadden. Los Angeles Sparks star Candace Parker won the team award. The WNBA won the Billie Jean King Contribution Award and Melissa Stockwell earned the Wilma Rudolph Courage Award. Vivian Hao won the Annika Inspiration Award.

Scott wins with record round SOUTHAMPTON, Bermuda — Masters champion Adam Scott had a record round at Port Royal to win the PGA Grand Slam of Golf. Starting the final day of the 36hole exhibition three shots behind, Scott set the course record with a 7under 64 to beat U.S. Open champion Justin Rose by two shots.

SCOREBOARD On The Air Today H i g h S c h o o l V o l l e y b a l l — Sutherlin at Marshfield, 6 p.m., KMHS (1420 AM). NFL Football — Seattle at Arizona, 5:30 p.m., NFL Network. College Football — Miami at North Carolina, 4:30 p.m., ESPN. Major League Baseball — American League Championship Series Game 5, 4:30 p.m., Fox. Preseason Basketball — Miami at Brooklyn, 5 p.m., TNT. Friday, Oct. 18 H i g h S c h o o l F o o t b a l l — Sutherlin at Marshfield, 7 p.m., KMHS (91.3 FM); BrookingsHarbor at North Bend, 7 p.m., K-Light (98.7 FM) and KURY (95.3 FM); Coquille at Myrtle Point, 7 p.m., KTEE (94.9 FM and 95.7 FM); Gold Beach at Glide, 7 p.m., KGBR (92.7 FM). C o l l e g e F o o t b a l l — Central Florida at Louisville, 5 p.m., ESPN. C anadian F oo tbal l L eag ue — Calgary at Edmonton, 9 p.m., NBC Sports Network. Major League Baseball — National League Championship Series Game 6, Los Angeles at St. Louis, 5:30 p.m., TBS. Auto Racing — NASCAR Sprint Cup Camping World RV Sales 500, practice at 11:30 a.m. and 1 p.m., Fox Sports 1. NBA Preseason — Portland at Los Angeles Clippers, 7:30 p.m., KHSN (1230 AM). Major League Soccer — D.C. United at Sporting Kansas City, 5 p.m., NBC Sports Network. Saturday, Oct. 19 College Football — Georgia at Vanderbilt, 9 a.m., CBS; Texas Christian at Oklahoma State, 9 a.m., Fox; South Carolina at Tennessee, 9 a.m., ESPN; Minnesota at Northwestern, 9 a.m., ESPN2; Texas Tech at West Virginia, 9 a.m., Fox Sports 1; Colorado State at Wyoming, 11 a.m., Root Sports; UCLA at Stanford, 12:30 p.m., ABC; Auburn at Texas A&M, 12:30 p.m., CBS; Oklahoma at Kansas, 12:30 p.m., ESPN; Iowa at Ohio State, 12:30 p.m., ESPN2; Montana State at Weber State, 2:30 p.m., Root Sports; Arkansas at Alabama, 4 p.m., ESPN; LSU at Mississippi, 4 p.m., ESPN2; USC at Notre Dame, 4:30 p.m., NBC; Florida State at Clemson, 5 p.m., ABC; Washington State at Oregon, 7 p.m., Fox Sports 1 and KWRO (630 AM and 100.3 FM); Oregon State at California, 7:30 p.m., ESPN2 and KBBR (1340 AM). Major League Baseball — Detroit at Boston, 1:30 p.m., Fox. Major League Soccer — Seattle at FC Dallas, noon, NBC; Real Salt Lake at Portland, 7 p.m., Root Sports. Auto Racing — NASCAR Camping World Truck Series Talladega 250, 1 p.m., Fox Sports 1; American Le Mans Series Alms Petit, 3:30 p.m., Fox Sports 1; IndyCar MA-VTV 500, 5 p.m., NBC Sports Network.

Local Schedule Today High School Volleyball — Far West League: Sutherlin at Marshfield, 6 p.m.; North Bend at Brookings-Harbor, 6 p.m.; Douglas at South Umpqua, 6 p.m. Sunset Conference: Reedsport at Bandon, 6:30 p.m.; Glide at Gold Beach, 7 p.m.; Myrtle Point at Coquille, 6:30 p.m. Skyline League: Powers at Yoncalla, 6 p.m. High School Girls Soccer — Far West League: North Bend at Coquille, 4:30 p.m.; Marshfield at Douglas, 5 p.m. High School Boys Soccer — Far West League: North Bend at Coquille, 2:30 p.m.; Marshfield at Douglas, 3 p.m.; Pacific at Brookings-Harbor, 4:30 p.m. ; Sutherlin at South Umpqua, 3 p.m.

High School Cross Country — Siuslaw, Coquille, Pacific, Myrtle Point and Gold Beach at Run for the Brownies, 4:30 p.m., Florence. Friday, Oct. 18 High School Football — Far West League: Sutherlin at Marshfield, 7 p.m.; BrookingsHarbor at North Bend, 7 p.m.; South Umpqua at Douglas, 7 p.m. Sunset Conference: Bandon at Reedsport, 7 p.m.; Coquille at Myrtle Point, 7 p.m.; Gold Beach at Glide, 7 p.m. Skyline League: Powers at Butte Falls, 3 p.m. High School Volleyball — Skyline League: Pacific at Camas Valley, 5:30 p.m. Col lege Vol leyball — SWOCC at NWAACC Crossover, Bellevue, Wash., TBA. Saturday, Oct. 19 High School Volleyball — Siuslaw, Hidden Valley, Tillamook , Henley, Valley Catholic, Phoenix, Coquille, Reedsport, North Bend at Marshfield tournament, 9 a.m. College Women’s Soccer — SWOCC at Clackamas, 12:15 p.m. College Men’s Soccer — SWOCC at Pierce, 2:15 p.m. S o u t h C o as t Y o u t h F o o t b a l l L e a g u e — A t Marshfield: Bandon Cardinals vs. North Bend Colts, 9 a.m.; North Bend Ravens vs. Coos Bay Jaguars, 9 a.m.; Coquille 49ers vs. Coos Bay Chargers, 11 a.m.; Bandon Saints vs. North Bend Steelers, 11 a.m.; Coquille Chiefs vs. Gold Beach Lions, 1 p.m.; Coos Bay Vikings vs. Coos Bay Jets, 3 p.m. At Reedsport: Gold Beach Packers vs. Reedsport Redskins, 9 a.m.; North Bend Titans vs. North Bend Broncos, 11 a.m.; Coos Bay Raiders vs. Reedsport Falcons, 1 p.m.

Pro Baseball Division Series League Championship Series National League Friday, Oct. 11 St. Louis 3, Los Angeles 2, 13 innings Saturday, Oct. 12 St. Louis 1, Los Angeles 0 Monday, Oct. 14 Los Angeles 3, St. Louis 0 Tuesday, Oct. 15 St. Louis 4, Los Angeles 2 Wednesday, Oct. 16 Los Angeles 6, St. Louis 4 Friday, Oct. 18 Los Angeles (Kershaw 16-9) at St. Louis (Wacha 4-1), 5:37 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 19 x-Los Angeles (Ryu 14-8) at St. Louis (Wainwright 19-9), 5:37 p.m. American League Saturay, Oct. 12 Detroit 1, Boston 0 Sunday, Oct. 13 Boston 6, Detroit 5 Tuesday, Oct. 15 Boston 1, Detroit 0 Wednesday, Oct. 16 Detroit 7, Boston 3 Today Boston (Lester 15-8) at Detroit (Sanchez 15-9), 5:07 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 19 Detroit at Boston, 1:37 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 20 x-Detroit at Boston, 5:07 p.m.

Wednesday’s Linescores Dodgers 6, Cardinals 4 St. Louis 002 000 002 — 4 10 0 Los Angeles 021 010 11x — 6 9 0 J.Kelly, Choate (6), Mujica (6), Siegrist (7),

Axford (8) and Y.Molina; Greinke, B.Wilson (8), Jansen (9) and A.Ellis. W—Greinke 1-0. L—J.Kelly 0-1. HRs—Los Angeles, Ad.Gonzalez 2 (2), C.Crawford (1), A.Ellis (1).

Tigers 7, Red Sox 3 Boston 000 001 101 — 3 12 0 Detroit 050 200 00x — 7 9 0 Peavy, Workman (4), Dempster (6), F.Morales (7), Doubront (8) and Saltalamacchia; Fister, Coke (7), Alburquerque (7), Smyly (7), Benoit (9) and Avila. W—Fister 1-0. L—Peavy 0-1.

Pro Soccer Major League Soccer EASTERN CONFERENCE W L T Pts GF GA x-New York 15 9 8 53 50 39 15 10 7 52 44 29 x-Sporting KC 13 10 9 48 39 37 Houston Montreal 13 12 7 46 48 47 13 12 7 46 44 47 Chicago Philadelphia 12 10 10 46 40 40 New England 12 11 9 45 45 36 Columbus 12 15 5 41 40 42 Toronto FC 5 16 11 26 29 46 D.C. United 3 22 7 16 21 56 WESTERN CONFERENCE W L T Pts GF GA 13 5 14 53 49 33 Portland Real Salt Lake 15 10 7 52 55 40 Los Angeles 15 11 6 51 52 37 Seattle 15 11 6 51 41 39 Colorado 13 10 9 48 42 33 13 11 8 47 33 41 San Jose Vancouver 12 11 9 45 48 42 FC Dallas 10 11 11 41 45 50 6 18 8 26 29 60 Chivas USA NOTE: Three points for victory, one point for tie. x- clinched playoff berth Wednesday, Oct. 16 Los Angeles 1, Montreal 0 Friday, Oct. 18 D.C. United at Sporting Kansas City, 5 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 19 Philadelphia at Montreal, 11 a.m. Seattle FC at FC Dallas, 11:30 a.m. Vancouver at Colorado, 3 p.m. Columbus at New England, 4:30 p.m. Toronto FC at Chicago, 5:30 p.m. Real Salt Lake at Portland, 7:30 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 20 New York at Houston, 2 p.m. San Jose at Los Angeles, 6 p.m.

Pro Football NFL AMERICAN CONFERENCE East W L New England 5 1 3 2 Miami 3 3 N.Y. Jets Buffalo 2 4 South W L Indianapolis 4 2 Tennessee 3 3 2 4 Houston Jacksonville 0 6 North W L 4 2 Cincinnati 3 3 Baltimore 3 3 Cleveland Pittsburgh 1 4 West W L Kansas City 6 0 Denver 6 0 3 3 San Diego Oakland 2 4

T 0 0 0 0 T 0 0 0 0 T 0 0 0 0 T 0 0 0 0

Pct PF .833 125 .600 114 .500 104 .333 136 Pct PF .667 148 .500 128 .333 106 .000 70 Pct PF .667 121 .500 134 .500 118 .200 88 Pct PF 1.000 152 1.000 265 .500 144 .333 105

PA 97 117 135 157 PA 98 115 177 198 PA 111 129 125 116 PA 65 158 138 132

NATIONAL CONFERENCE East W L T Pct PF Philadelphia 3 3 0 .500 166 Dallas 3 3 0 .500 183 1 4 0 .200 107 Washington N.Y. Giants 0 6 0 .000 103 South W L T Pct PF New Orleans 5 1 0 .833 161 Carolina 2 3 0 .400 109 1 4 0 .200 122 Atlanta Tampa Bay 0 5 0 .000 64 North W L T Pct PF Detroit 4 2 0 .667 162 Chicago 4 2 0 .667 172 Green Bay 3 2 0 .600 137 Minnesota 1 4 0 .200 125 West W L T Pct PF Seattle 5 1 0 .833 157 San Francisco 4 2 0 .667 145 3 3 0 .500 141 St. Louis Arizona 3 3 0 .500 111 Today Seattle at Arizona, 5:25 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 20 Tampa Bay at Atlanta, 10 a.m. Chicago at Washington, 10 a.m. Dallas at Philadelphia, 10 a.m. New England at N.Y. Jets, 10 a.m. Buffalo at Miami, 10 a.m. St. Louis at Carolina, 10 a.m. Cincinnati at Detroit, 10 a.m. San Diego at Jacksonville, 10 a.m. San Francisco at Tennessee, 1:05 p.m. Houston at Kansas City, 1:25 p.m. Cleveland at Green Bay, 1:25 p.m. Baltimore at Pittsburgh, 1:25 p.m. Denver at Indianapolis, 5:30 p.m. Open: New Orleans, Oakland Monday, Oct. 21 Minnesota at N.Y. Giants, 5:40 p.m.

PA 179 152 143 209 PA 103 68 134 101 PA 140 161 114 158 PA 94 118 154 127

Blazers 99, Jazz 92

Pro Basketball NBA Preseason EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic W Toronto 4 Brooklyn 3 Philadelphia 1 New York 1 Boston 1 Southeast W Miami 3 2 Charlotte 1 Washington Atlanta 1 Orlando 1 Central W 4 Chicago Cleveland 2 Detroit 1 0 Indiana 0 Milwaukee WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest W New Orleans 4 Houston 3 Dallas 2 1 Memphis San Antonio 0 Northwest W 2 Oklahoma City 2 Minnesota 2 Portland Denver 2 Utah 1 Pacific W L.A. Clippers 3 2 Sacramento 2 Phoenix

2 2 .500 1 2 3 .400 1 1/2 Wednesday’s Games Toronto 99, Boston 97 Dallas 92, Indiana 85 Chicago 96, Detroit 81 Houston 108, Orlando 104 Portland 99, Utah 92 Today’s Games Philadelphia at Charlotte, 8 a.m. New York vs. Washington, 4 p.m. Detroit at Cleveland, 4 p.m. San Antonio at Atlanta, 4:30 p.m. New Orleans vs. Oklahoma City, 5 p.m. Miami at Brooklyn, 5 p.m. Phoenix at Sacramento, 7 p.m. Friday’s Games L.A. Lakers vs. Golden State at Shanghai, China, 4:30 a.m. Memphis at Orlando, 4 p.m. Indiana at Chicago, 5 p.m. Portland at L.A. Clippers, 7:30 p.m. Golden State L.A. Lakers

L 1 1 2 2 5 L 1 2 2 2 3 L 0 1 2 4 4

Pct .800 .750 .333 .333 .167 Pct .750 .500 .333 .333 .250 Pct 1.000 .667 .333 .000 .000

GB — 1/2 2 2 3 1/2 GB — 1 1 1/2 1 1/2 2 GB — 1 1/2 2 1/2 4 4

L 0 1 2 2 2 L 0 1 2 2 3 L 1 1 1

Pct GB 1.000 — .750 1 .500 2 .333 2 1/2 .000 3 Pct GB 1.000 — .667 1/2 .500 1 .500 1 .250 2 Pct GB .750 — 1/2 .667 1/2 .667

PORTLAND (99): Wright 1-2 0-0 3, Aldridge 713 2-5 16, Lopez 6-11 1-4 13, Lillard 7-20 10-10 24, Matthews 3-11 3-6 11, Leonard 0-1 0-0 0, Robinson 0-2 0-0 0, M. Williams 8-13 0-0 17, Barton 4-10 2-4 10, Claver 0-2 1-2 1, Freeland 25 0-0 4. Totals 38-90 19-31 99. UTAH (92): Jefferson 1-2 0-0 2, Favors 4-7 2-2 10, Kanter 10-17 3-4 23, Lucas III 2-5 3-3 8, Hayward 5-16 10-14 20, Burks 1-13 2-4 4, Hudson 3-7 0-1 9, Evans 2-6 3-4 7, Holiday 2-6 3-4 7, Biedrins 1-1 0-0 2. Totals 31-80 26-36 92. Portland 24 17 32 26 — 99 Utah 27 22 23 20 — 92 3-Point Goals—Portland 4-19 (Matthews 2-5, Wright 1-2, M. Williams 1-4, Barton 0-1, Leonard 0-1, Claver 0-2, Lillard 0-4), Utah 4-10 (Hudson 34, Lucas III 1-2, Burks 0-1, Hayward 0-3). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Portland 69 (Lopez 13), Utah 54 (Favors 17). Assists—Portland 18 (Matthews 5), Utah 16 (Hayward 7). Total Fouls— Portland 30, Utah 26. Technicals—Portland delay of game 2, Portland defensive three second 2, Utah delay of game 2. A—19,127 (19,911).

Hockey NHL EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic GP W 7 6 Toronto Detroit 7 5 Montreal 6 4 Tampa Bay 6 4 5 3 Boston Ottawa 6 2 Florida 7 2 8 1 Buffalo Metropolitan GP W Pittsburgh 6 5 7 2 Carolina N.Y. Islanders 6 2 5 2 Columbus N.Y. Rangers 6 2 Washington 7 2 New Jersey 6 0 Philadelphia 7 1 WESTERN CONFERENCE Central GP W Colorado 6 6 6 4 Chicago St. Louis 5 4 Minnesota 7 3 Nashville 6 3 7 3 Winnipeg Dallas 5 2 Pacific GP W 6 6 San Jose

L OT Pts 1 0 12 2 0 10 2 0 8 2 0 8 2 0 6 2 2 6 5 0 4 6 1 3 L OT Pts 1 0 10 2 3 7 2 2 6 3 0 4 4 0 4 5 0 4 3 3 3 6 0 2

GF 27 18 20 23 12 15 16 11 GF 23 15 19 12 11 17 11 10

GA 16 16 10 15 8 19 28 21 GA 15 21 17 12 25 24 21 20

L OT Pts 0 0 12 1 1 9 1 0 8 2 2 8 3 0 6 4 0 6 3 0 4 L OT Pts 0 0 12

GF 21 18 21 17 13 17 11 GF 30

GA 6 15 13 17 18 19 14 GA 9

6 5 1 0 10 21 14 Anaheim Phoenix 7 4 2 1 9 20 21 Calgary 6 3 1 2 8 20 20 7 4 3 0 8 20 22 Vancouver Los Angeles 7 4 3 0 8 17 19 Edmonton 7 1 5 1 3 21 32 NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss. Wednesday’s Games N.Y. Rangers 2, Washington 0 Anaheim 3, Calgary 2 Today’s Games Vancouver at Buffalo, 4 p.m. Carolina at Toronto, 4 p.m. Edmonton at N.Y. Islanders, 4 p.m. Pittsburgh at Philadelphia, 4 p.m. Columbus at Montreal, 4:30 p.m. New Jersey at Ottawa, 4:30 p.m. Minnesota at Tampa Bay, 4:30 p.m. Boston at Florida, 4:30 p.m. St. Louis at Chicago, 5 p.m. Los Angeles at Nashville, 5 p.m. San Jose at Dallas, 5:30 p.m. Detroit at Colorado, 6 p.m. Friday’s Games St. Louis at Winnipeg, 5 p.m. Phoenix at Anaheim, 7 p.m.

Transactions BASEBALL American League CHICAGO WHITE SOX—Acquired LHP Sean Bierman and INF Ben Kline from Tampa Bay to complete an earlier trade. LOS ANGELES ANGELS—Named Don Baylor hitting coach. TEXAS RANGERS—Claimed LHP Edwar Cabrera off waivers from Colorado and placed him on 60-day DL. BASKETBALL National Basketball Association LOS ANGELES LAKERS—Waived G Darius Johnson-Odom. NEW ORLEANS PELICANS—Exercised the thirdyear options on C Anthony Davis and G Austin Rivers. PHILADELPHIA 76ERS—Signed C Daniel Orton. WASHINGTON WIZARDS—Waived C D’Or Fischer. FOOTBALL National Football League NFL—Fined Chicago WR Brandon Marshall $10,500 for wearing green football shoes in an Oct. 10 game against the New York Giants. CAROLINA PANTHERS—Signed LB Jason Williams. Placed G Amini Silatolu on injured reserve. DALLAS COWBOYS—Released DT Jay Ratliff. GREEN BAY PACKERS—Signed WR Tyrone Walker to the practice squad. HOUSTON TEXANS—Placed CB A.J. Bouye and S Danieal Manning on injured reserve. Signed CB Elbert Mack and LB Mike Mohamed. NEW ENGLAND PATRIOTS—Placed LB Jerod Mayo on injured reserve. Re-signed DT Andre Neblett. Signed CB Travis Howard to the practice squad. NEW YORK GIANTS—Signed RB Peyton Hillis. TAMPA BAY BUCCANEERS—Signed WR Skye Dawson from the practice squad. Activated CB Danny Gorrer injured reserve/return and assigned him to the practice squad. Signed OT Emmett Cleary and DB Nick Saenz to the practice squad. Released OT Randy Richards from the practice squad. TENNESSEE TITANS—Signed LB Zac Diles. Waived WR Michael Preston. COLLEGE OKLAHOMA—Announced WR Trey Metoyer has left the football team.


B4 •The World • Thursday,October 17,2013

Sports

Mannion’s passing boosts Beavers in win streak BY ANNE M. PETERSON The Associated Press

There’s some unexpected alliteration among the top quarterbacks in the nation: Heisman hopefuls Johnny Manziel and Marcus Mariota have been joined by Oregon State’s Sean Mannion. The 6-foot-5 junior has thrown for 2,511 total yards with 25 touchdowns and he’s had just three interceptions. He’s averaging an eyepopping 418.5 yards passing a game to lead all FBS quarterbacks, and he’s also the leader in total offense with an average of 406.3 yards a game. A more traditional drop-back passer, Mannion is completing 32.3 passes per game (fourth nationally), and has a quarterback rating of 166.6 (11th), while leading a team that is ranked No. 1 in passing offense. “I think he’s a grounded guy that doesn’t lose sight of why this is happening,” Beavers coach Mike Riley said. “It’s not an accident. He’s well prepared, he’s got experience and he’s got the talent. He understands that preparation is the key.” For comparison’s sake, Manziel has 1,835 yards passing with 14 touchdowns and five interceptions for No. 7 Texas A&M, but he’s also run for 438 yards and five scores, and repeatedly shown that he can take over games — with last Saturday’s 41-38 come-frombehind victory over Mississippi a case in point. Mariota has thrown for 1,724 yards and 17 touchdowns for the second-ranked Ducks, and he has yet to throw an interception. The

unflappable sophomore is also capable on his feet, with eight rushing touchdowns. As with Manziel, Mariota benefits from a higher national profile than Mannion. Other quarterbacks in the national conversation include Clemson’s Tajh Boyd, UCLA’s Brett Hundley, Florida State’s Jameis Winston and Louisville’s Teddy Bridgewater. Mannion is starting to generate more buzz, however, including a fledgling “HeisMannion” hashtag on Twitter. His accomplishments come despite an offensive line that has been in flux. He’s also been lauded for carrying the Beavers while their running game has faltered. In Oregon State’s 52-24 victory over Washington State on Saturday, Mannion threw for 493 yards and four touchdowns. The Beavers rallied from a third-quarter deficit with five unanswered touchdowns. Brandin Cooks, Mannion’s favorite target, caught 11 passes for 137 yards and two TDs, raising the total touchdowns between the two to 18, a new school record. “Have we? Oh geez. I didn’t even know,” Mannion said. In equally humble fashion, Mannion is all about his teammates. “We feel good about our team,” he said. “We feel we’re getting better and better each week. Honestly, from our perspective, we let our play take care of itself. If we can continue to play good football, only good things are going to happen for us.” Oregon State was undecided at quarterback heading into the sea-

son. Riley was evaluating both Mannion and senior Cody Vaz, both of whom saw success last season when the Beavers went 9-4 after winning just three games in 2011. Mannion started Oregon State’s first four games last season but injured his left knee and required arthroscopic surgery. Vaz stepped in and won the next two games, giving the Beavers their best start since they also went 6-0 in 1907. Mannion finished with 2,446 yards and 15 touchdowns with eight starts in 10 appearances, while Vaz, hampered late in the season by a left ankle injury, threw for 1,480 yards and 11 touchdowns in seven games and five starts. Riley settled on Mannion a week before this season’s opener against Eastern Washington. “Sean’s attributes are obviously his ability to get the ball just about wherever you want on the field,” Riley said at the time. “Along with his knowledge about where we’re going and what he should do with the ball.” Oregon State was ranked No. 25 in the preseason, but the opener was a disaster with the Beavers falling 49-46 to the lower-division Eagles. They’ve rebounded since, winning five straight and going undefeated so far in three conference games. The Beavers travel Saturday to California (1-5, 0-3) which is adjusting under new coach Sonny Dykes. The Golden Bears are wary of Mannion because they rank last in the Pac-12 in pass defense, allowing opponents an average of 321.8 yards a game. “He’s just a good player,” Dykes

The Associated Press

Oregon State quarterback Sean Mannion attempts a pass during the first quarter against Washington State on Saturday. said. “He makes good decisions, he’s very, very accurate and he gets the ball out on time. They execute their offense very well.” Dykes should probably confer with Colorado coach Mike MacIntyre. Mannion threw six touchdowns in a 44-17 victory over

UCLA can jump in prominence

the Buffaloes late last month. “He’s kind of a daredevil when he throws it,” MacIntyre said. “He threw into double-coverage three times against us and three times Cooks came up with it. We should have had three picks, but Sean Mannion can throw the football.”

Playoff committee expects scrutiny BY RALPH D. RUSSO

BY RALPH D. RUSSO The Associated Press

The Pac-12’s game of the year has been tentatively scheduled for Nov. 7 between Stanford and Oregon on The Farm. Stanford’s loss at Utah last week put a dent in those plans. No. 9 UCLA can totally blow them up Saturday by handing the 13th-ranked Cardinal a second straight loss. That would turn the Oregon-UCLA game Oct. 26 into a top-10 — maybe even top-five — Pac-12 matchup, and make the Bruins a national championship contender in late October for the first time in a while. “We’re only thinking about this week and playing Stanford,” UCLA coach Jim Mora said. “It’s an opportunity for us to go on the road and play a very, very good football team. A team that beat us in the Pac-12 championship game. A team that we have a ton of respect for.” A Bruins victory could also send quarterback Brett Hundley surging up those Heisman Trophy watch lists. The last time UCLA was ranked higher than this was 2001. Those Bruins reached No. 4, and then dropped four straight, starting with a late October loss to Stanford. The Atlantic Coast Conference game of the year came off as planned. No. 5 Florida State at No. 3

College Picks

Clemson on Saturday, the first top-five matchup of ACC teams since 2005 (No. 5 Miami 27, No. 3 Virginia Tech 7) and only the fourth in league history. “It’s great for our conference,” Clemson coach Dabo Swinney said. “We’re the only league that’s got three undefeated teams.” No. 10 Miami will try to stay that way tonight at North Carolina. Barring some big upsets down the road, ClemsonFlorida State should settle the Atlantic Division race. Florida State does play Miami in a couple weeks, which could be an old-school ‘Canes-’Noles game, featuring two top-10 teams. Neither the Tigers nor Seminoles have No. 19 Virginia Tech on the schedule. If a game of the year does exist in the American Athletic Conference, it could very well be Friday night at Louisville. Teddy Bridgewater and the eighthranked Cardinals face Central Florida (4-1). The Knights are probably the most talented team on Louisville’s schedule, led by quarterback Blake Bortles and linebacker Terrance Plummer. If they can’t derail the Cardinals’ perfect season, who can? The picks: MAIN EVENT No. 5 Florida State (minus 3) at No. 3 Clemson: Jameis Winston is about to become even more famous ... FLORIDA STATE 42-35. MARQUEE MATCHUPS 1 No. 6 LSU (minus 7 ⁄2) at Mississippi: Three of last four

The Associated Press

The Associated Press

UCLA quarterback Brett Hundley runs the ball as California cornerback Cameron Walker gives chase during Saturday’s game. meetings decided by a touchdown or less ... LSU 35-31. No. 24 Auburn (plus 131⁄2) at No. 7 Texas A&M: Tigers ranked for first time since late 2011 ... TEXAS A&M 5235. No. 9 UCLA (plus 5) at No. 13 Stanford: Bruins can attack edges of Cardinal D like Utah ... UCLA 31-24. UCF (plus 12) at No. 8 Louisville, Friday: Bridgewater vs. Bortles is second-best quarterback matchup of weekend ... LOUISVILLE 28-21. No. 22 Florida (minus 3) at No. 14 Missouri: Tigers turn to redshirt freshman QB Maty Mauk ... MISSOURI 24-20. UPSET SPECIAL No. 20 Washington (plus 3) at Arizona State: Huskies have type of tough defensive front that gives Sun Devils problems ... WASHINGTON 35-28. PLUCKY UNDERDOGS No. 10 Miami (minus 81⁄2) at North Carolina, Thursday ... MIAMI 24-17. No. 11 South Carolina 1 (minus 7 ⁄2) at Tennessee ... SOUTH CAROLINA 28-17. 1 No. 15 Georgia (minus 8 ⁄2) at Vanderbilt ... GEORGIA 35-23.

No. 16 Texas Tech (minus 7) at West Virginia ... WEST VIRGINIA 31-28. TCU (plus 7) at No. 21 Oklahoma State ... OKLAHOMA STATE 30-21. No. 23 Northern Illinois (minus 17) at Central Michigan ... NORTHERN ILLINOIS 28-20. Tar Heels are desperate. Second straight road game for Gamecocks; Vols, meanwhile, were off last week. Road trips and injury concerns for Georgia and Texas Tech. Horned Frogs and Cowboys are hard to figure. Five of six games for Huskies have been decided by 14 or less. MISMATCHES Arkansas (plus 28) at No. 1 Alabama ... ALABAMA 4210. Washington State (plus 38) at No. 2 Oregon ... OREGON 58-17. 1 Iowa (plus 16 ⁄2) at No. 4 Ohio State ... OHIO STATE 35-14. Iowa State (plus 311⁄2) at No. 12 Baylor ... BAYLOR 5621. UNLV (plus 231⁄2) at No. 17 Fresno State ... FRESNO STATE 45-20. No. 18 Oklahoma (minus 1 23 ⁄2) at Kansas ... OKLAHOMA 35-10.

Cardinals should challenge Seahawks BY BARRY WILNER The Associated Press The last time Seattle and Arizona met, the Seahawks handed the Cardinals a 58-0 whipping, the worst defeat in franchise history. That game was in Seattle, where the Seahawks are nearly unbeatable. And it was at the end of Ken Whisenhunt’s regime as Arizona coach last December. Now, Bruce Arians is in charge of the Cardinals, and they have been competitive in all but one game while going 3-3. They are 2-0 at home heading into tonight, 1 when they will be 6 ⁄2-point underdogs. The reason they’ve kept things close is their defense, especially against the run.

Pro Picks

And it will be challenged by Seattle’s Marshawn Lynch, who has 487 yards and five TDs on the ground. Lynch is bothered by a hip injury, but he had a similar problem last week then played in a win over Tennessee. The Seahawks (5-1) have allowed fewer points than any team that has played six games except Kansas City. Their secondary, led by Richard Sherman, will be ball-hawking all night, knowing that Carson Palmer has been picked 11 times. Look for Seattle to add to Palmer’s interceptions total, but also look for Arizona to keep it much closer than 58 points ... SEAHAWKS, 20-14 Tampa Bay (plus 7) at Atlanta: At some point, the Falcons have to look like the Falcons we expected ... BEST BET: FALCONS, 26-13. Baltimore (plus 2) at Pittsburgh: Some think

Steelers turned a corner with first win. We’re not so sure ... UPSET SPECIAL: RAVENS, 20-19. 1 Denver (minus 6 ⁄ 2) at Indianapolis: Happy returns for Peyton in a game he wants very badly ... BRONCOS, 3327. Chicago (minus 1) at Washington: Bears head to bye with stake of first place in NFC North ... BEARS, 31-26. Cleveland (plus 10) at Green Bay: Packers are too banged-up to rout Browns ... PACKERS, 21-13. New England (minus 4) at New York Jets: Speaking of banged-up, look at both of these rosters ... PATRIOTS, 13-10. 1 Houston (plus 6 ⁄ 2) at Kansas City: Tough to pick Texans until they show us something ... CHIEFS, 19-10. Dallas (plus 3) at Philadelphia: LeSean McCoy will be the difference ...

EAGLES, 28-27. 1 Cincinnati (plus 2 ⁄2) at Detroit: Reggie Bush will be the difference ... LIONS, 2720. 1 San Diego (minus 7 ⁄2) at Jacksonville: Cross-country trip, coming off Monday nighter. Bad vibes for Chargers. Still ... CHARGERS, 28-13. Minnesota (plus 3) at New York Giants: Monday night classic: 1-4 vs. 0-6. Giants get first win ... GIANTS, 2416. 1 Buffalo (plus 8 ⁄ 2) at Miami: Time for Dolphins to assert themselves in home divisional game ... DOLPHINS, 23-16. 1 San Francisco (minus 4 ⁄2) at Tennessee: Niners conquer Music City, then head to London ... 49ERS, 28-20. St. Louis (plus 6) at Carolina: Two wildly inconsistent teams. Take the hosts, barely ... PANTHERS, 17-16.

The most scrutinized committee in sports has been set. The members say they’ll need thick skin, plenty of time and the ability to leave their loyalties behind to pick the four teams that will play for college football’s national title next year. They say they are ready for the pressure. “I think I’ve experienced plenty of heat in my life,” former Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice said. Rice, former Nebraska coach Tom Osborne and College Football Hall of Fame quarterback Archie Manning are among the 13 people who will be part of the College Football Playoff selection committee in 2014. The committee was officially unveiled Wednesday. The College Football Playoff will replace the Bowl Championship Series. The selection committee will work similarly to the one that picks the teams for the NCAA basketball tournament, though instead of 68 teams it will choose and seed four to play in the semifinals. The winners of those games, played on a rotating basis at six bowl sites, will meet a week later for the national championship. “There will undoubtedly be people who disagree with the outcome,” Rice said. Rice was a surprising pick to be part of the committee because she has never worked directly in college athletics, though when she was provost at Stanford the athletic department was under her supervision and she hired Tyrone Willingham as football coach. She called herself a “student of the game.” “What I can hopefully bring to this committee is critical judgment and the willingness to work real hard ... to put the best four teams on the field,” she said. Rice, who grew up in Alabama, said college football has been trying to come up with a way to crown a champion for years and mentioned how the 1966 championship was muddled when Notre Dame and Michigan State played to a tie. Notre Dame was voted champion by the coaches’ and AP polls, but Alabama went 11-0. “It enhances head-tohead competition,” Rice said about the new system. She said Pac-12 Commissioner Larry Scott approached her about being part of the committee. “Condi definitely earned her spot on this committee,” said Bill Hancock, the execu-

tive director of the BCS. “Obviously, part of this is going to be the ability to make judgments under scrutiny, and Condi has that.” Rice is the only woman on the committee. Some, such as former Auburn coach Pat Dye and former Georgia star and ESPN analyst David Pollack, have said they would prefer only those who have played football to be on the committee. “I’ve been in enough positions to respect people who have different views,” Rice said. “I will work very hard reviewing film to make good judgments.” She added: “I don’t feel I’m carrying the banner for anyone except those of us who love college football.” The panel is made up of five current athletic directors, former players and coaches and college administrators, and a former member of the media. “Our work will be difficult, but rewarding at the same time,” Arkansas athletic director and committee chairman Jeff Long said. “We have important judgments to make during that process. We realize we represent all of college football.” The rest of the members are: Barry Alvarez, athletic director, Wisconsin; Lt. Gen. Mike Gould, former superintendent of the United States Air Force Academy; Pat Haden, athletic director, Southern California; Tom Jernstedt, former NCAA executive vice president; Oliver Luck, athletic director, West Virginia; Dan Radakovich, athletic director, Clemson; Steve Wieberg, former college football reporter, USA Today; Willingham, former head coach of Notre Dame, Stanford and Washington; Mike Tranghese, former commissioner of the Big East Conference. Hancock said term limits for committee members will eventually be three years, but that will not be the case for all the current members because they do not want to replace the entire committee at once. “We haven’t worked out the stagger yet,” Hancock said. Committee members will recuse themselves when a team they have a direct relationship with comes up in meetings. “It’s imperative for all committee members to check their loyalties and affiliations before entering the meeting room,” Jernstedt said. Hancock said the committee members will be allowed to examine whatever data they believe is relevant. “No one single metric will be identified as paramount over all other data,” he said.


Thursday, October 17,2013 • The World •BB55

Classifieds Theworldlink.com/classifieds

Employment 200 204 Banking We are excited to announce an available position in Myrtle Point, Oregon.

Care Giving 225 HARMONY HOMECARE “Quality Caregivers provide Assisted living in your home”. 541-260-1788

Business 300

Salary Range: $ 10.00 - $19.00 EOE. For more details please apply online: www.myfirstccu.org

304 Financing Full-Time Teller in North Bend, Oregon. Salary Range: $ 9.00 - $17.00 EOE For more details please apply online: www.myfirstccu.org

207 Drivers

$$EASY QUALIFYING real estate equity loans. Credit no problem. Oregon Land Mortgage. 541-267-2776. ML-4645.

306 Jobs Wanted Interest List for future openings: Independent Contract Newspaper Carrier. Contact Susana Norton at 541-269-1222 ext. 255

ONCE A WEEK DELIVERY The World Link- Free Paper. Contact Susana Norton at 541-269-1222 ext. 255

Notices 400

School Bus Driver needed in the North Bend/Coos Bay area for South Coast Head Start, a part of Oregon Coast Community Action. Must be able to pass a Background Check, and pre employment Drug Test. Interested applicants can call 541-888-3717 or for more info. visit www.orcca.us for more info. Closes 10/21/13. EOE

211 Health Care Care provider Position now available at Harmony Estate Care Center, Bandon Oregon. Experience administering medication a plus. 541-404-1825

403 Found All free ads must fit the criteria listed below. They also include free photo.

NOW HIRING — IMMEDIATE NEED — APPLY TODAY! www.charter.com/careers Our Coos Bay office has an opening for an installer in our Coos Bay office. Training provided. Job description online. Part time/ Temporary Lab Assistant must have good hand skills. 24 Hrs/ week. M/ W/F . Mail to The World 350 Commercial Ave Coos Bay Or. 97420 Box #0334

RENTALS & REAL ESTATE SPECIALS Choose any of these specials and add a photo for $5.00 extra.

$35.00 Rentals / Real Estate 2

4 week - 6 lines,

All specials will appear in The World, Bandon Western World, Umpqua Post, Wednesday Weekly, Online & Smart Mobile. All specials are category specific. There are no refunds on specials.

Lost & Lost Pets

Services 425 I do housecleaning. I am honest, hardworking, reliable, and efficient. $12.50 w/ 2 Hr. Minimum.CB/ NB areas. Please call 541-217-0819.

Real Estate 500 PUBLISHER’S NOTICE All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitations or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention, to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination.” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-669-9777. The toll-free telephone number for the impaired is hearing 1-800-927-9275.

Rentals 600 601 Apartments Available Now! 3 bed. Townhouse setting. in like a park Stove/Fridge/Drapes. W/D Hook ups W/G pd. $530. Apply at 324 Ackerman 541-888-4762

New professional office space in Coquille. 1000 Sq. Ft., pre-wired for data, phone and cable. $790 month plus move in specials. 541-396-3682 or 541-297-5446.

2 bedroom, 1 bath, Garage W/D hookup. Quite - Empire Lake Area. Garbage paid. No pet/ smoking $750. + dep. 275 Ackerman. 541-888-5310 for application Coquille- Immaculate 2-1/2 bdr, one bath duplex located in a quite, park like setting. $575 mo. plus $300 deposit. Carpet, stove, fridge, blinds, w/d hookup, Water/Garbage paid. Sorry, no pets. 541-396-4398 MUST SEE! Newly refurbished unit. 2 bedroom, 1 bath. Hardwood & laminate flooring, granite counter tops, fireplace, W/D in unit, carport, patio. 1.5 blocks West of BAH, W/S/G paid. No smoking/pets. Only $800/mo + cleaning & security dep. Call for appointment. 541-267-2626.

614 Warehouses RENTALS & REAL ESTATE SPECIALS Choose any of these specials and add a photo for $5.00 extra.

Rentals / Real Estate 1

Large Studio C.B. $450. Studio C.B. $395. Studio N.B. $425. 1 bedroom C.B 525. Call for info.

Rentals / Real Estate 2

541-297-4834

Rentals / Real Estate 3

Willett Investment Properties

3 week - 6 lines,

CB Clean 3 bedroom, 1 bath home. New carpet, Wood Stove, Dishwasher & disposal, appliances Garage. No smoking/ Animals. $875/mo. + deposit. Call 541-756-3957. 3 bed 1 bath w/ detached garage and Boat house on N. Ten Mile lake. $900 plus Dep. 541-759-2958 Clean 2+ BR. 1 Bth. Unfurnished home in North Bend w/sun porch, garage. Wind free area near Simpson Park. Wood Stove, Appliances, dishwasher, W/D hook ups. $800 first, last. Call Brooks at 541-808-1009

2 week - 6 lines,

$45.00

$55.00 Rentals / Real Estate 4 4 week - 6 lines,

$59.95 All specials will appear in The World, Bandon Western World, Umpqua Post, Wednesday Weekly, Online & Smart Mobile. All specials are category specific. There are no refunds on specials.

541-267-6278

RURAL SUBSCRIBERS: Due to The World’ s expansive daily delivery area, rural or remote motor route customers may receive regular delivery later than the times above. Missed deliveries may be replaced the following delivery day. To report missed deliveries, please call 541-269-9999.

707 Tools 710 Miscellaneous For sale: 3-drawer black file cabinet w/casters & lock; 1-pencil / paper drawer; 2-letter size file drawers; 541-271-0508. $40. obo

777 Computers Laptop computer. Windows 7- Intel processor 4g ram $225 call 541-297-6019

778 Games Play Station II w/controllers. Several games for $3 ea. 541-888-6097 $35

Pets/Animals 800

802 Cats

Light Truck & SUV Tire Chains. Never used.$50 541-888-6097 Meat/ Sausage H.D. Grinder $25. 2 WB Scanners $10 & $15. Electric Slicer $25. 12 Qt. S.S. Stock pot and S.S. Bowl $20. 541-888-9746

Market Place 750

Kohl’s Cat House Adoptions on site. 541-294-3876

803 Dogs

754 Garage Sales

“MAKE ME AN OFFER” Estate Sale: Fri Oct 18th-Sunday 20th from 9-4! Featuring furniture, tools, building supplies and more. Located 48180 Highway 101, Langlois Coos Bay Estate/ Garage Sale. Books, Furniture, Glassware, VitaMix, Toys, Jewelry, Sewing Machines. Fri & Sat 8-4 Sat, most 1/2 price at Noon 62176 Olive Barber 3 miles from Eastside Bridge See photos on Facebook White Raven Estate Sales Coos Bay: 64652 Duling Rd. Thurs/Fri/Sat/Sun 8:30-4:30pm. Household items, Furnishings, Tools, Fishing, Antlers, mounted and unmounted. Much more! Coos Bay: 91601 Cape Arago Dr. Fri and Sun.9-5pm. Household Items, Furniture, Tools and New Bike. All quality items. CRAFT VENDORS WANTED. Dec. 7th 9-3pm. Holly Jolly Bazaar to benefit Cartwheels Pre-School. Call Carmel @ 541-888-2050 EASTSIDE: Furniture, antiques, bedding, kitchen wares, crafts, books, decorations and more! Fri 9-3 and Sat 9-3 710 16th Ave. Eastside follow signs from “F” by Coachouse Eastside: Moving Sale at the Storage unit behind the Coach House Restuarant. Oct 17, 18 & 19th 9-3pm. Furtniture, Household items, clothes, Patio furniture .

Pets All pet ads includes Photos and must be classified in categories 801 to 824

Good Ad - $10.00 3 lines - 1 week in The World, World, Western Bandon Umpqua Post, The World link, theworldlink.com and Smart Mobiles.

Better Ad - $12.00 4 lines - 2 week in The World, Bandon Western World, Umpqua Post, The World link, theworldlink.com and Smart Mobile.

Best Ad - $17.00 (includes boxing) 6 lines - 3 week in The World, Bandon Western World, Umpqua Post, and The World and link, theworldlink.com Smart Mobile.

808 Pet Care Pet Cremation 541-267-3131

901 ATVs

Free Ads

Garage Sales All garage sale ads includes Photos and must be classified in categories 751 to 756 & 826 to 830

For Rent 2 bedroom. 1bth house. large yard, close to shopping and North Bend schools. Garbage paid. No smoking. $525 mo. $300 dep. 2312 Everett 541-756-7758.

4 lines - 1 week in The World, Bandon Western World, Umpqua Post, The World link, theworldlink.com and Smart Mobiles.

8-27-12

Hydro-Massage 8 Jet Bathtub, Never Installed, never used ,kept inside, Ultra jet Pump & Heater $1500 obo. Call 541-404-5607

Small Cehinator upright Freezer, Apt. Size, Good Condition $50. Whirl pool combo Refrigerator/Freezer. 15.5 cubic ft. good condition $50. 541-808-0534

All free ads must fit the criteria listed below. They also include free photo.

Merchandise for Sale under $500 total.

ADVERTISING POLICY The Publisher, Southwestern Oregon Publishing Co., shall not be liable for any error in published advertising unless

Best Ad - $12.00 (includes a photo & boxing) 6 lines - 3 week in The World, Bandon Western World, Umpqua Post, and The World link, theworldlink.com and Smart Mobile.

776 Appliances

8x11 AREA RUG, excellent condition $150. 3 Bentwood oak bar stools, $25 each. 541-944-7976.

AUTO / VEHICLES / BOATS & TRAILERS All Auto ads must be classified in categories 901 to 946

Good Ad - $12.00 4 lines - 1 day in The World, Bandon Western World, Umpqua Post, The World link, theworldlink.com and Smart Mobiles.

Good Ad - $12.00 3 lines - 1 week in The World, World, Western Bandon Umpqua Post, The World link, theworldlink.com and Smart Mobiles.

Better Ad - $17.00 (includes boxing) 5 lines - 2 days in The World, 1 day in Bandon Western World, Umpqua Post, The World link, 7 days on theworldlink.com and Smart Mobile.

Serving Oregon’s South Coast Since 1878

If your World newspaper fails to arrive by 5 p.m. Monday through Thursday or 8 a.m. on Saturday, please call your carrier. If you are unable to reach your carrier, telephone The World at 541-269-9999.

The very best SEASONED HARDWOOD, no green wood. $210 cord, includes delivery. 4x4x8. 541-751-0766.

Better Ad - $7.00 4 lines - 2 week in The World, Bandon Western World, Umpqua Post, The World link, theworldlink.com and Smart Mobile.

701 Furniture

Coos Bay: Nice 2 bdrm., 2 bath w/ basement. Appliances and W/D included. Pellet stove. N/S, pets on approval $950 mo plus $1000 dep. References Required. 541-756-4702

an advertising proof is requested in writing and clearly marked for corrections. If the error is not corrected by the Publisher, its liability, if any, shall not exceed the space occupied by the error. Further, the Publisher will reschedule and run the omitted advertisement at advertiser’s cost. All claims for adjustment must be made within seven (7) days of date of publication. In no case shall the Publisher be liable for any general, special or consequential damages.

Mahogany porcelain gas stove w/ Accessories and stack $1800 obo. 541-759-2958

Other Stuff 700

North Bend: 3 Bed 2 Bath, Large yard and Garage. Nice area! Pets Neg. $1075 per mo. Plus $1075 cleaning dep. 541-756-5429

HOME DELIVERY SERVICE: For Customer Service call 541-269-1222 Ext. 247 Office hours: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday-Friday.

3 lines - 1 week in The World, Bandon Western World, Umpqua Post, The World link, theworldlink.com and Smart Mobiles.

608 Office Space

$35.00

604 Homes Unfurnished

Good Ad - $5.00

Harding Production Lathe with a turrete cross feed with some tooling 5C collet. $1200. 541-756-5109

APARTMENTS AVAILABLE

North Bend One bed. close to shopping & schools. W/G incl. No pets/smoking. $495/$400 dep. 1189 Virginia #2 541-267-0125 or 541-297-6752

All merchandise ads must be classified in categories 700 to 710 & 775 to 799

706 Remodeling

1 week - 6 lines,

Beautifully renovated 1 BR loft apartment with large beautiful Bathroom w/skylights in historic downtown Coquille. $500/mo + $500 Security deposit. No pets /no smoking. S/W incl. 541-680-8805

Merchandise

COQUILLE: Immaculate 3 bd. 2 bath home. Close to town. Includes refrig, stove, dishwasher. Nice deck off back and separate small shop/storage. Room to park RV or boat. No Smoking allowed. No pets allowed. Good rental references. $800 month/$900 sec dep. Call 541-404-5075.

610 2-4-6 Plexes

$45.00

541-267-6278

6 lines - 3 week in The World, World, Western Bandon Umpqua Post, and The World and link, theworldlink.com Smart Mobile.

SIMPSONS HEIGHTS: 2-3 bedroom, 1.5 bath house. Wood floors/ fireplace. $925/month, + deposit. Pets negotiable. Available now! References required. 541-751-7999.

2 week - 6 lines,

$59.95

501 Commercial

213 General

510 Wanted

4 lines - 1 week in The World, Bandon Western World, Umpqua Post, The World link, theworldlink.com and Smart Mobiles.

for full time associates. Please apply in person at 2890 Ocean Boulevard Coos Bay, OR 97420

for full time associates. Please apply in person at 2890 Ocean Boulevard Coos Bay, OR 97420

REEDSPORT FOR SALE BY OWNER. Duplex 1 & 2 bedroom. 362 North 9th St. $70,000. Cash Clear Title 541-361-6274

Rentals / Real Estate 4

Found & Found Pets

North Bend: Simpson Heights Area. 2 bedroom, 1 bath, appliances, W/D hookups, fenced yard, very nice neighborhood, no smoking. $750/month + deposit. Pets negotiable. 541-294-5271

507 2-4-6 Plexes

Merchandise for Sale under $500 total.

4 lines - 1 week in The World, World, Western Bandon Umpqua Post, The World link, theworldlink.com and Smart Mobile.

Myrtle Point, Clean 2 bedroom, 1 bath home, garage, outside building for workshop/garden tools, No smoking property, No pets allowed. Good rental references. $650 month plus $750 security deposit. Call 541-404-5075

606 Manufactured

$55.00

$1000 sign on bonus

$5000 sign on bonus

541-297-4834

3 week - 6 lines,

428 Housekeeping

RN-

WANTED:HOUSE Coos Bay or North Bend area for under $50,000, in any condition. Have cash and can close quickly. Call Howard

Rentals / Real Estate 3

Needed

CNA-

Coquille: 3 bdrm 1 bath, w/attached garage, fenced back yard w/apple tree, hardwood floors, fireplace w/ insert, vinyl windows & siding. $139,000. 541-260-3919

1 week - 6 lines,

Free Ads

755 Market Basket U - PICK CRANBERRIES one week only, Oct. 19 - 26. 11-4pm Highway 101 S. at Hoopla Ln. 2.5 miles S. of Bandon. Farmstand open for pre pick berries and Jam. 541-260-7775

756 Wood/Heating RECENTLY REDUCED! 1996 Manufactured home. Large living Room w/ Sunporch. Formal Dinning Room- 3 Bedrooms/ 2 Bth, open kitchen. 2 car Garage plus Shop. Was $179,000 NOW $165,000. Call 541-267-3639.

Rentals / Real Estate 1

CAREGIVERS Caregivers needed in The Coos Bay Area and Reedsport area for State contracted Christian inhome care agency. Must have reliable transportation, be 18 or older, pass a criminal background check, have a high school or equivalent education with current auto insurance. Please call Donna 541-808-2355 M-F, 9-3.

701 Furniture

227 Elderly Care

Financial Services Representative

We are excited to announce an available position for a

Homes Unfurnished Value V l 604Ads Ad

504 Homes for Sale

Better Ad - $15.00 (includes a photo) 6 lines - 2 week in The World, World, Western Bandon Umpqua Post, The World link, theworldlink.com and Smart Mobile.

Best Ad - $20.00

Found & Found Pets 4 lines - 1 week in The World, World, Western Bandon Umpqua Post, The World link, theworldlink.com and Smart Mobile.

Lost & Lost Pets 6 lines - 3 week in The World, Bandon Western World, Umpqua Post, and The World and link, theworldlink.com Smart Mobile. Older wood Dinette Table $40 and 3 Gallon round Aquarium $15 Call 541-266-7096

(includes boxing) 5 lines - 1 week in The World, Western World, Bandon Umpqua Post, and The World link, theworldlink.com and Smart Mobile.

Best Ad - $25.00 (includes a photo & boxing) 6 lines - 3 week in The World, Bandon Western World, Umpqua Post, and The World and link, theworldlink.com Smart Mobile.

PORT ORFORD: ESTATE SALE Fri & Sat, 9-4, Tons of Tools, Hand & Machine, Saws, Tool Boxes, Large Variety, Furniture, Dragons, Much More. CASH ONLY 13th & Idaho, Port Orford

755 Market Basket For Sale: Fresh picked King Apples. Great for baking or eating. Hand picked .45 cent lb./Windfalls .25 lb. Free Delivery. 541-756-4885

Two 07 Honda EX400’s ( Black, Red) titles and manual included. Trailer 6 1/2 x 16. All in immaculate conditon. All three $9800, can separate, make offer. Call 541-751-1306


B6• The World •Thursday, October 17,2013

909 Misc. Auto

914 Travel Trailers NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE

HONDA WORLD

$5,990 2006 Ford Focus SE 3-Door, One Owner, Low Miles. #13246B/317142

$7,990 2008 Kia Spectra Auto, 4-Door, Air, Low Miles, Clean. #B3390A/617112

For Sale: 30’ 2005 Open Road travel trailer with 14’ tip-out; walk around bed; two 12.5 gallon propane tanks; leveler jacks; furnace; sleeps 4; like new, used only 3 times. See to appreciate. $18,000 obo. 541-267-2678

915 Used Cars 1999 Buick Regal LE , Auto, V6, Leather, Sunroof, 200K, $2200. 541-267-4794

918 Vans

On Monday, November 18, 2013 at the hour of 10:00 a.m. at the Front Door of the Coos County Courthouse, 250 North Baxter St. Coquille, Oregon, the defendant’s interest will be sold, subject to redemption, in the real property commonly known as: 975 16th Street, Coquille, OR 97423,. The court case number is 13CV0324, where PHH Mortgage Corporation is plaintiff, and Duane C. Runkle, Deborah Runkle, Western Mercantile Agency, Credit Services of Oregon, Other Persons or Parties, including Occupants, unknown claiming any right, title, lien, or interest in the described Property, is defendant. The sale is a public auction to the highest bidder for cash or cashier’s check, in hand, made out to Coos County Sheriff’s Office. For more information on this sale go to: www.oregonsheriffs.com/sales.htm PUBLISHED: The World-October 17, 24, 31 and November 07, 2013 (ID-20240359)

$9,990 2005 Nissan Altima SE V6, Well Equipped. #B3320A/064113

NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE

$13,990 2006 Honda Pilot EXL 4x4, Moon Roof, Leather, More! #B34015/518677

$14,990 2006 Dodge Dakota SLE Ex Cab, 4x4, 18K Miles, Auto, V6, One Owner. #B3404/617112

$16,990 2008 Ford Explorer XLT 4x4, One Owner, Low Miles. #B3369/A62307

$16,990 2000 Toyota Tundra Access Cab 4x4, One Owner, 56K Miles, Clean. #B3412/125856

2005 Nissan Quest Van, runs great, nice shape, very reliable, 81.5 K miles $7800. 541-347-3478

Legals 100 NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE On November 18, 2013 at the hour of 10:00 a.m. at the Front Door of the Coos County Courthouse, 250 North Baxter St. Coquille, Oregon, the defendant’s interest will be sold, subject to redemption, in the real property commonly known as: 70909 Devore Arm Road, Lakeside OR 97449. The court case number is 12CV0254, where U.S. Bank is plaintiff, and Gary W. Baumgartner; Patricia K. Baumgartner and Occupants of the Premises, is defendant. The sale is a public auction to the highest bidder for cash or cashier’s check, in hand, made out to Coos County Sheriff’s Office. For more information on this sale go to: www.oregonsheriffs.com/sales.htm PUBLISHED: The World- October 17, 24, 31 and November 07, 2013 (ID-20240356)

$22,990 2004 GMC 2500 HD 4x4 Ext Cab One Owner, Duramax Diesel, SLE, Low Miles. #B3397A/218312

1350 Ocean Blvd., Coos Bay

HondaWorld.com 541-888-5588 • 1-800-634-1054

NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE On November 18, 2013 at the hour of 10:00 a.m. at the Front Door of the Coos County Courthouse, 250 North Baxter St. Coquille, Oregon, the defendant’s interest will be sold, subject to redemption, in the real property commonly known as: 2755 33rd St Coos Bay OR 97420. The court case number is 13CV0273, where JPMorgan Chase Bank, NA, is plaintiff, and Joseph W. Nelson; State of Oregon, Department of Justice; Occupants of the Property is defendant. The sale is a public auction to the highest bidder for cash or cashier’s check, in hand, made out to Coos County Sheriff’s Office. For more information on this sale go to: www.oregonsheriffs.com/sales.htm PUBLISHED: The World- October 03, 10, 17 and 24, 2013 (ID-20239882)

On Monday, November 18, 2013 at the hour of 10:00 a.m. at the Front Door of the Coos County Courthouse, 250 North Baxter St. Coquille, Oregon, the defendant’s interest will be sold, subject to redemption, in the real property commonly known as: 93663 and 93750 White Lane, North Bend OR 97459,. The court case number is 13CV0655, where William R. Evans and Jacqlyn R, Evans is plaintiff, and Ronda K. Potter, is defendant. The sale is a public auction to the highest bidder for cash or cashier’s check, in hand, made out to Coos County Sheriff’s Office. For more information on this sale go to: www.oregonsheriffs.com/sales.htm PUBLISHED: The World- October 17, 24, 31 and November 07, 2013 (ID-20240358)

OREGON TRUSTEE’S NOTICE OF SALE T.S. No: L543431 OR Unit Code: L Loan No: 37217027/ELDER AP #1: 1139904 Title #: 8335073 Reference is made to that certain Trust Deed made by VICKI L. ELDER as Grantor, to RURAL HOUSING SERVICE OR ITS SUCCESSOR AGENCY, UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE as Trustee, in favor of UNITED STATES OF AMERICA ACTING THROUGH THE RURAL HOUSING SERVICE OR SUCCESSORS AGENCY, UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE as Beneficiary. Dated April 16, 2009, Recorded April 16, 2009 as Instr. No. 2009-3462 in Book —- Page —- of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of COOS County; OREGON SUBSIDY REPAYMENT AGREEMENT DATED 4/16/09 covering the following described real property situated in said county and state, to wit: THE E 1/2 OF THE FOLLOWING DESCRIBED PARCEL TO-WIT: A PARCEL SITUATED IN SECTION 16, TOWNSHIP 29 SOUTH, RANGE 12 WEST OF THE WILLAMETTE MERIDIAN, COOS COUNTY, OREGON, DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: BEGINNING AT A PIPE POST WHICH IS IN THE NORTH BOUNDARY OF STOVER LANE AND 1279 FEET SOUTH AND 1136.97 FEET EAST OF THE CENTER OF SAID SECTION 16; THENCE NORTH 361 FEET TO A PIPE POST; THENCE SOUTH 89 DEGREES 30’ EAST 175 FEET TO A PIPE POST AND FENCE CORNER; THENCE SOUTH 349.15 FEET TO A

PIPE POST; THENCE SOUTH 80 DEGREES 54’ WEST A DISTANCE OF 175.50 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, EXCEPT THE SOUTH 160 FEET THEREOF. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said Trust Deed and a Notice of Default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is Grantor’s failure to pay when due, the following sums: 4 PYMTS FROM 07/16/11 TO 10/16/11 @ 658.25 $2,633.00 21 PYMTS FROM 11/16/11 TO 07/16/13 @ 949.16 $19,932.36 TOTAL LATE CHARGES $53.79 MISCELLANEOUS FEES $15.00 Sub-Total of Amounts in Arrears: $22,634.15 Together with any default in the payment of recurring obligations as they become due. ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and Trust Deed, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. The street or other common designation if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 1983 SUNSET LANE, MYRTLE POINT, OR 97458 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street or other common designation. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said Trust Deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: Principal $145,385.28, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument secured from 06/16/11, plus subsidy recapture in the sum of $7,606.38 and fees assessed in the amount of $3,532.95, plus accrued interest due thereon, and such other costs and fees are due under the note or other instrument secured, and as are provided by statute. WHEREFORE, notice is hereby given that the undersigned trustee will, on December 3, 2013, at the hour of 10:00 A.M. in accord with the Standard Time, as established by ORS 187.110, INSIDE THE MAIN LOBBY OF THE COOS COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 250 N. BAXTER, COQUILLE , County of COOS, State of OREGON, (which is the new date, time and place set for said sale) sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the Grantor had or had power to convey at the time of execution by him of the said Trust Deed, together with any interest which the Grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said Trust Deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in O.R.S.86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation of the Trust Deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and Trust Deed, together with trustee’s and attorney’s fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. It will be necessary for you to contact the undersigned prior to the time you tender reinstatement or payoff so that you may be advised of the exact amount, including trustee’s costs and fees, that you will be required to pay. Payment must be in the full amount in the form of cashier’s or certified check. The effect of the sale will be to deprive you and all those who hold by, through and under you of all interest in the property described above. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word “grantor” includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Trust Deed, and the words “trustee” and “beneficiary” include their respective successors in interest, if any. The Beneficiary may be attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained may be used for that purpose. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder’s sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. If available, the expected opening bid and/or postponement information may be obtained by calling the following telephone number(s) on the day before the sale: (714) 480-5690 or you may access sales information at w w w. t a c fo r e c l o s u r e s . c o m / s a l e s DATED: 07/22/13 CHRISTOPHER C. DORR, OSBA # 992526 By CHRISTOPHER C. DORR, ATTORNEY AT LAW DIRECT INQUIRIES TO: T.D. SERVICE COMPANY FORECLOSURE DEPARTMENT 4000 W. Metropolitan Drive Suite 400 Orange, CA 92868 (800) 843-0260 TAC# 966312 PUB: 10/17/13, 10/24/13, 10/31/13, 11/07/13 PUBLISHED: The World- October 17, 24, 31 and November 07, 2013 (ID-20240348) OREGON TRUSTEE’S NOTICE OF SALE T.S. No: L543441 OR Unit Code: L Loan No: ALLEN AP #1: 372758 Title #: 8335779 Reference is made to that certain Trust Deed made by GLENN K. ALLEN III, BRANDI L. ALLEN as Grantor, to TICOR TITLE COMPANY as Trustee, in favor of DENNIS MARIE POLLOCK, TRUSTEE OF THE DENNIS MARIE POLLOCK TRUST as Beneficiary. Dated August 5, 2010, Recorded August 11, 2010 as Instr. No. 2010 7311 in Book —- Page —- of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of COOS County; OREGON covering the following described real property situated in said county and state, to wit: LEGAL DESCRIPTION Lot 15, Block 4, Roosevelt Boulevard Park (unrecorded plat), Coos County, Oregon, more particulary described as follows: Beginning at a point in the E.J. Foley Donation Land Claim No. 40 in Section 30, Township 25 South, Range 13 West of the Willamette Meridian, Coos County, Oregon from which point the iron pipe at the Southwest corner of the said Section 30 bears South 52° 41 West a

distance of 4218.70 feet; thence North 23° 34’ East for a distance of 400.0 feet to a point on the Southerly boundary of the right-of-way of Spaw Boulevard; thence South 66° 26’ East along the said right-of-way boundary for a distance of 100.0 feet; thence South 23° 34’ West for a distance of 400.0 feet; thence North 66° 26’ West for a distance of 100.0 feet to the point of beginning, being a portion fo the E.J. Foley Donation Land Claim No. 40 in Section 30, Township 25 South, Range 13 West of the Willamette Meridian, Coos County, Oregon. EXCEPTING THEREFROM that portion hertofore sold to John W. Hoffman and Dana R. Hoffman, husband and wife, more particularly described as follows: A portion of Lot 15, Block 4, Roosevelt Boulevard Park (unrecorded plat), Coos County, Oregon, more particularly described as follows: Beginning at a point in the E.J. Foley Donation Land Claim No. 40 in Section 30, Township 25 South, Range 13 West of the Willamette Meridian, Coos County, Oregon, from which point the iron pipe at the Southwest corner of said Section 30 bears South 52° 41’ West a distance of 4218.78 feet; thence North 23° 34’ East for a distance of 120 feet to an iron pipe; thence South 66° 26’ East 89 feet, more or less, to an iron pipe; thence North 23° 34’ East for a distance of 280 feet, more or less, to an iron pipe located on the Southerly boundary of the right-of-way of Spaw Boulevard; thence South 66° 26’ East along said right-of-way boundary of Spaw Boulevard for a distance of 11 feet; thence South 23° 34’ West for a distance of 400 feet, more or less, to an iron pipe; thence North 66° 26’ West for a distance of 100 feet to the point of beginning, being a portion of the E.J. Foley Donation Land Claim No. 40 in Section 30, Township 25 South, Range 13 West of the Willamette Meridian, Coos County, Oregon. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said Trust Deed and a Notice of Default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is Grantor’s failure to pay when due, the following sums: 9 PYMTS FROM 11/10/12 TO 07/10/13 @ 607.00 $5,463.00 9 L/C FROM 11/25/12 TO 07/25/13 @ 30.35 $273.15 Sub-Total of Amounts in Arrears:$5,736.15 PLUS EVIDENCE THAT REAL ESTATE TAXES ARE CURRENT. Together with any default in the payment of recurring obligations as they become due. ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and Trust Deed, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. The street or other common designation if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 91542 SPAW LN, COOS BAY, OR 97420 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street or other common designation. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said Trust Deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: Principal $40,274.37, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument secured from 03/10/13, and such other costs and fees are due under the note or other instrument secured, and as are provided by statute. WHEREFORE, notice is hereby given that the undersigned trustee will, on December 5, 2013, at the hour of 10:00 A.M. in accord with the Standard Time, as established by ORS 187.110, INSIDE THE MAIN LOBBY OF THE COOS COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 250 N. BAXTER, COQUILLE , County of COOS, State of OREGON, (which is the new date, time and place set for said sale) sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the Grantor had or had power to convey at the time of execution by him of the said Trust Deed, together with any interest which the Grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said Trust Deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in O.R.S.86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by pay-

ment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation of the Trust Deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and Trust Deed, together with trustee’s and attorney’s fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. It will be necessary for you to contact the undersigned prior to the time you tender reinstatement or payoff so that you may be advised of the exact amount, including trustee’s costs and fees, that you will be required to pay. Payment must be in the full amount in the form of cashier’s or certified check. The effect of the sale will be to deprive you and all those who hold by, through and under you of all interest in the property described above. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word “grantor” includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Trust Deed, and the words “trustee” and “beneficiary” include their respective successors in interest, if any. The Beneficiary may be attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained may be used for that purpose. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder’s sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. If available, the expected opening bid and/or postponement information may be obtained by calling the following telephone number(s) on the day before the sale: (714) 480-5690 or you may access sales information at w w w. t a c fo r e c l o s u r e s . c o m / s a l e s DATED: 07/25/13 CHRISTOPHER C. DORR, OSBA # 992526 By CHRISTOPHER C. DORR, ATTORNEY AT LAW DIRECT INQUIRIES TO: T.D. SERVICE COMPANY FORECLOSURE DEPARTMENT 4000 W. Metropolitan Drive Suite 400 Orange, CA 92868 (800) 843-0260 TAC# 966315 PUB: 10/17/13, 10/24/13, 10/31/13, 11/07/13 PUBLISHED: The World- Ocober 17, 24, 31 and November 07, 2013 (ID-20240351) IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE STATE OF OREGON IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF COOS Case No. 12CV0860 SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION CITIMORTGAGE, INC., its successors in interest and/or assigns, Plaintiff, v. MARY E. ALARCON AKA MARY ELLEN ALARCON; MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS INC., SOLELY AS NOMINEE FOR CITIBANK, N.A.; STATE OF OREGON; WESTERN MERCANTILE AGENCY, INC.; AND OCCUPANTS OF THE PREMISES, Defendants. TO THE DEFENDANTS: MARY E. ALARCON AKA MARY ELLEN ALARCON: In the name of the State of Oregon, you are hereby required to appear and answer the complaint filed against you in the above-entitled Court and cause on or before the expiration of 30 days from the date of the first publication of this summons. The date of first publication in this matter is October 03, 2013. If you fail timely to appear and answer, plaintiff will apply to the above-entitled court for the relief prayed for in its complaint. This is a judicial foreclosure of a deed of trust in which the plaintiff requests that the plaintiff be allowed to foreclose your interest in the following described real property: LOTS 18, 19 AND THE WEST 10 FEET OF LOT 20, BLOCK 5, MIDLAND ADDITION TO NORTH BEND, COOS COUNTY, OREGON Commonly known as: 2164 State Street, North Bend, Oregon 97459. NOTICE TO DEFENDANTS: READ THESE PAPERS CAREFULLY! A lawsuit has been started against you in the above-entitled court by


Thursday, October 17,2013 • The World •BB77 CitiMortgage, Inc., plaintiff. Plaintiff’s claims are stated in the written complaint, a copy of which was filed with the above-entitled Court. You must “appear” in this case or the other side will win automatically. To “appear” you must file with the court a legal document called a “motion” or “answer.” The “motion” or “answer” (or “reply”) must be given to the court clerk or administrator within 30 days of the date of first publication specified herein along with the required filing fee. It must be in proper form and have proof of service on the plaintiff’s attorney or, if the plaintiff does not have an attorney, proof of service on the plaintiff. If you have any questions, you should see an attorney immediately. If you need help in finding an attorney, you may contact the Oregon State Bar’s Lawyer Referral Service online at www.oregonstatebar.org or by calling (503) 684-3763 (in the Portland metropolitan area) or toll-free elsewhere in Oregon at (800) 452-7636. This summons is issued pursuant to ORCP 7. RCO LEGAL, P.C. Michael Botthof, OSB #113337 mbotthof@rcolegal.com Attorney for Plaintiff 511 SW 10th Ave., Ste. 400 Portland, OR 97205 P: (503) 977-7840 F: (503) 977-7963 PUBLISHED: The Word- October 03, 10, 17 and 24, 2013 (ID-20239810) IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE STATE OF OREGON IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF COOS BANK OF AMERICA, N.A, its successors in interest and/or assigns, Plaintiff v. BRAD VANLANDINGHAM, TAMMI VANLANDINGHAM, COOS COUNTY and CITIBANK, N.A., Defendants. Case No. 13CV0657 SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION TO DEFENDANT: BRAD VANLANDINGHAM: In the name of the State of Oregon, you are hereby required to appear and defend the complaint filed against you in the above entitled Court within thirty (30) days from the date of the first publication of this summons. The date of first publication in this matter is September 26, 2013. If you fail timely to appear and answer, for want thereof, plaintiff(s) will apply to the court for relief demanded in the complaint. This is a judicial foreclosure of a deed of trust in which the plaintiff requests that the plaintiff be allowed to foreclose your interest in the following described real property: PARCEL 3 PARTITION PLAT 2002 #14 FILED AND RECORDED OCTOBER 31, 2002 CAB C/359 BEARING MICROFILM REEL NO. 2002-14392, RECORDS OF COOS COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 63503 WALLACE RD, COOS BAY, OR 97420. NOTICE TO THE DEFENDANT: READ THESE PAPERS CAREFULLY! You must “appear” to protect your rights in this matter. To “appear” you must file with the court a legal paper called a “motion” or “reply.” The “motion” or “reply” must be given to the court clerk or administrator within 30 days along with the required filing fee. It must be in proper form and have proof of service on the Plaintiff’s attorney or, if the Plaintiff does not have an attorney, proof of service on the Plaintiff. If you have questions, you should see an attorney immediately. If you need help in finding an attorney, you may call the Oregon State Bar’s Lawyer Referral Service at (503) 684-3763 or toll-free in Oregon at (800) 452-7636. The Oregon State address is Bar`s web http://www.osbar.org. This summons is issued pursuant to ORCP 7. Malcolm t Cisneros, A Law Corporation, Nathan F. Smith, OSB #120112, Nathan@mclaw.org Attorneys for Plaintiff 2112 Business Center Drive, Second Floor, Irvine, CA 92612, P: (949) 252-9400, F: (949) 252-1032

PUBLISHED: The World - September 26, October 03, 10 and 17, 2013. (ID-20239252) CIRCUIT COURT OF OREGON FOR COOS COUNTY NO. 13CV0510 PLAINTIFF’S SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., Plaintiff, v. DEBORAH SIMPSON, AS PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE OF THE ESTATE OF JAMES G. SIMPSON, DECEASED; THE ESTATE OF JAMES G. SIMPSON, DECEASED; THE UNKNOWN HEIRS AND DEVISEES OF JAMES G. SIMPSON, DECEASED; DEBORAH SIMPSON AKA DEBRA A. BRUNNER; ANGELA SIMPSON WALKER; TAMERA L. WALKER; MELANEE I. SIMPSON WALKER; STATE OF CALIFORNIA; SOUTHERN OREGON CREDIT SERVICE; WESTERN MERCANTILE AGENCY, INC.; ASSET ACCEPTANCE, LLC; AND, PERSONS OR PARTIES CLAIMING ANY RIGHT, TITLE, LIEN OR INTEREST IN THE PROPRTY DESCRIBED IN THE COMPLAINT HEREIN, Defendant(s). TO: Angela Simpson Walker; the Unknown Heirs and Devisees of James G. Simpson, Deceased; the Estate of James G. Simpson, Deceased; and, Persons or Parties Unknown Claiming Any Right, Title, Lien or Interest in the Property Described in the Complaint Herein, IN THE NAME OF THE STATE OF OREGON: You are hereby required to appear and defend against the allegations contained in the Complaint filed against you in the above entitled proceeding within thirty (30) days from the date of service of this Summons upon you. If you fail to appear and defend this matter within thirty (30) days from the date of publication specified herein along with the required filing fee, BANK OF AMERICA, N.A will apply to the Court for the relief demanded in the Complaint. The first date of publication is October 17, 2013. NOTICE TO DEFENDANTS: READ THESE PAPERS CAREFULLY! You must “appear” in this case or the other side will win automatically. To “appear” you must file with the court a legal paper called a “motion” or “answer.” The “motion” or “answer” must be given to the court clerk or administrator within thirty days along with the required filing fee. It must be in proper form and have proof of service on the plaintiff`s attorney or, if the plaintiff does not have an attorney, proof of service on the plaintiff. IF YOU HAVE ANY QUESTIONS, YOU SHOULD SEE AN ATTORNEY IMMEDIATELY. If you need help in finding an attorney, you may call the Oregon State Bar`s Lawyer Referral Service at (503) 684-3763 or toll-free in Oregon at (800) 452-7636. The object of the said action and the relief sought to be obtained therein is fully set forth in said complaint, and is briefly stated as follows: Foreclosure of a Deed of Trust/Mortgage Grantors: Deborah Simpson as Personal Rep of J Simpson, Deceased Property address: 62760 Koski Road, Coos Bay, OR 97420

[ ]Matt Booth, OSB #082663 Email: mbooth@robinsontait.com [x]Zachary Bryant, OSB #113409 Email: zbryant@robinsontait.com [ ]Craig Peterson, OSB #120365 Email: cpeterson@robinsontait.com [ ]Brandon Smith, OSB #124584 Email: bsmith@robinsontait.com Robinson Tait, P.S. Attorneys for Plaintiff Tel: (206) 676-9640 Fax: (206) 676-9659

September 8, 1994 on property commonly known as 1624 Ivy Street, Coquille, OR 97423 and legally described as: Lot 4, Block 3, Coquille Park, Coos County, Oregon. The complaint seeks to foreclose and terminate all interest of Eileen Marie Gunther and all other interests in the property.

PUBLISHED: The World- October 17, 24, 31 & November 7, 2013 (ID-20240096) CIRCUIT COURT OF OREGON FOR COOS COUNTY

If you have questions, you should see an attorney immediately. If you need help in finding an attorney, you may contact the Oregon State Bar’s Lawyer Referral Service online at www.oregonstatebar.org or by calling (503) 684-3763 (in the Portland metropolitan area) or toll-free elsewhere in Oregon at (800) 452-7636.

NO. 13CV0733 PLAINTIFF’S SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, Plaintiff, v. LINDA DUNNING; UNKNOWN HEIRS AND DEVISEES OF ROGER F. DUNNING, DECEASED; THE ESTATE OF ROGER F. DUNNING, DECEASED; OREGON FIRST COMMUNITY CREDIT UNION; AND PERSONS OR PARTIES UNKNOWN CLAIMING ANY RIGHT, TITLE, LIEN, OR INTEREST IN THE PROPERTY DESCRIBED IN THE COMPLAINT HEREIN, Defendant(s). TO: UNKNOWN HEIRS AND DEVISEES OF ROGER F. DUNNING, DECEASED; THE ESTATE OF ROGER F. DUNNING, DECEASED; AND PERSONS OR PARTIES UNKNOWN CLAIMING ANY RIGHT, TITLE, LIEN, OR INTEREST IN THE PROPERTY DESCRIBED IN THE COMPLAINT HEREIN, IN THE NAME OF THE STATE OF OREGON: You are hereby required to appear and defend against the allegations contained in the Complaint filed against you in the above entitled proceeding within thirty (30) days from the date of service of this Summons upon you. If you fail to appear and defend this matter within thirty (30) days from the date of publication specified herein along with the required filing fee, U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION will apply to the Court for the relief demanded in the Complaint. The first date of publication is October 10, 2013. NOTICE TO DEFENDANTS: READ THESE PAPERS CAREFULLY! You must “appear” in this case or the other side will win automatically. To “appear” you must file with the court a legal paper called a “motion” or “answer.” The “motion” or “answer” must be given to the court clerk or administrator within thirty days along with the required filing fee. It must be in proper form and have proof of service on the plaintiff`s attorney or, if the plaintiff does not have an attorney, proof of service on the plaintiff. IF YOU HAVE ANY QUESTIONS, YOU SHOULD SEE AN ATTORNEY IMMEDIATELY. If you need help in finding an attorney, you may call the Oregon State Bar`s Lawyer Referral Service at (503) 684-3763 or toll-free in Oregon at (800) 452-7636. The object of the said action and the relief sought to be obtained therein is fully set forth in said complaint, and is briefly stated as follows: Foreclosure of Trust/Mortgage

a

Deed

The “motion” or “answer” (or “reply”) must be given to the court clerk or administrator within 30 days of the date of first publication specified herein along with the required filing fee. The date of first publication of the summons is September 26, 2013.

of

Grantors: Roger F. Dunning and Linda Dunning

DATED this 1 day of October, 2013.

Property address: 355 15th Street, Bandon, OR 97411

_______________________________

Publication: The World DATED this 8th day of October, 2013. [ ]Matt Booth, OSB #082663 Email: mbooth@robinsontait.com [ ]Zachary Bryant, OSB #113409 Email: zbryant@robinsontait.com [ ]Craig Peterson, OSB #120365 Email: cpeterson@robinsontait.com [X]Brandon Smith, OSB #124584 Email: bsmith@robinsontait.com Robinson Tait, P.S. Attorneys for Plaintiff Tel: (206) 676-9640 Fax: (206) 676-9659 PUBLISHED: The World- October 10, 17, 24 and 31, 2013 (ID-20240284)

Attorney for Plaintiff, /s/ Cara J. Richter Cara J. Richter #094855 [crichter@logs.com] SHAPIRO & SUTHERLAND, LLC 1499 SE Tech Center Place, Suite 255 Vancouver, WA 98683 (360)260-2253; Fax (360)260-2285 S&S No. 13-111549 PUBLISHED: The World- September 26, October 03, 10 and 17, 2013 (ID-20239324) NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE On Monday October 28, 2013 at the hour of 10:00 a.m. at the Front Door of the Coos County Courthouse, 250 North Baxter St. Coquille, Oregon, the defendant’s interest will be sold, subject to redemption, in the real property commonly known as:68309 Collier Road, North Bend OR 97459,. The court case number is 12CV0408, where Wells Fargo Bank, NA is plaintiff, and Carlos Herrera; Dawn R. Herrera aka Dawn R Gillum; State of Oregon; Occupants of the Premises is defendant. The sale is a public auction to the highest bidder for cash or cashier’s check, in hand, made out to Coos County Sheriff’s Office. For more information on this sale go to: www.oregonsheriffs.com/sales.htm PUBLISHED: The World- September 26, October 03, 10 and 17, 2013 (ID-20238920) NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE On Monday October 28, 2013 at the hour of 10:00 a.m. at the Front Door of the Coos County Courthouse, 250 North Baxter St. Coquille, Oregon, the defendant’s interest will be sold, subject to redemption, in the real property commonly known as: 93766 Bay Park Lane Coos Bay OR 97420,. The court case number is 12CV0413 , where Wells Fargo Bank, NA is plaintiff, and Scott A. Gallagher-Starr; Shaay C. Gallagher-Starr; Oregon First Community Credit Union; and Occupants of the Premises is defendant. The sale is a public auction to the highest bidder for cash or cashier’s check, in hand, made out to Coos County Sheriff’s Office. For more information on this sale go to: www.oregonsheriffs.com/sales.htm PUBLISHED: The World- September 26, October 03, 10 and 17, 2013 (ID-20238899) NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE On Monday November 04, 2013, at the hour of 10:00 a.m. at the Front Door of the Coos County Courthouse, 250 North Baxter St. Coquille, Oregon, the defendant’s interest will be sold, subject to redemption, in the real property commonly known as:844 N Dean St. Coquille, OR 97423,. The court case number is 13CV0314, where Nationstar is plaintiff, and Roy E. Lake; Susan R. Lake; Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc.; Corestrar Financial Group, LLC; The Bank of New York Mellon fka The

Bank of New York, as successor Trustee to JPMorgan Chase Bank, NA as Trustee on behalf of the certificate holders of the CWHEQ Inc., CWHEQ Revolving Home Equity Loan Trust, series 2005-M; Western Mercantile Agency, Inc; Dave Winningham Corporation fdba Henry A Schroeder and Sons; GE Capital Retail Bank fka GE Money Bank; Cavalry Investments, LLC; Discover Bank; Unifund CCR Partners; Midland Funding, LLC, Other Persons or Parties including Occupants, Unknown claiming any Right, Title, Lien, or Interest in the Property Described in the Complaint Herein, is defendant. The sale is a public auction to the highest bidder for cash or cashier’s check, in hand, made out to Coos County Sheriff’s Office. For more information on this sale go to: www.oregonsheriffs.com/sales.htm PUBLISHED: The World- September 26, October 03, 10 and 17, 2013 (ID-20239241) TRUSTEE’S NOTICE OF SALE Reference is made to a certain trust deed (“Trust Deed No. 1”) made, executed and delivered by Rex A. Campbell and Debora Campbell, husband and wife, as grantor, to First American Title Co., as trustee, in favor of Oregon First Community Credit Union, as beneficiary, dated April 25, 2005, and recorded on April 27, 2005, as Recording No. 2005-6008, in the mortgage records of Coos County, Oregon. Oregon First Community Credit Union is now known as First Community Credit Union. Reference is also made to a certain trust deed (“Trust Deed No. 2”) made, executed and delivered Rex A. Campbell and Debora Campbell, husband and wife, as grantor to First American Title Co., as trustee, in favor of Oregon First Community Credit Union, as beneficiary, dated February 13, 2006, and recorded on February 21, 2006, as Recording No. 2006-2298, in the mortgage records of Coos County, Oregon. Oregon First Community Credit Union is now known as First Community Credit Union. Trust Deed No. 1 and Trust Deed No. 2 are collectively referred to herein as the “Trust Deeds.” The Trust Deeds covers the following described real property (“Property”) situated in said county and state, to-wit: Lots 17, 18 and the west half of Lot 19, Block 31, FIRST ADDITION TO MARSH FIELD, Coos County, Oregon. There are defaults by the grantor or other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by the Trust Deeds, with respect to provisions therein which authorize sale in the event of default of such provision; the defaults for which foreclosure is made are: 1. Grantor’s failure to pay real property taxes when due; 2. Grantor’s failure to avoid having junior liens encumber the Property; 3. Grantor’s failure to pay when due the following sums secured by Trust Deed No. 1: arrearage in the sum of $5,087.33 as of July 15, 2013, plus additional payments, property expenditures, taxes, liens, assessments, insurance, late fees, attorney’s and trustee’s fees and costs, and interest due at the time of reinstatement or sale; and 4. Grantor’s failure to pay when due the following sums secured by Trust Deed No. 2: arrearage in the sum of $256.68 as of July 15, 2013, plus additional payments, property expenditures, taxes, liens, assessments, insurance, late fees, attorney’s and trustee’s fees and costs, and interest due at the time of reinstatement or sale. By reason of said defaults, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligations secured by said Trust Deeds immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: Trust Deed No. 1: Payoff in the sum of $75,276.14 as of July 15, 2013, plus taxes, liens, assessments, property expenditures, insurance, accruing

PHH Mortgage Corporation, Plaintiff, vs.

king (denying the queen). What should declarer do? South’s auction — a takeout double followed by a minimum no-trump bid — showed a good 18 to 20 points. North bid three no-trump because he counted an extra point for his five-card suit and expected his partner to be able to place the missing high cards based on the bidding. South starts with only four top tricks: one spade, two hearts and one club. He can get two diamond and four club winners, but he will presumably have to lose the lead twice because East needs the club king for his opening bid. Declarer must let East win the first trick.This sacrifices one spade trick, but gains nine in the long run. South takes the third spade, plays a club to dummy’s ace (the king might drop singleton), and concedes a club. Here, East has no riposte. If declarer takes trick one, then when East gets in with, say, the club king, he returns the spade six (higher of two remaining cards) and West plays his three to keep communication with his partner. Then the contract fails, the defenders taking three spades, one diamond and one club.

LOUISE CATHERINE MOORE; EILEEN MARIE GUNTHER; JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, SUCCESSOR IN INTEREST BY PURCHASE FROM THE FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION AS RECEIVER OF WASHINGTON MUTUAL BANK F/K/A WASHINGTON MUTUAL BANK, FA; STATE OF OREGON; WESTERN MERCANTILE AGENCY, INCORPORATED, OTHER PERSONS OR PARTIES, including OCCUPANTS, UNKNOWN CLAIMING ANY RIGHT, TITLE, LIEN, OR INTEREST IN THE PROPERTY DESCRIBED IN THE COMPLAINT HEREIN Defendants. TO THE DEFENDANTS: Marie Gunther

Eileen

NOTICE TO DEFENDANT: READ THESE PAPERS CAREFULLY! A lawsuit has been started against you in the above-entitled Court by PHH Mortgage Corporation, Plaintiff. Plaintiff’s claim is stated in the written Complaint, a copy of which is on file at the Coos County Courthouse. You must “appear” in this case or the other side will win automatically. To “appear” you must file with the court a legal paper called a “motion” or “answer.” The “motion” or “answer” must be given to the court clerk or administrator within 30 days along with the required filing fee. It must be in proper form and have proof of service on the plaintiff’s attorney or, if the plaintiff does not have an attorney, proof of service on the plaintiff. The object of the complaint is to foreclose a deed of trust dated September 14, 1998 and recorded as Instrument No. 1998-56681 given by Georgia Gunther Knudsen as Trustee of, a single person, The Georgia Gunther Knudsen Trust, Agreement, Dated

WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on December 19, 2013, at the hour of 11:00 a.m., in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at the following place: West Front Entrance of the Coos County Courthouse, 250 N. Baxter St., Coquille, Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the above-described Property, which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by grantor of the said Trust Deeds, together with any interest which the grantor or grantor’s successors in interest acquired after the execution of the Trust Deeds, to satisfy the obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the Trust Deeds reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or Trust Deeds, and in addition to paying said sum or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and Trust Deeds, together with trustee’s and attorney’s fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the singular includes the plural, the word “grantor” includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Trust Deeds, and the words “trustee” and “beneficiary” include their respective successors in interest, if any. The NOTICE TO RESIDENTIAL TENANTS, attached hereto as Exhibit A, is incorporated herein by reference. [Exhibit A, NOTICE TO RESIDENTIAL TENANTS, is not published pursuant to 86.750(2)(b).] THIS COMMUNICATION IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. UNLESS YOU NOTIFY US WITHIN 30 DAYS AFTER RECEIVING THIS NOTICE THAT YOU DISPUTE THE VALIDITY OF THE DEBT, OR ANY PORTION OF IT, WE WILL ASSUME THE DEBT IS VALID. IF YOU NOTIFY US, IN WRITING, WITHIN 30 DAYS AFTER RECEIPT OF THIS NOTICE THAT YOU DO DISPUTE THE DEBT OR ANY PORTION OF IT, WE WILL PROVIDE VERIFICATION BY MAILING YOU A COPY OF THE RECORDS. IF YOU SO REQUEST, IN WRITING, WITHIN 30 DAYS AFTER RECEIPT OF THIS NOTICE, WE WILL PROVIDE YOU WITH THE NAME AND ADDRESS OF THE ORIGINAL CREDITOR IF DIFFERENT FROM THE CURRENT CREDITOR. DATED: July 31, 2013. Valerie A. Tomasi, Successor Trustee Tomasi Salyer Baroway 121 SW Morrison, Suite 1850 Portland, OR 97204 Phone: 503-894-9900; fax: 971-544-7236 PUBLISHED: The World- October 03, 10, 17 and 24, 2013 (ID-20239794)

LOCA L N EW S

FOR THE COUNTY OF COOS No. 13CV0692 CIVIL SUMMONS

Joan Konner, who inter alia has more than a dozen Emmys from the National Academy of Television Arts and Sciences, said, “Procrastination gives you something to look forward to.” Procrastination when the dummy comes down is a good idea because it is beneficial to look forward to the 13 tricks. This deal benefits from clear thinking at the beginning. South is in three no-trump. West leads his fourthhighest spade and East puts up the

Trust Deed No. 2: Payoff in the sum of $13,182.16 as of July 15, 2013, plus taxes, liens, assessments, property expenditures, insurance, accruing interest, late fees, attorney’s and trustee’s fees and costs incurred by beneficiary or its assigns.

Your resource for

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE STATE OF OREGON

BRIDGE

interest, late fees, attorney’s and trustee’s fees and costs incurred by beneficiary or its assigns.

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B8 •The World • Thursday, October 17,2013

Not putting car in park might not be harmful but is a bad habit Dear Tom and Ray: I met my fiance in a car accident three years ago. I bumped into his car, and the rest is history. However, as luck would have it, the only time we argue is when it comes to driving and car care. He drives a stick-shift Mazda Miata, and I drive an automatic 2010 Nissan Altima. So there are a lot of features in my car that he had to get used to (e.g., keyless ignition). The one thing that always gets me is that he often turns off the engine without shifting back into park. I tell him that it dam-

FRIDAY, OCT. 18, 2013 Sticking to moderate and practical plans will ensure that you progress with minimal setbacks this year. If you have critical decision to make, you should seek the advice of experts for the best results. Less waffling and more calculated action will lead to success. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) — Not everyone will look out for your best interests. Take a hands-on approach when dealing with know-italls. Overreacting and indulgence should be controlled. SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) — Your talent and ability to get a job done in an innovative manner will win favors as well as enhance your reputation. You’ll be called upon to do something special, so be prepared. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) — Look before you leap. Excitement and adventure may be beckoning, but so will danger, delays and unfortunate consequences. Stick close to

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TOM AND RAY MAGLIOZZI ages the car, and he says no it doesn’t. I find that hard to believe, because the car home, where your efforts will be appreciated. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22Jan. 19) — You’ll be torn between what you want to do and what you are being asked to do. Offer to take on more if it will ensure that you get to do both. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20Feb. 19) — You may need to make a sudden change of direction. Your emotions will not lead you astray. Follow your heart and engage in whatever activity promises to get you closer to your goals. PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) — Ask, and you shall receive. Figure out what you want and lay down some ground rules. You’ll be surprised by the response you receive. Get everything in writing. A R I E S (M a r c h 2 1 - A p r i l 19) — Don’t veer off in different directions. It’s important to stick to whatever you are working on until you finish. A special reward awaits you if you honor a promise. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) — A secret can have an impact on an important decision. Do whatever it

won’t start if the gear lever is not in park. Can you knock some sense into my man? I love him to death, but not his car/driving philosophy. Thank you. — Michelle R A Y : Well, the act of turning off the engine while the car is still in drive doesn’t hurt anything, other than the chances that you’re going to go with him to the altar. Neither the transmission nor the engine care. TOM: But the reason he should break himself of this habit is because it’s easy to then forget to actually put it in park.

RAY: Maybe you’ve done this yourself at some point? You pull up somewhere, you’re a little distracted, so you turn off the ignition and take your foot off the brake. Then in your peripheral vision you notice that the car next to you is moving. And suddenly it occurs to you: It’s not the other car, it’s me! TOM: Of course, it would be worse if you had gotten out of the car before it started to roll away. Luckily, the keys won’t come out of the ignition unless the car is in park. So that gives you one more signal that something’s

wrong (why won’t my key come out? Oh, right. Because I didn’t put the car in park, and my car is rolling into a UPS truck!). RA Y : But in a car like yours, Michelle, with keyless ignition (where you just need to have the key in your pocket, and the car recognizes it electronically when you get in the car), it’s one step easier to leave the car in drive, open the door, get out and walk away. TOM: Now, that presupposes that you’d somehow miss the warning chime that would sound when you

takes to uncover information that is sensitive in nature. Your intuition, coupled with persistence, will pay off. GE M I NI ( M ay 2 1 - J u n e 20) — Initiate a plan and watch everything unfold before your eyes. Don’t expect everyone to be happy with your actions, but it will help you weed out who is on your side and who isn’t. CA N CE R ( J u n e 2 1 - J u l y 22) — Press for what you want. Don’t hold back and don’t give in. The more direct you are, the better you will do. Your intuition is acute and will help you make the best choice. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) — Complete domestic errands and proceed to take care of your needs. A trip or outing with a close friend with will enhance your life and brighten your future. VI R G O ( A u g . 2 3- S e p t . 22) — An unexpected change in your physical, emotional or financial situation can be expected. Protect your mind, body and soul along with your assets. Preparation will help avert loss.

SATURDAY, OCT. 19, 2013 Take part in events that will broaden your horizons and give you greater insight into the possibilities that are out there for you. You are on the verge of a breakthrough that can help you improve your life and simplify some of the stresses that have been weighing heavily on your mind. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) — Thinking about the past could lead to a reunion with old friends. Email someone you miss or make plans to travel to old, familiar places. New beginnings will rejuvenate you. SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) — You will please and impress the people you encounter. Your polished and precise way of presenting yourself and your abilities will lead to an interesting turn of events. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) — Make positive changes to your living quarters using innovative ideas and doing the work yourself. Take pride in the way you look and make simple changes that can keep you up to date. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-

Jan. 19) — Make a personal and professional assessment and plan how you will improve your career and domestic situations. If you pay attention and work hard, you’ll make some fascinating discoveries. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20Feb. 19) — Don’t let anyone dictate what you can and cannot do. Voice your opinion and follow through with plans that will point in a rewarding direction. Romance is highlighted. PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) — You are in a good position at present. Don’t be afraid to negotiate to get what you want. You are in the driver’s seat, so take control and make your dreams come true. ARIES (March 21-April 19) — Plan to have a good time. Engage in activities that are conducive to love and romance. Keep in mind that you don’t need to overdo it to have fun. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) — Emotions are on the rise, and dealing with personal matters or the problems of co-workers could be a tricky process. Be willing to compromise, and strive

opened the door with the car in gear. But remember, you’ve already tried to turn off the car without putting it in park, so we know you're distracted. RAY: So, while it’s not mechanically harmful, Michelle, it could lead to a stupid mistake. So remind him that you’re getting married soon. And tell him that means that if he does ever leave the car in drive and lets your car roll into a fetid, alligator-infested swamp, there are a lot of years ahead for him to never live it down. Good luck. for equality. GE M I N I ( M a y 21 - J u n e 2 0 ) — Your actions will make a difference. You will receive rewards for your ability to find solutions and make things happen. A change of heart will lead to happiness. C A N C E R ( J u n e 2 1- J u l y 22) — Getting involved in an unusual group or situation will be enlightening. Express your thoughts and firm up a commitment. Now’s the time to branch out and go for the brass ring. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) — Double-check your motives and weigh the pros and cons of making a lifestyle change. It may not be easy, but it will be rewarding. You cannot live a lie or ignore your needs. V I R G O ( A ug . 2 3 - S e p t . 22) — If you travel, you’ll discover people, places and activities that make you feel alive. A sudden change in your financial situation will encourage you to make personal improvements.

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