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Naming Ceremony

7th September 2006


P L aul

ester

Chief Executive, VT Group plc

Welcome to Portsmouth Naval Base for the Naming Ceremony of Clyde, the first complete ship to be built in Portsmouth for almost 40 years. This 80m. Offshore Patrol Vessel Helicopter (OPVH) marks a further step in the renaissance of shipbuilding in the Naval Base, reviving memories of the launch of the Leander Class frigate, HMS Andromeda in May 1967. Clyde is the fourth OPV to be built by VT Shipbuilding. It marks a development from the previous three in its class, HMS Tyne, HMS Severn and HMS Mersey, in that it has helicopter capability. Like her sister ships, Clyde will continue to be owned by VT and leased to the Royal Navy. At the time, this approach to contracting was pioneering. Today it is in the mainstream of the principles underpinning the UK Government始s 2005 Defence Industrial Strategy. Central to this strategy is the concept of through-life capability management. This approach is both a challenge and an opportunity for industry. The opportunity is that more of the MOD始s activities are opened up to private sector involvement. The challenge is, by taking a more holistic approach to initial equipment acquisition and to its subsequent support, companies know when they build a ship that they will have responsibility for maintaining it for the next 20 years. This creates all the right incentives to focus on the quality of the initial design and build to minimise subsequent running costs. This requires a new culture and a new way of working for the MOD and for industry, and the need to develop successful long-term partnering arrangements. In addition to constructing the ship, VT will be responsible for a full Contractor Logistic Support package for period of 5 years. This will be delivered through a round-the-clock, global maintenance commitment that includes spares and repairs. There are many parties involved in bringing the successful completion of a warship to fruition and I commend all of those involved in her construction and thank all of those organisations and individuals who have contributed.


ML D rs

esley

unt

Sponsor

The naming of Clyde today is the culmination of several years hard work by all the team at VT Shipbuilding in Portsmouth involved in her design and construction. She is a testament to their dedication and professional expertise and they deserve our congratulations for producing such a fine ship. I feel immensely privileged to have been asked to perform this duty and very honoured to become her sponsor. I look forward to a long and happy association with the ship in the future, wherever she may be in her service with the Royal Navy.


Principal Characteristics Length overall Length waterline Beam Draught Displacement (full load) Accommodation Core complement Additional TOTAL

81.5 metres 73.6 metres 13.6 metres 3.8 metres 1854 tonnes 34 24 58

Armament 30mm gun 4x GPMG Performance Speed full load Range at 12 knots Endurance

20 knots 5500 nautical miles 21 days


I

n February 2005 VT were awarded the contract for the provision of the latest Royal Navy Offshore Patrol Vessel.

The Offshore Patrol Vessel (Helicopter), Clyde, will undertake the role of the Falkland Islands patrol vessel, replacing the two existing Castle class OPVs. Clyde is a follow-on to the three highly successful VT River class OPVs currently in service with the Royal Navy's Fishery Protection Squadron. To meet the requirements for the Falkland Islands patrol role, Clyde has been built to an enhanced River class design. This includes a flight deck capable of operating helicopters up to the size of Merlin aircraft, as well as a dedicated air and surface surveillance radar. The enhanced design also features additional accommodation (catering for embarked military forces), higher level survivability, a larger calibre main gun, improved self-defence capability and an enhanced communications system. Clyde operates one VT Halmatic Pacific 22 MkII RIB for rescue and general operations and one MkII Rigid Raider for beach-landing duties. The design also incorporates an active fin stabilisation system from VT Maritime Dynamics for improved sea-keeping performance at speed. Clyde is capable of maintaining over twenty knots in sea-state four and remaining fully operational in up to sea-state six. The vessel has a range of over 5,500 nautical miles. The use of low temperature notch-toughened steel and a proven sea-keeping pedigree means that this vessel is ideally suited to operations in the extremely harsh environment of the South Pacific.


A M

Rear Admiral

ndrew

athews

Controller of the Navy

Today marks a key moment in the life of Clyde - her formal naming effectively starts her life in the Royal Navy. Her role is to patrol the South Atlantic, a hugely challenging environment for the ship and her crew, and with the potential of remaining on station for up to 5 years we are expecting a great deal from Clyde. Building a warship is a complex process requiring an enormous amount of teamwork, skilled engineering, high quality project management and genuine hard work. That Clyde has been produced by VT Shipbuilding in little over a year and right on time says a great deal about this yard始s capability. I congratulate them on their performance. Clyde is not owned by the Royal Navy but leased from VT; a sign of the innovative commercial practices that we are increasingly adopting in this modern world. VT will remain responsible for maintenance and support throughout the period of the lease. After today始s ceremony, Clyde will undertake a busy period of trials to demonstrate her capability leading up to her acceptance into the Royal Navy. I wish Clyde and her Ship始s Company good fortune for the future.


HC MS

lyde: a name with tradition

The first HMS Clyde was a 38-gun frigate of the ʻArtois/Apolloʼ Class, built at Chatham Dockyard and launched in March 1796. She carried a complement of 270 officers, ratings and Marines. Although her career was short (she was broken up in 1805), it was very eventful and she saw action on several occasions. When mutiny broke out at the Nore in the Thames Estuary in 1797, the Clydeʼs Captain was able to persuade his crew to return to their duty – one of only two ships to break the mutineersʼ blockade and escape into the Medway.

The second HMS Clyde is the only example since the 1740s of a ʻRebuildʼ, a new ship built to the same design (and name) as one recently scrapped. The third was a ʻLedaʼ Class 38-gun frigate, the largest class of sailing frigates ever built, and was launched at Woolwich Dockyard in October 1828. In 1904 the composite screw sloop HMS Wild Swan became the fourth HMS Clyde in her role as the Aberdeen Royal Naval Reserveʼs second Drill Ship. The most recent HMS Clyde was a ʻThamesʼ Class submarine, built at Barrow by Vickers Armstrong and launched in March 1934. As built, HMS Clyde measured 1805 tons standard displacement, 2680 tons submerged and was 345 feet long. From 1936 she served in the Mediterranean until the outbreak of war in 1939 when she patrolled the South Atlantic and home waters. In June 1940 she was operating off Norway when she torpedoed the German battlecruiser Gneisenau off Trondheim, blowing a hole in her bows ʻbig enough to allow a picket boat to sail throughʼ; the Gneisenau was in dockyard hands until December. Between 1941 and 1944 the Clyde served in the Mediterranean. Her most valuable work here was in 1942, carrying cargoes of vital and high-value materiel to the besieged island of Malta, a task for which her high speed and very large internal capacity was particularly suited. In 1946 she was paid off and sold after completing more than twenty war patrols and more than a dozen cargo passages to Malta. Following WWII, the name was adopted by the Clyde Division Royal Naval Reserve, which used the name for its Ton Class sea tenders between 1954 and 1976.

Extract from 'HMS Clyde arriving at Sheerness after the Nore Mutiny, 30 May 1797' by William Joy, 1830


S

hipbuilding at Portsmouth Five Centuries of Innovation

Portsmouth has always been at the forefront of new technology. Over five hundred years ago, King Henry VII built the worldʼs first dry dock close to where HMS Victory is located today. The dock used two sets of wooden gates, interspersed with clay and gravel to make the dock watertight. The dock, along with a store, smithy and forge, cost the crown £193 0s 5d – around £100,000 at todayʼs prices. In contrast, VT has invested more than £50 million in its new facilities at Portsmouth. The first recorded ship to be built and named at Portsmouth was Sweepstake in 1497. She was the first of nearly 300 vessels to be built in the yard, including Henry VIIIʼs Mary Rose in 1509, remodelled in 1536 to become the first ship with broadside firing guns – a concept which would be used for the next 350 years. From the second half of the 17th century the dockyard was expanded, whilst 1797 saw the installation of the first steam engine, closely followed in 1802 by the building of the Block Mills. Built by Marc Isambard Brunel, (father of Isambard Kingdom Brunel), the Block Mills was the worldʼs first steam driven factory and produced the wooden blocks used in the rigging of sailing ships. The pioneering mass-production techniques meant that one man could do the work of ten skilled blockmakers. The drive for new technology and bigger vessels saw further expansion. In 1850 the 99 acre site was the worldʼs largest industrial complex. In 1864 a further 180 acres were added, the spoil from the excavated basins being used to build Whale Island. In 1905, Portsmouth built the first of the Dreadnoughts. The 17,900 ton HMS Dreadnought was the first major ship with steam turbines. It was completed in a record breaking 366 days. From then until outbreak of the First World War, the dockyard was launching one battleship every year. After the Second World War, shipbuilding in the dockyard started a gradual decline. The last ship to be built was the Leander class frigate, HMS Andromeda in 1967. Further reductions in the dockyard workforce followed in the 70s and 80s. After 500 years and the construction of 286 known warships, it was thought that shipbuilding was unlikely to return to Portsmouth… Small images L-R: Shipbuilding last century in Portsmouth; Crowds gathered to watch the launch of HMS Iron Duke in 1912; The site of the current VT Shipbuilding footprint shown in the 1990s. Above: Portsmouth Naval Base in the 1950s. Right: The same area photographed in 2003 showing the VT Shipbuilding facility.


A New Approach to Shipbuilding

&

Design

David Pugh

Engineering Designer David works in Clydeʼs Design Office. After graduating from The University of Sheffield, David joined VTʼs Graduate Scheme. “I design the machinery installations on Clyde, such as the fuel system and bringing the various components of the propulsion system together. “When it comes to designing a ship, we start with a list of requirements, such as its desired speed, its capacity and the role that it is intended to perform. In Clydeʼs case, and unlike the previous River Class vessels, this included the provision of a Helideck capable of landing a Merlin Helicopter. “We then start identifying the equipment that is needed to fulfil that requirement. Computer Aided Design is used to create the drawings and associated paperwork needed to start construction. “My job continues during the build process, ensuring the systems that were developed on paper work when theyʼre installed.”

Supply Chain

Charlane Lotriet Buyer

Charlane moved to VTʼs supply chain department in 2004 from General Motors. “Iʼm responsible for Hull and Outfit. This includes things like the anchors, chains and rigging – pretty much all the metalwork attached to the ship. I also cover safety equipment like life buoys and firefighting equipment. “Our department is divided into commodity teams. As well as Hull and Outfit there is Electrical, Steel and Mechanical. The Contracts Team deal with the suppliers that come in to install their own equipment on the ship, such as the communications and radar systems. “We use the Bill of Materials as our shopping list, and work closely with the designers to ensure which are the most cost-effective suppliers to meet the technical specification. Each commodity team has its own set of key suppliers. Itʼs important that we have good relationships with these suppliers and we are constantly looking at ways to develop these so we gain a better understanding of each other's businesses.”


A New Approach to Shipbuilding

&

Steelwork

Tom Newman

Head of Steelwork (Shop) A product of the VT Graduate Scheme, Tom works in the Steel Production Hall. “Raw material arrives at one end where itʼs cut by robotic laser and plasma cutters. The computers not only cut the pieces, but they print identity codes onto them so itʼs a bit like making a giant Airfix kit.

“When the pieces are cut, most end up on the panel line where they are placed on huge square palettes which run on tracks down the length of the building. Every eight hours the palettes move down the line to the next welding station, and another completed assembly comes out the end and is moved to the Assembly Hall. “We produced over a hundred flat panels for Clyde, the largest of which weighed almost twenty tonnes. We had some sixty people working for six months on Clyde which, due to the investment in the facility, is considerably less than would have been needed at our old facility in Southampton.”

Assembly

Dan Tarry

Steelwork Apprentice Dan is currently finishing his four-year apprenticeship with VT. After a spell working on Clyde in the Steel Production Hall, Dan has been in the Assembly Halls. “The flat plates and sub-assemblies are moved from the Steel Production Hall to Assembly Hall A, where they are put together to make the units. I work with a tradesman to prepare the pieces for welding. This involves checking for flatness, preparing the edges and making sure everything is within tolerance. The hot work team then weld the pieces together. We do a similar job in Hall B. This is where the units are finally assembled into the complete ship." Dan says he enjoys everything about the job. “You can be doing something different every day. Iʼll be glad when Clydeʼs completed as itʼs the first whole ship Iʼve worked on. Iʼm now looking forward to finishing my apprenticeship and becoming a tradesman.”


A New Approach to Shipbuilding

&

Mechanical

Electrical

Keith Weaver

MBE

Electrical Team Leader

Ian Isaac

Pipe Fitter Chargehand Ian completed his apprenticeship at VT over twenty years ago. Fuel, water, hydraulics, exhaust pipes, even sewage are moved around Clyde thanks to Ian and the other twenty-five fitters that install the various pipe systems on the ship. “Work on the Clyde started last year when we began making the various bulkhead penetrations. These are the short lengths of pipe that connect the pipework in one compartment with those in the next. Once made, they go over to the hotwork teams to be welded into the structure. “We start fitting pipe runs into the modules where we can, but generally most of the pipe-fitting occurs once the main structure has finally come together. Once a system is completed we test for leaks and then go about setting the equipment to work. We are also involved in commissioning and sea trials - which is great fun!”

“We have over 30 electricians on Clyde – VT staff and contractors. We have apprentices and adult trainees who have moved from other disciplines. For them, Clyde is probably the best training ground they could ever have.” Keithʼs involvement with Clyde started months before the keel was laid down, helping to work out the cable runs for the 60 miles of cables within the ship. “All ships are the same. We start at the main switchboard and generator in the centre and run the cables out from there. We can then start on making off the connections – all thirty-eight thousand of them! The equipment can then be plugged in and we help setting the systems to work.” Clyde is the 26th ship Keith has worked on in his 36 years at VT – a career that was recognised in 2002 when he was awarded an MBE for services to shipbuilding and the defence industry.


&

Fitting Out

Rod Davis

Hull Manager

Apart from the engines and the electrical systems, Rod is responsible for everything within Clydeʼs hull. “If you think of what youʼd find in a hotel, thatʼs what Iʼm responsible for; decoration, ventilation, the cabins and the kitchen are all within my remit. “A lot of the systems and equipment on board are manufactured by specialist companies. Whereas on previous ships we have installed most of this equipment ourselves, on Clyde we have asked the firms to install it. We have adopted this practice from commercial shipbuilding and it is proving to be very cost-effective. “Having more contractors on board has been a steep learning curve for everyone, but this close working with our suppliers means that we get a better understanding of each other's business and products.”

A New Approach to Shipbuilding

Commissioning

Mike Flewin Project Executive

MBE

Mike has been building ships for thirty-six years. “I did my apprenticeship here in Portsmouth Dockyard – in fact I saw HMS Andromeda launched in 1967, the last warship to be built at Portsmouth” Mike is responsible for all aspects of the build of Clyde, including design, build and commissioning. “To ensure the ship is built correctly we follow strict procedures and constantly check that the ship is being built to specification. "After sea trials, we will discuss any outstanding issues with the customer before handing her over. The red ensign will be replaced with the white ensign to signify her entering service with the Royal Navy.” Clyde will be the fifteenth ship build Mike has managed. “Itʼs a funny feeling when you finally hand a ship over. For a couple of years she is a major part of your life, and then all of a sudden someone else is looking after her. However, you get a tremendous feeling of pride for the team that has shown such professionalism and dedication on the project.”


A New Approach to Shipbuilding

C L S ontractor

ogistic

upport

Greg Smith

Principle ILS (Integrated Logistic Support) Engineer

Greg has been an ILS Engineer at VT for 6 years. It is his job to ensure the ship continues to operate at optimum efficiency during its lifetime. “In my job I need to wear many hats. We have to select equipment and spares that best fits its intended purpose, will last and be easily reparable, all of course to the budget. “With Clyde being based in the South Atlantic, itʼs even more important that we get the support right as theyʼre a long way from our suppliers. We need to get the balance between what we hold on the ship, what we hold at our facility in the Falklands and what we get direct from the suppliers." For Greg, building the ship is just the beginning. “We are under contract to provide Clyde to the Royal Navy for the next 5 years, with the ship being available for 282 out of 365 days. The support package will be critical to meet this target.”

The Falkland Islands will be Clyde's new home following her hand-over.


The VT Shipbuilding Team - August 2006

EMPLOYEES

ABRAHAMS,S ACKLAND,PA ADAMS,CD ADAMS,SE ADDISON,R AINSWORTH,TP AKHURST,P AKHURST,R ALDOUS,BE ALLAN,AW ALLEN,J ALLEN,S AMEY,J ANDERSON,RJ ANDERSON,S ANDREW,DW ANDREWS,J ANDREWS,ME ANGEL,A ANSELL,M ANSELL,RJ APLIN,N ARMSTRONG,P ATRILL,MA ATTON,PJ AUSTWICK,WJ AYRES,AV BAILEY,PG BAILEY,S BAINES,A BAKER,C BAKER,GP BAKER,R BAKER,TJ BALCHIN,BJ BALLARD,K BANKS,JP BANNISTER,G BARBER,DA BARCROFT,J BARFOOT,RG BARGE,GE BARGE,SJ BARKER,PM BARKER,TB BARKWILL,A BARNARD,A BARNES,D BARON,WR BARRETT,PJ BARTLETT,KR BARTLETT,NS BATTY,JS BEACON,MJ BEALE,P BEAMES,CJ BEARD,PJ BECK,EL BEEBY,J BELCHER,RT BELLAMY,DP BELLO,MA BEST,DR BEST,FG BEVAN,LW BEVIS,JE BEYNON,A BICHARD,DP BICHARD,JP BILES,S BIRCHMORE,JE BIRD,R BIRD,RN BIRKS,PJ BISHOP,GN BLACKLOCK,PD BLATCH,J BLOXHAM,K BOORN,NG

BOWERS,K BOWERS,KJ BOWERS,MR BOWLES,SR BOWYER,H BOWYER,KF BOYLE,KJ BRANFORD,IW BRENKLEY,JA BRENNAN,SI BREWER,K BRINDLEY,ML BROWN,AR BROWN,CG BROWN,D BROWN,J BROWN,J BROWN,MJ BROWN,RJ BROWN,S BROWN,SA BROWNE,DJ BROWNLEE,DW BRYSON,H BUCKINGHAM,MR BUCKSEY,M BUDD,LR BUDDEN,MA BUNN,SW BURDETT,VC BURNETT,A BURNHAM,MC BUTCHER,P BUTT,PJ BUTTERFIELD,GF CAMERON,A CANNONS,MP CANTELL,DG CANTELO,BW CARPENTER,DR CARPENTER,P CARR,RG CARROLL,CC CARSWELL,PJ CARTER,BJ CARTER,M CARTON,DM CARTWRIGHT,TM CASSEY,M CAULK,DR CHALLINOR,DS CHAMBERS,JB CHANT,DP CHAPMAN,EJ CHARLES,GM CHATFIELD,AJ CHISHOLM,DR CHITTOCK,PJ CHRISTIE,R CHUTER,V CIUPEK,BA CLAIR,G CLARK,CM CLARK,R CLARK,RG CLARKE,AA CLAYTON,MJ CLAYTON,PM CLEMENT,AJ CLEMENTS,PR CLINTON,DJ CLOKE,AL COCKERELL,I COCKING,JE COCKINGS,PM COFFIN,NO COGGER,R COLE,LJ COLLINS,AC COLLINS,BC

COLLINS,PJ COLLINS,S COLVERSON,DJ COMBER,P COMMINS,JP CONDON,AJ COOK,LT COOKE,E COOLEY,DJF COOMBES,GM COOMBES,M COOMBES,MR COOPER,DA COOPER,DF COOPER,PE CORNELIUS,SR COTTELL,MJ COTTRELL,BK COULSON,RR COUNIHAN,S COURTS,MD COWPER,NJ COX,J COXEN,AJ COZENS,G CRABB,PL CRIDGE,AD CROOK,DT CROW,EK CRUICKSHANK,B CUMMINS,CT CUMNER,J CURRY,CT CZERNIAJEW,PAJ DANCE,P DANFORD,MR DANIEL,S DANIELS,AK DARLING,JI DAVAGE,LE DAVEY,SE DAVIES,A DAVIES,P DAVIES,SV DAVIES,W DAVIES,WJ DAVIS,PG DAVIS,RG DAY,KN DAY,RG DE ZINGER,G DEAR,AJ DEAR,LG DECK,J DEMPSEY,L DENNIS,RG DERRICK,WE DEVENISH,T DEWET,W DIAPER,JD DIBDEN,AJ DIBDEN,DJ DICKINSON,WR DICKSON,PS DIXON,MA DOAK,JDW DODKINS,AR DOLING,BJ DOLLERY,PRW DOMINY,DJ DOMINY,R DOMINY,RR DOMONEY,DJ DOUBLE,IP DOUGHERTY,MJ DOUSE,C DOWMAN,EM DOYLE,M DUFFNER,AC DUFFY,LT

DUNBAR,MJA DUNFORD,MP DUNHAM,TE DUNKLEY,S DUNN,AJ DURANT,BR DURRANT,KH DYER,EG DYER,PM DYER,SP EADES,JP EARLY,D EARWAKER,RSG EAST,ND EATON,B EDENBOROUGH,AN EDES,DJ EDWARDS,B EDWARDS,N ELCOMBE,JJ ELCOMBE,JJ ELLIOTT,S ELLIOTT,TM ELLIS,N ELTHAM,RJ EVANS,PS EVES,R FARLEY,PJ FAULDS,D FAY,AEG FAY,CJ FAY,PM FEARIS,PL FELTHAM,RT FELTHAM,S FENNEMORE,K FERRETT,L FETHERSTONHAUGH,C FIDDY,AJ FILMORE,R FINCH,PA FITZPATRICK,D FLETCHER,L FLEW,MC FLEWIN,MJ FOLKES,MW FORDE,D FOSTER,N FRANCIS,C FREEMAN,RJ FRENCH,J FROST,DC FRY,AR GALE,MD GALLOWAY,MJL GARDNER,GF GARNETT,A GARRATHY,J GARTH,J GATES,R GENNINGS,RP GENTILI,ST GIBBARD,P GIDNEY,R GILBERT,L GILFOY,PD GILL,JH GILLEN,R GILLESPIE,S GLASBEY,AJ GLASSPOOL,JD GLAZEBROOK,CT GLYNN,CP GOBLE,DJ GODFROY,SA GOFF,AH GOLDRING,RE GOLDSMITH,MR GOODE,A GOODMAN,LW

GOPAL,NP GORVIN,MJ GOUGH,JE GRAHAM,TH GRALAK,M GRAY,DG GREEN,BJ GREEN,D GREEN,M GREGORY,M GREGORY,MJ GREGORY,PJ GRIFFITHS,AR GROSSETT,CH GULLETT,TJ GUNN,HJ HALE,V HALL,AJ HALL,DC HALLETT,I HALLWAY,A HANN,R HARDING,CV HARDYMAN,JW HARMSWORTH,CJ HARRINGTON,RG HARRIS,A HARRISON,M HARTLEY,KJ HAWKINGS,C HAWKINS,WS HAYCOCK,DG HAYES,PJ HAYNES,K HAYWARD,B HAYWARD,GW HAYWARD,KA HAYWARD,LM HAYWARD,P HEIGHTON,LC HIGHMORE,DR HILL,JP HISCOCK,BW HOARE,PJ HOARE,TP HOBBS,DJ HOBIN,IF HOCKADAY,L HOCKLEY,CR HOLLOWAY,JR HOLLOWAY,RC HOLLOWAY-MOGER,MC HOLMES,D HOLMES,D HOLMES,TA HOPTON,JB HORAN,CJ HORNER,B HORNER,GJ HORTON,A HOSEY,DM HOSEY,S HOUGHTON,JDW HOWICK,SG HUGHES,MJ HUMBY,DJ HUME,AJ HUMPHREYS,MP HUNT,SJ HURST,PJ HUTCHINGS,DF HUTCHINS,DJ HUTTON,IK HYDE,A HYLAND,RA HYOM,DT IRVINE,R ISAAC,IS ISAACS,DW ISHAM,P

IVES,LJ JACKSON,AR JACKSON,S JAMES,PC JAMES,PW JARMAN,N JEFFERY,LM JENKINS,CA JENKS,PS JERAM,DP JERAM,PD JERRAM,MP JERRARD,S JERRIM,ML JOBE,CL JOHNSTON,C JONES,J JONES,UA JOSIC,J JOWETT,DJ JOYCE,GW JUDD,MF KANE,TJ KARPETA,M KELLETT,PMG KELSALL,SJ KILLEEN,R KING,PA KING,SD KIRBY,P KNIGHT,D KNOWLES,B LACEY,G LACEY,P LAKE,M LAMBE,KJ LAMBERT,LR LANE,PD LANGE,CT LANGRIDGE,K LAWRENCE,MJ LAWRENCE,PK LAWSON,A LAWSON,R LE CLERCQ,CR LEA,D LEADSOM,MJD LEDGER,AJ LEE,PA LEE,R LE-MARQUAND,JA LEVER,PJ LEWIS,AP LEWIS,R LIDDAN,AJ LINN,M LOADER,JR LOCKWOOD,A LORIMER,ID LOTRIET,C LOUTH,KR LOVE,SR LOYNS,SJ LYALL,J MACDONALD,R MACHIN,RG MACKAY,B MACKINNON,AW MAIDMENT,PA MALCOLM,KA MALCOLM,M MANVELL,SJ MARSHALL,JJ MARTEN,PS MARTIN,GR MARTIN,IJ MARTIN,JD MARTIN,JW MASON,I MATTHEWS,CG

MAXWELL,AL MAY,RJ MAYOR,F MCCALL,I MCCAUGHAN,T MCCORMACK,L MCCULLY,P MCFADYEN,J MCGILL,AJ MCGUINESS,KR MCINTOSH,P MCKENNA,AJ MCKENZIE,IP MCLAUGHLIN,MA MCLOUGHLIN,BE MCMAHON,R MCMAHON,TP MCNALLY,T MCNICOL,P MCSTAY,BM MEARS,A MEDCALF,PJ MERRITT,LG METCALFE,S MIDDLETON,SL MILFORD,RM MILLER,AJ MILLER,ME MILLS,B MILLS,SJ MILNE,ER MINTRAM,JA MITCHELL,D MITCHELL,DI MITCHELL,TS MOFFITT,A MOGRIDGE,D MONAGHAN,MJ MONCASTER,R MONKCOM,DR MOODY,C MOORE,AM MOORE,G MOORE,M MORGAN,H MORRISON,A MOSS,A MOSS,DJ MOULAND,JB MUKHERJEE,DS MUNN,JG MUNN,WI MURPHY,B MURREY,DW NELSON,PR NEWBURY,RD NEWMAN,BJ NEWMAN,T NICHOLSON,SF NIGHTINGALE,F NIJJER,M NORRIS,L OʼCONNOR,M OGBURN,PJ OʼHARA,M OʼHARA,SP OLIVE,AD ORCHARD,AG OSBORNE,AM OSBORNE,D OSGOOD,DR OʼSULLIVAN,JA OʼTOOLE,JP OWENS,JD PADDICK,KD PAGE,RJ PALLISER,C PALMER,L PALMER,WR PANCALDI,DS

PAONESSA,FA PARKINSON,M PARSONS,AJ PARSONS,TJ PASKINS,RC PATTISON,NP PAULLEY,S PAYNE,M PEARCE,JBM PEARSON,MJ PENFOLD,TW PEPPER,G PEPPER,KM PERRY,W PERRYMAN,I PHILLIPS,JG PLATTS,CP PLOWS,NJ POLLARD,M POPHAM,KJ PORRETT,AP PORTAS,PM POTTER,JA POTTS,T POWELL,B PRICE,G PRITCHARD,TJ PRIVETT,IA PUCKETT,RM PUGH,DG PURCELL,C PURTON,PS QUINELL,AP RACKETT,MJ RANDALL,KR RANDLE,KP RANKIN,CA REAKES,GR REED,GV REEVES,J REID,CS RHYS-JONES,W RICHARDS,MG RICHARDSON,J RICHARDSON,JS RIDLEY,MJ RIGG,D RIGGS,PO RIXON,R ROBERTS,MA ROBERTS,S ROBERTS,SM ROBERTSON,GS ROBINS,AV ROBINSON,AG ROBINSON,S ROBSON,A RODWELL,WF ROGERS,M ROOD,BE ROWE,RG ROWE,TJM ROWLES,I RUSSELL,GE RUSSELL,WM RUTHERFORD,S RYDER,MW SALTER,P SANDALL,CJ SANDALL,MJ SANSON,R SAUNDERS,BJ SAUNDERS,MJ SAUNDERS,S SAUNDERS,SM SAWYERS,MT SAXTY,A SCHOENROCK,NW SEARLE,GD SELEMANI,GEH

SETFORD,D SEVIER,SW SEWARD,M SHAFFERY,RP SHAW-HAMILTON,MP SHEARING,SJ SHELLEY,NA SHELVERTON,CP SHEPHERD,AJ SHERBAKOV,M SHERBORNE,PT SHERITON,MJ SHERMAN,IT SHIPP,D SHORT,R SIBLEY,RM SICHEL,KA SILLENCE,N SILSBURY,GT SIMMONS,MJ SIMPSON,AE SIMPSON,D SIVYOUR,SGF SLADE,BH SLOCOMBE,MJ SMITH,AD SMITH,AJ SMITH,B SMITH,G SMITH,JE SMITH,K SMITH,KJ SMITH,L SMITH,MB SMITH,NDT SMITH,PT SMITH,RA SMITH,RJ SMITH,RL SMITH,SR SMITH,T SMITHSON,K SNELLING,DM SPALDING,M SPATCHER,A SPEARPOINT,RM SPENCER,D SPENCER,WG SPRATT,J SQUIBB,MC STALLARD,R STANCLIFFE,BM STANTON,S STAUNTON,K STEDMOND,A STEVENS,AH STEVENSON,DC STEWART,DG STEWART,DR STEWART,GPG STEWART,NM STIRK,PT STOKES,IG STOKES,N STORER,D STRAFFORD,GC STRAND,ER STRIDE,AA STROUD,M STUNELL,RA STURGESS,MV SUMNER,PD SWAIN,M SYKES,DJ SYKES,S TAIT,GR TAPPENDEN,DC TARRY,D TARRY,R TAYLER,S

TAYLOR,AJS TAYLOR,GK TAYLOR,K TEMPLETON,S THEW,S THOMA,S THOMPSON,DRG THOMPSON,M THOMPSON,MA THOMPSON,S THORNE,RF TILBURY,I TILL,MW TILL,PW TIVADAR,JP TOMASSO,A TOMLINSON,C TOPP,GL TOWNSEND,L TOYE,TJ TRANTER,GR TREASURE,JA TREVETT,RI TROWBRIDGE,AT TUCK,RM TUCKER,JM TUCKER,PA TUNGATT,SM TURNER,I TURNER,JA TURP,SR TYNAN,PB TYRRELL,P VANOESTREN,JD VAUGHAN,D VAUGHAN,KR VICKERS,SG VIPOND,M WADDINGTON,R WAGSTAFF,A WALLACE,R WALLER,M WARD,PM WARD,RJ WARDELL,AW WARREN,AJ WARWICK,PB WATERHOUSE,MW WATERMAN,G WATERS,LG WATSON,RJ WATTS,CR WATTS,D WATTS,SD WAY,R WEARN,AR WEAVER,KR WEAVER,PJ WEAVER,RW WEBB,GA WEEKS,RS WEEKS,SJ WEIGHTMAN,LJ WELDON,IM WELLS,AJ WESLEY,DJ WESTHORPE,D WESTHORPE,MH WHEELER,CP WHEELER,G WHEELER,PA WHELDRAKE,R WHITCHER,H WHITE,G WHITE,L WHITE,M WHITE,MB WHITE,S WHITE,T WHITE,WJ

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CONTRACTORS ACHESON,D ADDISON,R ALLAN,S AMBROSE,W AMEY,R ANDERSEN,G ANDERSON,C ANTHONY,P ARLOTTE,R ARMSTRONG,F ARNOTT,S ATKINSON,B ATKINSON,G BAIRD,D BALLARD,S BARRON,D BARRON,T BATES,L BAXTER,J BERRY,P BLAMPIED,B BODEN,D BOLTON,C BONNER,P BOOTE,B BOWES,J BOWSHER,D BRADLEY,W BRIDGES,D BRIGGS,G BRIMMAGE,T BROTHERS,R BROWN,A BROWN,W BUCK,M BURNS,A BURNS,G BUTTLE,S CALLARY,P CAPLEN,D CARR,I CARTER,P CAUGHEY,S CHANDLER,B CHANDLER,P CLARKE,B CLARKE,G COISH,S COLLINS,A COLLINSON,C CONNACHAN,S

CONVERY,S CONWAY,N COOPER,J CORONKOLAS,N COSTAR,N COTTON,S COULTHARD,I COX,J CRAIG,J CRICHTON,A CROOK,G CUDAHY,C CURRIE,D DAISH,C DAVIDSON,G DAVIES,S DAVIS,W DAW,S DEAN,D DEAS,C DEVENISH,T DICKINSON,A DICKINSON,R DICKS,M DOBSON,K DOCHERTY,G DOCHERTY,S DODDS,F DOU,A DOW,E DOWDING,G DUNDON,M EATON,T EDWARDS,J ELLIOTT,J ELLIS,J EMBLETON,A ESCOTT,J EVANS,G EVANS,S EVANS,T FATAYEER,N FLOOD,F FOLEY,A FOX,S FREEL,P FULCHER,P FYNAN,P GALLAGHER,B GALLAGHER,M GALLAGHER,P GATT,J GAUGHAN,F GEE,C GHYSEL,G GHYSEL,M GILMOUR,P GOODWIN,P GOUGH,R GRAHAM,G GRANT,J GRAY,D GRAY,O GRIEVESON,S GRIFFIN,B HALEY,W HARVEY,B HATCH,A HAWKE,J HAYES,G HEMMINGS,I HENSHAW,A HILL,J HINDSHAW,M HOLLEY,M HOLMES,P HOOPER,C HOPKINS,E HORNE,B HOWELLS,C

HUNTER,J HUNTER,S HUNTLEY,J IRVING,S IRWIN,D JAMES,A JEFFREY,K JENKINS,J JERAM,A JOHNSON,B JOHNSON,L JONES,B JONES,D JONES,T JORDAN,K JORDAN,S JOYCE,S JUDD,G KALNINS,T KENNEDY,A KENNEDY,P KIDGELL,C KIERSTENSON,B KING,M KIRKBRIDE,D KNOWLES,D LANGSHAW,A LAWRENCE,R LEMMON,S LEWIS,G LILLEY,A LINKLATER,B LINSLEY,J LINSLEY,N LLEWELLYN,S LOVELOCK,D LOW,A MACKAY,C MACKENZIE,C MACLINDEN,J MALONEY,J MANSHIP,R MARSHALL,A MATHESON,L MATTHEWS,S MCALINDON,G MCALONEY,J MCAULAY,G MCAULAY,J MCCALLUM,A MCCUTHEON,R MCKAY,J MCKEATING,D MCKENNY-MILNE,A MCKINDLESS,D MCKINNON,S MCMEAN,A MCMILLAN,A MILLIGAN,H MITCHELL,P MONTELLO,L MOONEY,J MORGAN,R MOSCROP,P MOTH,D MURRAY,S NICOLSON,A OʼGORMAN,C OʼNEILL,P ORAM,G ORMSTON,M OSGOOD,S PANCALDI,S PEARSON,K PEDLEY,B PERSSKOG-GE,J PETERSON,J POOLEY,B POWNEY,T PRICE,M

PRICKETT,I PURDY,B RACKETT,C RALPH,P RAMSEY,C RAMSHAW,T REID,B REYNOLDS,P RICHARDS,A RICHARDS,J RIX,G ROBINSON,S ROBSON,D ROLLASON,R RONALD,R ROWE,A SAYERS,P SHAW,R SIBBALD,K SIMPSON,G SKIVINGTON,O SLARK,D SMITH,A SMITH,G SOUTHERN,R STEVENS,K STEVENSON,J STILL,A STONE,R STONLEY,A STRETTELL,J SUTHERLAND,R SWANN,H TAFT,M TANNER,C TAYLOR,R TAYLOR,S TEMPLE,J TEMPLE,K THOMPSON,S THOMPSON,S THOMSON,M TIERNAN,R TILLEY,P TITHECOTT,N TODD,E TULIP,W TURNER,A TURNOUGH,L URIE,R WAGSTAFF,D WALL,J WALLINGTON,A WALNE,D WEEKS,G WEIR,P WHITE,J WHITEHOUSE,C WILKINSON,P WILLIAMS,B WILLIAMS,E WILLIAMS,Y WILLIAMSON,J WILSON,C WILSON,G WILSON,J WILSON,S WINKWORTH,P WOODBURN,P WRAY,A WRIGHT,A WRIGHT,P WYLIE,P YOUNG,L YOUNG,R YOUNG,W ZUNIGA,M


Lieutenant Commander

S H imon

opper

Commanding Officer - HMS Clyde

What do you think of the new Clyde? She始s absolutely outstanding. She is a big, impressive ship with extra capabilities. The two existing Castle Class ships have an air surveillance capability but HMS Clyde has more modern technology and better armament. What will you be doing with Clyde when she is handed over? Once HMS Clyde is handed over in October, the ship and her company will undergo a rigorous few months of crew familiarisation and training around the UK coast before deployment. And where will she eventually be deployed to? She will be operating around the Falkland Islands. Our role is to become part of the infrastructure down there and I始m keen to get the islanders to accept her as their patrol vessel as soon as possible. We want to be there in time to be part of the commemorations for the 25th anniversary of the Falklands conflict. What will be the effect of VT having responsibility for Clyde始s support? We will have a VT engineer embedded in the ship and he will be part of the ship始s company. This gives the rest of the crew the chance to concentrate on their operational role. These principles have already been tried with the River Class ships, but we are now taking this concept 6,000 miles away so it will be a totally new challenge.


T

he Legend of the Crest

In the late sixth century, the Queen of Cadzow was suspected of 'intrigue' by her husband as she had given his ring to a court favourite. The king, in a day's hunting, caught sight of the ring on the manʼs finger while resting under a tree. While the courtier slept, the king carefully drew the ring from his finger and cast it into the water. On returning home he angrily demanded to see the ring; when the Queen could not produce it he cast her into prison. In her misery she sent a messenger to Bishop Kentigern (later venerated as St Mungo) beseeching him to help her, as she had only been guilty of an act of frivolity. Kentigern was filled with compassion and sent a messenger to take a fishing rod to the spot on the riverbank where the ring had been flung into the water and instructed him to bring back the first fish he caught. The messenger hurried to the spot and caught a salmon and brought it directly to Kentigern. Kentigern instructed him to cut open the fish and amazingly the ring was found in its belly. The messenger delivered the ring to the Queen who was able to hand it back to her doubting husband and peace was restored.


S

VT would like to thank the following people and organisations for their help with the Naming Ceremony: Mr Mark Caroe Captain Hedley Kett DSC* RD* RNR Mr Brian Patterson Mr Mike Summers BAE Insyte HMS Victory HM Naval Base Portsmouth National Maritime Museum Portsmouth Historic Dockyard Property Trust Royal Navy Historical Branch Royal Navy Museum Royal Navy Submarine Museum The Government of The Falkland Islands The Imperial War Museum

uppliers

AEI Cables Aish Technologies Ball Valves UK Limited BSS CSD Sealing Systems Ltd Denholm Industrial Services FSL Habia Cable Limited Humber Electrical Imtech Kaefer Man B & W Diesel Limited MCT Brattberg Ltd Muhlhan Murray International Metals Portchester Engineering PPS R & M Electrical Group RBS Scaffolding Rightons Rolls-Royce Stauff UK Ticon Triumph Controls Inc Tyco Electronics Wartsila Lips Defence


Clyde Souvenir Programme