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T H E

W H I T E

M O U N T A I N

S C H O O L

COU R S E G U I D E


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TABLE

OF

CONTENTS

MESSAGE FROM THE HEAD OF SCHOOL ...................................... 01 ACADEMI C PROGRAM ......................................................................02 GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS ......................................................03 ENGLISH DEPARTMENT ..................................................................04 HISTORY DEPARTMENT ..................................................................07 PHILOSOPHY AND RELIGIOUS STUDIES DEPARTMENT ..............09 MATHEMATICS DEPARTMENT ........................................................11 COMPUTER SCIENCE DEPARTMENT ..............................................13 SCIENCE DEPARTMENT ..................................................................14 SUSTAINABILITY STUDIES DEPARTMENT ......................................16 WORLD LANGUAGES DEPARTMENT ..............................................18 VISUAL AND PERFORMING ARTS DEPARTMENT ..........................20 LASR PROGRAM ................................................................................23 OUTDOOR EDUCATION DEPARTMENT ........................................25 FIELD COURSES ................................................................................26 THE LEARNING CENTER..................................................................27 ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE ..............................................28 COLLEGE COUNSELING ..................................................................29


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“The essential skill of the 21st century is knowing how to ask the most interesting questions.” , , TONY WAGNER INNOVATION LAB HARVARD UNIVERSITY

M E S SAG E F RO M T HE HE AD OF SC HOO L ARE YOU CURIOUS?

At The White Mountain School, we have a culture of inquiry. Our primary goal is to help our students become curious and engaged – true learners. We believe that asking great questions is as valuable as knowing answers, and we help students learn to frame and follow their own questions. Our approach of student-driven inquiry takes students out of the passenger seat and puts them in the driver’s seat. Students learn that education, at it’s most fundamental level, is an inquiry process – searching for answers to questions that matter most. Cognitive science research indicates we learn best when seeking answers to questions we truly hold, not just questions teachers have told us to explore. Research on motivation shows that students are most engaged when they have the opportunity to explore their interests. If we want enduring learning – for our students to leave the classroom with the desire and skills to learn more – we must make time and space for them to develop their curiosity. The traditional college-preparatory curriculum remains important to us. We engage students in broad and deep explorations of the liberal arts. This is our intellectual heritage: the ideas, philosophies and values scholars have developed and refined over many generations. A broad understanding of our heritage, our shared wisdom, grounds our students and gives them a place to stand as they think about their own future. Content coverage is essential but not as an end in itself. It is important to the extent that it exposes students to beautiful ideas and helps them think anew about their own world – and their own questions. Schools must move away from an outdated reliance on memorization and recall toward a focus on inquiry and true engagement with ideas. The White Mountain School is at the forefront of this movement. We are engaged with the broader educational community. We host workshops for teachers from other schools on building a culture of inquiry. We talk one-on-one with academic and admission leaders at colleges and universities to get feedback on our approach. And, we present at national conferences on our work. We have an obligation to our students. To best prepare for the world they will shape in the future, we must help them become curious, engaged learners.

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Too often in schools, students are just passengers—they are along for the ride. We want to teach them to drive their learning. Student-driven inquiry provides students with that opportunity.” -

TIMOTHY BREEN , PH . D ., HEAD OF SCHOOL

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ACADEMIC PROGRAM As a college-preparatory school, The White Mountain School’s curriculum is structured according to the traditional liberal arts model; however, our ultimate focus is the intellectual engagement and development of our students. Our academic curriculum serves to instill an inquisitive spirit through meaningful learning. By nurturing their curiosity, we hope to inspire our students to discover their passions, whether for artistry, leadership, service or social change. ESSENTIAL SKILLS AND HABITS FOR ACADEMIC SUCCESS Our culture of inquiry and small class sizes help students develop the skills and habits for success. We have studied the findings of leading researchers about academic achievement in college and developed a summary of the skills and habits that correlate with success. These skills and habits – naturally developed through student-driven inquiry – are what students need to thrive as learners in high school, college and beyond: Skills: n Organization Skills: time management; goal-setting; workspace and notebook organization n

Study Skills: note-taking strategies; reading skills; test preparation; test-taking strategies

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Research Skills: identifying relevant issues and questions; evaluating and using a variety of resources; developing original arguments

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Critical Thinking Skills: analyzing, synthesizing and interpreting information; assessing the soundness of an argument

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Communication Skills: expressing ideas with clarity, concision and grace; writing with correct grammar, punctuation and citations; writing well-structured essays with logical conclusions; preparing and delivering engaging, informative presentations

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Quantitative Reasoning Skills: describing, interpreting, manipulating, and problem-solving with mathematical equations; thinking systematically and logically

Habits: n

Curiosity: owning the learning process; framing questions well; exploring ideas with purpose and enthusiasm

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Reflection: awareness of current level of understanding; ability to reflect on successes/challenges; use of feedback to improve

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Collaboration: engaging in spirited dialogue and teamwork; participating successfully in study groups; communicating openly with teachers and advisors

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Persistence: pursuing inquiry as a dynamic process; working with precision and accuracy; persevering when presented with a novel, difficult or ambiguous task

HONORS COURSES: We offer an honors option of all of our year-long, non-AP courses. Honors-level courses are available to students who have a strong desire to strengthen their depth of knowledge and the development of their skills in a given subject. Students take on more complex, in-depth exploration of course material and complete a variety of rigorous assignments, independent projects and assessments within the context of heterogeneous classrooms.

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GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS STUDENTS MUST TAKE A MINIMUM OF FIVE COURSES PER TERM.

The minimum number of credits required for graduation is 19. Year-long courses are worth one credit; semester-long courses are worth half a credit.

MINIMUM DEPARTMENTAL REQUIREMENTS (Earned in equivalent of U.S. grades 9-12) English 4 credits total* History 2½ credits total,* including: 1 credit Modern World History and 1 credit U.S. History Philosophy and Religious Studies ½ credit Mathematics 3 credits total, including: 1 credit Algebra I, 1 credit Geometry and 1 credit Algebra II Science 3 credits total, including: 1 credit Biology, 1 credit Chemistry or Physics Sustainability Studies ½ credit World Languages 2 credits in one language* Visual and Performing Arts 1 credit LASR Program Successful completion of the LASR program requirement Field Courses Successful completion of one Field Course per semester enrolled

*ESL students have different requirements.

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ENGLISH DE P A R TM E N T

Our English Department enables students to communicate clearly and confidently, to read literature for understanding and appreciation, and to think critically about the societal, moral and existential questions to which their study of literature gives rise. Students are challenged at all stages of our fouryear curriculum to bolster their vocabulary and grammatical skills through reading and analytical writing. Through discussions that inspire authentic engagement with classic and contemporary texts, students become acquainted with literature’s timeless

themes, various literary genres and a range of voices spanning from Shakespeare to Salinger. Most importantly, students are primed to compose effective responses to questions not only pertaining to what they have read, but also to their own lives and curiosities. Our English teachers employ differentiated teaching approaches as students identify their individual passions and strengths. In class, students read, journal, deliberate, present and argue, eventually assuming ownership over their classroom discourse.

YEAR-LONG COURSES

English I / Honors English I In their freshman year, students encounter the myriad forms and potential power of written expression, reading works representing a variety of cultures across time and space. This course enables students to master the rudiments of strong writing and cultivates the desire and ability to read texts carefully and critically. Assigned readings in English I often feature young people as protagonists and explore the complexities entailed in “coming of age.” Those journeys become vehicles for class discussion and writing, as students practice supporting their ideas and interpretations clearly and with evidence. While students do analytical as well as creative writing, our ongoing emphasis is on improving skills in reading, writing, studying, research, presentations and critical thinking.

English II / Honors English II Students in this course continue to hone their ability to think critically, with particular emphasis on conveying thoughts in writing with clarity and precision. Students in English II identify and study aspects of strong writing from a variety of European authors, building on that foundation in regular writing activities. We encourage students to articulate their own questions as they read works by Sophocles, Shakespeare, Conrad, Voltaire, Swift, Mary Shelley, Kafka, Ibsen, Orwell and others. Written assessments both assist and help gauge students’ reading comprehension and analytical skills. Weekly vocabulary tests aid students in the expansion of their English lexicon. Over the course of the year, students produce at least one research paper, several comparative and persuasive essays, a multi-genre writing project, multiple oral presentations and brief weekly journals.

English III / Honors English III To frame their year-long survey of American literature and to connect the diverse works that they study – a selection of short stories, poems, novels, nonfiction pieces and plays – English III students discuss and reflect on a number of recurring themes in American Literature: conflicts between different groups of Americans (e.g., men versus women; the wealthy versus the poor), and between opposing ideas and values (e.g., materialism versus idealism; conformity versus rebellion). Students develop their analytical reading and writing skills through formal and informal writing assignments. Students read works by Emerson, Poe, Twain, Chopin, Fitzgerald, Hurston, Dickinson and Frost, among others, and are encouraged to connect the ideas they encounter in literature with their own beliefs and experiences. Many aspects of this course emphasize sustainability concepts.

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AP English Literature Open to seniors who have demonstrated excellence in the study of English, this course is taught at a level appropriate for college freshmen. Through the careful reading of noteworthy fictional and philosophical literature, students come to understand the significance of “great books” and that serious exploration of the ideas found in those books can help us understand the human condition, and ourselves, more authentically. We aim to help students become independent thinkers who are capable not only of thinking critically about literature, but also of confronting their unexamined opinions intelligently and judiciously. Toward that end, it is important that students understand the contexts in which certain literary works were written, so students also read the philosophic texts that have influenced the thoughts of the authors. In doing so, students see that the great works of literature and philosophy are in dialogue with one another about the most important questions. Over the course of the year, students develop their analytical, expository and argumentative writing skills through formal and informal writing assignments in which they write critically about the genres, themes and styles of their assigned readings. Some classes are lecture-based, but it is imperative that students also learn from each other by means of classroom dialogue. That endeavor fosters independent thought, pushing the students to give an account of themselves and their ideas concerning great literature.

These courses are offered on a rotating schedule and are cross-listed with Philosophy and Religious Studies or Sustainability Studies department electives.

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SEMESTER-LONG COURSES

Beats and Beyond This course examines a noteworthy trend that emerged in American literature in the 1950s. With the rise of the Beat Generation, authors began to explore nontraditional topics and wrote in an anti-conformist style. Students in this course encounter the roots of the Beat Generation in Jack Kerouac’s “On the Road,” followed by later manifestations of the Beats in Ken Kesey’s “One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest” and Kurt Vonnegut’s masterpiece “Slaughterhouse-Five.” This survey enables students to analyze the evolution of countercultural literature between 1957 and 1969. Beyond the study of certain novels, we explore movies and music from this time period, as well as the historical events that defined it. (Open to juniors and seniors, or with permission of the instructor)

Creative Nonfiction A literary style with roots in the 1960s counterculture movement, writers of creative nonfiction seek to generate creative, compelling narratives from factual information. Examples are found in literary journalism, travel and sports writing, personal essays and biographies. In this course, students read examples of creative nonfiction with religious events or spiritual questions at their root. Our main text is “Salvation on Sand Mountain,” a journalistic assignment turned personal history and spiritual journey, supplemented by selections from Philip Zaleski’s “The Best Spiritual Writing 2013.” As a writing-intensive course, students write in several styles of creative nonfiction, drafting and revising to develop a portfolio of their work. (Open to juniors and seniors, or with permission of the instructor)

Creative Writing Umberto Eco wrote, “Those things about which we cannot theorize, we must narrate.” Writing is a way of knowing the world. In this course, students are challenged to see the world from the perspective of writers. Students read and discuss classic and contemporary fiction and poetry as they build their portfolio – and their skills as writers. The backbone of the class is a workshop in which students both give and receive feedback from their peers. Class readings and discussions focus on particular issues associated with the craft of writing. Students may have opportunities to attend readings and performances and engage with authors outside of School. (Open to juniors and seniors, or with permission of the instructor)

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Exploring Environmental Writing Students in this discussion-based course explore the writings of American authors concerned with the environment. The works of Henry David Thoreau, John Muir, Annie Dillard, Rachel Carson, Jack Turner and Aldo Leopold help students understand the history and philosophy of the environmental movement in America. Assignments include reading and responding to articles, essays, poems and stories, as well as leading class discussions, contributing to a class blog, and giving presentations about current issues and events. Students’ final assignment is writing a personal environmental philosophy based on their experiences and the course readings. (Open to juniors and seniors, or with permission of the instructor)

Murder in Literature Murder propels the narratives and shapes the meanings of some of Western literature’s most powerful and provocative works. In this literaturefocused course, students study the underlying causes and reasons for murder and its morally complex consequences. They explore various themes through reading, discussion and writing in multiple genres. The reading list includes “To Kill a Mockingbird,” “Frankenstein,” “Othello,” “The Maltese Falcon” and “In Cold Blood.” Students grapple with moral issues, study the psychology of murderers, discover the importance of means, motive and opportunity in each story, and relate the textual themes and motifs to their own lives and the world today. (Open to juniors and seniors, or with permission of the instructor)

Place-Based Writing Students in this course have the opportunity to write informatively and creatively about the places they are from and the places in which they are currently situated, both literally and figuratively. They discover how places impact people and shape events, and, consequently, how places influence writing. We also read a number of articles, short stories and essays that effectively take us to different places, causing us to experience the emotion, essence and sensual nature of several distinct locations. Writing assignments include essays, poetry and short stories, many of which will be compiled into a class journal titled “Writing our Communities.” Writings of particularly high quality may be submitted to contests or for publication. (Open to juniors and seniors, or with permission of the instructor)

Spiritual Memoir Defined by Elizabeth J. Andrew as “an intimate conversation between oneself and a great mystery,” spiritual memoirs offer opportunities for students to learn about themselves and understand their experiences in a new light. Regular journal writing, revision and participation in writing workshops are integral parts of this course. In class, students discuss excerpts from published memoirs as examples of the form and content of creative nonfiction. At the end of the semester, each student submits a memoir for publication to an outside source and participates in a public reading. (Open to juniors and seniors, or with permission of the instructor)

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“My education at The White Mountain School has pushed me to see how interrelated everything is, and my courses have deepened my understanding of the world.” - B IANCA L ORA , S TUDENT

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HISTORY DE P A R TM E N T

Our History Department encourages students to examine critically the patterns and processes that have shaped the modern world, as well as the collective wisdom of human societies’ most profound, influential thinkers. This intellectual odyssey cultivates curiosity about contemporary moral debates and prevailing political ideologies, generating essential questions about today’s world that are explored within our curriculum. We educate students in the history of both the Western and Eastern hemispheres, exploring the traditional philosophical and religious orientations within each. Our standard course progression helps

students analyze the causes of change in human civilizations throughout history. A variety of important academic skills are emphasized across our curriculum, including how to conduct research, how to organize and analyze data, and how to construct persuasive, evidence-based arguments. We impart those skills through class discussion, deconstruction of primary sources and expository writing assignments. Our goal is to inspire students to use those skills as they assume active, responsible roles in their local and global communities.

YEAR-LONG COURSES

World History I / Honors World History I Focusing on history prior to 1400, World History I explores the confluence of geography, religion, economics, politics, society and culture in world history through the primary lens of sustainability. The main objective of this course is to help students develop an understanding of the myriad experiences of the people who occupy our planet, as well as the global events and movements that have given the modern world its present shape. We also explore contemporary global political issues and events as they relate to our studies. Throughout the year, students work on study skills, map reading, research, critical thinking and writing and are expected to engage in class discussions, give oral presentations, read from a variety of texts and sources, and conduct research on particular topics.

World History II / Honors World History II Focusing on history after 1400, World History II gives particular attention to the global innovations, revolutions and events that have shaped today’s societies. Assignments are designed to help students grapple meaningfully with some of the most poignant problems and questions to emerge since the Renaissance. Students learn to process and utilize historical evidence as they themselves ultimately articulate the broadest lessons of modern human history. This course uses sustainability as a lens through which to analyze and understand the modern world.

U.S. History / Honors U.S. History This course, typically taken by students in their junior year, identifies and traces major themes in American history from the Colonial era to the present. Students explore the development of the federal government, movement patterns of people into and within the country, historic interactions between various racial and cultural groups, the effects of free enterprise and corporations within society, and the United States’ evolving relationships with other nations.

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AP Human Geography The evolving field of human geography examines the modern and historical patterns, means and processes of human occupation in both place and space. While this class involves an introduction to physical world geography, our study is tied primarily to the unique impacts and consequences of the interaction between geography and human populations. Aided by maps and mapping tools, students study world religions, cultural patterns and global economics in order to understand how those forces place and order people in spatial dimensions. We use established models and methods as tools for understanding how cities develop, how people move and how populations shift. While this course enables students to discover a new lens with which to understand historical events, it also benefits those who seek a deeper understanding of the modern world. Contemporary politics, economics, conflicts and events help us understand geographical concepts in real time. We may also have a number of opportunities to learn from our own local geography through selected case studies and field trips. As with all AP courses, we concentrate on the specific strategies and skills students need to be successful on the AP Exam. (Open to juniors and seniors, or with permission of the instructor)

NOTE: These courses are offered on a rotating schedule and are cross-listed with Philosophy and Religious Studies department electives.

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SEMESTER-LONG COURSES

Eastern Religions: A Study of Hinduism and Buddhism In this course, we employ the lens of the academic study of religion to examine two foundational faiths of Asia: Hinduism and Buddhism. After reviewing sacred texts and historical foundations, we examine ethics, articles of faith, artistic representations, and current religious practices. Students read a selection of modern texts that address the integration of those faiths within the modern world. Finally, students use the tools they develop to research other religious practices of the region, some of which have their roots in Hinduism and Buddhism, and some of which evolved alongside the major faiths. (Open to juniors and seniors, or with permission of the instructor)

Western Religions: A Study of Judaism, Christianity and Islam This course employs the lens of the academic study of religion to examine the three major global monotheisms – Judaism, Christianity and Islam – all of which trace their origins to Abraham, a “father in faith.” After reviewing sacred texts and historical foundations, we examine the similarities and differences among ethics, articles of faith, artistic representations, and current practices between those religions. Finally, students explore the intersection of those religions and how “the people of the book” have shaped – and continue to shape – the modern world. (Open to juniors and seniors, or with permission of the instructor)

Moral Reasoning and Ethics: An Examined Life This course uses a variety of classical and contemporary sources to inform discussions of today’s social issues. Students explore the works of Aristotle, Kant, Mill, Nietzsche and Marx, as well as religious-based ethical systems around the world, applying them to examinations of issues such as capital punishment, medical ethics, environmentalism, abortion, social equity and economics. This course asks students to grapple with questions that have inspired philosophers throughout history and continue to impact our world. (Open to juniors and seniors, or with permission of the instructor)

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PHILOSOPHY AND RELIGIOUS STUDIES DE P A R TM E N T

Our Philosophy and Religious Studies Department enables students to wrestle thoughtfully and critically with questions of morality, spirituality and personal identity. As an Episcopal school, we encourage an affirming and academically informed discourse about what students regard as having ultimate meaning and purpose, and about what virtues ought to be espoused and cherished. Courses in this department afford opportunities to encounter the

Judeo-Christian and other faith traditions, using the wisdom of the ages to inform students’ everevolving understanding of themselves, their relation to others and the mysteries of the spiritual realm. Along with this emphasis on self-discovery, students practice what is entailed in thinking and reasoning philosophically: to analyze assertions and arguments with a simultaneously open and skeptical mind, and to articulate others’ viewpoints charitably.

NOTE: These electives are offered on a rotating schedule and are cross-listed with English and History department electives.

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SEMESTER-LONG COURSES

Beats and Beyond This course examines a noteworthy trend that emerged in American literature in the 1950s. With the rise of the Beat Generation, authors began to explore nontraditional topics and wrote in an anti-conformist style. Students in this course encounter the roots of the Beat Generation in Jack Kerouac’s “On the Road,” followed by later manifestations of the Beats in Ken Kesey’s “One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest” and Kurt Vonnegut’s masterpiece “Slaughterhouse-Five.” This survey enables students to analyze the evolution of countercultural literature between 1957 and 1969. Beyond the study of certain novels, we explore movies and music from this time period, as well as the historical events that defined it. (Open to juniors and seniors, or with permission of the instructor)

Eastern Religions: A Study of Hinduism and Buddhism In this course, we employ the lens of the academic study of religion to examine two foundational faiths of Asia: Hinduism and Buddhism. After reviewing sacred texts and historical foundations, we examine ethics, articles of faith, artistic representations, and current religious practices. Students read a selection of modern texts that address the integration of those faiths within the modern world. Finally, students use the tools they develop to research other religious practices of the region, some of which have their roots in Hinduism and Buddhism, and some of which evolved alongside the major faiths. (Open to juniors and seniors, or with permission of the instructor)

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Western Religions: A Study of Judaism, Christianity and Islam This course employs the lens of the academic study of religion to examine the three major global monotheisms – Judaism, Christianity and Islam – all of which trace their origins to Abraham, a “father in faith.” After reviewing sacred texts and historical foundations, we examine the similarities and differences among ethics, articles of faith, artistic representations, and current practices between those religions. Finally, students explore the intersection of those religions and how “the people of the book” have shaped – and continue to shape – the modern world. (Open to juniors and seniors, or with permission of the instructor)

Moral Reasoning and Ethics: An Examined Life This course uses a variety of classical and contemporary sources to inform discussions of today’s social issues. Students explore the works of Aristotle, Kant, Mill, Nietzsche and Marx, as well as religious-based ethical systems around the world, applying them to examinations of issues such as capital punishment, medical ethics, environmentalism, abortion, social equity and economics. This course asks students to grapple with questions that have inspired philosophers throughout history and continue to impact our world. (Open to juniors and seniors, or with permission of the instructor)

Spiritual Memoir Defined by Elizabeth J. Andrew as “an intimate conversation between oneself and a great mystery,” spiritual memoirs offer opportunities for students to learn about themselves and understand their experiences in a new light. Regular journal writing, revision and participation in writing workshops are integral parts of this course. In class, students discuss excerpts from published memoirs as examples of the form and content of creative nonfiction. At the end of the semester, each student submits a memoir for publication to an outside source and participates in a public reading. (Open to juniors and seniors, or with permission of the instructor)

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Most of my classes are discussion-based. There is always an opportunity to talk about our specific interests. I love that our school makes time for that.” - B ARBARA C ONANT, S TUDENT

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MATHEMATICS DE P A R TM E N T

Our Mathematics Department strengthens students’ quantitative skills and reasoning through a standard sequence of courses, ranging from Algebra I through AP Calculus BC. Wherever a student begins within our mathematics curriculum, his or her coursework constitutes strong preparation for success in college and beyond. Our math courses are skills-focused and emphasize, when applicable, the potential to apply those skills outside the classroom. Ultimately, we assist each student in cultivating a love of mathematics

for its own sake. We help students understand how the study of mathematics can enhance organization and precision while helping them see the possibility and beauty of creative solutions to problems. A student who completes AP Calculus BC earlier than his or her senior year, or who has an interest in a supplemental mathematical area, will be encouraged to pursue an independent study in that area with the support of a faculty advisor.

YEAR-LONG COURSES

Algebra I / Honors Algebra I This course equips students with basic algebra skills: the use of variables, solving linear and quadratic equations, manipulating systems of linear equations and solving inequalities. Students hone those abilities through daily assignments, group work and class discussions. This course not only strengthens students’ mathematical and problem-solving skills, but it also deliberately aids in developing organizational skills, written and oral communication skills, and the ability to collaborate effectively. In teaching and encouraging students to incorporate quantitative, logical analysis in their discernment processes, this course enables students to make well-informed decisions both inside and outside of the classroom. Students also learn how to use graphing calculators to solve problems, verify their solutions and defend their answers.

Geometry / Honors Geometry Students in Geometry are guided through a study of the relationships that exist among a variety of geometric elements in two-dimensional space. A working knowledge of those relationships enables students to solve spatial problems. We cover the following specific topics: lines and angles, areas of polygons, the Pythagorean Theorem, solid geometry, similarity, trigonometry, coordinate geometry and properties of circles. During the course of the year, students are asked to identify fundamental geometric principles and use those principles to construct solutions to complex problems including proofs, complex figures and word problems. Assignments are designed with the goal of challenging students to think more abstractly. (Prerequisite: Algebra I)

Algebra II / Honors Algebra II In Algebra II, students use their background in linear functions and equations from Algebra I, as well as their experiences in Geometry, as springboards for learning about more intricate mathematical functions and relationships. This course helps students model and analyze a much broader range of phenomena, with applications in engineering, business, music, physics, finance, biology and many other disciplines. Students build upon their mathematical skill set through daily assignments, group work, student-led presentations, journals, class discussions and presentations by the instructor. Engaging in projects such as the design of trails with varying slopes and the building of parabolic solar ovens, students identify meaningful connections between graphical representations and algebraic principles. This course teaches students to effectively use graphing calculators in the problem-solving process. (Prerequisite: Algebra I)

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Precalculus / Honors Precalculus This course prepares students for success in either Calculus or another first-year, college-level course in mathematics. Students primarily engage in problem-solving and a study of mathematical functions, including function notation, inverse functions and the graphing of function families. Those concepts appear throughout the year as students learn about polynomial, rational, exponential, logarithmic and trigonometric functions. We focus much of our time on using those functions to solve “real world” problems, with a strong emphasis on effectively communicating the mathematical process and collaboratively working with peers to discuss and solve those problems. Solid algebra and geometry skills are essential for success in this course. (Prerequisite: Algebra II)

AP Calculus AB This course formally introduces students to the study of calculus: the mathematics of rates, change and accumulation. Students’ primary foci of study include limits, derivatives and integrals, with the ultimate objective of learning how to use those skills to solve problems. We also explore how to derive the formulas that are used in the new concepts to which students are introduced and derive many familiar equations from physics and geometry. This course prepares students to take the AP Calculus AB exam. (Permission of the instructor required)

AP Calculus BC Students in this section of Calculus work in greater depth and in new ways with the concepts and skills studied in AP Calculus AB, learning how they apply to more sophisticated function types including parametric, polar and vector functions. Students are introduced to and utilize several new methods of solving mathematical problems. This course prepares students to take the AP Calculus BC exam. (Prerequisite: AP Calculus AB and permission of the instructor)

A note regarding the mathematics course sequence: Students who intend to apply to selective colleges and/or pursue studies in science, medicine, economics, mathematics or engineering may wish to schedule their coursework so that they may take Calculus during their senior year. Freshmen students enrolled in Algebra I who want to take Calculus during their senior year have two options: OPTION 1: Take Geometry and Algebra II concurrently during sophomore year, Precalculus during junior year, and Calculus during senior year. OPTION 2: Take one course, such as Geometry, during the summer in order to advance more quickly through our mathematics sequence. (Requires prior approval from the School)

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So far I have taken four different math classes taught by three different teachers at WMS, but one thing has remained the same: All were taught in interesting ways where I could actually see how the numbers worked and connected – I have applied them to realworld problems, and they have connected to my science classes.” - D ANIEL H IERRO , S TUDENT

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COMPUTER SCIENCE DE P A R TM E N T

Our Computer Science Department believes that a foundational understanding of computer programming and coding is an important lens to understanding and contributing to the contemporary world. Our computer science courses enable students to learn the basics of programming strategy and common programming languages – C, Python and Java – and provide

sufficient foundation and inspiration for students to pursue additional self-driven computer programming initiatives. Our course offerings reflect our belief that students build computer science skills through both a traditional programming curriculum and skills application.

SEMESTER-LONG COURSES

Introduction to Computer Programming Introduction to Computer Programming aims to provide students with an understanding of the role computation plays in problem-solving. This class covers the several basic programming languages: C, a compiled language that serves as the base for most other languages; Python, an object-oriented, scripting language used on computers and the internet to make applications and games; and, Java, a large cross-platform language used to make applications (including Android apps) and games. Students use a Linux Virtual Machine to write and run their programs. (Prerequisite: Algebra I, or at least patience and a willingness to learn new skills!)

Introduction to Video Game Design Introduction to Video Game Design uses the programming language Python and the game engine PyGame to introduce some of the basics of game design and theory, including game loops, sprites, classes, object-oriented programming and troubleshooting. Over the course of the semester, students produce games ranging from platformers to side scrollers. Prior to taking this course, students must know how to install a Linux virtual machine and have a basic understanding of computer file structures. (Prerequisite: Algebra I, or at least patience and a willingness to learn new skills and platforms!)

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SCIENCE DE P A R TM E N T

The need for today’s citizens to be scientifically and technologically literate is highlighted by the fact that many of the challenges and questions facing society are science related. Our courses not only prepare students for college but also encourage them to be informed, responsible and active citizens. Scientific inquiry, the integration of technology, laboratory and fieldwork experiences, and cooperative learning permeate our science curriculum. Our Science Department offers learning experiences in which students question, hypothesize and experiment

while also building foundational knowledge in the core science disciplines. We emphasize the relevance and application of science above rote memorization of facts. Our faculty teaches students how to write lab reports, translate scientific inquiry into experimental design and employ both qualitative and quantitative methods of analysis. We maintain that a foundation in science and scientific thinking develops curiosity, prepares students for the future and encourages thoughtful stewardship of the natural world.

NOTE: Some of these courses are cross-listed with Outdoor Education department electives.

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YEAR-LONG COURSES

Biology / Honors Biology This course introduces students to the life sciences and the unique ethic of sustainability. Students view cell structure and function, genetics and evolution through a lens of systems and interactions. We explore the concepts of ecology and symbiosis as themes for understanding biotic communities at every level. Students collect and analyze both laboratory and field data and also work on experimental design. When possible, we examine and discuss contemporary environmental and bioethical issues, providing a real-world context for the course material.

Chemistry / Honors Chemistry In this course, students encounter the elements of the periodic table – a beautifully elegant summary of all that we know about the behavior and structure of the elements that comprise our world. Early in their exploration of the periodic table, students study chemical reactions. By carrying out experiments and collecting and analyzing data, students discover how the forces of equilibrium, stability and energy drive those chemical reactions to create the world we inhabit. Students’ coursework enhances their problem-solving skills and helps them experience the ways that chemists use numbers to describe what they observe. Instilling an understanding of equilibrium, acids and bases, chemical bonding and oxidation-reduction reactions, this course provides students with a solid background in chemistry. (Prerequisite: Biology)

Physics / Honors Physics This course begins with a look at the history and evolution of the scientific discipline of physics. We discuss and use the scientific method in our class and lab work and emphasize the importance of scientific measurement and the unit-analysis problem-solving method. We cover one- and two-dimensional motion, planetary motion, Newton’s laws, rotational motion, work, energy, power, gravitation, electricity and magnetism. In all of our studies, we make every effort to use relevant examples of where and how physics happens in the world around us. Throughout the course, we emphasize comprehension of concepts through application. Students have the opportunity to design their own investigations related to topics we study as a class and to pursue projects on topics of their own choosing. 14


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AP Environmental Science AP Environmental Science students cover a wide range of topics – environmental ethics and policy, forestry, water pollution and scarcity, population, food and agriculture, toxicology, air pollution, conventional and renewable energies – in preparation for the AP Exam. Students are exposed to a large breadth of information, but they also get depth in specific areas through independent research and field work (e.g., examining the carbon stored in campus trees, the particulates in the air they breathe, the water quality of a local spring and the Ammonoosuc River) and by participating in a variety of field trips (e.g., excursions to a forest plantation, the regional landfill, the recycling transfer station, a wastewater treatment plant, an organic, cage-free chicken farm, a wood chip power plant). This class is a combination of lecture, discussion, labs and field trips. (Open to juniors and seniors, or with permission of the instructor)

Anatomy and Physiology / Honors Anatomy and Physiology This exciting course – ideal for prospective medical students, outdoor enthusiasts or students who enjoy hands-on learning – integrates an extensive study of human anatomy and physiology with backcountry first aid, evacuation and injury prevention. Offered in partnership with Stonehearth Open Learning Opportunities (SOLO), the oldest continuously operating school for wilderness emergency medicine, this course examines the structure and function of organ systems and explores how to address injuries and problems with those systems in backcountry settings. In weekly role-playing scenarios, students assume the role of either patient or rescuer. Students are required to become certified in CPR outside of class. Students 17 and older (by June 1) who successfully pass the final exam earn certification as Wilderness First Responders. (Open to juniors and seniors, or with permission of the instructor)

NOTE: These courses are offered on a rotating schedule and are cross-listed with Sustainability Studies and LASR program department electives.

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SEMESTER-LONG COURSES

Food: Putting it on the Table Where does the food we eat come from? Why is it important to know? This course seeks answers to those questions by exploring food production methods (e.g., subsistence, sustainable, local, organic and industrial agriculture) and examining the emerging ideology of food justice – the idea that the benefits and risks of growing, processing, distributing and consuming food should be shared equitably. We cover topics including: the nutritional value of food, GMOs, water resources, soil quality, food availability and food “deserts,” government food subsidies, community-supported agriculture, farmers markets, farm-to-school programs, the Green Revolution and urban gardening. We also review case studies on global commodities such as cacao, coffee, sugar, corn, palm oil, and beef. Academic studies are balanced with hands-on activities; students learn practical skills related to food production, preparation and preservation by boiling their own maple syrup, canning food, interviewing local farmers, and helping out on the School farm. At the end of the semester, students work on a final project exploring an area of personal interest related to food.

Science Inquiry This small class (capped at six students per semester) provides scientifically-minded students with fundamental skills related to designing and executing original research in the natural sciences. Working closely with the instructor and the Director of Student Research and Inquiry, each student identifies an area of interest and develops a semester-long project investigating his or her question. Course content includes how to frame a scientific research question, write a literature review, structure a final research report and prepare a final presentation. Projects completed in this course may fulfil the LASR program requirement. To enroll, students must be self-motivated and have demonstrated the ability to work independently. Interested students are required to submit a project proposal for consideration prior to registering. (Prerequisite: approval of instructor)

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SUSTAINABILITY STUDIES DE P A R TM E N T

Founded in 2001, our Sustainability Studies Department is the first such department at the secondary-school level in the United States. Our courses help students become informed, thoughtful and active stewards of the changing ecosystem. Focusing on integral aspects of global sustainability – economy, natural environment, social equality and personal well-being – we introduce students to “systems thinking” (recognizing connections between the

biological world and human society and creating solutions that satisfy both human and environmental needs) and “seventh-generation thinking” (considering the lasting impact that today’s actions may have on generations to come). The White Mountain School integrates sustainable practices into daily life (e.g., community service, recycling, composting and work jobs) and through our Sustainability Club, international development work, and our organic farm.

NOTE: These courses are cross-listed with History and Science department electives.

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YEAR-LONG COURSES

AP Environmental Science AP Environmental Science students cover a wide range of topics – environmental ethics and policy, forestry, water pollution and scarcity, population, food and agriculture, toxicology, air pollution, conventional and renewable energies – in preparation for the AP Exam. Students are exposed to a large breadth of information, but they also get depth in specific areas through independent research and field work (e.g., examining the carbon stored in campus trees, the particulates in the air they breathe, the water quality of a local spring and the Ammonoosuc River) and by participating in a variety of field trips (e.g., excursions to a forest plantation, the regional landfill, the recycling transfer station, a wastewater treatment plant, an organic, cage-free chicken farm, a wood chip power plant). This class is a combination of lecture, discussion, labs and field trips. (Open to juniors and seniors, or with permission of the instructor)

AP Human Geography The evolving field of human geography examines the modern and historical patterns, means and processes of human occupation in both place and space. While this class involves an introduction to physical world geography, our study is tied primarily to the unique impacts and consequences of the interaction between geography and human populations. Aided by maps and mapping tools, we study world religions, cultural patterns and global economics in order to understand how those forces place and order people in spatial dimensions. We use established models and methods as tools for understanding how cities develop, how people move and how populations shift. While this course enables students to discover a new lens with which to understand historical events, it also benefits those who seek a deeper understanding of the modern world. Contemporary politics, economics, conflicts and events help us to understand geographical concepts in real time. We may also have a number of opportunities to learn from our own local geography through selected case studies and field trips. As with all AP courses, we concentrate on the specific strategies and skills students need to be successful on the AP Exam. (Open to juniors and seniors, or with permission of the instructor)

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NOTE: These courses are offered on a rotating schedule and are cross-listed with English and Science department electives.

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SEMESTER-LONG COURSES

Exploring Environmental Writing Students in this discussion-based course explore the writings of American authors concerned with the environment. The works of Henry David Thoreau, John Muir, Annie Dillard, Rachel Carson, Jack Turner and Aldo Leopold help students understand the history and philosophy of the environmental movement in America. Assignments include reading and responding to articles, essays, poems and stories, as well as leading class discussions, contributing to a class blog, and giving presentations about current issues and events. Students’ final assignment is writing a personal environmental philosophy based on their experiences and the course readings. (Open to juniors and seniors, or with permission of the instructor)

Food: Putting it on the Table Where does the food we eat come from? Why is it important to know? This course seeks answers to those questions by exploring food production methods (e.g., subsistence, sustainable, local, organic and industrial agriculture) and examining the emerging ideology of food justice – the idea that the benefits and risks of growing, processing, distributing and consuming food should be shared equitably. We cover topics including: the nutritional value of food, GMOs, water resources, soil quality, food availability and food “deserts,” government food subsidies, community-supported agriculture, farmers markets, farm-to-school programs, the Green Revolution and urban gardening. We also review case studies on global commodities such as cacao, coffee, sugar, corn, palm oil, and beef. Academic studies are balanced with hands-on activities; students learn practical skills related to food production, preparation and preservation by boiling their own maple syrup, canning food, interviewing local farmers, and helping out on the School farm. At the end of the semester, students work on a final project exploring an area of personal interest related to food.

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WORLD LANGUAGES DE P A R TM E N T

Our World Languages Department encourages students to achieve fluency in French or Spanish and to develop an understanding and respect for the culture, literature and history of those languages’ native speakers. Beyond our use of textbooks, we employ interactive teaching methods such as games, skits, multimedia presentations, exchanges with native-language schools and international travel to help students engage actively and productively in language learning. During the course of the curricular progression, students increase their vocabulary,

grammatical comprehension and overall competencies in speaking, reading, writing and listening. Our students often have opportunities to practice their language skills on campus with native speakers. Although two years of world-language courses satisfies the minimum requirement for graduation, we encourage students to continue their studies through their senior year, with the goal of achieving overall proficiency – the ability to listen, speak, read and write within a non-native language with confidence and ease.

YEAR-LONG COURSES

French I / Honors French I In the first year of French instruction, students encounter the language through listening, speaking, reading, writing, and learning a number of common vocabulary words and basic grammatical principles. Students are encouraged from the very beginning to listen to and speak the language through student-teacher interchanges, group work, music, movies and class presentations. Regular homework assignments and frequent journal writing focus on reading and writing in French. Students at every level of French instruction are encouraged to participate in our annual French exchange program to expand their speaking and comprehension skills with native speakers.

French II / Honors French II The second year of French instruction begins with the reinforcement of previously learned concepts, with the ultimate purpose of engendering within students a more comprehensive grasp of French language and culture. Through student-teacher interchanges, group work, music, movies and class presentations, students acquire increased proficiency in the language. Greater emphasis is placed at this level on pronunciation and inflection, as well as on improving students’ grammatical skills. (Prerequisite: French I)

French III / Honors French III The third year of French instruction reinforces the listening, speaking, reading and writing skills students acquired in French I and French II. Most of the instruction is conducted in French, and students are expected to speak French as much as possible during class. Students learn a great deal of new vocabulary and sophisticated grammatical concepts, including several complex verb conjugations. In addition, students are introduced to French literature and read “Le Petit Nicolas” by René Gobcinny. Students continue to expand their French cultural literacy through music and movies and complete a research project on a francophone region or country. (Prerequisite: French II)

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French IV / Honors French IV The fourth year of French instruction reinforces the listening, speaking, reading and writing skills students acquired in their previous French courses. At this level, all instruction is conducted in French, and students are expected to speak only French during class time. Throughout the year, students encounter a great deal of new vocabulary, review all previously studied grammatical concepts, read French literature, and work on a variety of French-oriented projects. (Prerequisite: French III)

French V / Honors French V / AP French This course is offered to students who demonstrate a high level of written and spoken French. Cultural projects, along with regular readings from prominent French authors, help students continue to expand their knowledge of French and the francophone world. Writing assignments often are paired with grammar lessons, allowing students to fine-tune their communication skills. Students have opportunities to customize the curriculum as well as to prepare for the SAT Subject Test and the AP Exam. (Prerequisite: French IV)

Spanish I / Honors Spanish I The first year of Spanish instruction introduces students to the Spanish language, builds a vocabulary of common terms, and instills comprehension of basic verb tenses and grammatical structures. Students take their initial steps toward mastery in reading, writing, speaking and listening to conversational Spanish. Through textbook work, supplementary readings, creative projects and field trips, students gain an appreciation of the language, life, history, geography and culture of Spanish-speaking people.

Spanish II / Honors Spanish II The second year of Spanish instruction facilitates students’ ongoing mastery of the fundamental language skills (reading, writing, speaking and listening). Students are introduced to comparative linguistics through the culture, values and aspirations of the Hispanic world. In Spanish II, students are expected to complete one project per semester on a cultural, bioregional, historic or creative topic of their choice. (Prerequisite: Spanish I)

Spanish III / Honors Spanish III In their third year of Spanish instruction, students achieve intermediate-level proficiency in the four language skills. Classes are this level are primarily conducted in Spanish, and by the end of the year, students have learned and reviewed most of the grammatical structures within the Spanish language. Supplementary project work and classroom presentations enhance students’ exposure to the culture and history of Spain, Latin America and Hispanic North America. As in Spanish II, students in this course are expected to complete one project per semester on a cultural, bioregional, historic or creative topic of their choice. (Prerequisite: Spanish II)

Spanish IV / Honors Spanish IV In their fourth year, students experience increased immersion in Spanish language and culture. Material is thematically and linguistically integrated to provide a review of the main structures of the language. Students study the ethnic origins of Hispanic culture in Europe and the New World and the religions, traditions and revolutionary movements of the twentieth century in Spain and Latin America. During the year, we read works by Hernán Cortés, Ana María Matute, Jorge Luis Borges, Juan Rulfo, Gabriel Garcia Marquez and Nicolas Guillén, among others. We also sample art from the pre-Columbian era, including works by Goya, Picasso and Lam. (Prerequisite: Spanish III)

Spanish V / Honors Spanish V / AP Spanish This course is offered to students who have completed Spanish IV and have demonstrated a desire to achieve fluency in Spanish. Students practice their verbal skills by communicating entirely in Spanish, while supplemental writing assignments help perfect grammar and improve vocabulary. Students study Spanish literature and complete several projects designed to improve their understanding of Hispanic cultures. Students have the opportunity to customize the curriculum as well as to prepare for the SAT Subject Test and the AP Exam. (Prerequisite: Spanish IV)

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VISUAL & PERFORMING ARTS DE P A R TM E N T

Our Visual and Performing Arts curriculum is centered on our belief that teaching and learning should be united in an interactive process that creates high standards of critical awareness within each individual. Using traditional and contemporary approaches to teaching in a studio atmosphere, we demonstrate that art and creativity contribute to individual growth, while nurturing an aesthetic awareness. Visual and performing arts allow us to move beyond verbal language, as many of our

senses and abilities are involved in producing and experiencing works of art. The development of an arts vocabulary helps provide a necessary balance within our speech- and writing-oriented society. We support students and encourage them to take their art experience as far as they can through our course offerings and independent study opportunities. A number of our students prepare and exhibit art portfolios for college-admission purposes – and for personal and artistic growth.

NOTE: Some of these courses are cross-listed under LASR program.

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YEAR-LONG COURSES

AP Studio Art (Drawing, 2-D Design, 3-D Design) This course is recommended for committed junior and senior students with a strong interest in developing as artists and creative thinkers. Students may concentrate on either two-dimensional media (based in design or mark-making) or three-dimensional media, with the goal of preparing and submitting a strong portfolio to the College Board. Class time also is used for peer critiques and visits to museums, galleries and local art studios. At the end of the year, students share their work in a formal gallery opening. (Prerequisite: Portfolio Seminar or permission of the instructor)

A Cappella As members of our student and faculty A Cappella ensemble, students learn and practice breathing techniques, vocal warm-ups, harmonizing, intonation, phrasing and blending as a group, typically without the support of instruments. Students also learn basic performing skills (i.e. stage etiquette, stage presence) and group collaboration skills. We often invite local community choirs to sing with us at our twice-aweek rehearsals. The group performs regularly at School events and ceremonies, as well as at some public venues (e.g., nursing homes, baseball games). Students who participate in A Cappella rehearsals and performances for a full school year can earn 0.25 credits. (No prior vocal experience is necessary.)

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Vocal Ensemble: Voice Lessons / A Cappella Vocal Ensemble combines individual voice instruction with an authentic A Cappella experience. Students enrolled in Vocal Ensemble also participate in the School’s A Cappella group. During private voice lessons, students practice more sophisticated concepts, including dynamics, diction, legato and staccato singing, and performance etiquette. To receive course credit for Vocal Ensemble, students must attend twice-a-week A Cappella rehearsals and once-a-week private voice lessons. (No prior vocal experience is necessary.) NOTE: Not-for-credit individual vocal and instrumental lessons also are available for an additional fee. More information is available upon request from the Academic Dean.

SEMESTER-LONG COURSES

Ceramics I, II Ceramics I and II are semester-long courses that introduce students to the many aspects of clay work. During the first semester, students explore texture, form and function through a variety of hand-built techniques. Students gain an understanding of the stages of clay (plastic, leather hard, bone-dry, bisqueware, glazeware) and learn a variety of glazing and finishing techniques. During the second semester, students begin to explore throwing techniques on the wheel. Studio work is supplemented with peer critiques and visits to museums, galleries and local art studios. These courses are highly student inquiry driven and facilitate planning and creating an original body of work based on their own research rather than pre-planned teacher-driven assignments.

Ceramics III, IV These intermediate-level, semester-long courses allow time for the dedicated potter/sculptor to refine and build upon the skills from previous levels and begin to work toward a more personal focus. Ceramics III and IV place a premium on developing the habits of successful artists through the thoughtful research and planning of projects the students develop themselves. These courses are highly inquiry-driven with greater expectations toward personal motivation and a willingness to experiment with various clay building techniques and surface finishes. Studio work is supplemented with peer critiques and visits to museums, galleries and local art studios. (Prerequisite: Ceramics I, II)

Portfolio Seminar: Ceramics Portfolio Seminar is an advanced course designed for highly motivated ceramicists. A commitment to independent work and a high level of technical competence are expected as students build and refine personal portfolios of work. Portfolio Seminar students also benefit from peer critiques and visits to museums, galleries and local art studios. At the end of the semester, students share their work in a formal gallery opening. Portfolio Seminar students may seek recommendation for AP Studio Art in 3-D design. (Prerequisite: Ceramics III, IV, or with permission of the instructor)

Studio Art I, II Studio Art I and II are semester-long courses that introduce students to a variety of fine art-making processes. Students develop conceptual and technical skills while studying many different kinds of media and how to use them safely. Studio work is supplemented with peer critiques, formal presentations and visits to museums, galleries and local art studios. These courses are highly student inquiry driven and facilitate planning and creating an original body of work based on research rather than pre-planned instructor-driven projects.

Studio Art III, IV These intermediate-level, semester-long courses build upon the foundation of the beginning courses with continued support of portfolio development and an increased attention toward self-discovery. Students examine their own strengths and weaknesses on a regular basis and work with the instructor to begin to move their work toward a personal focus. These courses are highly student inquiry driven with greater expectations toward personal motivation and a willingness to experiment with various media. Studio work is supplemented with peer critiques, formal presentations and visits to museums, galleries and local art studios. (Prerequisite: Studio Art I, II)

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Portfolio Seminar: Studio Art Portfolio Seminar is an advanced course designed for highly motivated artists. A commitment to independent work and a high level of technical competence are expected as students build and refine personal portfolios of work. Portfolio Seminar students also benefit from peer critiques and visits to museums, galleries and local art studios. At the end of the semester, students share their work in a formal gallery opening. Portfolio Seminar students may seek recommendation for AP Studio Art in Drawing, 2-D Design or 3-D Design. (Prerequisite: Studio Art III, IV, or with permission of the instructor)

Introduction to Theater To build a foundation of theater knowledge, students engage in script reading, improvisational acting, theater games, theoretical studies and on-stage skill-building exercises and performances. Students’ backgrounds and interests help shape the content and goals of the course. Students who work hard and play creatively leave the class with a dramatically improved command of the essentials of stage performance, an expanded knowledge of the world of theater, and useful professional skills and public-speaking abilities.

Theater: Short Performance This course focuses on the skills necessary to successfully stage a theatrical production. We cover script reading and annotation, stage direction and blocking, and theater history. Theater games, improvisations, monologues, dialogues, skits and short scenes strengthen students’ acting skills as well as their visual and physical presence. The course culminates with a polished, public performance of a play or musical.

Introduction to Choreography This introductory-level choreography course investigates the endless possibilities of movement and explores the structure and creation of dance based on the elements of time, space, energy and effort. Through guided movement exploration, personal movement exploration, dance observation, critical analysis of work presented in class and on-screen, journal writing and reading assignments, students develop and nurture their individual choreographic voice. Students are asked to open themselves to different movement styles, create their own movement studies, and learn to speak articulately about choreographic form. (No prior dance training is necessary.)

Photography In this introductory-level photography course, students explore the art of photography in four parts. First, we take an in-depth look at the history of photography, from its invention to contemporary work. Second, we learn the mechanics of film cameras and practice developing our own black-and-white film in our darkroom. Third, we learn the mechanics of digital single-lens reflex cameras and practice portraiture and still-life, action and abstract photography. And lastly, we use Adobe Photoshop to retouch and colorize our digital photography, creating multi-layered, composite images. At the end of the year, students exhibit their film and digital photography. (Students are required to have a digital SLR camera for this course.)

‘‘

The White Mountain School is a place where everyone can express their individuality and be accepted for who they are. Students are encouraged to find their passion and pursue it, whether it be academic, athletic or artistic.” - J ONATHAN “JJ” B ERKUN , S TUDENT

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LASR

P R O G R A M Each student at The White Mountain School completes the LASR program. This program is an opportunity for students to explore their own interests with creativity and rigor and to make a difference beyond the School. “LASR” stands for the general categories that students may pursue: Leadership, Arts, Service, Research. While individual projects within those categories differ in their

direction and emphasis, they all include research and writing, a presentation, and a component that adds value to the world. Students choose from several approaches to completing the project, including but not limited to the following courses: Research Seminar, Portfolio Seminar/AP Studio Art, Independent Study, Senior Project, Field Course Leadership, Science Inquiry.

NOTE: Some of these courses are cross-listed with Science, Visual and Performing Arts and Outdoor Education department electives.

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SEMESTER-LONG COURSES

Research Seminar More and more college professors lament the fact that recent high school graduates have neither the skills nor the background to write thoughtful pieces of analysis, reflection or synthesis. The White Mountain School offers a unique opportunity for upperclassmen to identify, pursue and research an academic topic of personal choosing. To prepare students for the significant writing and research skills college work requires, we focus on crafting and defending a written argument through both analysis and research. This is an open-topic seminar; therefore students pursue answers to questions about which they are truly passionate. (Open to sophomores, juniors and seniors, or with permission of the instructor)

Portfolio Seminar / AP Studio Art Students demonstrating excellence in art may enroll in Portfolio Seminar or an AP Art course. In addition to satisfying a student’s LASR program requirement, these courses assist talented student artists and potential art-school applicants in developing a strong and diverse portfolio of visual art. For more information, please see the course descriptions under Visual and Performing Arts. (Open to juniors and seniors, or with permission of the instructor)

Independent Study Students in good academic standing may propose and pursue an independent, semester-long study in a subject about which they are especially curious or passionate. Interested students are required to submit a written proposal for their independent study to the Academic Affairs Committee for approval. These courses usually involve significant reading and writing, as well as independent work and research under the supervision of a faculty member. (Open to sophomores, juniors and seniors. Specific guidelines are available from the Academic Dean.)

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Senior Project Qualified students have the opportunity to spend the second semester (in part or in full) of their senior year off campus actively pursuing an academic interest that lies beyond the scope of The White Mountain School curriculum. This specialized academic challenge involves independent self-designed research, significant critical writing, the creation of an oral and visual presentation to the School community, and provides opportunities for reflection and self-examination. Examples of past Senior Projects include: riding a bicycle across the United States, studying impressionism in France, learning about Latin American liberation theology in Guatemala, assisting a neonatologist at a medical center, mastering wilderness skills in Arizona, and working with the National Outdoor Leadership School in Wyoming. (Open to seniors. Specific guidelines are available from the Academic Dean.)

Field Course Leadership Students with exemplary Field Course performance records may apply to lead Field Courses of their own design. The process of creating and facilitating a course may entail the completion of a credit-bearing independent study. (Open to seniors. Specific guidelines are available from the Academic Dean.)

Science Inquiry This small class (capped at six students per semester) provides scientifically-minded students with fundamental skills related to designing and executing original research in the natural sciences. Working closely with the instructor and the Director of Student Research and Inquiry, each student identifies an area of interest and develops a semester-long project investigating his or her question. Course content includes how to frame a scientific research question, write a literature review, structure a final research report and prepare a final presentation. Projects completed in this course may fulfil the LASR program requirement. To enroll, students must be self-motivated and have demonstrated the ability to work independently. Interested students are required to submit a project proposal for consideration prior to registering. (Prerequisite: approval of instructor)

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OUTDOOR EDUCATION DE P A R TM E N T

Our Outdoor Education Department furthers the mission of our School by enhancing students’ relationships with the natural, human, physical and spiritual environments that surround them. Utilizing experiential methods, we equip students with the knowledge, skills and sensitivity required for the facilitation of safe and enjoyable outdoor experiences in a variety of topographic settings. Field Courses and extended outdoor trips spark personal self-discovery and nurture a love for the outdoors and develop a lasting concern for the earth’s ecosystem. We help students

achieve proficiency in Leave No Trace camping, various modes of wilderness travel, first aid and other backcountry skills. A focus on small-group dynamics and healthy student interactions also plays a key role in this process. With our instructional programs, we provide a venue for each student to participate in outdoor sports at an ability-appropriate level. Our department also provides students with the opportunity to take on leadership roles by becoming a student assistant or a student leader within our Field Courses and sports programs.

NOTE: Some of these electives are cross-listed with Science department and LASR program courses.

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SEMESTER-LONG COURSES

Outdoor Education and Leadership Modeled on the curriculum designed by the National Outdoor Leadership School (NOLS), this course combines classroom instruction, independent projects and practical application. Students learn the fundamentals of leadership development by practicing different styles of effective leadership and communication as well as decision-making and conflict resolution techniques. We also learn and implement skills related to safety, risk management, group management and environmental awareness. At the end of the semester, student put their knowledge to use by leading local youth groups and designing a weekend overnight backcountry trip.

Field Course Leadership Students with exemplary Field Course performance records may apply to lead Field Courses of their own design. The process of creating and facilitating the courses may entail the completion of a credit-bearing independent study. (Open to seniors. Specific guidelines are available from the Academic Dean.)

Anatomy and Physiology / Honors Anatomy and Physiology This exciting course – ideal for prospective medical students, outdoor enthusiasts or students who enjoy hands-on learning – integrates an extensive study of human anatomy and physiology with backcountry first aid, evacuation and injury prevention. Offered in partnership with Stonehearth Open Learning Opportunities (SOLO), the oldest continuously operating school for wilderness emergency medicine, this course examines the structure and function of organ systems and explores how to address injuries and problems with those systems in backcountry settings. In weekly role-playing scenarios, students assume the role of either patient or rescuer. Students are required to become certified in CPR outside of class. Students 17 and older (by June 1) who successfully pass the final exam earn certification as Wilderness First Responders. (Open to juniors and seniors, or with permission of the instructor) 25


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FIELD C O U R S E S

Students at The White Mountain School enjoy the unique and exciting opportunity to participate in a week-long Field Course each semester. Each of these immersive experiences allows an in-depth, academic exploration of a specific topic and occurs

within a geographic setting ideal for authentic study. These memorable excursions provide an incomparable means for students to explore and develop their passions beyond the walls of the traditional classroom.

Our Field Courses occur in September and March of each year. Most Field Courses are five days, though some international Field Courses are longer. FALL SEMESTER: n

Conservation and Mountain Bike Recreation: Public Land Management (Maine and New Hampshire)

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Developing Leadership through Expeditionary Canoeing (Oquossoc, Maine)

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Farm to Table: Experiencing Local Agriculture and Low-Impact Living (Bethlehem, New Hampshire)

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Hydropower: the Costs and Benefits of Damming Free-Flowing Rivers (The Forks, Maine)

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Living in a Democracy: State and National Politics in an Election Year (Concord, New Hampshire)

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“Mainely” Art and Music: a Cultural Exploration around Acadia National Park (Bar Harbor, Maine)

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The Map is Not the Territory: Geography and Old-School Land Navigation (New Hampshire and Vermont)

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Nicaragua’s History, Culture and Vision for a Sustainable Future (La Paz and Managua, Nicaragua)

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Place-Based Writing in the White Mountains (Alexandria, New Hampshire)

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Poverty, Homelessness and Hunger: Meeting People’s Basic Needs (Portland, Maine)

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Sky Island Desert Ecology: a Rock Climbing Expedition (Tucson, Arizona)

SPRING SEMESTER:

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Avalanche Awareness, Snow Science and Backcountry Skiing (Sun Valley, Idaho)

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Building a Team: Leadership Ropes Course (The Browne Center, University of New Hampshire, Durham, New Hampshire)

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Everyday Feminism: an Examination of Gender, Power and Sexuality (Northampton, Massachusetts)

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Exploring Culture and Social Justice in a Developing Caribbean Nation (Dominican Republic)

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Giving Back through Service and Community Development (New England)

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Green Living in the Urban World (Montreal, Canada)

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Independent Student Project (Portland, Maine)

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The Physics of Climbing (North Conway, New Hampshire)

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The Study and Practice of Buddhism (Woodstock, New York)

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Winter Photography in the White Mountains (New Hampshire)


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T H E

LEARNING C E N T E R

The White Mountain School recognizes that all students learn differently and that some students require additional academic support, guidance and coaching to thrive in our demanding academic program. Our Learning Center exists to provide high-achieving students with the individual attention they need to develop self-awareness, self-advocacy and foundational academic skills and strategies

necessary for college. At The White Mountain School, we believe that good learning is a relational activity. As such, our Learning Center faculty either work one-on-one or in small groups with students and are fully integrated into the life of the School. That individual relationship also helps Learning Center faculty individualize their coaching to support students’ individual learning styles.

The Learning Center provides two levels of fee-based academic support: Academic Coaching and Academic Skills group. A role of the admission process is to help students and families determine the level of support necessary to be successful in our academic program. Educational testing provides essential insight into a student’s learning strengths and challenges and is required of all students at the Academic Coaching level. For both Academic Coaching and the Academic Skills group, Learning Center faculty review weekly reports from teachers, help students develop plans for the week ahead, communicate weekly with parents, help students to set and monitor goals, and advocate for their students.

ACADEMIC COACHING (INDIVIDUAL, THREE TIMES PER WEEK) Academic Coaching provides individualized, one-on-one academic support. Students and academic coaches meet three times each week during a regularly scheduled class time as part of the academic day. This program provides a high level of support for students who are working to establish, increase or maintain the academic skills they need to be successful. Students and academic coaches partner to determine the specific goals for the semester, which may include areas such as time management, organizational skills, study skills, active reading, work completion, and the writing process. As part of our larger program philosophy, all students develop skills to enhance self-awareness and self-advocacy. In order to promote consistent and transparent communication, students and parents receive weekly feedback from all of their academic teachers as well as from their academic coach. Educational testing is required for students who are interested in Academic Coaching and must be submitted during the admission process. Students in Academic Coaching are asked for a minimum one-year commitment to the program. Academic Coaches and the Learning Center Director partner with students in securing accommodations, including extended time, separate testing, and assistive technology. Our Learning Center Director also coordinates the application process for securing accommodations for the SAT, ACT and other standardized testing. ACADEMIC SKILLS (SMALL GROUP, THREE TIMES PER WEEK) Academic Skills offers personal attention through a small group format. Each group consists of no more than four students and meets together three times each week during a regularly scheduled class time as part of the academic day. This program provides consistent support and attention for students who are working to develop their academic skills related to areas such as time management, organizational skills, study skills and classroom engagement. Students work with their academic coach to prioritize the skills they want to develop and receive weekly feedback from their teachers and academic coach about their progress. Educational testing is not required; however, any student with educational testing must submit documentation in order to secure accommodations including extended time, separate testing, and assistive technology. Our Learning Center Director also coordinates the application process for securing accommodations for the SAT, ACT and other standardized testing. 27


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A S

A

ENGLISH S E C O N D

Our English as a Second Language (ESL) program is a rigorous college-preparatory program that prepares English language learners for mainstream classes in both the humanities and sciences. Students solidify their comprehension of English by reviewing basic grammar and honing listening, reading and conversational skills. They also learn how to analyze literature

L A N G U A G E

and write formal essays. Teachers in this program strive to nurture ESL students holistically by helping them make connections with domestic students, supporting them emotionally as they transition to life in the United States, and encouraging them to discover their passions and become actively involved in the School community.

YEAR-LONG COURSES

ESL II: Literature and Composition This course is designed for intermediate-level ESL students. In this course, students encounter various literacy genres including short stories, poetry and novels. Students learn to read literature carefully and understand contextual clues, forming and conveying opinions through written and verbal analysis. They also review the fundamentals of English grammar, building upon that foundation with more advanced mechanics. This course aids students in writing formal compositions and literary analysis essays.

Writing and Language Coaching Writing and Language Coaching provides personal academic coaching through a small group format. Each group meets during a regularly scheduled academic block as part of the academic day. This program provides additional language support for international students who are not in a self-contained ESL course. The program focuses on writing, grammar, editing skills, content and assignment comprehension, planning and prioritization of assignments, and the research process. In addition, program instructors assist students with college essays and college-placement test preparation, including preparation for the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL).

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COLLEGE COU N S E L I NG

The college counseling program at The White Mountain School is firmly based on the principle that discovering “good fits” between students and post-secondary institutions is what the college admission process should be. At its foundation is the concept that students are most likely to succeed

at colleges that closely reflect their individual capabilities, desires and goals. Working in concert with both students and families, we identify a number of appropriate fits for each student and provide support and assistance in each student’s application and decision-making process.

All students participate in a non-credit-bearing college-counseling course in their junior year, starting in December. Each student practices skills in interviewing and standardized test-taking, explores opportunities for summer enrichment, and begins the process of creating and refining his or her college list.

SELECTION OF COLLEGE ACCEPTANCES 2011-2016 Allegheny College American University American University of Paris (France) Art Institute of Chicago Bard College Barnard College Belmont University Bentley University Boston University Bowdoin College Brevard College Bryn Mawr College Case Western Reserve University Clarkson University Colby College Connecticut College Davidson College Denison University Dickinson College Drexel University Earlham College Emerson College Florida Institute of Technology Franklin & Marshall College

Gettysburg College Goucher College Green Mountain College High Point University Hobart and William Smith Colleges Hofstra University Knox College Lewis & Clark College Miami University (Ohio) Mount Holyoke College Muhlenberg College New England College New York University Pace University Pennsylvania State University Pratt Institute Prescott College Purdue University Quest University (Canada) Quinnipiac University Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute Rhode Island School of Design Rochester Institute of Technology Rutgers University

St. Lawrence University Saint Michael’s College St. Thomas University (Canada) Sierra Nevada College Skidmore College Smith College SUNY Polytechnic Institute SUNY Potsdam SUNY Stony Brook Syracuse University Temple University Trinity College Tufts University University of Arizona University at Buffalo (SUNY Buffalo) University of California, Berkeley University of California, Davis University of California, Irvine University of California, San Diego University of California, Santa Barbara University of California, Santa Cruz University of Chicago University of Colorado, Boulder University of Connecticut

University of Denver University of Hartford University of Illinois at Chicago University of Indiana The University of Manchester (UK) University of Maryland University of Massachusetts, Amherst University of New Hampshire University of Puget Sound University of Southern California University of St. Andrews (UK) University of Tampa University of Vermont Virginia Tech Warren Wilson College Wesleyan University Whitman College Xavier University of Louisiana

‘‘

We were incredibly impressed with the level of organization, professionalism and insight that the College Counseling office demonstrated. As parents of a boarding student, it was comforting to us to know that Mark was in such capable hands.” - M ARIA B LUNI , PARENT

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M I S S I O N S TAT E M E N T WE ARE A SCHOOL OF INQUIRY AND ENGAGEMENT. GROUNDED IN OUR EPISCOPAL HERITAGE, WE PREPARE AND INSPIRE STUDENTS TO LEAD LIVES OF CURIOSITY, COURAGE AND COMPASSION.

371 West Farm Road, Bethlehem, NH 03574

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admission@whitemountain.org

WWW. WHITEMOUNTAIN . ORG

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t: 603.444.2928

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f: 603.444.5568

Profile for The White Mountain School

Course Guide  

Course Guide