Issuu on Google+

Search for The Westfield News

WEATHER TONIGHT Cloudy Skies. Low of 34.

The Westfield News Serving Westfield, Southwick, and the surrounding Hilltowns

www.thewestfieldnews.com VOL. 86 NO. 9

THURSDAY, JANUARY 12, 2017

By AMY PORTER Correspondent HUNTINGTON – Members of the Jacob’s Ladder Business Association (JLBA) met Tuesday evening at the Rapids Bar and Grill for their annual meeting. A new slate of officers was elected. They are: Michele Kenney, president, Christina Beeke, vice president, Linda Greenia, secretary, and Stu Besnoff, treasurer. Other positions filled include Elizabeth Massa, marketing director, Bryan Farr, website liaison, Linda Hamlin, clerk, Christina Beeke, membership and meeting and events coordinator, and Wendy Long, scholarship coordinator. Michele Kenney, who continues her term as president, greeted the twenty or so members present with a recap of activities over the past year. See JLBA, Page 3

Planning Board continues public hearing for marijuana moratorium request By GREG FITZPATRICK Correspondent SOUTHWICK – The Planning Board held a public hearing on Tuesday night, regarding a zoning bylaw amendment. The public hearing involved the planning board proposing a moratorium for any applications or approvals of medical marijuana, recreational marijuana, and marijuana production facilities. The moratorium would last up to 18 months at the most, as it would give the Planning Board and the town of Southwick the chance to review the state’s legislation while conducting their own zoning and bylaw for the town. It is unclear as to when the state will finishing their legislation on marijuana, since the voters in Massachusetts voted in favor of recreational marijuana in November 2016. See Moratorium, Page 3

— DANIEL PATRICK MOYNIHAN

75 cents

Gateway School Committee gets first look at FY18 budget

Jacob’s Ladder Business Association holds annual meeting

Michele Kenney, president, and Bryan Farr, website liaison of the Jacob’s Ladder Business Association it is annual meeting on Tuesday.

“Everyone is entitled to his own opinion, but not his own facts.”

A group of nurses from Baystate Noble Hospital cheer on one of the speakers at a demonstration on Westfield Park Square. (Photo by Lynn Boscher)

Noble Hospital nurses picket for contract negotiations with Baystate Health By GREG FITZPATRICK Correspondent WESTFIELD – The Massachusetts Nurses Association (MNA) provided an informational picket for the Baystate Noble Hospital nurses on Wednesday afternoon. The picket happened on the sidewalks near the Court St. entrance of the hospital. The contract for the Noble Hospital nurses expired on March 31, 2016 and negotiations between the nurses and Baystate Health have been ongoing ever since. Patient care is an important aspect that the MNA and the nurses feel should be negotiated in their contract. “Our number one priority is patient care and patient limits,” said Paul Dubin, who is a nurse in the rehab unit at Noble and the cochairman for the MNA. The Noble Hospital nurses picketing outside the hospital feel that patient care has been lacking due to low staffing. According to the press release from the MNA on January 9, 94 % of nurses at Noble were surveyed before negotiations began and said that their unit was shortstaffed some or most of the time. Rubin says that some nurses at Noble have gone without breaks and lunch breaks because they are understaffed and also causes nurses to have to do several tasks besides caring for the patient. “When you take the nurse away from the bedside, you take away that care,” said Dubin. Dennise Colson, one of the nurses picketing, feels that a contract needs to be put in place. “The goal is to get a contract in the end,” said Colson. “The nurse’s goal is to make sure it’s fair and for the patients.” The importance of staffing was certainly highlighted at the picket as the nurses and the MNA frequently chanted, “hey, hey, oh, oh, unsafe staffing has to go,” and “be fair to those who care.” Baystate Health was also able to comment on the needs from the

RONALD BRYANT President and CEO Noble Hospital nurses regarding staffing. “We really strongly disagree that there is any resemblance of unsafe staffing at Noble Hospital,” said Baystate Health President. According to Bryant, and reported by the National Quality Forum, the staffing at Baystate is well above the average. “We’re very, very confident that our staffing levels are safe and really in most instances, above the averages not only in the state, but in the nation,” said Bryant. Noble Hospital nurses went on to say that they would like to see staffing grids added into the contract. Bryant says that if any nurse is unsatisfied with the staffing, they have the resources to address the problem. “There’s a process they can go through with management,” said Bryant. “We can certainly address these issues.” Another key element to contract negotiations that the Noble nurses were discussing at the picket was the health insurance plan that they are currently receiving and the See Nurses, Page 8

By AMY PORTER Correspondent HUNTINGTON – At Wednesday’s School Committee meeting, Superintendent David B. Hopson presented a first look at the Gateway Regional FY18 budget. He said the only new position included in the budget was for a required half-time nurse in the Middle School and High School. Not included was a needed life skills teacher, curriculum director or technology director. He said the budget also contained no funds for the OPEB (Other Post Employee Benefits) account. See Gateway Budget, Page 7

State announces that Westfield’s drought conditions have improved By GREG FITZPATRICK Correspondent WESTFIELD – The Massachusetts Office of Energy and Environmental Affairs announced the current drought conditions for all parts of the state in a press release on January 6. It was reported that the region that includes Westfield, has improved its drought conditions. “We’re still in a drought warning,” said Westfield DPW Director Dave Billips. “But things have improved.” According to Billips, the water level of the Granville reservoir has gone up a couple of feet. The Granville Reservoir is a main water source for the city of Westfield. However, at least 10 more feet needs to be added to the reservoir in order for it to be filled. See Drought, Page 3

US National Guard’s 104th holds annual awards ceremony By DAN DESROCHERS Correspondent WESTFIELD—The US National Guard’s 104th Fighter Wing honored its top members this past Saturday, during its 43rd annual awards ceremony. The ceremony, which was held on Jan. 7 at the Sheraton Hotel at 1 Monarch Pl., Springfield, recognized 12 of the Fighter Wing’s approximately 1,400 members. Over 400 members and their families were at the ceremony to celebrate their peers’ achievements. Awards were given to members of the wing following competition with peers in flights, squadrons and groups. The winners will compete for state recognition, as well as at the national level against other winners. According to a press release from the Guard, See 104th, Page 3

Huntington Selectmen ask Fire Chief for quotes to wire all town buildings By AMY PORTER Correspondent HUNTINGTON – The Selectmen asked Fire Chief Gary Dahill on Wednesday to get quotes for a new fire alarm system in all of the town’s buildings after the recent close call in Stanton Hall. Dahill said the fire alarm was working in Stanton Hall, but was never hooked up to any call out system. He said he does test the system every year. On the day of the fire on Christmas eve, Dahill was out Christmas shopping, when a

town resident called him reporting that he saw smoke in the building. Dahill called assistant chief Charles Dazelle who was home in Huntington at the time. When Dazelle got to the building, it was full of smoke, resulting in $20,000 in damage. Stanton Hall is expected to reopen January 20. Dahill said if the fire had occurred at 2 a.m. instead of mid-day, it would have been worse. At the time, all of the records from Town Hall were being stored in Stanton Hall while new furniture was coming in. “It was a wake-up call,” Dahill said.

“We could have lost that building. We could have lost this building,” said Selectman Ed Renauld, referring to Town Hall, which is connected by a walkway to Stanton Hall. “I would like to set up fire alarms in all these buildings that transmit to somewhere, or are monitored,” he added. He asked Dahill to get three quotes for Stanton Hall, Town Hall, the Water/ Sewer building, the Highway Garage, two fire stations, Huntington Public Library, North Hall and the Hilltown Community Ambulance station, which is owned by the town. Renauld asked for prices by March 4. He

said the amount would go to the Annual Town Meeting in May, and the funds would be available by July 1. “I think it will be an easy sell at the town meeting,” Dahill said. Dahill said last year his department responded to 325 calls, the majority of them medical calls. Police Chief Robert Garriepy, also at the Selectmen meeting, said the police department was among the offices that were moved and received new furniture in the upgrade of Town See Fire Chief, Page 7


PAGE 2 - THURSDAY, JANUARY 12, 2017

1669

WESTFIELD

WWW.THEWESTFIELDNEWS.COM

SOUTHWICK

HUNTINGTON

1792

1775

1775

1770

GRANVILLE

AROUND TOWN U.S. Air Force National Guard Airman 1st Class Pavel Chumak graduates

U.S. Air Force National Guard Airman 1st Class Brenden P. Paradis graduates

U.S. Air Force National Guard Airman 1st Class Pavel Chumak graduated from basic military training at Joint Base San AntonioLackland, San Antonio, Texas. The airman completed an intensive, eight-week program that included training in military discipline and studies, Air Force core values, physical fitness, and basic warfare principles and skills. Airmen who complete basic training also earn four credits toward an associate in applied science degree through the Community College of the Air Force. Chumak is the son of Lidia Rudenko of Westfield, Mass. He is also the brother of Sergey Chumak. The airman graduated in 2012 from Westfield High School, Westfield, Mass.

U.S. Air Force National Guard Airman 1st Class Brenden P. Paradis graduated from basic military training at Joint Base San AntonioLackland, San Antonio, Texas. The airman completed an intensive, eight-week program that included training in military discipline and studies, Air Force core values, physical fitness, and basic warfare principles and skills. Airmen who complete basic training also earn four credits toward an associate in applied science degree through the Community College of the Air Force. Paradis is the son of Kelly Paradis of Westfield, Mass., and Steven R. Paradis of East Longmeadow, Mass., and grandson of Robert Loiselle of Yarmouth, Mass. He graduated in 2016 from Westfield High School, Westfield, Mass.

THE WESTFIELD NEWS

1783

RUSSELL

CHESTER

1810

1780

1741

MONTGOMERY

BLANDFORD

TOLLAND

Submit your Around Town News to pressreleases@thewestfieldnews.com

Western New England University’s Irene R. Costello Named to Who’s Who Among Students in American Universities and Colleges SPRINGFIELD — Irene R. Costello of Westfield, MA majoring in Marketing at Western New England University, has been selected for inclusion in the 2016-2017 edition of Who’s Who Among Students in American Universities and Colleges. Costello is one of 32 students from Western New England University who have been selected as national outstanding campus leaders. The University’s nominating committee and editors of the annual directory have included Costello based on academic achievement, service to the community, leadership in extracurricular activities and potential for continued success.

Cassandra Steele named to President’s List GREENVILLE, SC — Cassandra Steele, a Sophomore Elementary Education major of Westfield, was among approximately 490 Bob Jones University students named to the Fall 2016 President’s List. The President’s List recognizes students who earn a 3.75 or higher grade point average for the semester.

Keene State College Fall 2016 Dean’s List KEENE, NH — Keene State College announces that 1,400 students have been named to the fall 2016 dean’s list, including the student(s) in your area, listed below. Jordan Clauson, Bridget Hartnett and Emily Orell of Westfield; Sarah Otterbeck of Huntington; Lydia Randall of Granville; Kayleigh Vocca of Southwick.

ODDS & ENDS

Aubrey Anna Winiarski named to Dean’s list at the University of New Haven WEST HAVEN, Conn. — Aubrey Anna Winiarski of Southwick, a Bachelor of Science candidate, majoring in Chemical Engineering in the Tagliatela Coll of Engineering has been named to the Dean’s List for the fall semester at the University of New Haven. The dean’s list honors undergraduate students who demonstrate excellence in their academic performance. Full-time undergraduate students who earn a grade point average (G.P.A.) of 3.50 or better in any one semester will be appointed to the dean’s list for that semester.

LOCAL LOTTERY LAST NIGHT’S NUMBERS

TONIGHT

FRIDAY

Mostly sunny.

30-36

SATURDAY

Partly Cloudy.

29-31

WEATHER DISCUSSION Cloudy Skies.

34-36

Today, rain showers in the morning will evolve into a more steady rain in the afternoon. High around 50F. Tonight, cloudy skies early, followed by partial clearing. Low 34F. Winds W at 10 to 15 mph. Friday, sun and a few passing clouds. Temps falling to near 30. Winds NW at 10 to 20 mph. Friday Night, partly cloudy. Low 14F. Saturday, cloudy skies early, followed by partial clearing. High 31F.

TODAY 7:18 a.m.

4:41 p.m.

9 hours 23 Minutes

SUNRISE

SUNSET

LENGTH OF DAY

Pounds of meth hidden in snail statue found in Cincinnati CINCINNATI (AP) — U.S. Customs and Border Protection officials say officers in Cincinnati intercepted more than 50 pounds of methamphetamine that was concealed inside a statue of a snail. Authorities say the package, which came from Mexico and was labeled “Mexican stone crafts,” contained a decorative snail statue that exhibited “interior anomalies” during an X-ray inspection on Dec. 30. Customs officers drilled a hole into the statue and found 53 pounds of a white crystalline powder that tested positive for meth. Richard Gillespie, CBP’s Cincinnati Port Director, says the agency’s officers excel at preventing dangerous packages from reaching innocent citizens. The snail’s intended destination was Lawrenceville, Georgia.

MASSACHUSETTS MassCash 05-15-20-22-30 Mega Millions Estimated jackpot: $137 million Megabucks Doubler 22-24-25-35-36-43 Estimated jackpot: $8.9 million Numbers Midday 2-0-8-6 Powerball 01-03-13-16-43, Powerball: 24, Power Play: 2 Estimated jackpot: $106 million

CONNECTICUT Cash 5 01-03-18-31-33 Lucky Links Day 03-07-10-17-18-20-21-22 Lucky Links Night 01-05-06-09-12-13-14-21 Play3 Day 2-5-2 Play3 Night 7-7-7 Play4 Day 4-6-2-2 Play4 Night 4-7-7-4 Powerball 01-03-13-16-43, Powerball: 24, Power Play: 2 Estimated jackpot: $106 million

TODAY IN HISTORY

Today is Thursday, Jan. 12, the 12th day of 2017. There are 353 days left in the year.

O

n Jan. 12, 1910, at a White House dinner hosted by President William Howard Taft, Baroness Rosen, wife of the Russian ambassador, caused a stir by requesting and smoking a cigarette — it was, apparently, the first time a woman had smoked openly during a public function in the executive mansion. (Some of the other women present who had brought their own cigarettes began lighting up in turn.)

ON THIS DATE:

In 1773, the first public museum in America was organized in Charleston, South Carolina. In 1828, the United States and Mexico signed a Treaty of Limits defining the boundary between the two countries to be the same as the one established by an 1819 treaty between the U.S. and Spain. In 1915, the U.S. House of Representatives rejected, 204174, a proposed constitutional amendment to give women nationwide the right to vote. The silent film drama “A Fool There Was,” which propelled Theda Bara to stardom with her portrayal of a predatory vamp, premiered in New York. In 1932, Hattie W. Caraway became the first woman elected to the U.S. Senate after initially being appointed to serve out the remainder of the term of her late husband, Thaddeus. In 1945, during World War II, Soviet forces began a major, successful offensive against the Germans in Eastern Europe. Aircraft from U.S. Task Force 38 sank about 40 Japanese ships off Indochina. In 1959, Berry Gordy Jr. founded Motown Records (originally Tamla Records) in Detroit. In 1966, President Lyndon B. Johnson said in his State of the Union address that the U.S. military should stay in Vietnam until Communist aggression there was stopped. The TV series “Batman,” starring Adam West and Burt Ward as the Dynamic Duo, premiered on ABC, airing twice a week on

consecutive nights. In 1971, the groundbreaking situation comedy “All in the Family” premiered on CBS television. In 1976, mystery writer Dame Agatha Christie died in Wallingford, England, at age 85. In 1986, the shuttle Columbia blasted off with a crew that included the first Hispanic-American in space, Dr. Franklin R. Chang-Diaz. In 1987, Anglican Church envoy Terry Waite arrived in Lebanon on his latest mission to win the release of Western hostages; however, Waite ended up being taken captive himself, and wasn’t released until 1991. In 1998, Linda Tripp provided Independent Counsel Kenneth Starr’s office with taped conversations between herself and former White House intern Monica Lewinsky.

TEN YEARS AGO: Two kidnapped boys, Ben Ownby and Shawn Hornbeck, were found alive in the same suburban St. Louis apartment — four days after Ben vanished and 4 1/2 years after Shawn disappeared. (The boys’ abductor, Michael Devlin, is serving multiple life terms for kidnapping and sexual assault.) Durham County, North Carolina, District Attorney Mike Nifong, facing ethics charges, asked to be removed from the Duke lacrosse rape investigation. (State prosecutors later exonerated three suspects; Nifong ended up being disbarred.) Larry Stewart, the anonymous Missouri philanthropist known as “Secret Santa,” died at age 58.

FIVE YEARS AGO: Pentagon leaders scrambled to contain damage from an Internet video purporting to show four Marines urinating on Taliban corpses. (The Marine Corps announced in Aug. 2012 that three Marines had received administrative punishments in connection with this incident.) Former South Dakota Gov. Bill Janklow, a Republican who dominated the state’s politi-

cal landscape for more than 25 years, died in Sioux Falls at age 72.

ONE YEAR AGO:

In his final State of the Union address, President Barack Obama urged Americans to rekindle their belief in the promise of change that first carried him to the White House, declaring that the country must not allow election-year fear and division to put economic and security progress at risk. Iran detained 10 American sailors and their two small Navy boats after the boats drifted into Iranian waters; the sailors and their vessels were released the following day. The St. Louis Rams’ move back to Los Angeles was approved by 30 of 32 NFL owners. Media mogul Rupert Murdoch announced his engagement to ex-supermodel Jerry Hall (they married the following March).

TODAY’S BIRTHDAYS:

Actress Katherine MacGregor (TV: “Little House on the Prairie”) is 92. The Amazing Kreskin is 82. Country singer William Lee Golden (The Oak Ridge Boys) is 78. Actor Anthony Andrews is 69. Movie director Wayne Wang is 68. Actress Kirstie Alley is 66. Radio commentator Rush Limbaugh is 66. Legal affairs blogger Ann Althouse is 66. Writer Walter Mosley is 65. Country singer Ricky Van Shelton is 65. RadioTV personality Howard Stern is 63. Writer-producer-director John Lasseter is 60. Broadcast journalist Christiane Amanpour is 59. Rock musician Charlie Gillingham (Counting Crows) is 57. Actor Oliver Platt is 57. Basketball Hall of Famer Dominique Wilkins is 57. Entrepreneur Jeff Bezos is 53. Rock singer Rob Zombie is 52. Actor Olivier Martinez is 51. Rapper TBird (B-Rock and the Bizz) is 50. Model Vendela is 50. Actress Farrah Forke is 49. Actress Rachael Harris is 49. Rock singer Zack de la Rocha is 47. Rapper Raekwon (Wu Tang Clan) is 47. Singer Dan Haseltine (Jars of Clay) is 44. Rock musician Matt Wong (Reel Big Fish) is 44. Singer Melanie Chisholm (Spice Girls) is 43. Contemporary Christian singer Jeremy Camp is 39. Actress Cynthia Addai-Robinson is 37. Rhythm-and-blues singer Amerie is 37. Actress Issa Rae is 32. Actress Naya Rivera is 30. Actor Will Rothhaar is 30. Actor Andrew Lawrence is 29. Rock singer ZAYN is 24.


THE WESTFIELD NEWS

WWW.THEWESTFIELDNEWS.COM

THURSDAY, JANUARY 12, 2017- PAGE 3

GOVERNMENT MEETINGS MONDAY, JANUARY 16

BLANDFORD Police Department Meeting at 6 pm Zoning Board Meeting at 7 pm Selectmen’s Meeting at 7 pm

TOLLAND Men’s Coffee at PSC Building at 7:45 am Board of Selectmen at 5 pm Planning Board at 7 pm

TUESDAY, JANUARY 17

WESTFIELD Planning Board at 7 pm

BLANDFORD Assessor’s Meeting at 5 pm

TOLLAND School Committee at 7 pm

Members from the 104th Maintenance Group stand with their commanders and supervisors after receiving their group-level awards at the 104th Fighter Wing’s 43rd Annual Awards Banquet, Jan. 8, 2017. (U.S. Air National Guard photo by Tech. Sgt. Lindsey Sarah Watson-Kirwin.)

104th

Continued from Page 1

the event provided a morale booster for members. “It’s a good morale builder,” Master Sgt. Matthew Chapman, first sergeant for the 104th Fighter Wing, said in the press release. “It allows troops to get together with other areas of base and mingle out of uniform. This is a very family-oriented event.” The winners and their awards are as follows: Master Sgt. Mark Gaskalka, Information Assurance Medallion Award Senior Airman James Roncarati, Ground Safety Award Major Ashley Rolfe, Annual Flight Safety Award Master Sgt. Dawn Soldan, Major General George W. Keefe Award for “Enlisted Excellence”

Moratorium

Staff Sgt. Marie Georgefils, Honor Guard of the Year Award Master Sgt. Carla Belliveau, First Sergeant of the Year Mr. James Ladue, Civilian of the Year A1C Trevor Perreault, Airman of the Year Staff Sgt. John Tourtellotte, Non-Commissioned Officer of the Year Master Sgt. Michael Kearnes, Senior Non Commissioned Officer of the Year Master Sgt Christine Lupacchino, AGR/Technician of the Year First Lt. Jason Grimaldi, Company Grade Officer of the Year

Continued from Page 1

Roz Terry, the Chairperson for the Planning Board, sees the moratorium as a reasonable way for the board to carefully go through the zoning and the bylaws. “We’re just open to propose a moratorium,” said Terry. “We’re just hoping that the town will give us time.” The Southwick residents voted in favor of recreational marijuana on this year’s ballot question, and the Planning Board recognizes that they have to respect the voters. “We can’t prohibit (marijuana) it,” said Terry. “It has to be allowed.” According to what the state legislation has formed, the Planning Board will have to take into account that one decision for marijuana could also mean another. “Whatever we do with the medical (marijuana) is going to open the gates for the retail,” said Planning Board member Mike Doherty. The moratorium would prevent any marijuana companies from taking applications for either medical or recreational use, until the state finishes their legislation. Doug Moglin, who is a former member of the Planning Board, has an extensive background with zoning and bylaws, and reminded the board what the biggest priority would be with the moratorium. “The approach you guys need to take is strictly from a zoning issue,” said Moglin. As the moratorium would allow the town to carefully and patiently create their zoning, any licenses for possible marijuana companies, would have to be put on hold until the Cannabis Control Board completes their licensing process. Terry also reminded the Planning Board that a sub-committee should be formed. The committee would give updates on what the state is doing and what the town could do moving forward with zoning and bylaws. The request for a moratorium was continued as the public hearing will resume at the next planning board meeting on Feb. 7. According to Terry, the moratorium would have to stay open until at least the next special town meeting, which is set to be in May.

Drought

New JLBA members in 2016 Helen Garcia (right), owner of River Café and Bakery and daughter Alison Garcia.

JLBA

Continued from Page 1

“It has been a pleasure to work with a group of innovative entrepreneurs, as we strive to create a better business association, and ultimately, a better climate for business in the hilltowns,” Kenney said. Kenney noted that the JLBA has collaborated with many other groups seeking to improve economic health in the region, including Healthy Hampshire, the American Institute for Architects and the Hilltown Collaborative, and by hosting a legislative forum. Kenney said their goals were and continue to be increasing JLBA membership and participation, expanding the Buy Local Campaign, and to increase marketing, communications and promotion of the region. Toward that end, they are developing a 2017 Business and Trail head map, both in print and interactive on a soon-to-be redesigned website at www.jlba.org, under the auspices of Bryan Farr of the Historic U.S. Route 20 Association. During the business portion of the meeting, a treasurer’s report showed $750 in the scholarship fund. Scholarships of $250 are given annually to students in the region interested in pursuing a career in business. It was voted to open the scholarship to include schools in towns represented by member businesses. Members also voted to change meeting nights from Tuesdays to Thursdays in 2017.

LOST & FOUND

Continued from Page 1

LOST:Poinsettia Christmas pin. Lost 12/3/16 possibly in Big Y or CVS on E Main St or WS house tour. Call or text 537-6242. (12-14)

“We need either rain or snow to fill it up,” said Billips. With the Granville Reservoir being fed by mountain streams, there has to be about 50 inches of snow or at least 10 inches of rain for the water levels to be completely full. The reservoir is currently offline as it has been since Dec. 28 when the Westfield News reported that the water source was shut down yet again due to the continuing drought. “It was just getting so low, we had to take it offline,” said Billips. On Dec. 28, it was reported that the water level was 11 feet below the spillway level. As of Jan. 11, Billips said that the reservoir is 10 feet below the spillway. As for the wells in Westfield, Billips said that wells two and three are running while one and four can run if they need to. Wells five and six do run when the tank levels need to be kept up but they aren’t running all the time. The DPW is already preparing for the spring and summer so there doesn’t have to be a water restriction or ban this time around. “We’re hoping that we don’t have to do that this year,” said Billips. Billips noted that the Granville Reservoir would pump 5 or 6 million gallons a day in the summer.

LOST: Searching for my second cousin Marjorie L. Hudson, daughter of Harold (proprietor of Front Page Cigar Company) and Phyllis Hudson, residing in Westfield at least into the late 1950’s. If you have any information, please contact Nancy Miller at 415-931-4339. (12-6) LOST: White handkerchief with blue embroidery. Between Pine Hill Cemetery and Mechanic St on 11/11/16. 413-562-2268. (11-14)

FOUND: Cat, Grey, short hair cat. West Springfield - Dewey St./Sibley Ave. Please call: 732-4954 (11-08)

Southwick Select Board Board of Assessors The Select Board is looking for an interested resident to serve on the Board of Assessors. The Board of Assessors is responsible for the assessment of properties for tax purposes. The three member board is elected by the town for a term of three years in a manner so that one term expires each year. This position will be up for election in May of 2017. The resident must be a registered voter. Please submit a letter of interest and resume by 12:00 p.m. January 13, 2017, to the Select Board’s Office, Town Hall, 454 College Highway, Southwick, MA 01077.

Westfield Athenaeum Boys’ & Girls’ Library Family Movie WWW.PINTEREST.COM/WATERCONSERVATION

WESTFIELD — Kids and their grownups are invited to watch “The Secret Life of Pets” in the Lang Auditorium at the Athenaeum on Saturday, January 14 at 2pm. Snacks and juice will be provided.


PAGE 4 - THURSDAY, JANUARY 12, 2017

WWW.THEWESTFIELDNEWS.COM

COMMENT

THE WESTFIELD NEWS

Call 572-3999 to leave your comment. To get the full effect of the PulseLine, listen to the calls at thewestfieldnews.com

Trump concedes Russia’s role in election hacking By JULIE PACE AP White House Correspondent NEW YORK (AP) — President-elect Donald Trump's first news conference since winning the election was a combative and freewheeling affair, and the famously unconventional politician demonstrated he had not been changed by the weight of his victory. Trump said for the first time Wednesday that he accepts Russia was behind the election year hacking of Democrats that roiled the White House race. Looking ahead, he urged Congress to move quickly to replace President Barack Obama's signature health care law and insisted anew that Mexico will pay the cost of a border wall. He defiantly denied reports that Russia had collected compromising personal and financial information about him, lambasting the media for peddling "fake news" and shouting down a journalist from CNN, which reported on the matter. His family and advisers clapped and cheered him on throughout. Trump's transition has been shadowed by U.S. intelligence assessments that Russia not only meddled in the election, but did so to help him defeat Democrat Hillary Clinton. After spending weeks challenging that idea, Trump finally accepted at least part of the intelligence conclusions. "As far as hacking, I think it was Russia," Trump said, quickly adding that "other countries and other people" also hack U.S. interests. Still, he kept needling the intelligence agencies, saying it would be a "tremendous blot" on their record if officials were leaking information from his classified briefings. Director of National Intelligence James Clapper said in a statement later that he had spoken with Trump Wednesday evening and told him he does not believe any leaks came from the intelligence community. One U.S. official told The Associated Press Tuesday night that intelligence people had informed Trump last week about an unsubstantiated report that Russia had compromising personal and financial information about him. Some media outlets reported on the document, which contains unproven information alleging close coordination between Trump's inner circle and Russians, as well as unverified claims about unusual sexual activities by Trump. The AP has not authenticated any of the claims. Clapper said Wednesday he had told Trump the intelligence community "has not made any judgment that the information in this document is reliable." Wednesday's news conference was initially billed as a chance for Trump to answer questions about his plans for distancing himself from his sprawling, family-owned real estate and licensing business. Lawyer Sheri Dillon stepped to the lectern midway through the event to announce that the president-elect was relinquishing control of the Trump Organization to his adult sons and an executive, as well as putting his business assets in a trust. While new international business deals will be banned, the company will be allowed to start new projects in the U.S. The move appears to contradict a previous pledge by the president-elect. In a tweet last month, Trump said that "no new deals" would be done while he was in office. The president-elect set some concrete policy markers Wednesday, though specifics continued to be in short supply on some of his major campaign promises. He promised that a replacement for Obama's sweeping health care overhaul would be offered "essentially simultaneously" with a congressional vote to repeal the measure. He said his team would send a plan to Congress after Rep. Tom Price, his pick to lead the Department of Health and Human Services, is confirmed. Turning to his plans to build a wall along the nation's southern border, Trump vowed that Mexico would "reimburse" the cost of the project through an unspecified tax or payment. He said that while his administration would begin negotiating with Mexico after his Jan. 20 inauguration, he did not want to delay the work until an agreement was reached, raising the prospect that U.S. taxpayers could ultimately bear the costs.

Westfield Democratic City Committee Meeting WESTFIELD —  The next meeting of the Westfield Democratic City Committee  is  Thursday, January 12, 2017   at 7 PM in the Dolan-Ely Apartment Complex Administrative Building.  The Dolan-Ely Apartment Complex is on Murphy Circle, the street adjacent to the Westfield Senior Center. The meetings are open to the public. All are  invited and welcome to attend.

The Westfield News A publication of the Westfield News Group LLC James Johnson-Corwin

Flora Masciadrelli

Multi-Media Manager

Director of Sales/ Classified Manager

Marie Brazee

Chris Putz

Business Manager

Sports Editor

Lorie Perry

Director of Ad Production

Patrick R. Berry President

62 School Street, Westfield , MA 01085

(413)562-4181 www.thewestfieldnews.com

President-elect Donald Trump listens to a question during a news conference in the lobby of Trump Tower in New York, Wednesday, Jan. 11, 2017. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

Leaked dossier on Trump circulated in DC for months By JACK GILLUM Associated Press WASHINGTON (AP) — It was a bombshell story, emerging on the eve of Donald Trump's first news conference as president-elect: U.S. intelligence officials had presented Trump with unsubstantiated claims that Russia had amassed compromising personal and financial allegations about him. The purported Russian efforts were described in a newly released and uncorroborated dossier produced in August. But they had circulated more widely in Washington in October — following early reports and opaque warnings from elected officials that something was afoot involving the Kremlin and Trump. In October, Mother Jones magazine described how a former Western spy — assigned to look into Trump's Russian ties for a private American firm — had presented his findings to the FBI in August. Those findings, the magazine said, were produced for political opposition research and said that Russian intelligence had compromised Trump during his visits to Moscow — information that, if true, could be used to blackmail him or undermine his presidency. The Wall Street Journal on Wednesday identified the dossier's author as Christopher Steele, a director of London-based Orbis Business Intelligence Ltd., whom the Journal said declined repeated requests for interviews through an intermediary. Another Orbis director told the Journal he wouldn't "confirm or deny" that Orbis had produced the report. Efforts to reach him by The Associated Press were not immediately successful. There was no listed number for Steele's address in Runfold, outside Farnham, Surrey, about 35 miles southwest London. Neighbor Mike Hopper said Steele had lived there for about 18 months with his wife and four children. Hopper is looking after the family's cats. "He did not say where he was going or when he was coming back," he said. CNN reported Tuesday night that Trump had been briefed in a classified setting about a summary of the investigator's findings. Meanwhile, BuzzFeed published the 35-page dossier Tuesday night. The website defended publishing the report because it said Americans "can make up their own minds about allegations about the president-elect." Other news outlets withheld publishing most details about the unverified claims because they couldn't confirm them. Shortly after reports were published late Tuesday about the dossier, Trump tweeted: "FAKE NEWS - A TOTAL POLITICAL WITCH HUNT!" The president-elect said at a combative news conference Wednesday that the allegations were "phony stuff" leaked by "sick people."

Director of National Intelligence James Clapper said in a statement later that he had spoken with Trump Wednesday evening and told him the intelligence community "has not made any judgment that the information in this document is reliable." The Kremlin, meantime, said that Russia and the United States can overcome the current diplomatic strain based on mutual respect once Trump takes office. President Vladimir Putin's spokesman, Dmitry Peskov, told reporters Thursday that "Moscow hopes that our presidents will get along well." He added that while Moscow and Washington can't agree on everything, they can normalize their strained ties if they show "mutual respect." Peskov made the statement while commenting on Trump's news conference Wednesday, during which he voiced hope of getting along with Putin. Peskov welcomed Trump's readiness to conduct a dialogue with Russia, adding that "it will help us find a way from many difficult situations." The dossier contains unproven information about close coordination between Trump's inner circle and Russians about hacking into Democratic accounts as well as unproven claims about unusual sexual activities by Trump among other suggestions attributed to anonymous sources. The Associated Press has not authenticated any of the claims. In October, then-Senate Minority Leader Harry Reid wrote to the FBI asking it to publicly disclose what it knew about any Trump campaign ties to Russia. "It has become clear that you possess explosive information about close ties and coordination between Donald Trump, his top advisers, and the Russian government — a foreign interest openly hostile to the United States, which Trump praises at every opportunity. The public has a right to know this information," Reid wrote on Oct. 30. He said he learned of the information from FBI Director James Comey and from other top U.S. national security officials. It wasn't immediately clear how much Reid knew specifically of the compromising information versus Russian hacking activity in general. A few weeks later, in mid-November, Sen. John McCain became aware of the allegations but decided it was impossible to verify them without a proper investigation, according to a report Wednesday by The Guardian. The newspaper reported McCain was reluctant to get involved because it could be seen as payback for insults Trump made about the Arizona Republican during the campaign. The summary of the dossier allegations was appended to a classified assessment of Russia's suspected attempts to meddle in the U.S. presidential election. Trump and President Barack Obama were briefed on the intelligence community's findings last week.


WWW.THEWESTFIELDNEWS.COM

THE WESTFIELD NEWS

Obituaries http://thewestfieldnews.com/category/obituaries

William P. Ring NORTH BROOKFIELD – William P. Ring, 48, of North Brookfield died December 31, 2016 at home. He was born in Nashua, NH on December 6, 1968. He attended Westfield High School and was a Forklift operator for the Coca Cola bottling Company in Northampton where he was known as “Box Car Billy”. Billy enjoyed fishing, motorcycles, playing his guitar and listening to music. He leaves a daughter Marilyn T. Ring of Westfield, his father Roger W. Ring of North Brookfield, his mother Irene (Lepine) Ring of Westfield, two brothers, Jonathan Mathis of Ware and David Viveiros of Ashford, CT, four sisters, Melissa Ring of Russell, Lynn Stone of Goosecreek, SC Rebecca Viveiros of Berlin, NH and Melissa Leighton of Berlin NH. The funeral will be Saturday January 14, 2017 at 4 PM at the Firtion-Adams Funeral Home 76 Broad St. Westfield. Calling hours will precede the service from 2-4 PM at the funeral home. Burial will be at the convenience of the family in the spring.In Lieu of flowers donations in William’s memory may be made to the any charity. firtionadams.com

Police Logs WESTFIELD Major crime and incident log Tuesday, Jan, 3, 2017 4:20 p.m.: Motor vehicle violation, Southampton Road and Friendly’s Way. Police stopped a vehicle that was reportedly stolen near the aforementioned intersection. However, after talking to the operator and running information on the vehicle and operator, it was found that the vehicle was previously recovered but not updated within the computer system. No arrests. 5:23 p.m.: Larceny, Pleasant Street. Police received a report of a wallet that was stolen from a convenience store on Pleasant Street. The victim alleges that they left the wallet on a counter and left for 15 minutes, then when they came back it was missing. Police reported that surveillance footage alleged to have shown a suspect possibly stealing the wallet. Police were investigating. 11:07 p.m.: Accident, Little River Road. Police received a report of a one-vehicle crash involving a 2015 Chevrolet Traverse and shrubbery. According to the driver, they attempted to avoid an animal that had gotten into the roadway, and in the process veered off the road and into some bushes. Police requested a tow for the vehicle but no injuries were reported.

Westfield YMCA Self-Defense Class WESTFIELD — Awareness, Safety and Protect,  SelfDefense Series at the YMCA of Greater Westfield will consist of three Sunday afternoon’s for woman only. Each Sunday you will get workouts that will maximum physical efficiency and self-confidence to help deal with a variety of situations. You will learn how to quickly disable an attacker and learn how to take advantage of time and space. You will learn various stances, striking motions, kicks, choke holds, and other defense techniques to help protect yourself. Learn to prepare for the unexpected! The instructor, Catlin McCue, is a certified R.A.D., rape aggression defense, instructor. This program is based on realistic self-defense tactics taught for woman only. The Sunday dates are January 22nd, February 5th and 12th from 12:15PM to 1:30PM. Girls 14 and 15 of age must be accompanied by a parent or guardian. Registration is required. Space is limited. For more info, contact  Cindy Agan, Fitness Director, P. 413. 568.8631 or Email: cagan@ Yankee Village Shops westfieldymca.org.

53 Southwick Rd.

Mon-Thur HOURS: Mon-Thur10-6 10-6 FriFriday 10-310-3 • Sat• Closed Sat 10-1 and

Can You Help Sarah?

FACES OF CARSON

Morningside

Sarah Helps Seniors

with Stefan Czaporowski

••••••••• fridays •••••••• Can You 6-8 am: JP’s Talk about Town, with Jay Pagluica Help Westfield Gas & Electric is a proud supporter of The Carson Center Sarah?

57 Maple Street East Longmeadow, MA (413) 526-9790 HOURS : Mon-Fri 10-6pm Mon-Thur 10-6pm Fri 10-3 • Sat 9-1pm Saturday 9-1pm

www.MemoryLaneLamps.com

WESTFIELD—Massachusetts Attorney around the country of harassment and intimidaGeneral Maura Healey will address Westfield tion of racial, ethnic and religious minorities, State University students during the universiwomen, LGBTQ individuals, and immigrants. ty’s 178th undergraduate commencement cerPrior to the election of Healey as its leader, emony on Saturday, May 20. The commenceshe spent many previous years working in the ment ceremony will be held at 4 p.m. at the Office of the Attorney General under then MassMutual Center in Springfield, Mass. Attorney General Martha Coakley. Healey’s “Westfield State University is honored to leadership roles included service as Chief of have Attorney General Healey offer her valued Business and Labor, Chief of the Public insight with our graduates at our commenceProtection and Advocacy Bureau, and Chief of ment,” said Westfield State University the Civil Rights Division. President Dr. Ramon S. Torrecilha. “Attorney As Chief of the Civil Rights Division, Healey General Healey’s exemplary work as a public made national headlines as the lead attorney in servant and her impressive list of professional Massachusetts’ fight against the federal Defense achievements align well with the universiof Marriage Act (DOMA). She led the effort MAURA HEALEY ty’s emphasis on civic engagement and the to challenge the act—which defined marstrength of our criminal justice program.” riage solely as between a man and a woman—arguing that it Attorney General Healey has been recognized for her advo- violated the U.S. Constitution by interfering with Massachusetts’ cacy efforts for underserved populations. Following her first- sovereign authority to define and regulate the marital status of ever run for an elected office, Healey was sworn in as Attorney its residents. Massachusetts became the first and only state in General on January 21, 2015. Notable efforts during her term the nation to file a complaint against the act; and in 2010, the include launching the Community Engagement Division which U.S. District Court ruled that DOMA was unconstitutional. brings the Attorney General’s Office and its work into neighIn her other roles under then Attorney General Martha borhoods and communities across the Commonwealth. Under Coakley, she helped defend the Massachusetts buffer zone law, her leadership, the Earned Sick Time law and the Domestic which protected women from being harassed at reproductive Workers’ Bill of Rights were passed. In May of 2015, her office health care centers. She also shut down predatory lenders that became the first state agency to offer paid family leave for all were wreaking havoc on Massachusetts communities and oversaw a team that worked with homeowners to help make their employees. Since taking office, Healey has tackled issues touching the loans affordable. Healey’s early legal career included work as a clerk for Judge lives of residents across Massachusetts, including the heroin and prescription drug abuse epidemic, escalating health care David Mazzone in the United States District Court in costs, workers’ rights, and student loan costs. She has focused Massachusetts, as a junior partner at the international law firm on strengthening consumer protections and on improving our Wilmer Hale, and as a Special Assistant District Attorney in criminal justice system. Middlesex County. In November 2016, Healey established a hotline for Healey received her bachelor’s degree from Harvard College Massachusetts residents to report bias-motivated threats, and her law degree from Northeastern University School of harassment, and violence following post-election reports Law. At Harvard, she served as captain and point guard on the women’s basketball team and upon graduation, she spent two years playing the sport professionally in Europe before returning to the U.S. to complete her law degree. In 2006, she was inducted into the New England Basketball Hall of Fame. Other professional accolades include the Massachusetts Teachers Association’s 2016 Friends of Labor Award for her work promoting economic security and fair labor practices; the Disability Law Center’s Francis X. Bellotti 2015 Civil Rights Award for her commitment to equal access for people with disabilities in the Commonwealth; and the Massachusetts LGBTQ SUE WEST, CEO Bar Association’s 2012 Kevin Larkin Memorial Award for Public Service for her leadership and continued work to protect The Carson Center for Human Services the civil rights of all citizens of the Commonwealth. Healey also received honorary degrees from Salem State University Celebrating 50 Years of and her alma mater, Northeastern University School of Law. Real Help with Real Life 1963-2013 “Attorney General Healey serves as a role model to our students, having dedicated her career to the causes she is most passionate about,” said Class of 2017 Council Member Jonathan These were the only people Darcy Cubetus of Forestdale, Mass. “Her personal and professional could really talk to. She knew that when stories alone provide great inspiration and her remarks will be she told them how she moved back in particularly poignant as the Class of 2017 begins the next chapwith Tomas after he’d been released ter of its future.” from prison for the assault on her, that Tickets are required to attend Westfield State University they’d ‘get it.’ They would know how commencement. For more information, visit http://www.westshe felt. The other mem­bers of Carson’s field.ma.edu/commencement. domestic violence support group understood how she was feeling. The court had put Tomas on a ‘bracelet’ that tracked Obituaries always online at his movements. If he hurt Darcy, he would definitely go http://thewestfieldnews.com/category/obituaries back to prison, where he did not want to go. It was the first time Darcy had felt this kind of protection. When Darcy had called the police on him two years ago, she was the one that ended up in trouble. Tomas had convinced the cops that she’d pushed him and they arrested her, instead. She did not call for a long time after that. The second time she’d called, Tomas did get arrested, but the Assistant District Attorney told her that they wouldn’t go forward without her testimony. It was all up to her alone. Tomas’ mother and brother and friends came over every day to plead with her not to ruin his life. She could not ruin his life. She did not want to hurt him. She just wanted him to stop hurting her, so told the ADA she did not want to go forward. Tomas was furious with her for ‘getting him in trouble’ anyway. The next time the police came, it was because the neighbors had seen him attacking her. There was the hospital record of her broken ribs and the marks from the Listen at WSKB.org or watch on Comcast Cable CH. 15 strangulation. The evidence was stronger, but still, the ADA told her it was all up to her. Darcy did not visit him in jail, but he called her. It sounded terrible in there. •••••••• Mondays •••••••• Darcy thought about this: if she had told any of her friends that, for example, her brother had hit her, but that 6-8 am: Good Monday Morning! with she still loved her brother, her friends would under­stand Katherine Bentrewicz & Elli Meyer this. But when she told her friends that her boy­friend had hit her, but she still loved her boyfriend, her friends 8-10am: Owls on the Air with Michael thought she was “sick.” It was when he was in jail that Darcy started going to “Buster” McMahon ‘92 Carson’s domestic violence support group. The group was the only really emotionally safe place for her. The group members understood. They wanted her to be safe. •••••••• tuesdays ••••••• They wanted her to understand that she could not change him, and that it was not her fault that he hurt her, but they 6-8 am: WOW, It’s Tuesday, with Bob Plasse also understood that of course, she loved him, too. The group members also knew what it felt like for 8-10am: Ken’s Den, with Ken Stomski Darcy to move back in with Tomas when he came out on his tracking bracelet. The first time he started talking at •••••• Wednesdays ••••• her with that menacing tone, Darcy did not cower. She did not shrink into the corner. She stood up and told him 6-8 am: Wake Up Wed., with Tina Gorman she wasn’t afraid anymore. She had to stand on the tongue in the mouth of the lion and tell him that he 8-10am: Political Round Table couldn’t hit her anymore. Maybe no one outside the group would understand what it felt like to take your power back in that way, but she felt she had to do it. The ••••••• thursdays •••••• group members told her that she didn’t need to stand up to him in person. She could have stood up to him inside 6-8 am: The Westfield News Radio Show, her head. She didn’t need to live with him. But they didn’t judge her when she did choose to live with him. with host Patrick Berry Darcy called the police when he shoved her around two weeks later and he went right back to jail, just as 8-9 am: In The Flow with Rob & Joe: they’d promised. She was glad she’d tried this one last Westfield Tech. Academy’s time. She was glad she’d stood up. And she was glad her Carson group had stood by her. Rob Ollari & Joe Langone By JAC Patrissi

9-10am: Superintendents’ Spotlight

(Route 10 & 202)

Westfield, MA (413) 562-9792

Attorney General Maura Healey to serve as Westfield State Commencement Speaker

www.sarahgillett.org

www.sarahgillett.org

RADIO FOR THE WESTFIELD MASSES

Wednesday, Jan. 4, 2017 12:40 a.m.: Motor vehicle violation and arrest, North Road. Police reported that a 1996 Toyota Camry was fleeing from police, originating in Holyoke. The chase had crossed into Westfield and police pursued, but eventually stopped pursuit due to the location of the chase through Root Road. However, the vehicle was reportedly bailed out of by two suspects on Wyben Road following the termination of the pursuit. Police were able to stop one of the suspects after they reportedly injured themselves while exiting the vehicle, but the other suspect was able to get away in spite of a police canine attempting to find the suspect. Jeremy Noyes, 24, of Russell, was arrested and charged with trespassing and interfering with a police officer. 5:15 p.m.: Larceny, Mechanic Street. Police received a report from an alleged victim who claimed that their PlayStation 4 was reportedly stolen. Police had a suspect but no arrests were made. 10:19 p.m.: Motor vehicle violation and arrest, Union Street. Police stopped a vehicle after recognizing the driver, Cristina C. Fernandez, 28, of Westfield, to have no license to operate a vehicle. Police arrested Fernandez and charged her with unlicensed operation of a motor vehicle and no inspection/sticker. 10:57 p.m.: Assault, Franklin Street. Police received a report of a possible assault involving four assailants and one alleged victim. According to police, the incident occurred after the victim and one of the assailants allegedly “exchanged words” and became violent. One assailant reportedly punched the victim in the face, but that was the only reported suspect. Police were investigating.

THURSDAY, JANUARY 12, 2017- PAGE 5


PAGE 6 - THURSDAY, JANUARY 12, 2017

WWW.THEWESTFIELDNEWS.COM

THE WESTFIELD NEWS

ARTSLEISURE

The Arts Beat By MARK AUERBACH

Amadeus: A Majestic Musical Rivalry at The Majestic Amadeus, Peter Shaffer’s sweeping fictionalized history of the rivalry between classical music composers Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart and Antonio Salieri, kicks off the New Year at West Springfield’s Majestic Theater through February 12. A big hit in London, on Broadway, and subsequently as a film, Amadeus tells of Salieri’s jealousy for Mozart’s talents, and disdain for his wild ways. Shaffer, who adapted the play into the film, was inspired by a short 1830 play by Alexander Pushkin called Mozart and Salieri (which was also used as the libretto for an opera of the same name by Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov in 1897). The play premiered on Broadway in 1980 with Ian McKellen as Salieri, Tim Curry as Mozart, and Jane Seymour as Constanze. Tim Curry was replaced by Star Wars star Mark Hamill, who in turn was replaced by John Thomas Waite, who stages the Majestic production. Amadeus won the 1981 Tony Award for Best Play. It was adapted by Shaffer for the 1984 Academy Awardwinning film of the same name At the Majestic, Keith Langsdale plays Salieri; Stephen Petit of Southwick plays Mozart; Kaytlyn Vendeloecht plays Constanze Weber, and Westfield actor Stuart Gamble plays Emperor Joseph II. . For details: 413.747.7797: or http://www.majestictheater.com/

[Title of Show] Plays West Hartford’s Playhouse on Park [Title of Show], the quirky Broadway musical, takes over West Hartford’s Playhouse on Park from January 11-29. Authors Jeff Bowen and Hunter Bell wrote the musical as an entry in the New York Musical Theatre Festival, and the show made its way uptown to Broadway, where it won a Tony Award nomination for Best Book of a Musical in 2009. Composer and lyricist Bowen and librettist Bell describe [Title of Show] as “a musical about two guys writing a musical about two guys writing a musical”. The musical has lots of insider Broadway musical jokes that will make anyone who has seen a new musical this century chuckle. David Edwards directs. The cast includes Miles Jacoby from the Broadway and National Tours of The Book of Mormon, Peje Mele, Ashlkey Brooke, and Amanda Forker. Director David Edwards makes his Playhouse on Park debut as director with [Title of Show]. As an actor, he is a veteran of Broadway’s By Jeeves, The Rothschilds, and The Producers. Recently, he was nominated for a Connecticut Critics Circle Award for his direction of South Pacific at Ivoryton Playhouse. For details: 860.523-5900 EXT 10 or http://www.playhouseonpark.org/

The Ghost Light Project: A National Theatre Initiative

moting equality, diversity, and a safe space for artists to create works that showcase important issues and for audiences to participate in these onstage/offstage dialogues and discussions. Activism has been part of the picture since Ancient Greece, when Aristophanes wrote an anti-war play, Lysistrata, in which a group of solder’s wives denied their husbands sex, until they gave up their battle.. The Ghost Light Project, a new national initiative, aims to unite the theater community nationwide in solidarity. The project aims to create spaces – both literal and symbolic – that will serve as lights in the coming years, and to activate a network of people across the country working to support vulnerable communities. On January 19 at 5:30PM in each time zone across the country, members of the theater community from Broadway to regional theaters to high schools and colleges and community theaters will come together to launch The Ghost Light Project. As of December 31, some of the participating regional theaters and companies include Arts Emerson; Boston Center for The Arts, Silverthorne Theatre in Massachusetts and ; Connecticut College, TheaterWorks, Housatonic Musical Theatre Society, Eugene O’Neill Theater

Ashley Brooke stars in [Title of Show], at Playhouse on Park.

Miles Jacoby stars in [Title of Show], at Playhouse on Park.

Center and Goodspeed Musicals in Connecticut, and more. , For details on the group’s mission, and an updated list of participants: https://theghostlightproject.com/

and Springfield, MA native who won the 1973 Tony Award for his performance opposite Debbie Reynolds in Irene, died on December 26. Born George Irving Shelasky in 1922, he grew up singing at neighborhood synagogues and churches. He made his Broadway debut in 1943 in Oklahoma!. With 32 Broadway credits, Irving performed in such classics as Gentleman Prefer Blondes, Can-Can, Bells Are Ringing, the 1981 revival of The Pirates of Penzance, and Me and My Girl, for which he earned a

Of Note Michael Wartella, the Berkshires native who recently played Mickey Rooney in Goodspeed’s Chasing Rainbows, stars with Christian Borle, John Rubenstein, and Jackie Hoffman in the new Broadway musical Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, which opens on Broadway in late March. Wartella was previously on Broadway in Wicked and Tuck Everlasting. Also in the cast is Alan H. Green from Barrington Stage’s Broadway Bounty Hunter last season. For details: http://www.charlieonbroadway.com/ George S. Irving, the actor

David Edwards directs [Title of Show], at Playhouse on Park.

Stephen Petit as Mozart in Amadeus. Photo by Majestic Theater/Rick Teller.

Keith Langsdale as Salieri in Amadeus. Photo by Majestic Theater/Rick Teller.

The theatre community has always been a front-runner, when it comes to pro-

Tony nomination. He was married to the ballerina Maria Karnilova, who starred on Broadway as Tessie Tura in Gypsy and Golde in Fiddler on The Roof. ——— Mark G. Auerbach studied theatre at American University and the Yale School of Drama. He’s worked for arts organizations and reported on theatre for newspapers and radio.

“Our Family Cooks For Your Family”

Village Pizzeria R

FREE CUP OF SOUP

S

DEBIT

with any Grinder

during Lunch (excluding Grinder of the Month) DINE IN ONLY

E

T

A

U

R

A

N

T

College Highway, Rt. 10 & 202, Southwick, MA

569-3160 • 569-3403

--- JANUARY -----

Grinder of the Month Pizza of the Month

8" Veal Parm Grinder with Sauce

3

$$ 75 95

Kickin’ BBQ Pork Pizza

Onions 25¢¢ extra Onions & Peppers Peppers 30 Check out our LUNCHEON SPECIALS - served 11am to 3pm daily! HOURS: Mon-Thur 11am-11pm • Fri-Sat 11am-12am • Sun 12pm-10pm


WWW.THEWESTFIELDNEWS.COM

THE WESTFIELD NEWS

THURSDAY, JANUARY 12, 2017- PAGE 7

SCORE BIG WITH

When you open a new GetReal Checking account

GAME ON!

SM

Stop in or visit bankesb.com for details! Each depositor is insured by the FDIC to at least $250,000. All deposits above the FDIC insurance amount are insured by the Depositors Insurance Fund (DIF).

The bank of you. Member FDIC

bankesb.com | 855.527.4111

* $100.00 promotional offer is for opening a GetReal Checking account and activating direct deposit (of at least $25.00) or signing up for online banking and conducting 5 debit card transactions using your debit card within the first 60 days of account opening ($100.00 will be credited to the account by the last day of the statement cycle following the 60th day the account has been open). $50.00 promotional offer is for making 5 bill payments using online banking and enrolling in eStatements within 60 days of account opening ($50.00 will be credited to the account by the last day of the statement cycle following the 60th day the account has been open). $50.00 loyalty bonus will be paid after the account has been open for 12 months ($50.00 will be credited to the account by the last day of the statement cycle following the 365th day the account has been open). Bonuses are for new customers and limited to one account per customer. In accordance with applicable regulations bonus payouts may be 1099 reportable. Account must be in good standing and have a positive balance at the time the bonus is paid. Minimum balance to open the account is $10.00. May not be combined with other promotional offers. This is a limited time offer and subject to change without notice.

The Gateway School Committee posed for picture day at Wednesday’s meeting. (Photo by Amy Porter)

Gateway Budget It also did not contain funds for the search for a new superintendent, or superintendent separation. FY18 is the last year in Hopson’s contract as superintendent. The current projected budget is $16,095,514, an increase of $159,386 or 1% over last year’s budget. He said some of the increases are due to a contracted increase in regional transportation of $18,861. Increases in out-ofdistrict tuition costs for school choice and charter tuition of $234,818, and negotiated pay increases for staff of $129,584 or 1.5%. Oil prices have also risen for all of the schools. The increases were offset by what Hopson called “a coordinated effort by the district and by the leadership team to cut costs.” Reductions included $345,865 in out-ofdistrict placements for special education students, reduction in special education transportation of $99,403, and savings of $38,392 in the use of electricity despite an increase in rates.

Continued from Page 1 Hopson added that the projected FY18 budget of $16,095,514 is $1,787,006 less than the FY09 budget, despite the fact that a decade has passed. Hopson said of all the unfulfilled positions or needs, the School Committee might consider doing something for life skills. He said the leadership team all agreed this was the most urgent need. Michele Crane, chair of the School Committee, asked what would be the cost for the life skills position. The life skills program would be for special education students between the ages of 18 and 22, before they age out of the public school system when they turn 22. Currently the program is being taught in the school, but they need to expand, Hopson said. Hopson said the new director of pupil services Kurt Garivaltis is looking at placing students in internships and jobs in the community. Gateway now has a bus available for in-house transportation, which make community

Fire Chief

Continued from Page 1

Hall. He said the furniture was purchased used, and he was able to get the pieces for $5,100, which would have cost an estimated $18,000 new. He said he purchased the furniture from Lexington Furniture in West Springfield, whose owner lives in Blandford. Garriepy has served as police chief in Huntington for 25 years, starting at age 20. He now has eight part-time employees. He is the only full-time employee in the department.

placements more realistic for the district. He said they would also be looking for job placements in Westfield and Holyoke. Middlefield representative Sarah Foley asked how many students would be in the program. Hopson said six currently, but another six students are coming up. He also said that if the needs for a job program aren’t met in the district, the students could go to another program out of district, which Gateway would be responsible for. Hopson also said that students are moving into the district with more and more needs. Megan Coburn, principal of Chester Elementary, Littleville Elementary and the Middle School said since August, they have enrolled 35 new students, 16 with significant needs, and 6 English language learners. “It’s great, and we’re excited to have new kids,” Coburn said, but added that there are significant needs to meet. Huntington representative Jeff Wyand asked about the

need for a curriculum director and technology director. Currently, the duties of both of those positions are being spread out among the leadership team. Hopson said eventually, Gateway will want to add a half-time director position for both areas. He said down the road, there is also the possibility of sharing one or both with other districts. Wyand also asked what the district is thinking about the OPEB trust. Business manager Stephanie Fisk said that last year, they put in what they had achieved in savings in the health care line item. “I’d go with anything left over in insurance,” Fisk said. Wyand also asked about possible costs for the superintendent search and separation. Hopson said the Massachusetts Association of School Committees (MASC) charges $10,000 for the search process, but the average cost for a search is $30,000. He said separation will cost $40,000 to $48,000. Hopson said the School Committee has to decide whether to offer an extension, and the superintendent would have to agree, or build in $40 to $60,000 not currently in the budget. Another suggestion that has been given to the towns is to consider a 5-year average for the school budget, which would give a predictive number for the towns to work with. Hopson said the new system would require acceptance by all six towns, and would mean an increase for some of the smaller towns.

Huntington Police Chief Robert Garriepy shows newly refurbished police department in Town Hall. Garriepy has served as police chief for the town for 25 years. (Photo by Amy Porter)

CSF Westfield Dollars for Scholars is now set up as an eligible charity in Amazon Smile WESTFIELD — If you use Amazon, CSF would appreciate it if you would make all your purchases through Amazon Smile because CSF will get a percent of all purchases made. It only takes a minute to setup your account. - Go to www.smile.amazon.com - Box at bottom right of screen “Pick your own charitable organization” - Type CSF Westfield and then click the Search button - Click the Select button next to our organization name

Fri. 1/13 thru Thurs. 1/19

Patriots Day (R)

Fri - Sun: 12:30, 3:30, 6:30, 9:30 Mon: 12:30, 3:30, 6:30 Tue: 9:30 AM, 12:30, 3:30, 6:30 Wed: 12:30, 3:30, 6:30 Thu: 12:30, 3:30, 6:30, 9:30

Hidden Figures (PG)

Fri - Sun: 1:00, 4:00, 7:00, 9:30 Mon: 1:00, 4:00, 7:00 Tue: 10:00 AM, 1:00, 4:00, 7:00 Wed: 1:00, 4:00, 7:00 Thu: 1:00, 4:00, 7:00, 9:30

- Coming Soon -

ToSCa

- 1/26/17

Giacomo Puccini’s Tosca is melodrama at its purest, a festival of lush melodies and dramatic outbursts that remains one of this composer’s most popular works to this day. It is also a genuine “action opera,” a realistic crime story, complete with torture, betrayal, murder, sex and suicide.


PAGE 8 - THURSDAY, JANUARY 12, 2017

THE WESTFIELD NEWS

Noble Hospital nurses and members of the Massachusetts Nurses Association had an informational picket outside Noble Hospital on Wednesday afternoon. (Photo by Greg Fitzpatrick)

Nurses

Continued from Page 1

changes they want to be made. The current health insurance plan for the nurses at Noble Hospital is a one-year plan with HMO (Health Maintenance Organization). This means that the nurses will need the majority of their health care to be from a network provider. The nurses will have to use the options that Baystate Health offers them in their plan. Ann Kennedy, who is an ICU (Intensive Care Unit) nurse at Noble, wants to see more options with the health insurance plan. “I would think you would have more than one option,” said Kennedy. Rather than an HMO, Kennedy believes that a PPO (Preferred Provider Organization) should be in the health insurance plan, so the nurses have the option to look at out of network providers. Although Kennedy knows that the doctors at Noble Hospital are great care providers, Kennedy wants to have the option of choosing her own doctor. “I want to go to the doctor who I feel is best for my care,” said Kennedy. Baystate Health stands by their health insurance plan and continues to encourage the Noble nurses to use the benefits they have in the plan. “That plan is still in place,” said Bryant. “We encourage folks to not only use our plan, but use our hospitals. The contract negotiations between Baystate Health and the Noble Hospital nurses began on February 10, 2016, have held 17 negotiating session and will continue to meet. As Bryant has been the President of Baystate Health for almost six years, this is the third time he has gone through contract negotiations with Noble Hospital. Bryant noted that, “It’s not unusual for these contracts to go past their expiration dates.” There is no timetable yet as to when the two parties will come to an agreement, but Bryant is optimistic that negotiations with the MNA will occur at some point “We always have to,” said Bryant. “They’ve been a great partnership with us, so sooner or later we will come to some type of agreement.”

Mayor Brian Sullivan urges the group and the hospital to find an acceptable settlement.

Denise Colson and Pamela Fournier lead the demonstration.

Paul Dubin and Denise Colson address the group.

Representative John Velis speaks to the group about what they do for the community.


THE WESTFIELD NEWS

THURSDAY, JANUARY 12, 2017- PAGE 9

WWW.THEWESTFIELDNEWS.COM

SPORTS

Bombers shock Lions By CHRIS PUTZ Staff Writer LUDLOW – The Westfield High School wrestling team is showing no signs of slowing down. The Bombers posted another impressive result Wednesday night, this time on the road, shocking the Ludlow Lions 33-30. The effort was best summed up in one ultimate matchup featuring a young, budding wrestler. Westfield 220-pound freshman Cerrito Serrano may be an underclassman, but his heart, body, and mind operated at a top shelf, MVP-like level. Serrano wrestled Longmeadow’s mighty Phil Nguyen for a full six minutes before just being edged out 3-0. Westfield’s Vitalliy Borodin (132) also earned the praise of his coaching staff by going toe-to-toe with his opponent, Cesar Alvan, for a full six minutes in a loss. If one only glanced at the scoreboard, the “true” results would have been lost. “(Cerrito) Serrano and (Vitalliy) Borodin may have lost their matches, but wrestling the full six minutes and not getting pinned were the keys to (the) Westfield win,” Bombers’ coach Chris Malinowski said. Westfield freshman Nick Clauson (152 pounds) wrestled his best match of the season, defeating Ludlow’s Chris Avsenealt, 10-3. Bombers’ junior Dennis Sevastyanov (160) edged Maiden Giza, 5-2. Junior Jack Yvon (170) pinned Ben Shaw in the first period. Sophomore Joe Raco (182) won an overtime thriller against Ben Lahound, 4-2. Freshman Kaleb Cree (126), Keandre Godbout (138) and heavyweight Johnny Gourde picked up victories for Westfield. The victory featured so much more. Westfield’s Mike Malinowski led in a matchup of 192

pounders, 2-0, before succumbing to injury in the third period. Bombers’ 145-pounder, Louis Rogers, wrestled up a weight class and wrestled well. Westfield’s 106-pound freshman Yaneil Alicea saw his first action of the season, but fell to the experienced K.J. Sotomayer. Sylan Beddow pinned Bombers’ Cole Cannady (120). BOYS’ BASKETBALL

Saints mount climb Mount Everett 56, St. Mary 40 SHEFFIELD – The nightly scores might not show it but the St. Mary High School boys’ basketball team is reaching new heights every day. St. Mary senior Jake Butler continued his scoring tear, leading the hard-charging Saints to within one point of Mount Everett at the half before falling late, 56-40. “Playing back to back, we just ran out gas,” St. Mary coach Joe Molta said. “Unfortunately, not enough depth, not enough height to go 32 minutes.” After playing to a 26-25 halftime score, Mount Everett pulled away. Butler scored a team-high 23 points for St. Mary. “I can’t say enough about how well he’s playing,” Molta said of his crafty point guard. “His motor is running really high.” “Again we continued to put on a great effort,” the head coach explained. “Hopefully one of these days, these kids will get rewarded.” See H.S. Roundup, Page 11

Westfield’s Vitalliy Borodin wrestles his opponent to the mat in a recent match. Borodin provided one of several shining moment’s in the Bombers’ upset of Ludlow Wednesday. (File Photo)

Southwick vs. Franklin Tech Wrestling

Dan Rotar (113# class) is ready to take his opponent down.

Connor Stevens (182# class) throws is opponent to the mat.

Jake Walker (126# class) grapples with Franklin Tech.

Miguel Gonzalez (152# class) stands his opponent on his head.

Jake Walker (126# class) struggles to get free.

Miguel Gonzalez (152# class) has his opponent tied in a know.

Eddie Martinez (145# class) forces his opponent to the mat.

PHOTOS BY LYNN F. BOSCHER

Josh Silvia(160# class) prepares for a take down.

Find the latest Westfield News sports coverage on


PAGE 10 - THURSDAY, JANUARY 12, 2017

THE WESTFIELD NEWS

WWW.THEWESTFIELDNEWS.COM

WINTER ’16-17 HIGH SCHOOL SCHEDULE GATEWAY REGIONAL HIGH SCHOOL Thursday, Jan. 12 SKIING – PVIAC Race, Berkshire East (Charlemont), 5 p.m. JV BOYS’ BASKETBALL at Franklin Tech, 5:30 p.m. GIRLS’ BASKETBALL vs. Smith Voke, 6:30 p.m. BOYS’ BASKETBALL at Franklin Tech, 7 p.m. Friday, Jan. 13 No Sports Scheduled *Saturday, Jan. 14* WRESTLING at Maple Hill, 7:30 a.m. Monday, Jan. 16 No Sports Scheduled Tuesday, Jan. 17 SKIING – PVIAC Race, Berkshire East (Charlemont), 5 p.m. GIRLS’ BASKETBALL at Westfield Technical Academy, 4 p.m. JV BOYS’ BASKETBALL vs. Hampden Charter School of Science, 5 p.m. BOYS’ BASKETBALL vs. Hampden Charter School of Science, 6:30 p.m. Wednesday, Jan. 18 No Sports Scheduled Thursday, Jan. 19 SKIING – PVIAC Race, Berkshire East (Charlemont), 5 p.m. JV BOYS’ BASKETBALL vs. Baystate Academy Charter Public School, 5 p.m. BOYS’ BASKETBALL vs. Baystate Academy Charter Public School, 6:30 p.m. GIRLS’ BASKETBALL at John J. Duggan Academy, 6:30 p.m. Friday, Jan. 20

GIRLS’ BASKETBALL at Pioneer Valley Christian Academy, 5:30 p.m. Monday, Jan. 23 GIRLS’ BASKETBALL at St. Mary, Westfield Middle School North, 5:30 p.m. Tuesday, Jan. 24 JV BOYS’ BASKETBALL vs. Westfield Technical Academy, 5 p.m. BOYS’ BASKETBALL vs. Westfield Technical Academy, 6:30 p.m. Wednesday, Jan. 25 JV BOYS’ BASKETBALL vs. St. Mary, 5 p.m. BOYS’ BASKETBALL vs. St. Mary, 6:30 p.m. Thursday, Jan. 26 SKIING – PVIAC Race, Berkshire East (Charlemont), 5 p.m. JV GIRLS’ BASKETBALL vs. Commerce, 5 p.m. GIRLS’ BASKETBALL vs. Commerce, 6:30 p.m. Friday, Jan. 27 No Sports Scheduled Saturday, Jan. 28 WRESTLING at Albany High School, 7:30 a.m. Monday, Jan. 30 JV GIRLS’ BASKETBALL vs. Sci-Tech, 5 p.m. GIRLS’ BASKETBALL vs. Sci-Tech, 6:30 p.m. Tuesday, Jan. 31 BOYS’/GIRLS’ SKIING – PVIAC Race, 5 p.m. JV BOYS’ BASKETBALL at McCann Tech, 5 p.m. BOYS’ BASKETBALL at McCann Tech, 6:30 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 1 WRESTLING at Hampshire Regional, 7 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 2 BOYS’/GIRLS’ SKIING – PVIAC Race, 5 p.m.

ST. MARY HIGH SCHOOL Thursday, Jan. 12 SKIING – PVIAC Race, Berkshire East (Charlemont), 5 p.m. Friday, Jan. 13 No Sports Scheduled Saturday, Jan. 14 ICE HOCKEY at Chicopee, Smead Arena, noon Monday, Jan. 16 ICE HOCKEY vs. South Hadley, Amelia Park Ice Arena, 10 a.m. Tuesday, Jan. 17 SKIING – PVIAC Race, Berkshire East (Charlemont), 5 p.m. GIRLS’ BASKETBALL at Mount Everett, 5 p.m. JV BOYS’ BASKETBALL at Franklin Tech, 5:30 p.m. BOYS’ BASKETBALL at Franklin Tech, 7 p.m. ICE HOCKEY vs. Greenfield, Amelia Park Ice Arena, 8 p.m. Wednesday, Jan. 18 GIRLS’ BASKETBALL vs. Hampden Charter School of Science, Westfield Middle School North, 5:30 p.m. Thursday, Jan. 19 SKIING – PVIAC Race, Berkshire East (Charlemont), 5 p.m. JV BOYS’ BASKETBALL at Smith Voke, 5 p.m. BOYS’ BASKETBALL at Smith Voke, 6:30 p.m. Friday, Jan. 20 GIRLS’ BASKETBALL at Sci-Tech, 6 p.m. ICE HOCKEY vs. Chicopee Comp, Amelia Park Ice Arena, 8 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 21 ICE HOCKEY at Turners Falls, Collins/Moylan Arena, 6:30 p.m. Monday, Jan. 23 GIRLS’ BASKETBALL vs. Gateway, Westfield Middle School North, 5:30 p.m.

Tuesday, Jan. 24 No Sports Scheduled Wednesday, Jan. 25 JV BOYS’ BASKETBALL at Gateway, 5 p.m. BOYS’ BASKETBALL at Gateway, 6:30 p.m. ICE HOCKEY vs. Amherst-Pelham, Amelia Park Ice Arena, 8 p.m. Thursday, Jan. 26 SKIING – PVIAC Race, Berkshire East (Charlemont), 5 p.m. JV BOYS’ BASKETBALL vs. Westfield Technical Academy, Westfield Middle School South, 5:30 p.m. BOYS’ BASKETBALL vs. Westfield Technical Academy, Westfield Middle School South, 7 p.m. GIRLS’ BASKETBALL at Westfield Technical Academy, 6 p.m. Friday, Jan. 27 ICE HOCKEY at Belchertown, Mullins Center Practice Rink, 4 p.m. Monday, Jan. 30 JV BOYS’ BASKETBALL vs. Pathfinder, Westfield Middle School South, 5 p.m. BOYS’ BASKETBALL vs. Pathfinder, Westfield Middle School South, 6:30 p.m. GIRLS’ BASKETBALL vs. Putnam, Westfield Middle School North, 5:30 p.m. Tuesday, Jan. 31 SKIING – PVIAC Race, Berkshire East (Charlemont), 5 p.m. JV BOYS’ BASKETBALL vs. Pioneer Valley Christian Academy, Westfield Middle School South, 5 p.m. BOYS’ BASKETBALL vs. Pioneer Valley Christian Academy, Westfield Middle School South, 6:30 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 1 No Sports Scheduled

WESTFIELD TECHNICAL ACADEMY Thursday, Jan. 12 No Sports Scheduled Friday, Jan. 13 GIRLS’ BASKETBALL vs. John J. Duggan Academy, 5 p.m. Monday, Jan. 16 No Sports Scheduled Tuesday, Jan. 17 GIRLS’ BASKETBALL vs. Gateway, 4 p.m. JV BOYS’ BASKETBALL vs. Smith Voke, 5:30 p.m. BOYS’ BASKETBALL vs. Smith Voke, 7 p.m. Wednesday, Jan. 18 No Sports Scheduled Thursday, Jan. 19 JV BOYS’ BASKETBALL at Pathfinder, 5:30 p.m. BOYS’ BASKETBALL at Pathfinder, 7 p.m. Friday, Jan. 20 GIRLS’ BASKETBALL at Franklin Tech, 7 p.m. Monday, Jan. 23 GIRLS’ BASKETBALL at Smith Voke, 6 p.m. Tuesday, Jan. 24 JV BOYS’ BASKETBALL at Gateway, 5 p.m. Wednesday, Jan. 25 No Sports Scheduled Thursday, Jan. 26 JV BOYS’ BASKETBALL at St. Mary, Westfield Middle School South, 5:30 p.m. BOYS’ BASKETBALL at St. Mary, Westfield Middle School South, 7 p.m. GIRLS’ BASKETBALL vs. St. Mary, 6 p.m. Friday, Jan. 27 JV BOYS’ BASKETBALL at Pioneer Valley Christian Academy, 5:30 p.m. BOYS’ BASKETBALL at Pioneer Valley Christian Academy, 7 p.m. Monday, Jan. 30 GIRLS’ BASKETBALL vs. Pathfinder, 4 p.m. Tuesday, Jan. 31 JV BOYS’ BASKETBALL vs. Hampden Charter School of Science, 4 p.m. BOYS’ BASKETBALL vs. Hampden Charter School of Science, 5:30 p.m. GIRLS’ BASKETBALL vs. Hampden Charter School of Science, 7 p.m.

Wednesday, Feb. 1 No Sports Scheduled Thursday, Feb. 2 No Sports Scheduled Friday, Feb. 3 GIRLS’ BASKETBALL vs. Commerce, 5 p.m. JV BOYS’ BASKETBALL at Franklin Tech, 5:30 p.m. BOYS’ BASKETBALL at Franklin Tech, 7 p.m. Monday, Feb. 6 No Sports Scheduled Tuesday, Feb. 7 Wednesday, Feb. 8 GIRLS’ BASKETBALL at Duggan Academy, Brookings School, 7 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 9 GIRLS’ BASKETBALL at Pioneer Valley Christian Academy, 6 p.m. Friday, Feb. 10 JV BOYS’ BASKETBALL at McCann Tech, 5:30 p.m. BOYS’ BASKETBALL at McCann Tech, 7 p.m. Monday, Feb. 13 GIRLS’ BASKETBALL at Gateway, 6:30 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 14 JV BOYS’ BASKETBALL vs. St. Mary, 5:30 p.m. BOYS’ BASKETBALL vs. St. Mary, 7 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 15 No Sports Scheduled Thursday, Feb. 16 GIRLS’ BASKETBALL vs. Smith Vocational, 6 p.m. Friday, Feb. 17 JV BOYS’ BASKETBALL at Smith Vocational, 5 p.m. BOYS��� BASKETBALL at Smith Vocational, 6:30 p.m. Monday, Feb. 20 No Sports Scheduled Tuesday, Feb. 21 GIRLS’ BASKETBALL at St. Mary, Westfield Middle School North, 5:30 p.m. JV BOYS’ BASKETBALL vs. Pathfinder, 5:30 p.m. BOYS’ BASKETBALL vs. Pathfinder, 7 p.m.

WESTFIELD HIGH SCHOOL Thursday, Jan. 12 JV BOYS’ BASKETBALL at Sci-Tech, 5:30 p.m. SKIING – PVIAC Race, Berkshire East Ski, 5 p.m. ICE HOCKEY at Agawam, Olympia Ice Center, 6:30 p.m. BOYS’ BASKETBALL at Sci-Tech, 7 p.m. Friday, Jan. 13 BOYS’/GIRLS’ SWIMMING at Amherst-Pelham, Amherst Regional Middle School, 4 p.m. JV BOYS’ ICE HOCKEY at Simsbury, Simsbury Farms, 4 p.m. JV GIRLS’ BASKETBALL at Chicopee, 5:30 p.m. GIRLS’ BASKETBALL at Chicopee, 7 p.m. *Saturday, Jan. 14* ICE HOCKEY at Dartmouth, Hetland Arena, 12:30 p.m. GIRLS’ ICE HOCKEY (Longmeadow Co-Op) at Leominster, Wallace Center (Fitchburg State), 4:30 p.m. *Sunday, Jan. 15* JV BOYS’ ICE HOCKEY at Chicopee Comp, Cyr Arena, 6:30 p.m. Monday, Jan. 16 ICE HOCKEY vs. Marblehead, Amelia Park Arena, noon JV BOYS’ ICE HOCKEY at East Longmeadow, Cyr Arena, 2:30 p.m. JV BOYS’ BASKETBALL at Hampshire, 5:30 p.m. BOYS’ BASKETBALL at Hampshire, 7 p.m. Tuesday, Jan. 17 BOYS’/GIRLS’ SWIMMING vs. Northampton, 4:30 p.m. GIRLS’ ICE HOCKEY (Longmeadow Co-Op) at Belmont, Viglirolo Rink, 5 p.m. SKIING – PVIAC Race, Berkshire East Ski, 5 p.m. JV BOYS’ BASKETBALL at Putnam, 5:30 p.m. BOYS’ BASKETBALL at Putnam, 7 p.m. Wednesday, Jan. 18 ICE HOCKEY vs. Agawam, Amelia Park Arena, 7 p.m. WRESTLING vs. Agawam, 7 p.m. Thursday, Jan. 19 SKIING – PVIAC Race, Berkshire East Ski, 5 p.m. JV BOYS’ BASKETBALL vs. Amherst-Pelham, 5:30 p.m. BOYS’ BASKETBALL vs. Amherst-Pelham, 7 p.m. Friday, Jan. 20 BOYS’/GIRLS’ SWIMMING vs. West Springfield, 4 p.m. JV GIRLS’ BASKETBALL at Longmeadow, 5:30 p.m. BOYS’/GIRLS’ INDOOR TRACK vs. TBD @ Smith College, 6:45 p.m. GIRLS’ BASKETBALL at Longmeadow, 7 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 21 GIRLS’ ICE HOCKEY (Longmeadow Co-Op) vs. Austin Prep, Fitzpatrick Ice Arena, Time TBA WRESTLING @ Burt Burger Invitational, Chicopee High School, 9 a.m. ICE HOCKEY at Minnechaug, Olympia Ice Center, 7 p.m. *Sunday, Jan. 22* GIRLS’ ICE HOCKEY (Longmeadow Co-Op) vs. Needham, Amelia Park Arena, 3 p.m. JV BOYS’ ICE HOCKEY vs. Agawam, Olympia Ice Center, 3:30 p.m.

Monday, Jan. 23 JV GIRLS’ BASKETBALL at Minnechaug, 5:30 p.m. GIRLS’ BASKETBALL at Minnechaug, 7 p.m. Tuesday, Jan. 24 BOYS’/GIRLS’ SWIMMING vs. Belchertown, 4 p.m. JV BOYS’ BASKETBALL vs. West Springfield, 5:30 p.m. BOYS’ BASKETBALL vs. West Springfield, 7 p.m. Wednesday, Jan. 25 GIRLS’ ICE HOCKEY (Longmeadow Co-Op) at Shrewsbury, North Star Youth Forum Ice Rink, 4 p.m. Thursday, Jan. 26 SKIING – PVIAC Race, Berkshire East Ski, 5 p.m. JV GIRLS’ BASKETBALL at Ludlow, 5:30 p.m. GIRLS’ BASKETBALL at Ludlow, 7 p.m. Friday, Jan. 27 BOYS’/GIRLS’ SWIMMING at East Longmeadow, 4 p.m. JV BOYS’ BASKETBALL at Northampton, 5:30 p.m. BOYS’/GIRLS’ INDOOR TRACK vs. East Longmeadow @ Smith College, 6:45 p.m. BOYS’ BASKETBALL at Northampton, 7 p.m. *Saturday, Jan. 28* JV BOYS’ ICE HOCKEY vs. Longmeadow, Amelia Park Arena, 6 p.m. *Sunday, Jan. 29* JV BOYS’ ICE HOCKEY at East Longmeadow, Cyr Arena, 4:30 p.m. Monday, Jan. 30 JV GIRLS’ BASKETBALL vs. Agawam, 5:30 p.m. GIRLS’ BASKETBALL vs. Agawam, 7 p.m. Tuesday, Jan. 31 BOYS’/GIRLS’ SKIING – PVIAC Race, Berkshire East (Charlemont), 5 p.m. JV BOYS’ BASKETBALL at Chicopee, 5:30 p.m. BOYS’ BASKETBALL at Chicopee, 7 p.m. BOYS’/GIRLS’ SWIMMING vs. Minnechaug, 4 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 1 BOYS’ ICE HOCKEY vs. East Longmeadow, Amelia Park Arena, 7 p.m. WRESTLING vs. Holyoke, 7 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 2 JV BOYS’ ICE HOCKEY vs. Simsbury, Amelia Park Arena, 3 p.m. BOYS’/GIRLS’ SKIING – PVIAC Race, Berkshire East (Charlemont), 5 p.m. JV GIRLS’ BASKETBALL at East Longmeadow, 5:30 p.m. GIRLS’ BASKETBALL at East Longmeadow, 7 p.m. Friday, Feb. 3 BOYS’/GIRLS’ INDOOR TRACK vs. TBD, Smith College (Northampton), 3:45 p.m. JV BOYS’ BASKETBALL at East Longmeadow, 5:30 p.m. BOYS’ BASKETBALL at East Longmeadow, 7 p.m. *Saturday, Feb. 4* BOYS’ ICE HOCKEY at Ludlow, Olympia, 2 p.m. GIRLS’ ICE HOCKEY (Longmeadow Co-Op) at Austin Prep, Essex Sports Center, 5:50 p.m. Monday, Feb. 6 GIRLS’ ICE HOCKEY (Longmeadow Co-Op) at Auburn, Horgan Skating Arena, 5:30 p.m. JV GIRLS’ BASKETBALL vs. Ludlow, 5:30 p.m.

SOUTHWICK-TOLLAND REGIONAL HIGH SCHOOL Thursday, Jan. 12 SKIING – PVIAC Race, Berkshire East Ski, 5 p.m. Friday, Jan. 13 JV BOYS’ BASKETBALL vs. Renaissance, 5:30 p.m. BOYS’ BASKETBALL vs. Renaissance, 7 p.m. GIRLS’ BASKETBALL at Mohawk Trail, 7 p.m. Sunday, Jan. 15 JV ICE HOCKEY at Wahconah, Olympia Ice Center, 6:10 p.m. Monday, Jan. 16 JV ICE HOCKEY at Greenfield, Collins-Moylan Arena, 4:30 p.m. Tuesday, Jan. 17 SKIING – PVIAC Race, Berkshire East Ski, 5 p.m. JV GIRLS’ BASKETBALL vs. Palmer, 5:30 p.m. GIRLS’ BASKETBALL vs. Palmer, 7 p.m. Wednesday, Jan. 18 WRESTLING at Sabis, 7 p.m. Thursday, Jan. 19 SKIING – PVIAC Race, Berkshire East Ski, 5 p.m. JV BOYS’ BASKETBALL vs. Easthampton, 5:30 p.m. BOYS’ BASKETBALL vs. Easthampton, 7 p.m. Friday, Jan. 20 BOYS’/GIRLS’ INDOOR TRACK vs. Athol, West Springfield @ Smith College, 3:45 p.m. JV GIRLS’ BASKETBALL vs. Smith Academy, 5:30 p.m. GIRLS’ BASKETBALL vs. Smith Academy, 7 p.m. Sunday, Jan. 22 JV ICE HOCKEY vs. Ludlow, Olympia Ice Center, 5:30 p.m. Monday, Jan. 23 GIRLS’ BASKETBALL at McCann Tech, 7:30 p.m. Tuesday, Jan. 24 JV BOYS’ BASKETBALL at Monson, 5:30 p.m. BOYS’ BASKETBALL at Monson, 7 p.m. WRESTLING vs. West Springfield, 7 p.m. Wednesday, Jan. 25 No Sports Scheduled Thursday, Jan. 26 SKIING – PVIAC Race, Berkshire East Ski, 5 p.m. GIRLS’ BASKETBALL at Pioneer Valley Regional, 7 p.m. Friday, Jan. 27 BOYS’/GIRLS’ INDOOR TRACK vs. Commerce, Greenfield @ Smith College, 5:45 p.m. JV BOYS’ BASKETBALL vs. Ware, 5:30 p.m. BOYS’ BASKETBALL vs. Ware, 7 p.m.

*Sunday, Jan. 29* JV BOYS’ ICE HOCKEY at Chicopee, Olympia Ice Center (West Springfield), 4:30 p.m. Monday, Jan. 30 JV GIRLS’ BASKETBALL vs. Ware, 5:30 p.m. GIRLS’ BASKETBALL vs. Ware, 7 p.m. Tuesday, Jan. 31 BOYS’/GIRLS’ SKIING – PVIAC race, Berkshire East (Charlemont), 5 p.m. JV BOYS’ BASKETBALL at Palmer, 5:30 p.m. BOYS’ BASKETBALL at Palmer, 7 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 1 WRESTLING vs. Hampden Charter School of Science, 7 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 2 BOYS’/GIRLS’ SKIING – PVIAC race, Berkshire East (Charlemont), 5 p.m. JV GIRLS’ BASKETBALL vs. Pope Francis, 5:30 p.m. GIRLS’ BASKETBALL vs. Pope Francis, 7 p.m. Friday, Feb. 3 BOYS’/GIRLS’ INDOOR TRACK vs. Pope Francis, Smith College (Northampton), 6:45 p.m. JV BOYS’ BASKETBALL vs. Granby, 5:30 p.m. BOYS’ BASKETBALL vs. Granby, 7 p.m. *Saturday, Feb. 4* WRESTLING (Quad Meet) vs. Andover, 10 a.m. Monday, Feb. 6 JV GIRLS’ BASKETBALL at Turners Falls, 6 p.m. GIRLS’ BASKETBALL at Turners Falls, 7:30 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 7 BOYS’/GIRLS’ SKIING – PVIAC race, Berkshire East (Charlemont), 5 p.m. JV BOYS’ BASKETBALL vs. Hampshire, 5:30 p.m. BOYS’ BASKETBALL vs. Hampshire, 7 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 8 No Sports Scheduled Thursday, Feb. 9 JV GIRLS’ BASKETBALL at Greenfield, 5:30 p.m. GIRLS’ BASKETBALL at Greenfield, 7 p.m. Friday, Feb. 10 JV BOYS’ BASKETBALL at Renaissance, Rebecca Johnson Elementary School, 5:30 p.m. BOYS’ BASKETBALL at Renaissance, Rebecca Johnson Elementary School, 7 p.m. WRESTLING D3 WEST SECTIONALS @ Pioneer Valley Regional School, Time TBD *Saturday, Feb. 11* WRESTLING D3 WEST SECTIONALS @ Pioneer Valley Regional School, All Day


THE WESTFIELD NEWS

H.S. Roundup BOYS’ ICE HOCKEY

Bombers team up, take down Lions Westfield 5, Ludlow 2 Five different players scored to lead Westfield to a home win. Sullivan Webster (1 assist), Liam Whitman (1 assist), Danny Antonellis, Nathan Boucher, Spencer Cloutier each had a goal for Westfield.

THURSDAY, JANUARY 12, 2017- PAGE 11

WWW.THEWESTFIELDNEWS.COM

Continued from Page 9 Bombers’ John Danahey had two assists. Austin Wolfe hand an assist. Westfield goalie Christopher Anderson finSt. Mary jumped out to a 2-0 lead just three ished with 22 saves. minutes into the game before Easthampton Gezotis, Bonney lead Saints tied it with two quick goals of its own in the first period. Gezotis reclaimed the lead for the St. Mary 4, Easthampton 3 Saints with about a minute remaining in the Shaun Gezotis had a hand in three scoring opening period. plays, netting one goal and assisting on two Bonney’s second goal, the team’s fourth, others as St. Mary won at Williston- sealed it as the St. Mary defense, bolstered by Northampton School. Matt Brady’s strong goaltending (31 saves), Kenny Bonney scored twice for St. Mary, preserved the win. Aaron Blanchard had one Saints’ goal, and St. Mary improved to 4-1-1.

Faceoff. (Photo by Bill Deren)

GIRLS’ BASKETBALL

HCSS cruises past WTA Hampden Charter School of Science 42, Westfield Technical Academy 13 HCSS opened the game with a 12-0 run, and cruised to a home victory. Jaymee Hall led Westfield Tech with six points.

Nathan Boucher Breaks through the Ludlow defense. (Photo by Bill Deren)

Goalie Chris Anderson deflects a pass out front. (Photo by Bill Deren)

Nathan Boucher scores far post glove side. (Photo by Bill Deren)

Spencer Cloutier takes the tip pass from Ryan Moorhouse. (Photo by Bill Deren)

Ryan Moorhouse fights through a check. (Photo by Bill Deren)

The puck attracts a crowd in the Westfield crease. (Photo by Bill Deren)

Matt Pelletier dives for the puck.

(Photo by Bill Deren)

WINTER ’16-17 HIGH SCHOOL STANDINGS BOYS’ ICE HOCKEY WESTFIELD 4-2* ST. MARY 4-1-1 GIRLS’ ICE HOCKEY LONGMEADOW (WHS CO-OP) 4-1-1 BOYS’ BASKETBALL WESTFIELD 2-4 SOUTHWICK 5-3 GATEWAY 2-4 WESTFIELD TECHNICAL ACADEMY 0-5 ST. MARY 1-5

GIRLS’ BASKETBALL WESTFIELD 0-7 SOUTHWICK 4-3 GATEWAY 0-6 WESTFIELD TECHNICAL ACADEMY 0-4 ST. MARY 0-5 WRESTLING WESTFIELD 5-2 SOUTHWICK 1-0* GATEWAY 0-1*

BOYS’ SWIMMING & DIVING WESTFIELD 4-2 GIRLS’ SWIMMING & DIVING WESTFIELD 5-1 *REPORTS MISSING

BOYS’ ICE HOCKEY WESTFIELD 5, LUDLOW 2 ST. MARY 4, EASTHAMPTON 3 GIRLS’ BASKETBALL HAMPDEN CHARTER SCHOOL OF SCIENCE 42, WESTFIELD TECHNICAL ACADEMY 13

WEDNESDAY’S RESULTS WRESTLING WESTFIELD 33, LUDLOW 31 BOYS’ BASKETBALL MOUNT EVERETT 56, ST. MARY 40

Find more LOCAL PHOTOS available at www.thewestfieldnews.com


PAGE 12 - THURSDAY, JANUARY 12, 2017

Dear Annie By ANNIE LANE

An Abusive Streak? Dear Annie: I have a friend I’ve known for at least 15 years. A month ago, I invited her and her husband for dinner. When both of my kids told me they didn’t want her over, I couldn’t believe it. I asked why. I told them that she’s always been good to them and she’d love to see them, especially my son, who has been away at college. My son told me she isn’t really my friend, that she only pretends she is because she thinks I am an abusive parent and she feels sorry for my kids. Apparently, she has felt this way for years, ever since my daughter was having a birthday party and I wouldn’t let her have cake because she wouldn’t eat her dinner. He also relayed her thought that I am a horrible parent because I won’t play games with my kids. I have a really bad fear of playing games with people, which is no different from being scared of snakes or being claustrophobic. I asked my daughter whether this is the reason she doesn’t want this woman over, and she said yes. She said the only reason she did not tell me about this sooner was that she didn’t want to hurt my feelings. I asked myself and my kids, “Am I really abusive?” Both of my kids told me that I am a little stricter than the average parent and have a tendency to scream a lot, but not more than most parents when they’re angry about what the kids did or did not do. I’m still going to have dinner with this woman. After dinner, the children will probably take off and go to their rooms, as they truly don’t want anything to do with her anymore. I thought I would confront her after dinner and give her a chance to explain why she has tried to turn my children against me. I really did think she was my friend for so many years. Do you think this is the right course of action? -- Hurt and Confused in Kansas Dear Hurt: Yes, talk to your friend -- but think of it as a conversation rather than a confrontation; otherwise, you’re setting yourself up for a hostile interaction. Give her a chance to explain herself. There’s a lot to be said for hearing it from the source. You might want to go for a walk or out for coffee, to be in a neutral space and away from the kids. And I would suggest looking inward. Is it possible you do raise your voice too loudly and too often? I know we all lose our cool from time to time, but there are better ways to get one’s point across than yelling. Dear Annie: In response to “Grieving for Snoopy,” you printed “The Rainbow Bridge,” a poem by Steve and Diane Bodofsky. I know that the poem was written with good intentions, but it never did a thing for me. The best advice to give a grieving pet owner, in my opinion, is to suggest that when she’s ready, she should go find that special dog or cat waiting at a local animal shelter. It won’t be “the same,” but it will be an individual with a unique, lovable nature. I still miss my old dog from way back when, but I no longer grieve. Five years ago, we reluctantly took care of a kitten. It was “just for a while” because we didn’t want a cat. Now he’s the heart of our family, the mellowest of fellows. As Mark Twain said, a house is not a home without a cat. Or a dog. -- Kay from New Paltz, N.Y. Send your questions for Annie Lane to dearannie@creators. com. To find out more about Annie Lane and read features by other Creators Syndicate columnists and cartoonists, visit the Creators Syndicate website at www.creators.com.

WWW.THEWESTFIELDNEWS.COM

THE WESTFIELD NEWS

TV Sports Tonight THURSDAY, JAN. 12 COLLEGE BASKETBALL

HONOLULU 3 A.M. (FRIDAY) 7 P.M. GOLF — EUROPEAN PGA TOUR, BMW SOUTH AFRICAN CBSSN — LA SALLE AT RHODE ISLAND OPEN, SECOND ROUND, AT GAUTENG, SOUTH AFRICA ESPN — NOTRE DAME AT MIAMI MOTOR SPORTS ESPN2 — OHIO ST. AT WISCONSIN 6:30 P.M. ESPNU — BELMONT AT MOREHEAD ST. NBCSN — DAKAR RALLY, STAGE 9 (SALTA TO CHILECITO, 9 P.M. ARGENTINA) (TAPED) BTN — PURDUE AT IOWA NBA BASKETBALL CBSSN — AUSTIN PEAY AT SIU-EDWARDSVILLE 3 P.M. ESPN — SMU AT CINCINNATI NBA — INDIANA AT DENVER ESPN2 — ARIZONA ST. AT ARIZONA 8 P.M. ESPNU — NORTHWESTERN AT RUTGERS TNT — CHICAGO AT NEW YORK FS1 — WASHINGTON AT CALIFORNIA 10:30 P.M. 11 P.M. TNT — DETROIT AT GOLDEN STATE ESPNU — SAINT MARY’S (CAL) AT PORTLAND NHL HOCKEY FS1 — UCLA AT COLORADO 8 P.M. GOLF NBCSN — MONTREAL AT MINNESOTA 3 P.M. WOMEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL ESPN2 — LATIN AMERICA AMATEUR CHAMPIONSHIP, 7 P.M. FIRST ROUND, AT PANAMA CITY SEC — GEORGIA AT SOUTH CAROLINA 7 P.M. 9 P.M. GOLF — PGA TOUR, SONY OPEN, FIRST ROUND, AT SEC — FLORIDA AT MISSISSIPPI ST.

At The Movies

HINTS FROM HELOISE THE WAY TO RECYCLE PLASTIC BAGS Dear Readers: PLASTIC-BAG RECYCLING is a trending topic. Retail stores are encouraging customers to bring in their own bags to carry home their purchases, and some are limiting or eliminating the bags altogether. What’s the correct way to recycle these bags? Here’s the scoop: If your city accepts the bags (check on the city’s website, or call 311), stuff as many bags as you can, making sure they are clean and dry, into one bag and tie that bag closed to create a “soccer ball” effect. Putting loose bags in the recycling is a big no-no. If your city doesn’t accept the bags (many don’t), the store itself may have a collection bin in its vestibule (lobby) to collect used bags for recycling. Keeping plastics out of the landfill and recycling them is the responsible thing to do to protect the environment for future generations. -- Heloise CAP AND KEEP Dear Heloise: In my office, we noticed that the black pens disappear quickly. A co-worker suggested putting out pens WITHOUT THEIR CAPS. This worked like magic! People won’t put uncapped pens into their pockets or purses. At the end of a long day, we collect, recap and put the pens away. -- Rhonda C., via email

In this image released by CBS Films, Mark Wahlberg appears on the set of the film, "Patriots Day." (Karen Ballard/CBS Films and Lionsgate Films via AP)

Review: In ‘Patriots Day,’ a community disarms terrorism By JAKE COYLE AP Film Writer Bombs detonated in the center of Boston are disarmed by bonds of family and community in Peter Berg's "Patriots Day," a stirring ode to civic life in the age of terrorism. "Patriots Day," which recreates the 2013 Boston Marathon and the subsequent four-day manhunt, is the third in a string of docudramas for Berg, following the Navy SEAL drama "Lone Survivor" and the recent oil rig disaster film "Deepwater Horizon." In tales of real-life American heroes, Berg has found a potent balance of fact and fiction, mixing expert big-budget filmmaking with realism. Following the all-around disappointment of "Battleship," he has made his muscular, masculine tales leaner and truer. In each, a skillfully visceral chronology culminates cathartically in moving codas of the real people from the movie. "Patriots Day," coming just over three years after the bombing that killed three and maimed many, could easily seem like typical Hollywood exploitation of a tragedy, or, on the other side of the coin, simple-minded rah-rah patriotism. That it's neither is due in part to the detail of Berg's manypeopled portrait of American life. Everyone here is an individual, a family member, someone doing their job. The film, from a screenplay by Berg, Matt Cook and Joshua Zetumer, weaves together a spectrum of characters from across the city — police detectives to victims to the bombers. While Berg gravitates toward tough-guy realms like the battlefield and the gridiron, he's most at home in the home. His films are grounded in quotidian family life, of husbands kissing wives goodbye and parents making breakfast for their kids. (The tremendous home life of Berg's TV series, "Friday Night Lights," is the best example of this.) He has surely made a close study of John Ford Westerns and their tender lingering on the hearth.

Beginning in the hours before the pressure-cooker bombs explode, Berg visits the home or workplace of the characters he'll stitch together throughout the film: newlyweds planning to watch the race (Rachel Brosnahan and Christopher O'Shea), an MIT officer (Jake Picking) flirting with a student (Lana Condor), and others. The final stop is the Tsarnaev brothers home, which, aside from the jihadist video playing, isn't so different from the others. The characters are all based on real people except for one: Boston police Sergeant Tommy Saunders (Mark Wahlberg, who starred in Berg's last two). He's a composite invented to connect the movie's many parts, a movie-star MacGuffin who happens to be there for every plot turn. His presence isn't jarring, though, in the superlative ensemble that includes Kevin Bacon (as the FBI team leader), John Goodman (as the Boston police commissioner), J.K. Simmons (as a Watertown sergeant) and, in one blistering scene, Khandi Alexander as a government interrogator. The Tsarnaev brothers are played by Themo Melikidze (as Tamerlan) and the especially good Alex Wolff (as Dzhokhar) who's presented here as a frivolous, foolhardy teenager most concerned with an iPod jack to play tunes in the carjacking of Chinese student Dun Meng (Jimmy O. Yang). "Patriots Day" has too little curiosity for the motives of the bombers; its street-level perspective doesn't go beyond Boston. Berg's film isn't seeking answers; it's seeking solace. "Patriots Day" puts forth a vision of a multicultural society that rises up to reject the fear of terrorism. Its heroes are of all colors, immigrants and Southies, alike. "Patriots Day," a CBS Films/Lionsgate release, is rated R by the Motion Picture Association of America for "violence, realistically graphic injury images, language throughout and some drug use." Running time: 133 minutes. Three stars out of four.


WWW.THEWESTFIELDNEWS.COM

THE WESTFIELD NEWS

SPEED BUMP Dave Coverly

THURSDAY, JANUARY 12, 2017- PAGE 13

RUBES Leigh Rubin

AGNES Tony Cochran

ARCHIE Fernando Ruiz and Craig Boldman

DADDY’S HOME

Tony Rubino and Gary Markstein

YOUR

HOROSCOPE

Contract Bridge

By Jaqueline Bigar

DUSTIN By Steve Kelley and Jeff Parker

HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Thursday, Jan. 12, 2017: This year you often wonder whether to respond to your feelings or to your intellectually driven thoughts. You will try both, until you find out which voice works best for you. If you are single, you have a strong magnetic quality that attracts many potential admirers. You might have difficulty choosing who, when and where. Just go with the flow. If you are attached, the two of you discover what a special year this could be. You seem capable of increased closeness and caring; your significant other can’t help but respond. LEO is always fun to hang out with. The Stars Show the Kind of Day You’ll Have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2-So-so; 1-Difficult

SCARY GARY

Mark Buford

DOGS of C-KENNEL Mick and Mason Mastroianni

B.C. Mastroianni and Hart

ONE BIG HAPPY Rick Detorie

ANDY CAPP Mahoney, Goldsmith and Garnett

ZACK HILL John Deering and John Newcombe

ARIES (March 21-April 19) HHH Good news comes via a close associate or partner. You probably will have to make a choice once you give consideration to the different possibilities. Your intuition guides you, whether you admit it or not. Tonight: Get an early start on the weekend. Let the wild child out. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) HHH You need to have an important conversation. Calls flood your desk during the daylight hours. You could be deciding which way to go with an emotional matter. You’ll hear news from someone at a distance. How much do you want to add to this conversation? Tonight: Nap first. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) HHH Let go of immediate concerns. You could feel overwhelmed by an already busy schedule, and you still might need to factor in some last-minute visits. Your sixth sense comes out when dealing with an authority figure; use your skills well. Tonight: Out and about. CANCER (June 21-July 22) HHHH You might feel more rambunctious than you have in a while. While you might take a comment lightly today, recognize what would have happened if you had been in just a so-so mood. Take responsibility for something you’ve said. Tonight: Get into weekend mode already. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) HHHHH You’ll sense a shift in the wind that turns in your favor, and you will be right. You might have to jump through some hoops today to get where you want to go. You should be able to get through your to-do list. Your sense of humor comes out when confusion hits. Tonight: In the limelight. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) HHHH Use the daylight hours to the max. You tend to come off as bold, direct and efficient. What a deadly combo, especially if you are dealing with a serious matter. A new acquaintance might act strangely, which will stimulate the need for some deep thought. Tonight: Be naughty! LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) HHHH You feel ready to handle a personal issue, which might emerge when you least expect it to. Express your feelings in a meeting. You could get some diverse feedback. Sometimes, it all boils down to this: Which perspective do you like best? Tonight: Where your friends are. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) HHHH You might need to rethink one of your basic concepts. How you handle a personal matter could radically change as a result. Others are emotional, to say the least. Don’t push yourself too hard right now. Even mental processing can be tiring. Tonight: Out and suddenly energized. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) HHHHH After a heavy day of discussions, you’ll feel ready speak your mind. You might want to update your plans for the weekend. A trip out of town might be exactly what you need. Your sense of humor points out the confusion in a money matter. Tonight: Look beyond the obvious. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) HHHH One-on-one relating could take on a serious tone. You might be tired of repeating the same pattern over and over. As a result, you’ll opt to respond in a different way. By changing your approach, you will see a difference in how the other party responds. Tonight: Make it cozy. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) HHHHH Your perspective probably will change because of feedback you hear from a partner or close friend. You might need to have a lengthy conversation about where you perceive a problem to be and what is going on in reality. Tonight: Go along with a loved one’s suggestion.

Crosswords

Cryptoquip

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) HHHH Your imagination is working overtime, which could force you to rethink a decision. You might not be sure which path is best for you. Use your creativity to go through the various options available to you, and focus on your priorities. Tonight: Do what you want.


PAGE 14 - THURSDAY, JANUARY 12, 2017

In this Sept. 22, 2016, file photo, Houston Texans quarterback Brock Osweiler (17) looks to pass as New England Patriots defensive end Chris Long (95) rushes during the first half of an NFL football game in Foxborough, Mass. Osweiler, while with the Broncos, beat Tom Brady and the Patriots in the playoffs last season. That was then. Now he and the Texans are 16-point underdogs to New England in Saturday's AFC divisional game, the biggest playoff mismatch in 18 years. (AP Photo/Charles Krupa, File)

What about the defense? Stingy Pats a challenge for Texans By KYLE HIGHTOWER AP Sports Writer FOXBOROUGH, Mass. (AP) — As well as Tom Brady and the Patriots' offense have played this season, much of New England's success over the last month has been directly tied to a defense that enters the playoffs as one of the NFL's stingiest. The Patriots ended the regular season allowing an NFL-low 15.6 points per game and just 88.6 rushing yards per game, tied for third fewest in the league. The numbers speak for themselves, but are not ones that New England defensive captain Dont'a Hightower believes are the result of any dramatic changes to their approach. "We've done well, we've stopped the other team from scoring," Hightower said. "In the second half of the season we were able to cause more turnovers. All in all, we've just molded together as a defense. It just took a little bit longer to jell." And jell they have. In New England's first nine games its defense allowed four opponents to score 20 or more points, including a season-high 30 given up in its 31-24 home loss to Seattle on Nov. 13. But during their current seven-game win streak the Patriots only allowed an opponent to score 20 or more points once, during their 30-23 win over the Ravens on Dec. 12. And after going three straight weeks in the middle of the season without forcing a turnover, 14 of the Patriots' 23 total takeaways came in their final six games. It adds to the challenge for a Houston team that enters Saturday's divisional-round matchup having already been shut out by the Patriots in a Week 3 loss (27-0). Texans coach Bill O'Brien said finding a way to crack the Patriots' run defense will be one of the biggest priorities. New England has 34 sacks, led by Trey Flowers (7), Jabaal Sheard (5), and Chris Long and Rob Ninkovich (4 apiece). It will mean lots of different looks for Texans quarterback Brock Osweiler. "They're obviously a team that lines up in different fronts," O'Brien said. "You have a bunch of really tough, hard-nosed players that are very, very well-coached, so their scheme presents a problem, too." Flowers in particular has been a revelation after playing in only one game as a rookie last season before being placed on injured reserve. "I just had my head down, focused, tried to do better and tried to make plays every time I'm out there," he said. "Maybe my role increased, I just made sure I was prepared for it. However many plays I get in a game, I make sure I'm productive in those plays." While Hightower said the defense's overall mentality hasn't changed, he did acknowledge some of the new members of the defense have gotten more comfortable with play calls and onfield adjustments as the season wore on. Where playing was more simplistic early, now they are able to integrate a lot more wrinkles to their attack. "We've excelled as far as understanding the game plan," he said. "I think that's what has really helped us because we have a lot of smart guys over there, and the more we're able to get in the meetings and digest it and get on the field, we're able to communicate and play a lot faster."

2016-17 Boston Celtics Schedule Jan. 13 at Atlanta, 8 p.m. Jan. 16 Charlotte, 7:30 p.m. Jan. 18 New York, 7:30 p.m. Jan. 21 Portland, 5 p.m. Jan. 24 at Washington, 7 p.m. Jan. 25 Houston, 7:30 p.m. Jan. 27 Orlando, 7:30 p.m. Jan. 28 at Milwaukee, 8 p.m. Jan. 30 Detroit, 8 p.m. Feb. 1 Toronto, 7:30 p.m. Feb. 3 L.A. Lakers, 8 p.m. Feb. 5 L.A. Clippers, 2 p.m. Feb. 8 at Sacramento, 10:30 p.m. Feb. 9 at Portland, 10:30 p.m. Feb. 11 at Utah, 10 p.m. Feb. 13 at Dallas, 8:30 p.m. Feb. 15 Philadelphia, 7:30 p.m. Feb. 16 at Chicago, 8 p.m. Feb. 24 at Toronto, 7:30 p.m. Feb. 26 at Detroit, 6 p.m. Feb. 27 Atlanta, 7:30 p.m. March 1 Cleveland, 8 p.m. March 3 at L.A. Lakers, 10:30 p.m. March 5 at Phoenix, 5 p.m. March 6 at L.A. Clippers, 10:30 p.m. March 8 at Golden State,

WWW.THEWESTFIELDNEWS.COM LEGAL NOTICES

LEGAL NOTICES

January 5, 12, 19, 2017

January 5, 12, 19, 2017

NOTICE OF MORTGAGEE'S SALE OF REAL ESTATE

NOTICE OF MORTGAGEE'S SALE OF REAL ESTATE

By virtue and in execution of the Power of Sale contained in a certain mortgage given by Scott R Parenteau and Jasmine J Parenteau to Mortgage Electronic Registration System, Inc. as nominee for Family Choice Mortgage Corporation, dated September 5, 2008 and recorded with the Hampden County Registry of Deeds at Book 17462, Page 233 as affected by a modification agreement recorded with said records at Book 19733, Page 475, of which mortgage the undersigned is the present holder by assignment from Mortgage Electronic Registration System, Inc. to BAC Home Loans Servicing, LP fka Countrywide Home Loans Servicing, LP dated July 9, 2011 and recorded with said registry on July 13, 2011 at Book 18839 Page 435 and by assignment from Bank of America, N.A., Successor by Merger to BAC Home Loans Servicing, LP, fka Countrywide Home Loans Servicing, LP to Secretary of Housing and Urban Development dated November 19, 2014 and recorded with said registry on April 22, 2015 at Book 20672 Page 3 and by assignment from Secretary of Housing and Urban Development to Bayview Loan Servicing, LLC dated December 10, 2014 and recorded with said registry on July 8, 2015 at Book 20780 Page 219 and by assignment from Bayview Loan Servicing, LLC to Bayview Dispositions IVA, LLC dated June 1, 2016 and recorded with said registry on August 9, 2016 at Book 21302 Page 358 and by assignment from Bayview Dispositions IVA, LLC to Morgan Stanley Mortgage Capital Holdings, LLC dated June 27, 2016 and recorded with said registry on August 10, 2016 at Book 21303 Page 509 and by assignment from Morgan Stanley Mortgage Capital Holdings LLC to FV-I, Inc. in trust for Morgan Stanley Mortgage Capital Holdings LLC dated August 10, 2016 and recorded with said registry on August 16, 2016 at Book 21312 Page 428, for breach of the conditions of said mortgage and for the purpose of foreclosing, the same will be sold at Public Auction at 12:00 p.m. on February 3, 2017, on the mortgaged premises located at 14 SIBLEY AVE, WESTFIELD, Hampden County, Massachusetts, all and singular the premises described in said mortgage,

Power of Sale contained in a certain mortgage given by Mark R. Chagnon to Wells Fargo Financial Massachusetts, Inc., dated November 23, 2005 and recorded with the Hampden County Registry of Deeds at Book 15540, Page 406, as affected by a Judgment recorded with said records at Book 21222, Page 576, of which mortgage the undersigned is the present holder by assignment from Wells Fargo Financial Massachusetts, Inc. to U.S. Bank Trust, N.A.. as Trustee for LSF9 Master Participation Trust dated August 31, 2016 and recorded with said registry on September 7, 2016 at Book 21345 Page 352, for breach of the conditions of said mortgage and for the purpose of foreclosing, the same will be sold at Public Auction at 11:00 a.m. on February 6, 2017, on the mortgaged premises located at 7 Fowler Street, Westfield, Hampden County, Massachusetts, all and singular the premises described in said mortgage, TO WIT: THE LAND IN WESTFIELD, HAMPDEN COUNTY, MASSACHUSETTS, BOUNDED AND DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: *BEGINNING AT A STONE MONUMENT ON THE EASTERLY LINE OF FOWLER STREET (HEADING NORTH FROM MEADOW STREET) FIVE RODS NORTHERLY OF THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF FRANK BODONDORF'S LOT, THENCE RUNNING NORTHERLY ON THE EASTERLY LINE OF SAID FOWLER STREET THREE RODS TO A STONE MONUMENT

HELP WANTED

THENCE WESTERLY FIFTY (50) FEET TO THE PLACE OF BEGINNING.

SUBJECT TO RESTRICTIONS AND EASEMENTS OF RECORD IF IN FORCE AND APPLICABLE.

NEWSPAPER DELIVERY ROUTES AVAILABLE Westfield & Southwick #1: Carroll Dr. Kelsey Ter, Putnam Dr. Russell Rd.

BEING THE SAME PROPERTY CONVEYED TO MARK R CHAGNON BY DEED FROM MARY ANN GENDREAU EXECUTRIX UNDER THE WILL OF JEAN DEEDY RECORDED 12/31/2001 IN DEED BOOK 12075 PAGE 386, IN THE REGISTRY OF DEEDS PLAN FOR HAMPDEN COUNTY, MASSACHUSETTS.

2. Loring Ln, Western Ave. Woodland Rd. 3. Heritage Ln. Westwood Dr.

PARCEL #5-4 For mortgagor's(s') title see deed recorded with Hampden County Registry of Deeds in Book 12075, Page 386. These premises will be sold and conveyed subject to and with the benefit of all rights, rights of way, restrictions, easements, covenants, liens or claims in the nature of liens, improvements, public assessments, any and all unpaid taxes, tax titles, tax liens, water and sewer liens and any other municipal assessments or liens or existing encumbrances of record which are in force and are applicable, having priority over said mortgage, whether or not reference to such restrictions, easements, improvements, liens or encumbrances is made in the deed.

4. Jarry Dr. Morningside Raddison Ln. Rosewood Ln. Sawmill Park Southwick Rd. South Village South Village East West View (Westfield & Southwick) 5. Youth Pennysaver Route: Allen St, Malone Ave, Jefferson St, Smith Ave, Charles St, Hampden St, Green St, Madison St, Washington St, W School St.

TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of Five Thousand ($5,000.00) Dollars by certified or bank check will be required to be paid by the purchaser at the time and place of sale. The balance is to be paid by certified or bank check at Harmon Law Offices, P.C., 150 California Street, Newton, Massachusetts 02458, or by mail to P.O. Box 610389, Newton Highlands, Massachusetts 02461-0389, within thirty (30) days from the date of sale. Deed will be provided to purchaser for recording upon receipt in full of the purchase price. The description of the premises contained in said mortgage shall control in the event of an error in this publication.

THENCE RUNNING EASTERLY AT RIGHT ANGLES TO SAID FOWLER STREET ABOUT ONE HUNDRED (100) Other terms, if any, to be anF E E T T O L A N D O F O N E nounced at the sale. STIMPSON, U.S. BANK TRUST, N.A., AS

THENCE RUNNING SOUTH- TRUSTEE FOR LSF9 MASTER ERLY ON THE WESTERLY PARTICIPATION TRUST LINE OF SAID STIMPSON, Present holder of said mortgage

THENCE RUNNING SOUTHERLY ON FOWLER STREET AT RIGHT ANGLES TO SAID The land and buildings thereon, STREET ABOUT ONE HUNin Westfield, Hampden County, DRED (100) FEET TO THE Massachusetts, being bounded STONE MONUMENT AT THE and described as follows: PLACE OF BEGINNING.

THE WESTFIELD NEWS

THENCE SOUTHERLY ONE HUNDRED AND THIRTY-TWO (132) FEET TO A STAKE,

**Excepting out Parcel 3 which was previously conveyed in By virtue and in execution of the Book 3768, Page 125.

TO WIT:

By its Attorneys, HARMON LAW OFFICES, P.C. 150 California Street Newton, MA 02458 (617) 558-0500 201509-0740 - PRP

Please call: Ms. Hartman 562-4181 x117

Seeking part-time group leaders for the Y’s Kids Child Care Program. Hours available M-F, 7AM- 9AM or 2:45PM-6PM. Must be 18 years or older Applications available at the Welcome Desk at the YMCA of Greater Westfield Westfield Preschool is now accepting applications for Preschool Teachers and Assistant Teachers. Please call: 413-568 4356

AUTO FOR SALE

NORTHERLY, by Dwight Street one hundred thirty-two (132) feet;

*For a more accurate description of parcel one see deed in TIMOTHY'S AUTO SALES. Book 12075, Page 386. Stop by and see us! We might EASTERLY, by Sibley Avenue have exactly what you're lookfifty (50 feet and five (5) inches; ANOTHER PARCEL OF LAND ing for, if not, let us find it for I N S A I D W E S T F I E L D D E - you! Bartlett Street, Westfield. SOUTHERLY, by land now or SCRIBED AS FOLLOWS, TO (413)568-2261. Specializing in formerly of Zofie Wielgus one WIT COMMENCING AT THE vehicles under $4,000. hundred Thirty-two (132) feet; SOUTHWEST CORNER OF and LAND NOW OR FORMERLY MOTORCYCLES & ATV’S WESTERLY, by land now or OF CORNELIUS KELEHER ON formerly of Ellen F. Fuller, forty- THE EAST SIDE OF FOWLER STREET, five (45) feet. MOTORCYCLE FOR SALE Together with and subject to a THENCE RUNNING SOUTHright of way as described in ERLY ONE ROD, THENCE '09 Triumph Bonneville SE deed of Zofie Wielgus to Stan- EASTERLY ABOUT EIGHTY- 865CC, New. 47 Miles. $5,500. ley A. Rzonca, et ux, dated June EIGHT (88) FEET TO LAND 413-388-0113 - Westfield 29, 1946 and recorded in the FORMERLY OF MURPHY AND Hampden County Registry of O'CONNELL,

Advertise Your

ESTATE

SALE Call (413) 562-4181 Ext. 118

Deeds in Book 1829, Page 329.

Being the same premises conveyed to the grantor by deed recorded immediately hereto. For mortgagor's(s') title see deed recorded with Hampden County Registry of Deeds in Book 17462, Page 231.

THENCE NORTHERLY ONE ROD TO LAND NOW OR FORMERLY OF CORNELIUS KELEBER, THENCE WESTERLY ON LAND NOW OR FORMERLY OF CORNERLIUS KELEHER TO THE PLACE OF BEGINNING.

The Westfield News "Your onlY local news" Still Only 75¢ Per Day! Available Online for Only 50¢ Per Day!

These premises will be sold and **ANOTHER PARCEL OF LAND conveyed subject to and with the I N S A I D W E S T F I E L D D E benefit of all rights, rights of way, SCRIBED AS FOLLOWS, TO restrictions, easements, coven- WIT: BEGINNING AT A STAKE an ts, liens or claims in the THREE HUNDRED FIFTEEN nature of liens, improvements, (315) FEET EAST OF THE INpublic assessments, any and all TERSECTION OF MEADOW unpaid taxes, tax titles, tax liens, A N D O T I S S T R E E T S S O water and sewer liens and any other municipal assessments or CALLED ON THE NORTHliens or existing encumbrances ERLY SIDE OF OTIS STREET, of record which are in force and are applicable, having priority THENCE RUNNING NORTHover said mortgage, whether or ERLY ONE HUNDRED AND not reference to such restric- THIRTY-TWO (132) FEET TO A tions, easements, improve- STAKE, ments, liens or encumbrances is made in the deed. THENCE EASTERLY FIFTY TERMS OF SALE:

10:30 p.m. March 10 at Denver, 9 p.m. March 12 Chicago, 3:30 p.m. March 15 Minnesota, 7:30 p.m. March 17 at Brooklyn, 7:30 p.m. March 19 at Philadelphia, 1 p.m. March 20 Washington, 7:30 p.m. March 22 Indiana, 7:30 p.m. March 24 Phoenix, 7:30 p.m. March 26 Miami, 6 p.m. March 29 Milwaukee, 7:30 p.m. March 31 Orlando, 7:30 p.m. April 2 at New York, 1 p.m. April 5 Cleveland, 8 p.m. April 6 at Atlanta, 8 p.m. April 8 at Charlotte, 6 p.m. April 10 Brooklyn, 7:30 p.m. April 12 Milwaukee, 8 p.m.

THENCE EASTERLY FIFTY (50) FEET TO A STAKE,

A deposit of Five Thousand ($5,000.00 ) Dollars by certified or bank check will be required to be paid by the purchaser at the time and place of sale. The balance is to be paid by certified or bank check at Harmon Law Offices, P.C., 150 California Street, Newton, Massachusetts 02458, or by mail to P.O. Box 610389, Newton Highlands, Massachusetts 02461-0389, within thirty (30) days from the date of sale. Deed will be provided to purchaser for recording upon receipt in full of the purchase price. The description of the premises contained in said mortgage shall control in the event of an error in this publication. Other terms, if any, to be announced at the sale. FV-I, INC. IN TRUST FOR MORGAN STANLEY MORTGAGE CAPITAL HOLDINGS LLC Present holder of said mortgage By its Attorneys, HARMON LAW OFFICES, P.C. 150 California Street Newton, MA 02458 (617) 558-0500 201512-0213 - PRP

Please call our Circulation Dept. at 413-562-4181 Ext. 117 or melissahartman@thewestfieldnewsgroup.com

(50) FEET TO A STAKE, THENCE SOUTHERLY ONE HUNDRED AND THIRTY-TWO (132) FEET TO A STAKE,

The Westfield News

THENCE WESTERLY FIFTY (50) FEET TO THE PLACE OF Classified Department BEGINNING.

• 62 School Street • Westfield, MA 01085

Call: 413-562-4181 ext. 118

**Excepting out Parcel 3 which floram@thewestfieldnewsgroup.com was previously conveyed in Book 3768, Page 125.

CUSTOMIZE YOUR COVERAGE and SAVE!

SUBJECT TO RESTRICTIONS AND EASEMENTS OF RECORD IF IN FORCE AND APPLICABLE.

CLASSIFIED RATES 15¢ each addt’l word over 15 words PLAN 4 - Longmeadow/Enfield PLAN 1

$14.45

Circle your selection.

BEING THE SAME PROPERTY 1x Pennysaver CONVEYED TO MARK R CHAGNON BY DEED 3x Westfield NewsFROM MARY ANN GENDREAU EXECUTRIX UNDER THE WILL OF JEAN DEEDY RECORDED 12/31/2001 IN DEED BOOK 1x PAGE Pennysaver 12075 386, IN THE REGISTRY OF DEEDS PLAN FOR 6x Westfield News MASHAMPDEN COUNTY, SACHUSETTS.

$17.75

PLAN 5

PARCEL #5-4

$21.00

PLAN 6

PLAN 2

PLAN 3

1x Pennysaver For 1x mortgagor's(s') title see Longmeadow/Enfield deed recorded with Hampden 6x Westfield County RegistryNews of Deeds in Book 12075, Page 386.

1 edition • 5.85 2 editions • 9.60 3 editions • 11.25 4 editions • 14.30

4x Pennysaver 24x Westfield News BUSINESS DIRECTORY

24x Westfield News PLUS 4 weeks Pennysaver

$62.95

$99.10


WWW.THEWESTFIELDNEWS.COM

THE WESTFIELD NEWS

CLASSIFIED

THURSDAY, JANUARY 12, 2017- PAGE 15

DEADLINE: 2PM THE DAY BEFORE Email floram@thewestfieldnewsgroup.com

To Adver tise call 413-562-4181 Ext , 118

Available online 24/7 at http://thewestfieldnews.com/classifieds

thewestfieldnews.com

Tell us someThing good!

HELP WANTED

HELP WANTED

FOSTER CARE:

CUSTOMER SERVICE REPRESENTATIVE

You can help change someone’s life. Provide a safe home for children and teens who have been abuse or neglected. $1000 Sign on bonus. Call Devereux Therapeutic Foster Care at:

Do you have a carrier who goes above and beyond in their delivery of The Westfield News? If so– we want to hear about it! All too often, negativity dominates the news. It’s time to change that! So shoot us an email at melissahartman@thewestfieldnewsgroup.com or write to us at 62 School St, Westfield, MA 01085 and tell us what your carrier has done to make your day just a little bit better. (If you don’t have their name, that’s fine– we can always look it up by your address.)

413-734-2493 or at

jknapp@devereux.org

Looking for a Unique Gift?

JOB FAIR! NEW RESIDENCE OPENING IN SOUTHAMPTON, MA. Berkshire County ARC’s Traumatic Brain Injury Programs are expanding again! We are looking for a team of superheroes for our brand new home. Must have experience in the field of brain injury. Full, parttime and relief (per diem) shifts are available. Instant interviews! SITE MANAGERS: $20.16-$20.75/HR. RESIDENTIAL SUPPORT: $14.82-$15.25/HR. PER DIEM POSITIONS: $13.75-$14.00/HR.

Put a picture of someone you love on a keepsake.

WHERE: BCArc Office 94 North Elm Street Ste 202 Westfield, MA WHEN: Wednesday, January 11 TIME: 2:00pm-6:00pm

These are pictures the staff at The Westfield News Group have taken at events throughout our communities.

All positions require a valid US Driver’s license, CORI and National Fingerprint Background Check.We offer an excellent benefit package. Visit our website at www.bcarc.org.to apply online or stop in Monday-Friday between 9:00am – 4:00pm or for a complete job listing and to complete an application. AA/EOE. You may also send resume and cover letter to: Attn. Human Resources at Berkshire County ARC, 395 South Street, Pittsfield, MA 01201, 413-499-4241. • Livestock Sales

Go to www.thewestfieldnews.com visit “Photos” look for your favorite photo, then click the “Buy” icon located at the top.

Seeking experienced candidate who is customer focused; must be able to process orders and provide immediate replies to customers; process daily billing and work with other team members to set-up new accounts and update data bases. Daily scanning of customers’ orders and act as back-up staff in scheduling customer deliveries and pick-ups; provide clerical support to other departments, as requested. Computer proficient in Internet, Word, Access, and Excel; experience in Distribution, Manufacturing or Chemical background preferred; Associates Degree in Business Administration preferred or minimum 5-7 years related experience. Astro Chemicals, Inc. 126 Memorial Drive Springfield, MA recruiting@astrochemicals.com

EEO/AA

Part-Time Senior Center Program Assistant (20 - 25 Hours) Seek highly motivated and energetic individual to develop, coordinate and facilitate programs and activities at the Senior Center. Responsible for public relations including digital marketing, community outreach, and administrative duties. Experience in working with senior citizens, strong organizational skills and effective communication skills required. Additional information, job description and application may be obtained at: www.granby-ct.gov or: Town Manager’s Office, 15 North Granby Road, Granby, CT 06035 on Monday through Wednesday from 8:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m., Thursday from 8:00 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. and Friday from 8:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. Applications will be accepted until 12:00 p.m. on 1/27/17 EOE

• Logloads • Lumber • Cordwood 50 Hastings Rd. • Southwick, MA 01077 • 413-569-0777

Who Does It? Local Business Bulletin Board

GARAGE DOORS Sales • Installation Service & Repair

Residential & Light Commercial

Certified, Licensed, Insured • Free Estimates 413-289-6550 • 413-626-1978 • www.menardgaragedoors.com

COMPLETE

BATHROOM & KITCHEN

R E N O V AT I O N S

Joe Coppa Owner/Installer CSL 103574 HIC REG 147782 CT HIC 0639058

SOLEK MASONRY

Chimneys • Foundations • Fireplaces (413) 569-6855 (413) 569-3428

Free Estimates

C &C

Zoning New Installations Heating & Cooling, INC Replacements Air Filtration Fully EPA Duct WorkCleaning Insured Certified Tune-Ups Steve Burkholder, Owner - License #GF5061-J Maintenance 18 Years Experience Gas Piping FREE (413) 575-8704 ESTIMATES Humidifiers

16 North Elm Street • Westfield, MA (413) 568-1618

PERRY’S

HOME IMPROVEMENTS • Residential Roofing, Siding, Windows • Quality Remodeling Services

A+ Rating

Sewer & Drain Cleaning 413-782-7322 No Job

Too Small!

373 College Hwy., Southwick, MA 01077 (413) 569-6104 (413) 998-3025 FULLY• INSURED • FREE ESTIMATES LONG TRUCK •LOADS fully insured • free •estimates CORD WOOD • LOTS CLEARED • TREE REMOVAL • EXCAVATION

David Rose Plumbing & Heating Veteran Owned & Operated Westfield, MA

We Warranty both material and labor

(413) 579-4073

MA Lic # PL33191-J Fully Licensed & Insured

Free Estimates (413) 454-8998 coppahomeimprovements.com

Carleton’s

Custom Lamp Picture Repair Framing 38 West school st. and and Restoration Westfield, MA Repair Appointments anytime

(413) 568-2339

CUSTOM HOMES (413)

(413) 537-5842

FREE ESTIMATES

FULLY INSURED

BAKER MASONRY Residential & Commercial BOBCAT SERVICES

FIREPLACES • CHIMNEYS • STEPS • SIDEWALKS • PATIOS CONCRETE DRIVEWAYS • BILCO HATCHWAYS

BRICK - BLOCK STONE - CONCRETE

(413) 569-3172 (413) 599-0015

CONSTRUCTION, INC. ADDITIONS REMODELING

FULLY INSURED

Home Repair Services 413-206-6386

The Safe, Guaranteed Solution to Your Home Repair and Maintenance Needs

568-0341 cell (413) 348-0321

Connect with us! Visit us online at

PLUMBING & HEATING Lic. #26177 • AGAWAM, MA

Fully Insured MA Lic #072233 MA Reg #144831

DAVE DAVIDSON (413) 569-9973 www.davedavidsonremodeling.com

New or Repair

Brick-Block-Stone

since 1984

thewestfieldnews.com

To advertise on our website call (413) 562-4181 The Westfield News 62 School St. Westfield

he

T

Press room

Coffees • edibles • News 62 School St. • Westfield

To Advertise Your Business & What You Do in this section Call (413) 562-4181


PAGE 16 - THURSDAY, JANUARY 12, 2017

WWW.THEWESTFIELDNEWS.COM

CLASSIFIED Available online 24/7 at http://thewestfieldnews.com/classifieds

THE WESTFIELD NEWS

DEADLINE: 2PM THE DAY BEFORE Email floram@thewestfieldnewsgroup.com

To Adver tise call 413-562-4181 Ext , 118 PETS

Advertise Your

THERE'S NO PLACE LIKE HOME PET SITTING SERVICE Vacation care, over night sittings, daily dog walks. (413)667-3684

ESTATE

SALE Call (413) 562-4181

FIREWOOD OVER STOCK SALE 2 Year Seasoned Cut, Split, Delivered $150 per cord Wholesale Wood Products 304-851-7666

FEED & STABLES CANADIAN HORSE HAY. Top Quality. Please call Roger (860)684-7428.

Ext. 118

Business Directory

WANTED TO BUY PAYING CASH FOR COINS, stamps, medals, tokens, paper money, diamonds and jewelry, gold and silver scrap. Broadway Coin & Stamp, 144 Broadway, Chicopee Falls, MA. (413)5949550.

A STEP ABOVE THE REST! JMF CHIMNEY SERVICE Repair your chimney before winter wreaks havoc. We do brick repair, crown seals and repairs. We also do stainless steel liner installs, as well as stainless rain caps. We sweep all flues. Free estimates provided. Call: 413-330-2186

FIREWOOD

HOUSE PAINTING

LOGGING

SNOWPLOWING

AFFORDABLE FIREWOOD

ALWAYS CALL FIRST!!! M&M SERVICES 29 Years serving the Westfield area. Painting, staining, house washing, interior/exterior. Wall coverings. Water damage and ceiling/wall repairs. Commercial/residential. Free estimates. Insured. References. Call Carmine at: 413-568-9731 or 413-537-4665 No job too small !!

WEIDLER LOGGING

G&G Services Plus

Purchasing standing timber and specializing in land clearing. Local company in business for 20+ years. Green firewood. Cut, split & delivered. Free delivery in Westfield area. Mixed hardwoods. $180 p/128 cf.

SNOWPLOWING. Free Estimates Sidewalks & Walkways Residential Only. Westfield Area Service You Can Trust! Call Greg: 413-210-3024

413-835-5491

STORAGE

Seasoned and green. Cut, split, delivered. Any length. Now ready for immediate delivery. Senior and bulk discount. Call (413)530-4820 or 413-626-3888

--------------------------FIREWOOD Forest Management 61 Plans Available

HENTNICK CHIMNEY SWEEPS. Chimney repairs and rebuilds. Stainless steel caps and liner systems. Inspections, masonry work and gutter cleaning. Free estimates. Insured. Quality work from a business you can trust. (413)848-0100, (800)793-3706.

5 Generations of Forest Management & Service to the Community We deliver. Run by veterans. Green Meadow Lumber

568-0056

--------------------------SEASONED FIREWOOD

DRYWALL T-BEST DRYWALL. Complete professional drywall at amateur prices. Our ceilings are tops! Call Mike 413-821-8971. Free estimates.

MASONRY

SEASONED FIREWOOD

100% hardwood Stacking available Cut, split, delivered (128cu.ft.) Volume discounts Call for pricing Hollister's Firewood 860-653-4950 or 860-250-4869

LETOURNEAU & SONS PAINTING ONE CALL DOES IT ALL! We are a family owned and operated, painting and home improvement company serving the Westfield area since 1986. We specialize in residential/commercial, interior/exterior painting and staining, ceiling and drywall repairs, water damage repair, exterior home repairs, and carpentry of all types including roof repairs. Call Bill for your FREE no obligation estimate (413) 977-9633 or (413) 562-5727 www.Ls-painting.com

ABC MASONRY & BASEMENT WATERPROOFING All brick, block, concrete. Chimneys, foundations, hatchways, new basement windows installed and repaired. Sump pumps and french drain systems installed. Foundations pointed and stuccoed. Free estimates (413)569-1611 or (413)374-5377

ELECTRICIAN JIM FERRIS ELECTRIC Senior discount. No job too small! Insured, free estimates. 40 years experience. Lic. #16303. Call (413)330-3682.

POEHLMAN ELECTRIC All types of wiring. Free estimates, insured. SPECIALIZING IN PORTABLE AND WHOLE HOUSE KOHLER GENERATORS, SERVICE UPGRADES, SMALL JOBS, POOLS. Gutter de-icing cables installed. All calls answered! Best prices, prompt service. Lic. #A-16886. (413)562-5816.

MASTER ELECTRICIAN 40 years experience. Insured. Reasonable prices. No job too small. Lic# A7625.Call Tom Daly, (413)543-3100. FLOORING & FLOOR SANDING A RON JOHNSON's Floor Sanding, Installation, Repairs, 3 coats polyurethane. Free estimates. (413)569-3066.

FORESTRY JML FORESTRY Seasoned Firewood for Sale 1/2 to Full Cords Delivered 413-575-8900 Westfield

HAULING A DUMP TRUCK Attic, cellars garages cleaned out. Wood and brush removal. Handy-Man services plus painting. Snowplowing. (413)569-0794 (413)374-5377 HOME IMPROVEMENT DAVE DAVIDSON: Bathroom & Kitchen Remodeling "GET IT RIGHT THIS TIME" Complete Bath Renovations. Now serving CT. Insured. Quality Work on Time on Budget Since 1984. MA. License #072233, MA.Registration #144831. CT. HIC. #0609568 569-9973. www.davedavidsonremodeling. com

JOSEPH'S HANDYMAN COMPANY Carpentry, remodeling, kitchen, baths, basements, drywall, tile, floors, suspended ceilings, restoration services, doors, windows, decks, stairs, interior/exterior painting, plumbing. Small jobs ok. All types of professional work done since 1985. Call Joe, (413)364-7038.

LANDSCAPING & LAWN CARE

Hagger's Landscaping Services LLC Timely and dependable snow removal commercial & residential Fall Clean-ups, Curb-side leaf pick-up, hedge trimming. Specializing in Hardscaping of patios/walkways/fire pits. We now provide junk removal and basement / attic clean-outs! All your Landscaping needs. Residential & Commercial Fully Insured/Free Estimates 413-626-6122 or visit www.haggerscape.com

A1 ODD JOBS/HANDYMAN Debris removal, landscaping, Fall yard cleanup, interior and exterior painting, power washing, basic carpentry and plumbing. All types of repair work and more. (413)562-7462 ACCURATE LAWNCARE Leaf & Brush Removal Gutter Cleaning Trimming & Mowing, Snow Removal with Sanding Family owned & operated Call (413)579-1639 accuratelawncare2013 @gmail.com

STORAGE Camper, Boat, Trailer outdoor storage yard. Year-round discounts. Safe and secure. Lockhouse Rd. Westfield, MA JML 413-575-8900

TRUCK SERVICE

PAINTING & WALLPAPERING HOME DECOR has been making beautiful new rooms for over 16 years. From cabinet makeovers to faux finishes, staging for sales and decorating advice for a new look. Call Kendra now for all your painting needs. Fully insured. Free Estimates (413)626-8880 or (413)564-0223

Truck & Trailer Repair We repair Pick-ups, Vans, SUVs & Campers in addition to light, medium, and heavy duty diesel trucks.

RAIN GUTTERS CLEANED & REPAIRED Chimneys repaired and chimney caps installed. Antennas removed. Roof leaks repaired, vent areas sealed. Senior citizen discount. Insured. Free estimates. H.I. Johnson Services (413)596-8859 (before 9pm)

PLUMBING & HEATING NICK GARDNER PLUMBING, WELDING & MECHANICAL SERVICES. Reliable service, Professional. Certified Welding. Insured. MA Lic. #PL31893-J. Call (413)531-2768 Nick7419@comcast.net

SNOWBLOWER REPAIR AFFORDABLE Snowblower/Lawnmower Service. Tune-ups/Repairs. FREE pick-up & delivery. Same day service available. 786-0022

SNOWPLOWING Specializing in COMMERCIAL & INDUSTRIAL property plowing, snow removal, de-icing, sand and/or salt. Reliable and experienced. NO DRIVEWAYS Call Tom: 413-244-3028 A-1 SNOWPLOWING Affordable Building Contractor Residential & light commercial Westfield Only 21 Years Experience Call Dave 413-568-6440

WHEN: FRIDAY JAN 20TH AND SATURDAY JAN 21ST FROM 10:00 A.M. TO 4:00 P.M. We are cleaning out 10 years of accumulations- The Attic is finally done and we are working on the basement at well. MERCHANDISE IN SO MANY DIFFERENT CATEGORIES!!! Antiques, Art, Antique Frames, VINTAGE CLOTHING, TEXTILES AND LINENS (includes vintage material etc.), EPHEMERA, MAGAZINES, ANTIQUE AND VINTAGE BOOKS, VINTAGE AUTOMOTIVE CATALOGS, AND REFERENCES BOOKS, VINTAGE AND ANTIQUE LIGHTING, ART GLASS, CHINA, GLASS, SKIS, ROLLERSKATES, ANTIQUE CHAIRS AND BEDS, CLOCKS, RADIOS, VINTAGE VINYL RECORDS78’S AND 45’S, ANTIQUE SHEET MUSIC, VINTAGE BOARD GAMES, DECORATIVE ARTS, NEW OLD STOCK ITEMS. TOO MUCH TO LIST HERE!! We need to make space for our Next Auction celebrating 10 years at our Gallery location in Huntington-

CASH, KNOWN CHECK, VISA,MASTERCARD OR DISCOVER.

APARTMENT WESTFIELD - Lovely 1 bedroom, 3rd Floor apartment, downtown with all appliances, onsite laundry and parking. $550 per month plus utilities, no smoking, first and last month’s rent. 413-562-2043

5 ROOM, 3 bedroom, completely renovated Westfield/Russell area, country setting. NEW stove, refrigerator and heating unit. Large yard, parking. $950 p/month. No pets please. Call today, won't last. Available immediately (413)348-3431

TOP TRUCK SERVICES CORP. Family Owned Servicing Western Mass since 1998

RAIN GUTTERS

HUGE ESTATES/TAG SALE AT OUR GALLERY LOCATED AT 10 E. MAIN ST. HUNTINGTON MASS. 01050

OUR TENTH ANNIVERSARY AUCTION WILL BE ON FEB 11TH 20 17. DON’T MISS THIS SALE ON JAN 20TH AND 21ST LOADS OF GREAT DEALS!!!!

floram@thewestfieldnewsgroup.com • PROFESSIONAL SERVICES • To Advertise call 413-562-4181 Ext. 118 CHIMNEY SWEEPS

TAG SALES

NAPA Truck Service Budget Truck Rental Location 24-Hour Emergency Service Fleet Repair MA Inspection Station "No truck or job too big or too small" 165 Bliss St. West Springfield, MA

413-788-6787

HILLTOWN APARTMENT FOR RENT LOCATION...LOCATION LOCATION! 14 East Main St., Huntington. 15 min. from Westfield center. 2 - 1 Bedroom Apartments @$650. 1 - 3 Bedroom Apartment @$875 All with eat-in kitchen, parking, shared yard. Oil heat. Laundry facility on-site. Snow removal included. Non-smoking. Crimefree property! 1st/Last needed upon renting. Call for info: 413-244-3936

top-truck.com

TREE SERVICE A BETTER OPTION GRANFIELD TREE SERVICE Tree Removal, Land Clearing, Excavating. (413)569-6104

American Tree & Shrub: Removal, pruning, bucket/crane work. Stump grinding, light excavation and tree planting. Firewood Available Fully Insured, Free Estimates. 24-hour Emergency Services. Veteran Owned 40 yrs. Experience 413-569-0469

UPHOLSTERY KEITH'S UPHOLSTERY & REPAIRS 30+ years experience for home or business. Discount off all fabrics. Get quality workmanship at a great price. Free pickup and delivery. Call (413)562-6639.

WINDOW CLEANING CRYSTAL CLEAR WINDOWS Cleaned inside and out! Including storms and screens. Fully insured. Free estimates. Call Paul NOW to book December appointments and save 10%. 413-237-2053

WESTFIELD 1 bedroom apartment, large closets, free heat and hot water included, laundry, parking. $820/month. (413)562-2266

ROOMS HUNTINGTON 1 room with heat, hot water, cable TV, air conditioning, refrigerator and microwave included. $475p/month. Call (413)531-2197.

MOBILE HOMES MONSON: Two bedroom, fixerupper needs TLC. Metal roof. Appliances, Shed, Porch 10' x 20'. Nice family park. $24,000 593-9961 DASAP.MHVILLAGE.COM

SERVICES A DUMP TRUCK Attic, cellars garages cleaned out. Wood and brush removal. Handy-Man services plus painting. Snowplowing. (413)569-0794 (413)374-5377

A1 ODD JOBS/HANDYMAN Debris removal, landscaping, Fall yard cleanup, interior and exterior painting, power washing, basic carpentry and plumbing. All types of repair work and more. (413)562-7462


Thursday, January 12, 2017