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Half-Out in the Extrawide

Fang

To replace a volume of lack of trope, of ache with an equal volume of disinfectant; to dip a capped head into the abstract and breathe there, bobbing among yellow sunk torpedoes, and to cough above it into chemical mist; to osmose to expulsion, to part the wet wreckage of us and to self-drown for the sake of recreation; to ask finally of the body’s slick white, its tiny antigravity hairs, what are you about: this is writing, and this is the forfeiture of the bounds that the self (not knowing better) occupies.

Poetry

Megan O’Keefe ’16

19 O’Keefe

Prose 18

and create the murals. I came to understand at that moment that vulnerability could be the ultimate strength. In the voice of this enervated girl, I heard the grandest essence of Buddhism. She exposed her physical being to ruthless nature; she opened her heart to love, to believe, and to be hurt. Without a religious identity myself, I was too ignorant to appreciate on a deeper level this different reality experienced by her. Yet through her penetrating voice, I felt connected, even as a blank slate, to a culture far away from my origin; I felt empowered, over the vicissitudes of history, to touch the softest yet bravest part of being a human: loving without a guard, getting touched easily, giving birth to new lives, and devoting oneself wholeheartedly. At the last sight of the caves, I was in tears. Lush grasses have become deserted, yet the prosperity rooted there remains; crafting hands are covered in dust, yet the colors they created have lived on. In the mist of history, one may be the humblest, yet one can still empower both oneself and others, with love and faith, vulnerably and powerfully at the same time. With the little girl’s voice lingering in my head, I cherish my vulnerability as a power, one that can empower more people. No longer am I a water-girl or an iron-girl. I am a clam-woman. Soft at heart and steadfast in actions, I’m ready to take the ocean currents.

Profile for The Wellesley Review

The Wellesley Review, Issue 16, Spring 2016  

STAFF Elle Friedberg '17, Emily Frisella '16, Rachel Pack '18, Jay Fickes '18, Laura Mayron '16, Wenbo Bai '16, Larua Maclay '18, Rachael Hw...

The Wellesley Review, Issue 16, Spring 2016  

STAFF Elle Friedberg '17, Emily Frisella '16, Rachel Pack '18, Jay Fickes '18, Laura Mayron '16, Wenbo Bai '16, Larua Maclay '18, Rachael Hw...

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