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APRIL 29 | 2013

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Buck stops at Huntingdale

COVER: Sculptress Jenny Whiteside was introduced to sculpture by African artists and will pass on her skills in a workshop at the Waverley Community learning centre. See page 14. Picture: Rob Carew

BY DANIEL TRAN A ‘modest’ $2.6 million would buy radical improvements to Huntingdale railway station, says Opposition Leader Daniel Andrews. Mr Andrews, the local member for Mulgrave, demanded that the state government commit to upgrading the station amid concerns from university students, staff and traders over the safety of the precinct. He said the plan was overdue and essential, given a recent announcement that the Rowville rail project — which would have created a station at Monash University — was at least 10 years away. ‘‘For $2.6 million, you could have a much better gateway to Monash University, which is such an important part of our local community,’’ Mr Andrews said. ‘‘I know every dollar’s precious, but I can’t think of a better investment that would deliver more.’’ Mr Andrews’ comments came as Oakleigh MP Ann Barker submitted a petition, signed by more than 1100 people, calling for the station to be improved. Monash Student Association president Freya Logan said the petition was a good step forward. ‘‘Huntingdale station is pretty much the gateway to Monash University. On Sundays and on the weekends, there are no buses for half an hour. There are no seats. There’s no lighting. It’s quite ridiculous. And a lot of [residential] students do use Huntingdale station to get back home, so I wouldn’t say it’s the best area at the moment,’’ she said. ‘‘It’s definitely time for this to be addressed. I think the government really needs to get moving on transport improvements.’’ The revamp, which was costed by Monash University, can be finished within six months once started. While he stopped short of listing the station as a transport priority for Labor, Mr Andrews said his party was examining transport infrastructure and would make more announcements closer to the 2014 election.

Step forward: Daniel Andrews with Freya Logan and Ann Barker at Huntingdale station. Infant immunisation rates across much of Monash have fallen below the 95 per cent benchmark that public health experts recommend. See page 13.

HAVE YOUR SAY What are the most urgent transport issues the state government should fix in Monash? Post a comment on this story at monashweekly.com.au

Safety issue: Paul Barton says redevelopment of Huntingdale station is a priority. Pictures: Rob Carew ‘‘Given my own electorate’s not far from here, I’ve had many students complain to me, and rightly so, about the poor service here. ‘‘It’s great to have the extra buses, it’s great to have the routes working well together. We just need the infrastructure so that people don’t have to be crossing over [the road].’’ Monash University’s director of environmental sustainability, Paul Barton, said the revamp of the station was a priority. ‘‘Clearly if the government is saying that Rowville Rail is 10 or more years away . . . we probably think 15 to 20, we’re going to be reliant on buses and we need to have really high quality bus services,’’ Mr Barton said. ‘‘We’ve got great buses but the infrastructure and the bus interchange is really appalling.’’ Monash University has more than 22,000

students on its Clayton campus. Last month, it found that about 4800 people were using the 601 shuttle bus on any given day. The plans for the improvement have also taken into account the need for a station upgrade if the Rowville rail project is approved. The lights and shelters used will be modular. ‘‘You could relocate [them] and use it elsewhere if required,’’ he said. Mr Barton said safety was a key issue for university commuters with the bus stop being located across a busy road, a lack of weather protection and graffiti and rubbish. ‘‘We know a lot of the female students don’t feel comfortable here at night.’’ He called for the state government to make the station upgrade a priority. ‘‘We see it as a short-term, fairly costeffective fix.’’

5 9 11 25

Dogfight Supreme Court battle looms

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Let’s get the facts straight

Phone 9238 7777 Classifieds 13 24 25 Distribution 1800 032 472 distribution@theweeklyreview.com.au Advertising fax 9238 7682 Editorial email easteditorial@mmpgroup.com.au Website monashweekly.com.au

Editor Greg Videon 9238 7646 News Editor Ian Munro 9238 7639 Regional Sales Manager Ben Sutton Sales Manager Georgina McLeod 9238 7777 Real Estate Client Relationship Director Matt Maasdijk 8667 4795 Publisher Antony Catalano Published by Metro Media Publishing Pty Ltd (ACN 141 396 741). All material is copyright and no part of this publication may be reproduced without written permission of the editor. Responsibility for election comment is accepted by Antony Catalano, 214-220 Park Street, South Melbourne, Vic, 3205. The Weekly endorses the Media, Entertainment and Arts Alliance’s “Code of Conduct”. All significant errors will be corrected as quickly as possible. Distribution numbers, areas and coverage are estimates only. For advertising terms and conditions, visit www.theweeklyreview.com.au and www.adcentre.com.au

To “I’m Realistic”, you need to be aware of the facts and consider of the circumstances. Here are some things you should be aware of: ■ DNA is inadmissible as evidence under this legislation. It is specifically only the shape of the dog that can be considered. ■ Jade had only very recently moved to Monash, and requested the paperwork in order to register Kerser. This was received the day before Kerser was seized. ■ Even if Kerser were registered, being deemed a ‘pit bull’ is still an automatic death sentence because of his age: dogs born after September 1 2010 must be killed under this legislation, regardless of whether or not they are registered. ■ Finally, you refer to the killing of old and injured animals, called euthanasia. Euthanasia, by definition is to provide relief. And, in fact, I agree with you, for those with no hope of any other reprieve, humans should also be entitled to euthanasia, if that is their own choice. But taking an innocent, harmless and loved family pet from its home, purely because of its shape, a soul who is loved and part of a family is something

our society should not advocate or embrace. I’d be keen to understand if you still feel the same about Kerser, Jade and their family’s situation once you take these factors into consideration. If you truly want to be “realistic” then I hope you seek the knowledge to understand what is really going on with this legislation, because it certainly does not achieve its claimed purpose. In fact, from firsthand experience, I would say that usually it achieves the opposite — the murder of innocent, sociable, well-balanced dogs torn from a loving family, harming not only the dog, but many humans too.

Kathy Zini, Glen Waverley

are all categorised under gambling. Unfortunately, gambling places, cigarette sale outlets, pubs or bottle shops, vineyards and brothels are conducting businesses providing legal services or products, no different from restaurants or supermarkets. It is unfair to treat them differently from all other business premises. Problem gamblers are like alcoholics and harddrug users. The current methods of supporting these ‘‘sufferers’’ are costly and far from effective. These are medical conditions and need to be treated in a more revolutionary way, namely medically. Sin Fong Chan (via web)

Nightmare on civvy street A very emotional story. I have known Peter or ‘Poppa’, as he is known by locals, for years now. I’ve always known he was a wonderful man but only now know how amazing he really is. Lisa Ferguson (via web)

Hands tied on pokie venue rates Whether it is pressing buttons on a real poker machine or just on a virtual one on a computer, or whether it is betting on horses or footy teams, these

Re: I can win Chisholm, upbeat Lib says It would be helpful if Mr Nguyen could clarify the Coalition’s promise to allocate $50 million over four years to improve public safety. Is this Australia-wide? That’s $12.5 million a year to cover the whole country. What does ‘local safety’ mean in this context? Josh Fergeus (via Facebook)

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Legal fees bite in protracted dogfight BY DANIEL TRAN MONASH ratepayers are facing the possibility of another $100,000 Supreme Court battle over the classification of a pit bull terrier. Jade Applebee, of Mount Waverley, is preparing to appeal against a Victorian Civil and Administrative Tribunal decision that backed the council’s finding that her dog, Kerser, is a pit bull. Her last-ditch attempt is expected to cost her and the council thousands of dollars. Monash mayor Micaela Drieberg said that appeals can only be made on the grounds that there was an error in law. ‘‘We haven’t received the paperwork yet so we don’t know what the suggested error is,’’ Cr Drieberg said. The case is unlikely to be heard for several months until after a directions hearing. This will be the second case Monash Council has fought in the Supreme Court under the state’s dangerous-dog law. The first, against David Dudas and his dog, Rapta, resulted in a $100,000 legal bill after the

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council lost the case. Cr Drieberg said the council was trying to recover the costs of the Dudas case through the Appeals Cost Board. ‘‘We’re very keen for the government to change the legislation so councils don’t have to carry so much legal responsibility,’’ she said. ‘‘We’re willing to play a role in protecting the community, but we need more support.’’ Under changes to Victoria’s dangerous-dog legislation, councils have the power to seize unregistered, restricted breed dogs and destroy them if they are found to match the standard characteristics of the breed. In December last year, Ms Applebee’s dog was seized by the council after it was found in a neighbour’s backyard. Ms Applebee, who maintains her unregistered dog is an American Staffordshire terrier cross, rejected the council’s finding and sought to overturn it at the Victorian Civil and Administrative Tribunal. After a two-day hearing, which included a physical inspection of the dog at the RSPCA in Burwood, VCAT deputy president Heather Lambrick upheld the council’s decision.

Appealing: Dog owner Jade Applebee with a picture of her pet, Kerser. ‘‘The overall impression of Kerser is one of compliance. He may not be a perfect example of a pit bull. However, such a dog probably does not exist,’’ Ms Lambrick said.

Picture: Rob Carew

‘‘Even in the areas where he does not meet the standard to a substantial degree, he meets the standard to some degree and importantly in the areas of musculature and strength.’’

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NEWS ●

State flunks test on at-risk youth: principal BY DANIEL TRAN

Ashwood school principal Helen Hatherly, right, and Monash mayor Micaela Drieberg want the state government to commit to supporting vulnerable young people.

AXING a support service for vulnerable young people will do lasting damage for years to come, a Monash school principal has warned. Helen Hatherly from Ashwood School says the imminent closure of the School Focused Youth Service program will deny students the chance to learn crucial life skills. Educators, youth workers and councillors are pressing the government to continue financing the service, created in 1998 in response to the Kennett government’s Suicide Prevention Taskforce. Its current funding ends in June. Mrs Hatherly said the fallout from students missing out on crucial programs would be felt in a decade. ‘‘The aim was to skill up students as well as support families. If the money is removed, then the possibilities for those programs is going to cease.’’ In addition to supporting young people by giving them access to essential services, the service aims to reduce suicide through earlyintervention programs. Ashwood School is a prep to year 12 specialist school for students with a mild intellectual

disability. The school uses the youth service to teach students about relationships, aggression and bullying. Mrs Hatherly, who is also the president of the Principals’ Association of Specialist Schools in Victoria, said the closure of the program would force schools into fund-raising to afford essential services. ‘‘We would ask the state government to at least continue the program for 12 months so we’ve got time to reorganise ourselves and to reorganise our funding.’’ The School Focused Youth Service is the responsibility of the Department of Education and Early Childhood Development and the Department of Human Services. Councils, which run the service with a grant from the state government, have not been informed of any replacement funding beyond June 30. Monash mayor Micaela Drieberg accused the state government of being irresponsible. ‘‘ We’re playing with people’s lives here. It’s the mental health of our young people,’’ she said. ‘‘We can’t support just leaving our young people’s health hanging at a loose end. It’s not good enough.’’ In Monash, between 2011-12, 13 schools in

the city took part in the service. ‘‘It’s one thing if they cease the funding and then announce a new type of program to address mental health of our young people, but they haven’t,’’ Cr Drieberg said. ‘‘And even if they are in the midst of developing it, we know nothing about it and as far as I’m aware, we haven’t been involved. She called on the state government to extend the program. ‘‘It’s been proven to work for many years and so we’d like to see it continue.’’ The Victorian government did not respond to questions about the youth service and whether it would be replaced or extended. A spokeswoman for Education Minister Martin Dixon said the government was not reducing services available for at-risk children. ‘‘The government will continue to support vulnerable children in Victoria and we are committed to ensuring we deliver the best service possible. ‘‘The Department of Education and Early Childhood Development is reviewing the broad range of programs and activities that focus on children, young people and adults who are vulnerable.’’ If you or someone you know is experiencing an emotional crisis, call Lifeline 13 11 14

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Nurses call for help on hospital safety BY CAMERON LUCADOU-WELLS NURSES may take industrial action over unresolved safety concerns at Dandenong Hospital’s emergency department since a 2011 state inquiry into the problem. Australian Nursing Federation state spokesman Paul Gilbert says a patient recently bit a ‘‘chunk’’ out of a nurse’s breast, the wound requiring plastic surgery. Two weeks ago, a nurse was threatened with a knife. Mr Gilbert said Monash Health, which runs Dandenong Hospital, had not strengthened security since the inquiry. “The security remains the worst we’ve seen. There’s no security guard inside the department.’’ Allan Whitehead, president of Victorian Emergency Physicians Association, said emergency doctors were disappointed in the lack of government funding to improve hospital security since the inquiry. Mr Gilbert said that during a night shift on

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March 29, a senior nurse allegedly tackled an aggressive male intruder ‘‘shaping up to him’’ in the supposedly secure treatment cubicles. The nurse, who has served at Dandenong Hospital for 16 years, was immediately disciplined and demoted from his supervisory and triage duties after the incident. Mr Gilbert said the hospital’s internal review of the incident on April 19 found the nurse acted reasonably and that there was a security breach and staff lacked training to calm potentially violent situations. “The nurse has been made a scapegoat. The hospital has criticised him for not following a Code Grey policy that doesn’t exist. He shouldn’t be criticised; the hospital should be ensuring a safe workplace,’’ Mr Gilbert said. The nurses want their colleague reinstateed and agreed protocols for handling violent patients. A Monash Health spokeswoman said the incident was being investigated internally and by Fair Work Australia.

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FEATURESTORY

Closing the health gap, slowly Ailing health in remote indigenous communities has been a national concern. But on our doorsteps, an Aboriginal co-operative is trying to reverse a set of sicklooking statistics. CAMERON LUCADOUWELLS reports.

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o-smoking posters plastered next to the rainbow serpent and the galaxy dot-painting murals are a sign of the times at the Dandenong and District Aborigines Co-operative. The co-op is a support hub for a 4000-strong indigenous catchment extending over east and south-east Melbourne to Gippsland, with 1400 patients on its health clinic’s books. Its smoking ban is one corrective step in the aim of ‘‘closing the gap’’ between indigenous Australians’ health and the rest of the community. The latest statistics show that 45 per cent of Aboriginal Australians are daily smokers — double the national average. Chief executive Andrew Gardiner says the co-op had to tread gently to force many of its members to kick the unhealthy habit on-site. ‘‘We couldn’t just say you can’t smoke here,’’ Gardiner says. ‘‘We put up white notices to warn beforehand to say the organisation is going smoke-free. Last July, we changed the notices to red.’’ As part of the program, a bin for cigarette butts was placed in Carroll Avenue, off-site and in front of the co-operative’s on-site Bunurong Aboriginal Health Services clinic. It’s often surrounded with waywardly disposed of butts. Anti-smoking is one of many campaigns waged against chronic ‘lifestyle’ illnesses such as heart disease and diabetes by the health service and co-operative. There’s a good reason. On average, there’s a 11.5-year life expectancy gap between indigenous and nonindigenous males, and 9.7 years for females. In one way it’s more like a 60-year time warp. The life expectancy for Aboriginal Australians is the same as the general population’s was in 1955. Smoking is one pointer to ill health. An Australian Bureau of Statistics report states indigenous smokers are three times more likely to be binge drinking than non-smokers. Other alarming statistics include the

The doc’s in: Valentina Galak. Pictures: Gary Sissons

‘We say to them their kids need to read and write. Don’t keep them down to your standard.’ — Andrew Gardiner

Campaigners: Andrew Gardiner, board member Margaret Gardiner and co-op member Sharon Kirkpatrick. high incidence of low birth weights, stillbirths and infant mortality among indigenous families. The co-op will get a share of the $4.6 billion Closing the Gap federal and state government program to improve Aboriginal health, housing and education. This month, the state government announced funding of $61.7 million over four years for the cause. The federally funded co-op expects none of this funding but the Victorian Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation welcomed it as another step towards overcoming indigenous disadvantage. Gardiner says unaffordable housing, unemployment and leaving school early are among the pillars of poor health — issues that aren’t solved overnight. ‘‘In the end, patients have to take responsibility for their own health. They can’t abrogate that to a doctor. ‘‘If you haven’t got good health, you

[ 10 ] MONASH WEEKLY – YOUR COMMUNITY VOICE

April 29, 2013

can’t do anything.’’ One of the hallmarks of the co-op’s Koori-only clinic is the ‘‘long consultation’’ between its GPs and patients. Its two doctors take the time to find out about the patient’s family and background. ‘‘Basically the long consultation is finding out whether the family has a history of heart disease, diabetes, cancer — all those things that are hereditary,’’ Gardiner says. ‘‘A lot of other doctors may overlook things like asking, ‘do you have allergies?’. We don’t treat [people] like they’re on a conveyor belt.’’ The clinic’s suite of health services includes general practice, dental health, sexual health, maternal and early childhood health, mental health, counselling and transport for members from all over Victoria. Valentina Galak has been a GP at the co-op since migrating as a refugee from the then-Soviet Union in 1981. She sticks to the clinic partly out of loyalty — ‘‘(these were) the only people that would employ me’’. She feels anguished about the numbers of patients who are long-term unemployed — she says it’s a rut set by

All ears: Alf McCartney. their parents and upbringing. ‘‘I feel what they need is more education. I know that doesn’t happen quickly.’’ One of the co-op’s other key staff is Alf McCartney, who on the surface appears to be a cheery mini-van driver. He brings members and the sick to the clinic for annual health checks and other appointments, but his gambits have an uncanny knack of breaking the ice. His empathy can unlock a reticient patient, helping them share vital details about their family and medical history. ‘‘He gets a captive audience inside that taxi. On top of that, he’s an Aboriginal elder and he’ll advise them,’’ Gardiner says. Early childhood health and education is another key plank of future health. For instance, there’s a relative scourge of underweight infants who face developmental delays and future health struggles. The co-op hosts a playgroup for mutual socialising and

support among mothers. It is also pushing parents to get interested in their children’s education, to the extent that the co-op advises schools to send letters to parents telling them of impending teacher-parent nights. ‘‘A lot of parents were disengaged from the school because of the things that happened at their own school. ‘‘We say to them their kids need to read and write. Don’t keep them down to your standard.’’ There are also practical programs such as ‘let’s go shopping’ tours as a way of warding off the risk of type 2 diabetes and other chronic illness. ‘‘Some say we just buy crappy food because it’s all we can afford. Well, let’s go to the market and see how much fresh food costs. We then take them through the cooking process, alert them to sugar and fat content on food labels.’’ The co-op also helps clean and maintain the homes of elderly and disabled members, chips in for schooling and clothing costs, hosts a traditional dance group and runs an older persons activity group. Through South East Medicare Local, the co-op has been advising the region’s GPs, psychologists and optometrists on how to treat indigenous people with cultural sensitivity. ‘‘They ask, ‘How do we talk to Aboriginal people?’ I say it’s easy to put into practice. It’s how you engage with them,’’ Gardiner says. Among the 150-plus nationalities living in Dandenong and the east and south-east of Melbourne, the First Australians still feel overlooked. ‘‘We’re not fully integrated in society. People know there’s an Aboriginal community but they don’t know much about it,’’ Mr Gardiner says. ‘‘The point of Welcome to Country is respect to elders past and present. We’re still here — people who are strong in their family and community values — and we want to be part of the wider community.’’ He sees the frustration of African community elders, who say their youth don’t listen to them. ‘‘This is what we went through in the 1950s. We saw 15 and 16 year olds getting pregnant and the elders lost a level of control.’’ The co-op is taking part in an Australian Institute of Health and Welfare study. Gardiner expects improvements in health outcomes to show in this year’s stage 1 report. ‘‘We’ve had a lot of kids reaching year 12, more than 10 years ago. Over that time we’ve had more engagement at schools and more support systems. ‘‘Education is their way out.’’


NEWS ●

INBRIEF Court-ordered donations

Wanted: Security footage of the men who stole violins valued at more than $25,000 from Bow for Strings in Glen Waverley.

It’s a crime duet

Fines or jail for bail breach People who breach their bail conditions will be slugged a $4200 fine or jailed for up to three months under tough new penalties introduced by the state government. The laws, which are designed to crack down on offences committed during bail, will also impose a curfew on offenders and bar them from certain areas. ‘‘All too often, offenders released on bail go on to commit a string of further offences. . . before coming to trial,” Attorney-General Robert Clark said. ‘‘The bottom line, under these new laws, will be that if you re-offend while on bail, you stand to be imprisoned for longer.’’

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SECURITY footage of the $25,000, 60-second raid on Glen Waverley music store Bow for Strings shows one man keeping watch while his accomplice grabs seven violins from the displays. The lookout for the 7pm heist on April 3 wore a grey hat, a brown jacket, black pants and white runners. The active thief wore white pants with black stripes down the sides, white runners and a grey and white Nike jacket. As revealed last week, the haul included an 1880s violin valued at $15,000, and all but one of the stolen instruments was antique. Information to the Monash crime investigation unit on 9567 8910.

Charities will continue to receive court-ordered donations after the state government introduced new laws enshrining the practice. The laws mean that people convicted of crimes can be ordered by a judge to donate money directly to a charity or through the court. It follows a Supreme Court ruling that found the long-standing practice was invalid.

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[ 11 ]


NEWS ●

Chemo, cameraderie help fight cancer BY DANIEL TRAN

Fighting on: Diane Wyse, an ovarian cancer survivor, is taking part in the Cancer Council’s Biggest Morning Tea. Picture: Rob Carew

[ 12 ] MONASH WEEKLY – YOUR COMMUNITY VOICE

April 29, 2013

EVEN while her body was being pumped full of the punishing cocktail that is chemotherapy, Diane Wyse never felt like she was suffering from a life-threatening disease. Her chemotherapy sessions were almost a family affair with people laughing, talking and sipping tea. In a sense, it was a rehearsal for the morning tea fund-raiser she is now organising as part of a nationwide benefit to support research. ‘‘The nurses and doctors there . . . made the experience very light, very personal,’’ she says. ‘‘I know it’s not enjoyable, but they made it enjoyable. It made you feel that you were there not for chemo (but for) a day with friends.’’ Mrs Wyse, who works in Mulgrave, was diagnosed with ovarian cancer in 2009. She was in hospital for a hysterectomy when doctors discovered the cancer by accident. Treatment started immediately and soon she lost her hair through 12 ses-

sions of chemotherapy. Through it all, her family, friends and colleagues created a network of support that helped her face her own mortality. ‘‘I never felt like I had (cancer),’’ she says. But her lowest moment came while in remission when one of her closest friends was diagnosed with cancer. Within six months her friend was dead. ‘‘I suffered with some survivor guilt. I couldn’t understand or explain to her family why I had gone through my treatment easier than she did, and why I was still here and she wasn’t. ‘‘I spoke to my oncologist and she said that’s the awful thing about cancer: two people can stand in front of her with the same cancer, the same diagnosis, and one survives and one doesn’t. ‘‘It did feel awful, not that you didn’t want to be here, but you coudn’t understand why she couldn’t be here with you as well.’’ The death of her friend sparked

within Mrs Wyse a desire to do something to fight cancer. Since then, she has taken part in Australia’s Biggest Morning Tea, run by the Cancer Council of Victoria. Last year in Monash, 274 hosts raised more than $100,000. Mrs Wyse, who was recently rediagnosed with cancer, has been holding the morning tea at her workplace, AE Smith Airconditioning, where she has worked for almost 20 years. This year, while she is in chemotherapy, the company will hold the event in every office around the country to raise money in her honour. ‘‘Cancer’s so big and . . . it touches everybody,’’ says Mrs Wyse. ‘‘We need more research, we need more equipment, we need more staff, we need more everything. And unless we . . . all put in, it’s not going to happen. Every little bit helps.’’ To register for Australia’s Biggest Morning Tea, text ‘TEA’ to 0400 867 867, biggestmorningtea.com.au or call 1300 656 585.


NEWS ●

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CHILDREN in Monash are falling short of immunisation standards with fewer than one in six meeting the acceptable vaccination benchmark. But radical anti-vaccination advocates only make up a small percentage of parents failing to immunise their children. Most families simply struggle to find the time. Jim Buttery, the head of infectious disease at the Monash Children’s Hospital, said that traditionally, most parents who did not immunise their children led busy lives. ‘‘Getting immunised on time tends to be more of a problem as children are getting older,’’ Associate Professor Buttery said. ‘‘Those families will eventually get their kids immunised, but they’ll be immunised late and it’s really trying to find ways to make sure that those kids have access to protection as early as possible.’’ Immunisation rates are determined by age and postcode. Data from the Australian Childhood Immunisation register in 2011-12 show that only one-year-olds from Ashwood, Chadsone and Mulgrave and two year olds from Hughesdale/Huntingdale, Mulgrave

and Oakleigh/Oakleigh East have met the 95 per cent immunisation target. All other areas and age groups are failing this benchmark. Professor Buttery stressed the importance of punctual immunisations. ‘‘It’s important that the immunisations are given as close to on time as possible to maximise the protection kids get. The immunisation program is timed to protect children before they become at risk for those diseases as much as possible. Late immunisations often mean that you’re not protected . . . when your risk is greatest.’’ He rejected claims by anti-vaccination groups that immunisations were linked to autism. ‘‘There’s only been one study that supported a link between MMR [measles, mumps and rubella] vaccine and autism. ‘‘Multiple studies since then by multiple different people have all failed to show any association. The original study has been discredited by an independent investigative journalist demonstrating results were falsified. All the other authors, apart from the first author, have withdrawn their support for that publication and the first author has been struck off the medical register.’’

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NEWS ●

Body of work, chiselled to perfection BY DANIEL TRAN

Midas touch: Sculptor Jenny Whiteside is happy to share her expertise on limestone carving.

Picture: Rob Carew

CREATIVITY always has its price. For Jenny Whiteside it is starting the day with aching arms and shoulders. A sculptor for 12 years, Whiteside spends her days hammering, chiselling and carving lumps of stone, skills she soon will be imparting to students at the Waverley Community Learning Centre. The 51-year-old started her craft after completing a workshop several years ago. Her African instructors did not speak English, so Whiteside learnt through watching them work with the stone. She quickly became enamoured with the art form and began teaching herself. ‘‘The whole process . . . surprised me, blew me away, excited me,’’ she says. Whiteside is now a full-time artist and works with materials from soft limestone to hard marble. When working, she only has a rough idea of what she wants to create. ‘‘When you use stone, it’s always a surprise. ‘‘When I work, I generally just let the stone dictate where I’m going to move with it.’’ Working with stones has its limitations and sometimes, plans are changed and mistakes are

incorporated into the creative process. ‘‘Sometimes I’ve knocked off an arm or I’ve drilled through a chunk that I didn’t want to drill through. ‘‘These things happen. Sometimes a little bit of swearing is involved,’’ she says, laughing. In June, Whiteside will be holding a one-day limestone carving workshop at the Waverley Community Centre to teach residents about sculpting. Topics range from finding the best tools to carving and finishing the work. Whiteside is encouraging any interested residents to try the course. ‘‘It’s just a fun day. We have a lot of fun and people find it quite meditative. Once they get into the groove of doing it, they find that they just get absorbed in what they’re doing. ‘‘The fabulous thing about the one-day workshops is you finish your sculpture in that day and you take it home. I think it’s a great achievement for most people.’’ The workshop is at the Waverley Community Learning Centre from 10am-4pm on Saturday, June 1. Limestone and tools provided. Participants should wear comfortable clothing and bring their own lunch. Cost: $125. Details: 9807 6011.

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[ 14 ] MONASH WEEKLY – YOUR COMMUNITY VOICE

April 29, 2013


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April 29, 2013 MONASH WEEKLY – YOUR COMMUNITY VOICE

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local business advertising feature

It’s sound advice oor hearing cuts people off from their friends. If you can’t hear what people are saying, you may often be left out of the conversation. It’s frustrating, but it can be helped with professional treatment and the right equipment. Australian-born, Greek-speaking audiologist Cris Ivanidis of Active Audiology spends much time getting to know his clients and understanding their hearing concerns, before prescribing treatment. “Most people come in because they’re feeling isolated and have lost their confidence in social situations. They don’t have much to spend, but they still would like a hearing solution that is small and not overly visible. This is possible at Active Audiology. Cris prescribes almost-invisible hearing aids at half the cost, because ‘‘you are paying for what you need, not for accessories and features that aren’t relevant to your hearing requirements”. Independent hearing clinics stock a range of

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hearing aids that may be less expensive and more suitable to your needs, he says. Cris recently opened a clinic on Burwood Highway. Burwood East, and hopes to make affordable hearing accessible to everyone in the community. “My clients are proof that you don’t need to spend excessive amounts of money on hearing aids that allow you to hear the TV and conversations comfortably. “Many are still working and cannot afford to have hearing problems. At the same time, they can’t afford to spend a lot on hearing aids.” He says his aids cost half as much as others and his independent clinic makes it easier for clients to access a wide range of hearing aids at competitive prices. Active Audiology offers clients a range of hearing assessments and hearing aid fittings. It offers trials of any hearing aid brand and model. There are free hearing services for eligible pensioners and DVA Gold card holders, under the Commonwealth Hearing Service Scheme,

Now hear this: Cris Ivanidis can offer independent advice on hearing equipment. Above, a Bernafon Chronos hearing aid. homes, onsite workplace checks and seniors clubs. He says everyone should always seek a second independent opinion about their hearing aids — and hopes he can provide that to the community. and tinnitus therapy. “Being independent gives me the freedom to choose from a large variety of hearing aid brands, meaning every client can achieve their hearing goals, within their budget.” Cris has other clinics in Altona and Balwyn treating patients off the street, as well as nursing

Active Audiology is at 11a/40 Burwood Highway, Burwood East; Opening hours are 9am-5pm Monday to Friday. Phone 9888 8855, fax 9888 7955, email info@activeaudiology.com.au or visit activeaudiology.com.au.

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April 29, 2013

IC N I CL N W PE E N O


local business advertising feature

Apples haven’t fallen far from family tree O

Staff also speak fluent Greek — a bonus for the city’s established Greek-speaking residents. There will be a range of Greek Easter specials in store next week. These include whole jap/kent pumpkins 69 cents per kg, 5 kg brushed potatoes $2.49 bag, 2 kg brown onions $1.29 bag, mandarins $1.89 per kg, new-season red delicious apples 99 cents per kg, new-season Packham pears 99 cents per kg, Bertini passata 720ml 89 cents per bottle and chicories two bunches for $2.50.

akleigh Fresh fruit market is a family affair. Owner Sam Raso runs the 20-year-old business with help from his wife, Antonella, and son, Nino, 19. Staff at the business are long-standing, too, with one serving behind the counter for 27 years. Oakleigh Fresh specialises in selling top quality fruit, vegetables and groceries to loyal customers, some who have been visiting the shop for 10 or 12 years. Mr Raso said his family had improved the business in the five months since they took over. ‘‘We have improved it; built it up,’’ he said. ‘‘We serve the freshest fruit and vegetables at the lowest prices.’’ Mr Raso ‘‘grew up in the fruit game’’ working at his parents stores at Parkmore, Patterson Lakes, Frankston, and Moonee Ponds, as well as a stint at Dandenong Market.

Oakleigh Fresh is at 15-18 Centro Oakleigh, phone 9563 4648. Open 7.30am-5.30pm Monday to Friday, 7.30am-6.30pm Thursdays and Fridays and Saturdays until 5pm.

Healthy fruit: Sam, Antonella and Nino Raso.

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local business advertising feature

Gutter experts out to protect in all seasons

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Spending time to research and develop an innovative product, the company came up with Maxi Mesh. It is not only fire-rated ‘0’ but is also used by local government departments, schools, shires and CFA brigades. Customers can be assured of quality Australian-made products designed to stand the test of time. Four Seasons was founded on a wealth of experience from the consultants through to the fitting team. With many of the Four Seasons team having had over a decade in the industry, customers can be assured they are dealing with the best.

For an obligation-free quote, phone the team at Four Seasons on 1300 302 523 or visit fourseasonsgutterpro.com.au.

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April 29, 2013

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t’s not often you can claim to have developed an award-winning business in your own backyard, but Four Seasons Gutter Protection can. Formed in 2003, Four Seasons is a wholly Australian-owned-and-operated company set up to satisfy the need for a product that was maintenance free, while addressing concerns about dust, sludge and leaf build-up in household gutter systems. The flow control mesh designed and developed by Four Seasons has become the market leader in Australia and New Zealand. Four Seasons is also certified by the Australian made, Australian Grown campaign as a supplier and manufacturer — testament to its quality and workmanship. In 2010, it became the first national company to be registered with the Australian Made campaign. In 2007, Four Seasons received an award for excellence in design and innovation, the first of its kind in the industry.


local business advertising feature

It’s game on, hobbyists he perfect gift for any child — or the young at heart — is a hobby or toy from eXtreme Hobbies. The business stocks a vast range of remote-controlled cars, aircraft, helicopters, boats and toys for any age and, being ‘factory direct’, they can offer a price-beat guarantee. New owner Philip Bedford said the eXtreme Hobbies’ product range would enthral any novice or long-time hobby enthusiast. ‘‘We’ve got a wide variety of products, including speciality items, parts and accessories. Our service technicians are the best in the hobby industry. ‘‘And we sell only the best brands of cars, boats, planes, construction equipment, helicopters, tanks, trains and musical toys. Of course, they’re

Full range: Kate and Wayne and the team at eXtreme Hobbies have the right gift for the hobby enthusiast. assist, teach and inform customers about what will give hours of enjoyment, and get the youngsters out of the house and into the open air. Open hours are Monday to Friday

10am-6pm; Saturday 9am-5pm. eXtreme Hobbies is at Brandsmart in Nunawading, Bayside shopping centre (shop 6/9 Station Street) in Frankston, and 43 Mercer Street,

Geelong. It also has stands at the Dandenong and Caribbean markets. Details: extreme-hobbies.com.au or 9544 5580.

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all backed up by our service and repairs.’’ Mr Bedford said eXtreme Hobbies aimed to cater to those who loved anything remote-controlled. He said the business was booming, with new branches opening at Frankston, Nunawading, Geelong and the Dandenong and Caribbean markets. An online site allowed enthusiasts to buy, sell or even swap items. Mr Bedford and his staff are hobby and craft enthusiasts who love finding hard-to-describe special items. So, if a remote-controlled car, plane or boat is on a loved one’s wish-list, eXtreme Hobbies is the place to go. It has the right advice, prices and products, plus some great specials. The friendly staff are happy to

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[ 19 ]


local business advertising feature

Travel dreams come true liff and Roz Harding started East Burwood Travel 30 years ago. It has remained independent and is one of the largest independent retail travel agencies in Victoria. And it’s this independence which gives the business the freedom to choose the best airlines and travel wholesalers for its clients. ‘‘We are better placed to tailor make your holiday,’’ new owner Brian Leeson said. ‘‘We do not have the large franchise fees and restrictions of other agency groups, which results in better prices and service for our customers.’’ East Burwood Travel is a member of the Australian Federation of Travel Agents and International Air Transport Association and has access

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to the JTG buying group, one of the largest in Australia. Its consultants specialise in cruising and are accredited by the International Cruise Council Australia. Brian and wife Sharon recently bought the business and have more than 50 years’ travel knowledge. Brian has extensive experience with airlines and tour wholesalers and was general manager NZ for Trafalgar Tours and Uniworld River Cruises. Sharon has airline experience and has worked for travel agencies in Eltham, Lower Templestowe and Toorak. ‘‘Together with our capable staff, most of whom have worked for EBT for more than 10 years, we would love to organise your next dream holiday, or make your business travel stream-

[ 20 ] MONASH WEEKLY – YOUR COMMUNITY VOICE

April 29, 2013

Flying high: The friendly East Burwood Travel team, above, and, right: Brian and Sharon Leeson with Cliff and Roz Harding lined and easier,’’ Brian said. East Burwood Travel also runs fully escorted tours, called Magic Carpet Tours, in which clients are escorted from Mel-

bourne by an experienced team member. ‘‘Thank you to our clients for their support over the last 30 years,’’ Brian said. ‘‘We appreciate your continued

business and look forward to assisting new clients make their travel dreams a reality.’’ East Burwood Travel: 9808 1177.


local business advertising feature

Enjoying a good yarn raftee Cottage in Oakleigh is bursting at the seams with exciting new seasons knitting yarns, just in time for the cold winter days ahead. The helpful team — Sylvia, Tracey, Marlies and Marg — have been kept busy stocking the shelves with the new arrivals. They have also welcomed many new customers since the closure of the long-established Wool Village at Brandon Park. ‘‘It’s lovely to welcome new faces to our store,’’ said owner Sylvia Van Der Horst. Yarns from the UK, Japan, Australia and Europe, including llama and

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mulberry silk, alpaca and bamboo, are in the store’s latest selection, as are those featured in the latest Better Homes & Gardens knitting supplement. These yarns and patterns, including lots of new scarf yarns, have arrived just in time for winter. Craftee Cottage has been operating for 24 years, stocking crochet yarns, tapestries, craft books and embroidery supplies. The store runs classes and offers a framing service and knife and scissor sharpening. The store posts orders daily, including overseas. Customers can also benefit from a loyalty program.

Getting creative: Craftee cottage team Marlies, Tracey, Sylvia and Mary have yarns of all sorts. ‘‘We offer personal and helpful customer assistance,’’ Sylvia said. ‘‘We pride ourselves on providing a happy and welcoming business

tage.com.au or crafteecottage.com.au. Opening hours are 9am-5pm Monday to Thursday, 9am-6pm Friday and 9am-3pm on Saturday.

for customers to visit.’’ Craftee Cottage is at Shop 5, 52-54 Atherton Road, Oakleigh, phone 9568 3606, email: info@crafteecot-

Craftee Cottage Shop 5, 52-54 Atherton Road Oakleigh 3166 Tel: 9568 3606/Fax: 9564 8217

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April 29, 2013 MONASH WEEKLY – YOUR COMMUNITY VOICE

[ 21 ]


local business advertising feature

The whole kitchen caboodle itchen company Granite Transformations has been transforming kitchens for more than 20 years. Using industry best practice and quality materials it has been modifying, updating and installing new kitchens to clients’ delight. The company specialises in kitchen makeovers and can create kitchens with quality new benchtops, cupboards and appliances. Proprietor George Tsobanis said Granite Transformations was a kitchen makeover specialist. ‘‘Don’t replace it, reface it,’’ he advises. ‘‘Modify and update your existing kitchen at a fraction of the cost of replacement. ‘‘Why remove your old kitchen when only the tops and doors may need to be replaced?’’ He said specialists could explain simple makeover ideas over the phone, or call on customers to advise, measure and quote, with a team of tradespeople on hand. ‘‘We also design, make and install new kitchens. And our work comes with a 10-year warranty. Visit our showroom and we will explain

K

Kitchen makeover: Granite Transformations’ Caringbah kitchen design before and after. our simple and effective makeover ideas.’’ Mr Tsobanis said Granite Transformations could give a kitchen a stunning new look with its trend superior engineered stone surface range. ‘‘These are fitted directly over the existing benchtop and splashback surfaces. They are

heat, scratch, stain and impact resistant. There’s minimal mess and demolition, with kitchens installed in as little as one day and having a 10-year warranty. Mr Tsobanis said: ‘‘We can complete your look with replacement doors and new appliances. Or, let us design and build you a

brand new kitchen — the choice is yours.’’ Granite Transformation is at factory 1 205A Middleborough Road, Box Hill South. Open Monday to Saturday 9am-4pm. Details: 9890 1222 or granitetransformations.com.au.

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205A Middleborough Road, Box Hill South Tel 9890 1222 www.granitetransformations.com.au [ 22 ] MONASH WEEKLY – YOUR COMMUNITY VOICE

April 29, 2013

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Kitchen makeovers.


local business advertising feature

A toast to 32 years he Hotel Bruce County and its experienced staff will soon be celebrating more than 32 years of anniversaries, birthdays, Mother’s Days, weddings and Friday night drinks after work. Then there’s an ongoing community support of local clubs and school fund-raising. The hotel, in Blackburn Road, Mt Waverley, has a lot to recommend it, such as Clancy’s Restaurant, the Overflow Cafe|Wine Bar, multiple conference spaces and 38 four-star rooms ranging from queens to garden suites. General manager Debra Harmon, a member of the owning family, said the hotel was more than a comfortable, welcoming place to stay. It’s also a popular private function venue. “We love to see families and friends celebrating their special moments and it’s a delight when they come back year after year,’’ she said. ‘‘We often then see guests book their own special occasions with us. It’s a happy circle.” The lunchtime specials and seasonal menus in the Overflow Cafe|Wine Bar and Clancy’s

T

Restaurant are also a big drawcard, attracting locals throughout the week and at weekends. They cater for large groups, or intimate dinners for two, and have a range of beverages that will make even the most discerning drinker smile. Conveniently situated about 20 minutes from the CBD, the hotel is easily reached via the Monash Freeway and EastLink. The accessible location, between the outer suburbs and the inner city, makes it perfect for leisure and business travellers. To find out about regular and special events, like Mother’s Day, wine dinners and comedy/ theatre lunches, or complimentary finger food on Friday nights, phone 8805 8400. The Overflow Cafe is open Monday to Friday for breakfast, lunch and dinner, and on Saturday for dinner. Clancy’s Restaurant opens Thursday and Friday for lunch, Thursday to Saturday for dinner.

Let’s celebrate: Hotel Bruce County’s a fine venue for all occasions

Hotel Bruce County is at 445 Blackburn Road, Mt Waverley. For bookings, email dine@brucecounty.com.au

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HOTEL BRUCE COUNTY | 445 BLACKBURN RD, MT WAVERLEY | 8805 8400 www.brucecounty.com.au | www.overflow-cafe.com.au | www.clancysrestaurant.com.au April 29, 2013 MONASH WEEKLY – YOUR COMMUNITY VOICE

[ 23 ]


NEWS ●

Vietnam veteran tells of the service history forgot BY TARA McGRATH STUDYING in your sixties for a third doctorate might seem to be more pastime than career stepping stone, but for John Carroll his latest phD was about shedding light on a cause close to his heart. He had long felt, since his own return from the Vietnam War, that he and his navy shipmates had gone under-recognised for their work in that conflict. Mr Carroll, 69, who has spent his retirement studying and researching rather than relaxing, will be at Monash University tomorrow to receive his third doctorate. Equally rewarding, his work has been published as the book titled Out of Sight, Out of Mind. The Ferntree Gully resident was on board the HMAS Sydney and HMAS Yarra during the Vietnam War and

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pretty easy, but those in the navy disagreed.’’ He claimed naval veterans were ‘‘dropping off the twig faster than the army’’, primarily because of their close proximity to the chemical defoliant Agent Orange. Mr Carroll said it was confirmed by government authorities that his prostate cancer several years ago resulted from exposure to Agent Orange. ‘‘Numerous health studies found that naval vets suffered the worst,’’ he said. After returning from the Vietnam War, Mr Carroll worked as a technical school teacher until he retired in 1990 to focus on study. The Carrolls are a family of students, with the author’s son and daughter achieving a doctorate and masters respectively. ‘‘But we still find time to support the Demons,’’ Mr Carroll said.

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believes navy veterans did not receive enough recognition for their efforts during the conflict. His original thesis identified and dispelled various myths which developed around the importance of sea transport and logistical support. One of the main problems was that historical records of the navy’s involvement were poorly compiled, Mr Carroll said. In 2006, he contacted about 25 captains and commanders of ships during the Vietnam War to get their comments on monthly reports that were completed at the time. ‘‘Lucky I got in touch then because only 12 are now left,’’ Mr Carroll said. So began a six-year journey that he hoped would give people a greater appreciation of what naval officers did during the Vietnam War. ‘‘The title of my book — out of sight, out of mind — says it all really.’’ ‘‘People thought the navy had it

There’s now one destination that lets you choose the way you access your local news. You’ll find all the latest breaking updates, as well as the current edition of the Weekly available for you to read online. If that’s not enough, you can even find out where to pick up your nearest copy by simply entering your postcode.

JUST VISIT YOURCOMMUNITYVOICE.COM.AU

When it’s right, your heart will know. Come along and find out why Sacré Cœur is right for your family. Year 5 Scholarships and Years 9, 10 and 11 Academic and Music Scholarships available to commence in 2014. Visit www.sacrecoeur.vic.edu.au for details or call our Registrar on 9835 2713.

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April 29, 2013

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TIMEOUT

A writer’s voice, unedited BY KAREN COOMBS ever mind the literary accolades and impressive resume — Cate Kennedy still knows what it’s like to get writer’s block, just like any of her peers. With her experience however, comes knowledge, and what Kennedy knows is not to think harder, but to keep writing. The popular Australian author says writers must learn to work without their ‘inner censor’, to ignore the pressure to write something incredible — in other words, just do it. ‘‘You can’t do it at an abstract level,’’ she said. ‘‘You can’t do it by thinking, but writing. In that way you find your inner voice and get a feel for your writing.’’ Kennedy will share her knowledge with other lovers of reading and writing as a special guest at the first Dandenong Ranges Writers Festival next month. It’s an ideal time to put into practice another of her tips for combating writer’s block, and that’s to meet with other writers — something Kennedy, a twice winner of The Age short story competition, is passionate about.

N

‘‘I love meeting readers and talking to other writers,’’ she said. ‘‘It’s a good sign when I come away from a workshop energised rather than drained. I love talking about the things that people find problematic. It’s a way to see that you’re not the only person having writing difficulties, everybody’s [writing] problems are universal.’’ Kennedy will present two full-day workshops covering various writing techniques and tips for finding your story’s heart. She particularly likes the way the festival is organised so participants can learn more about their own writing rather than just sit in on talks. ‘‘Rather than just listen, you learn more about them [authors] and their writing,’’ she said. ‘‘It’s a great dimension. It’s a great way to integrate that love of literature, and to enjoy it as a new writer. It’s a different way to listen, you want to know how they got the story together.’’ Apart from discussing the craft of writing, Kennedy will be inspiring emerging writers to find their own voice and reconnect with why they enjoy writing in the first place. ‘‘I like to focus on why you are writing this now, why this story. People don’t know what

they’ve got, the undercurrent of the story they are carrying around them. It’s a chance to step back, [and allow] others in the class to see it.’’ Autumn in the Dandenongs will be the ‘‘stunning’’ setting for the month-long festival, festival organiser Melissa Chipp said. Events range from a treasure hunt with children’s author Andy Griffiths to sharing canapes with top chef Shannon Bennett. Multi awardwinning poet Emilie Zoey Baker will demonstrate her distinctive style of ‘performance poetry’ while literary enthusiasts are invited to a retro tea party. ‘‘It will be an eclectic offering,’’ Ms Chipp said. ‘‘There’s something for everyone. The Dandenongs has a unique culture and history [in the arts] and this is an effort to celebrate that tradition and bring people to the ranges.’’ The Dandenong Ranges Writers Festival will run from May 2-29. Details: autumnauthors.com.

Write stuff: Cate Kennedy will share her expertise at the coming Dandenong Ranges Writers Festival.

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April 29, 2013 MONASH WEEKLY – YOUR COMMUNITY VOICE

[ 25 ]


NEWS

Advertisement

The Child Care Rebate is NOT income tested Cheerful help: Kara Waterworth, Naomi Pho and Amanda Merrett are raising money for the Salvo’s Red Shield Appeal.

Tin army sallies forth AFTER nearly 50 years of door-knocking and tin-rattling for the Salvation Army, Bruce Redman says he has only rarely been rebuffed by a member of the public. The majority are generous when they see volunteers at traffic lights, at shopping centres or at their door, and most have something to give. ‘‘People are very generous and very supportive of the Salvation Army. I suppose they can see that we do good work,’’ Dr Redman says. But while most are happy to donate, a constant shortage of volunteers means that some donations are never received by welfare organisation. ‘‘The problem is if someone’s not there to collect, then that money goes begging, unfortunately,’’ Dr Redman said. The Salvation Army, affectionately known as the Salvos, estimates that it helps more than a million Australians a year — roughly one person every 30 seconds. Their services range from providing beds for the homeless to helping disadvantaged parents feed their children. It also extends support to people affected by drug, alcohol or gambling addiction and those touched by domestic violence. In order to run its services, the Salvation Army said that it needs about $80 million a year, $10 million of which is collected during the Red Shield Appeal. Money raised with the help of volunteers during the appeal helps the organisation provide 2000 beds for the homeless and more than 100,000 meals to the hungry. Dr Redman says the organisation is always in desperate need of good volunteers. He encouraged residents to volunteer for the appeal on the weekend of May 25-26. ‘‘All they need to do is to give up a couple of hours of their time on either the 25th or the 26th to either knock on doors or to collect at intersections. ‘‘That’s it, really. It’s a bit of fun actually. We do find that people come from all walks of life and ages.’’

The Australian Government offers two types of financial assistance for child care: the Child Care Benefit and the Child Care Rebate.

The Child Care Rebate is not income tested.

It pays up to 50% of your out-of-pocket costs. Up to $7,500 per child, per year.

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For more information on what you are entitled to and how to claim, visit australia.gov.au/mychild or call 13 24 68

Helping families with the cost of child care

[ 26 ] MONASH WEEKLY – YOUR COMMUNITY VOICE

April 29, 2013

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Authorised by the Australian Government, Capital Hill, Canberra

The Salvation Army’s Red Shield Appeal will be held on May 25 and 26. Residents interested in volunteering can call 13 SALVOS (13 72 58) or visit salvationarmy.org.au.


Environmental acts: Friends of Scotchmans Creek and Valley Reserve speaker’s forum is at 7.30pm on May 16 at Alvie Hall, Mount Waverley (corner High Street and Alvie Roads). Hear Nicholas Croggon, a lawyer from the Environment Defenders Office, on the 25th anniversary of the Flora and Fauna Guarantee Act. Details: Ted Mason 9802 3481 or tedmason@bigpond.net.au. Fleet feet: Enjoy fitness walking with other locals at the Waverley Community Learning Centre, 5 Fleet Street, Mount Waverley, Monday and/or Wednesdays throughout the year from April 15. The group leaves from local parks for walks of about one hour. New people can join at any time throughout the year. Cost: $10. Bookings essential on 9807 6011 or email info@waverleyclc.org.au Gentle exercise: Tai chi and chi kung classes held 9am Saturday at Valley Reserve, Mount Waverley. Details: 9700 0547. Help on wheels: The Monash Volunteer Resource Centre needs volunteers for its Meals on Wheels program, to help elderly and disabled people stay in their homes as long as possible. Locals need to have three mornings a week or fortnight free and a

current driver’s licence. Details: 9562 0414. Membership available: The Combined Probus Club of Waverley Gardens meets at the Vegas Club, Waverley Gardens shopping centre, 9.45am on the last Tuesday each month. Details: Rick, 9801 4049 or Noela 9560 2528.

SEE&DO ●

PICTURE: ROB CAREW

AA help: Alcoholics Anonymous meets 7.30pm every Wednesday at Kerrie Road Neighbourhood House in Glen Waverley. Details: 1300 222 222. Public speaking: Waverley Communicators holds classes every second and fourth Tuesday of the month at the Mount Waverley Community Centre. Details: Heather, 9576 8790, or Hazel, 9578 1947. Local lessons: Pilates classes on Monday, Thursday and Saturday mornings in the Uniting Church Hall, 482 High Street Road, Mount Waverley, and Tuesday evenings at Parkhill Primary School hall, Ashwood. Details: karenspilates.com or 9807 0429. Send details by noon on the Wednesday before publication to eastsee&do @yourweekly.com.au or See & Do, PO Box 318, Dandenong 3175.

Magic carpet Helene Toohey has plenty of warm thoughts for this winter. The quiltmaker is holding patchwork and quilting classes at the Mount Street Neighbourhood House on 6 Mount Street, Glen Waverley, until the end of June. Cost: up to $151. Details: 9803 8706

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[ 29 ]


SPORT ●

Anzac Day matches a success BY ROY WARD ANZAC Day football in the Monash area looks certain to remain after Clayton and Glen Waverley Hawks both had a successful start with their inaugural matches on Thursday. Both clubs recorded better than average crowds for the matches while also forming good links with the Clayton and Waverley RSLs, which supported the matches and also received fund-raising from the day. Clayton hosted East Malvern at Meade Reserve while the Hawks played Mitcham. Hawks president Steve Potts called his club’s first Anzac Day at Central Reserve a success and said he expected the match to attract even more people next year. ‘‘It was a better crowd than we normally have

judging from the gate, and the canteen staff were run off their feet all day,’’ Potts said. ‘‘We had long lines for the canteen for half the match and overall the crowd number is something we can build on next year because we missed a few opportunities to advertise it this year.’’ Potts said Waverley RSL was keen to tailor the match to its Anzac Day next year while he praised Mitcham’s following for coming to the match. The Hawks and Mitcham will discuss the match ahead of next year with the Hawks keen to retain the right to host the match while Clayton has offered East Malvern the opportunity to host an Anzac Day clash against them next year. Plans for that match will only continue at the end of the season, with East Malvern in its first year of division 1 football and expected to figure in the releg-

ation fight at season’s end. If East Malvern gets relegated, the Clays are expected to find a new opponent for Anzac Day next year. Clays coach Ben McGee said he was happy with the inaugural Anzac Day match. “It will be a memorable thing, to be involved in the inaugural 2013 Anzac Day clash,” he said. “We want to continue our association with East Malvern and make it a yearly event. I’m very proud to have that sense of connection to the people who give our country such service. “I think people will go away today and say ‘geez, that was just a local footy match but the way they did it was outstanding’. “At the end of the day only 95,000 people can get into the MCG. We would like to get a few people who aren’t there to come back to local footy.”

Championship effort, borrowed spikes and all BEING athletic can get you a lot of success in sport. Just ask Westall Secondary College student Lieng Tang. Tang, who won a gold medal in the 11 years long jump at the School Sports Australia national athletics championships while at Westall Primary School, was last week awarded a School Sports Victoria Sporting Blue award for excellence in athletics at primary school level. Tang also claimed silver in the 100-metre relay and bronze in the 200-metre sprint along with a host of medals for softball, cross-country, aussie rules and rugby league. After coming to Australia from Cambodia as a small child, Tang had never belonged to a sporting club or had coaching opportunities before he came to Westall, where his teachers, especially physical education teacher Donna Westie, introduced him to the sports he now adores. When preparing for the state athletics championships last year, Tang didn’t even have a pair of running spikes until a few weeks before the event. ‘‘He ran in runners at regional track and field trials,’’ Westie explains. ‘‘One of the divisional co-ordinators asked him what size he was and they lent him new spikes. ‘‘Three weeks before the championships he was running in borrowed spikes.’’ Tang owns his own running spikes now and is enjoying the benefits of even more speed in his races. ‘‘They make me faster by a few metres. I am very happy,’’ Tang said. His favourite athletics events are the 200 metres and long jump but when it comes to choosing which style of footy he likes best he can’t decide. ‘‘I can’t pick,’’ Tang said.

State honour: Westall Primary School’s Lieng Tang, middle, won an outstanding athlete award for his efforts in athletics at the Victorian School Sports Awards last week. He is pictured with former AFL star Chris Johnson, left, and London Olympic water polo player Rowie Webster. ‘‘Probably rugby league. I love sprinting, it’s fast.’’ Westie also received a state honour for her work at Westall when she was awarded the School Sports Victoria outstanding teacher award last week. Westie was acknowledged for her coaching achievements and contribution to inter-school sport events over many years. Westie’s appreciation for all sports was demonstrated at Westall Primary School’s footy day some years ago, when she expected to see students turn up in their favourite AFL footy jumpers. To her surprise, most of the kids wore purple and gold jumpers for Mel-

[ 30 ] MONASH WEEKLY – YOUR COMMUNITY VOICE

April 29, 2013

bourne’s new rugby league team, Melbourne Storm. Westie, who didn’t know anything about rugby league at the time, decided to teach herself the rules of the game and how to play it. Years later, her Westall boys’ rugby team won the state championships in 2010 and 2011 while her girls’ side won the state title last year. Westie is passionate about helping all students reach their full potential, no matter what level they are at. ‘‘I tap into what I’ve got, what you’re starting with, I build from there,’’ she said. ‘‘I’m passionate about seeing the kids achieve something so they will feel

good about themselves. There’s something in it for everyone, everyone’s got a job to do out there.’’ Westie said she loves to get out and about and meet up with other sport teachers at the inter-school sports days. ‘‘I love networking with the other teachers,’’ she said. ‘‘We’re like a family, you become good friends and can support each other.’’ Westie said the stories behind people’s achievements in sport inspired her. ‘‘I just love hearing sports stories,’’ Westie said. ‘‘There’s a human story behind everyone.’’ — Karen Coombs

Central faces key challenge MONASH University Central players are bracing themselves to face the best defensive team in the league, VU Western Lightning, in the Devine Victorian Netball League championship division this Wednesday night. Central is coming off a disappointing 38-37 loss to Boroondara Genesis last Wednesday night in which Central failed to handle the Genesis’s defensive pressure and also struggled to shoot accurately. Despite those problems, Central still battled back into the game and took the lead midway through the final term before falling behind once more, then getting to within a goal just seconds ahead of the final buzzer. Central coach Leesa Maxfield said her side would have to be on its game against the Lightning. ‘‘VU has the best defensive pressure in the competition,’’ Maxfield said. ‘‘Against Genesis, the girls commented that it was the first time this season they have faced such tight one-on-one pressure and weren’t used to it. ‘‘You could call what Genesis did to us a wake-up call.’’ Maxfield was also disappointed in Central’s shooting against the Genesis, with Steph Tyrell hitting none of seven shots in the first quarter before being subbed out. Sarah Main shot 15 of 17 shots and Stacey Northey struggled to 22 of 35 shots. ‘‘We didn’t play well and we didn’t stick to our game plan,’’ Maxfield said. ‘‘But when you consider our shooting problems in the first quarter, to only lose by one goal shows we had opportunities to alter the result, especially if we had shown more discipline in keeping with our game plan.’’ Monash University Central faces VU Western Lightning at the State Netball and Hockey Centre, Parkville this Wednesday night at 7pm. — Roy Ward VNL CHAMPIONSHIP LADDER: VU Western Lightning 24 points, 127.20 per cent; City West Falcons 22, 123.37; Peninsula Waves 20, 133.06; Monash University Central 16, 112.17; Boroondara Genesis 16, 105.81; Southern Saints 12, 107.05; North East Blaze 8, 119.40; Yarra Valley Grammar Ariels 8, 87.90; UB Ballarat Pride 6, 65.44; Geelong Cougars 0, 57.14.


Clays score comeback win CLAYTON overcame nerves and lacklustre play to beat East Malvern in their special Anzac Day clash in the Southern Football League division 1 competition on Thursday. The Clays, who had won their opening two matches, trailed a three-quarter time and got a spray from coach Ben McGee before going on to win by 16 points. McGee said the winning form and the experience of playing on Anzac Day got to his players. ‘‘It has been a big three weeks for us as a footy club and we have got some big wins so to roll up and play four days later after beating St Kilda City took its toll physically and mentally,’’ McGee said. ‘‘Our first five kicks from our defenders went straight to opposition players, which definitely

SPORT ●

Bittersweet for Chargers

Got to break free: Clayton’s Tom Crameri attempts to get out of a tackle against East Malvern on Anzac Day. Picture: Sam Stiglec

BY ROY WARD

shows a sense of nervousness. There was a sense of involvement in the big day and even all the press on the Collingwood v Essendon build-up, I think it was hard for the boys not to be caught up in it.’’ The Clays also benefited from their visitors being down to just one interchange player after injuries to leading players Ryan De Visser, Brock Baker and Mitch Ferguson in the first quarter. Clayton won 11.14 (80) to 8.6 (54). Clayton’s Chris Harris and East Malvern’s Shane McCurry won the most courageous player awards for each team while the Clays were awarded the John Monash Cup. The Clays’ best were Chris Morrison, Aaron Purvis, Chris Sewell, Tom Crameri and Brad Robertson. East Malvern coach Matt Carroll said his players were proud to join in the day.

“It was fitting of the day we were playing on, Anzac Day, for us to show some spirit and push on like that while undermanned,” Carroll said. “It’s obviously a little disappointing but it was always going to be tough ask into the breeze in the final quarter.’’ The Clays have lost the points from their round 1 win over Chelsea Heights after mistakenly playing Justin Isaacs before his clearance had cleared. In division 2 on Saturday, Oakleigh District continued its good form with a 93-point win over South Yarra. In division 3, Mount Waverley kept on winning with a 19-point victory over Ashwood. Sandown ran up the score against Hallam Hawks with a 112-point thrashing. For full SFL results go to monashweekly .com.au

OAKLEIGH Chargers fell to a disappointing loss to Geelong Falcons in the TAC Cup on Saturday but still took some points from the week. AFL Victoria announced last week that the Chargers’ one-point loss to Western Jets the previous round had been overturned and made a draw after a scoring error was uncovered during a post-match review. An AFL Victoria spokesman said the error occurred in the second quarter when the goal umpires recorded the Chargers kicking 2.5 (17), when it should have been 2.6 (18). In the clash with Geelong Falcons at Warrawee Park on Saturday, the Chargers trailed at every change and struggled to match the Falcons. The Chargers have had to make many changes to their side due to the beginning of the private school football season. The Falcons went on to win 10.12 (72) to 4.8 (32). ■ Mulgrave, Glen Waverley Hawks and Waverley Blues all had losses in the Eastern Football League this round. The Hawks and Blues both played on Anzac Day. The Hawks lost to Mitcham by 48 points and the Blues fell to Mooroolbark by 14 points. In a 65-point loss on Saturday, the Lions got a dose of reality from EFL division 2 premiership favourite Montrose. ■ Oakleigh Amateurs continued to struggle in the VAFA Premier C Division, falling to another substantial defeat on Saturday, this time at the hands of Mazenod at Scammell Reserve. The Krushers lost to Mazenod 15.18 (108) to 6.13 (49). An injury-depleted Oakleigh failed to capitalise on the strong wind, kicking a total of 2-10 in their quarters with the wind. The Nodders, on the other hand, racked up an impressive 11-7 during their turn with the breeze. In fact, the Krushers’ most productive quarter was the last against the wind, adding 3-3. Tim Scott booted 2 for the Krushers with Pat Ioannidis and Gary Bennett among the best players. For full scores go to monashweekly.com.au.

Cannons parried again as Stars put up stiff resistance OAKLEIGH Cannons couldn’t find the goals and Southern Stars couldn’t keep players on the pitch. Normally the Cannons would have solved their goal problems and scored a comfortable win but not on Friday night, when a nine-man Stars team held strong for a 1-1 Victorian Premier League draw with the Cannons at Jack Edwards Reserve. The Stars went down to 10 men in the opening minutes when Vincent Bontempts was sent off for dragging down Reece Vittiglia in the box. Cannons star Ricky Diaco missed the resulting penalty. Diaco made up for his miscue in stunning fashion midway through the half when he curled a

free kick from the left sideline high into the far corner of the goal to make it 1-0. But the Stars refused to lay down and kept two strikers up front to start the second half, getting their reward in the 66th minute when towering defender David Obaze was left unmarked in the box from a free kick, heading home a perfect ball to even the scores. Despite having Stars midfielder Halil Gur sent off in the 77th minute for a second yellow card, the Cannons could not find the winning goal. Stars’ young goalkeeper Abdulkerim Koc leapt to the top corner of the goal to stop another Diaco free kick. During injury time the Stars even had a chance to steal an unlikely win but shot wide of the goal.

The draw leaves the Cannons with just four points from four matches, placing pressure on coach Bill Theodoropoulos and his players. While both sides only get a point from the draw, the achievement was celebrated by the Stars and commiserated by the Cannons. Stars coach Naya Younen was proud of his young side, praising each man for sticking to his job. “We have a team with the average age of 19 or 20. We don’t have players with the experience of a Ricky Diaco, but they showed tonight they have the hearts of lions.” Theodoropoulos said his players were silent in the rooms after the game. “At Oakleigh you are expected to win matches and we have to start

doing that or one of two things will change: either the coach will be replaced or there will be changes to the players.” The Cannons have signed star goalkeeper Lewis Italiano from Perth Glory and he played against the Stars. Italiano and fellow goalkeeper Griffin McMaster will compete for the keeper’s position. Theodoropoulos confirmed McMaster remained with the Cannons despite not being on the bench against the Stars. The VPL has a break this weekend and the Cannons’ next match is against Bentleigh Greens at Kingston Heath Soccer Complex at 8.15pm on May 10. — Roy Ward

April 29, 2013 MONASH WEEKLY – YOUR COMMUNITY VOICE

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April 29, 2013


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