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tv THE FAMILY \ SBS OnE,

THurSdAY, nOvEMBEr 24, 8.30pM

music 936 \ pEAkIng LIgHTS (dOMInO) The second LP from this Wisconsin husband-and-wife duo is hazed in good weather. You can practically smell the sunscreen on these eight tracks, which sprawl languorously in a dubby mix of psychedelic synths and druggy bass. Fusing electro, tribal rhythms and jangling guitars, standout tracks Birds of Paradise and All the Sun that Shines are guaranteed to raise your temperature (in a very chilled fashion, of course). There are echoes throughout of Ladytron’s glassy kraut-pop, but the arrangements here feel more organic, more romantic and, yes, far more summery. Hypnotic and immersive, 936 promises to be an irresistible soundtrack to the warm months ahead. \

This new eight-part documentary series brings to your living room… a living room. As the intro tells us, there’s nothing special about the Cardamones, except for the 35 remote-controlled cameras fitted in their house. We get to perch from their ceilings and discover exactly what goes on inside an ordinary Melbourne home. Mainly, they watch television. Which is exactly what we’re doing, sat inside our ordinary Melbourne homes. It’s uncanny. Overall, it’s at once as irresistible and as irritating as watching someone else’s home videos. The politics are particularly engaging, if uncomfortable, with mother Josephine a canny player, running small wars of attrition against her recalcitrant husband Angelo. Neither emerges more or less favourable, but more than a few couples will catch themselves in the funfair mirror the pair hold up. It’s hard to know if the show is more or less comfortable if you identify with its stars, but the family appear about as sympathetic as any of us would in such close focus. It isn’t as groundbreaking as Sylvania Waters or as engrossing as more contrived reality fare, but The Family might just provide an addictive alternative to The Slap. Its tiny dramas are far smaller in scale but no less likely to generate debate over who’s to blame. Still, for all that, it’s hard to shake a nagging disappointment as the end credits roll. Perhaps it’s just the sad The but undeniable realisation that our politics are lives aren’t movies after all. On the evidence here, we’re not living particularly grand romances but poorly written, engaging poorly acted and somewhat petty soap operas. \

going out OnE FLEW OvEr THE CuCkOO’S nEST \ OpEnS nOvEMBEr 24, CHApEL OFF CHApEL Famously filmed with Jack Nicholson in the lead, this brutal portrait of life in an American psychiatric hospital has a long history on stage. First treading the boards in 1963, the play was then revived as an award-winning Broadway production in 2001 and, more recently, saw Christian Bale win plaudits for a run in London’s West End. There are no big names in this local revival, but the script remains as unsettling as ever. Mischievous Randall P. McMurphy finds himself in an asylum after faking insanity to avoid a prison term. His irreverent attitude immediately brings him into conflict with the icy Nurse Ratched, who wields true power within the wards. When McMurphy tries to wake his comrades out of their medicated stupor, he marks himself as a threat to her order, requiring a drastic remedy. \

» Thursday-Saturday, 8pm, and Sunday, 6pm; $36, concession $28, groups 10+ $28 (+ BF) mbartlett@theweeklyreview.com.au

NOVEMbEr 23, 2011 \ The weekly review 17

HDV-Heidelberg-20111123-Edition79  

The Weekly Review

HDV-Heidelberg-20111123-Edition79  

The Weekly Review

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