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THE WEEKLY SUN RESPONSIBLE LOCAL JOURNALISM. • BELLEVUE • CAREY • HAILEY • KETCHUM • PICABO • SUN VALLEY • WHAT TO KNOW. WHERE TO BE.

F R E E | NOVEMBER 15 - 21, 2 0 1 7 | V O L . 1 0 - N O . 4 6 | W W W . T H E W E E K L Y S U N . C O M

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Election News Voters Oust Incumbents From Ketchum City Hall

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Nonprofit News Trek With Llamas Covers Vast Wilderness

WIB

Women In Business Special Section See Insert

“Thinking isn’t agreeing or disagreeing. That’s voting.” ~Robert Frost

Barry, a 10-month-old Australian Labradoodle, sports a mortarboard and tassel at Atkinson Park in Ketchum on Friday, Nov. 3. He earned the headgear by… For more information about this image, see “On The Cover” on page 3. Courtesy photo by Fay Petersen

BLACK FRIDAY SPECIALS

SEE PAGE 3


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T H E W E E K LY S U N •

NOVEMBER 15 - 21, 2017

NEWS ELECTION

KETCHUM ELECTIONS SWEEP NEW OFFICIALS INTO OFFICE

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eld last week, the elections in Ketchum swept three incumbents out of office and brought in three first-time political participants. Mayor Nina Jonas lost her bid for reelection to businessman Neil Bradshaw, while both Anne Corrock and Baird Gourlay lost to newcomers Amanda Breen and Courtney Hamilton. Bradshaw, who runs Murphy Business & Financial Corporation of Southern Idaho, says he has a mandate from the voters. “They’re going to make sure I stay on task,” he said. “We need to keep the momentum of engagement going so we can continue with the public participation that we had in this election. “In my first 60 days, and we’re working on it now, we’ll outline a way forward on these three items: housing, relocation for city hall and emergency services, and the rezone of the light industrial area, as per LI mixed use, height allowances, and preserving for industrial use. Live/work space is important to the future of Ketchum.” Bradshaw said he wants to create an environment that works for the many stakeholders in Ketchum, whether they’re voters or not. “We’ll make sure they’re heard, and that there’s a balance for the town,” he said. “Contested elections are not about establishing winners and losers. They’re about establishing what’s important to the community. Everyone wins when the issues that matter to the community are raised and debated openly.” Bradshaw said he was motivated to run because he wanted to see greater public participation. “We want to open the door to city hall, raise public participation and connect people,” he said. “We learn a lot in the aisles of Atkinsons’. I have been able to reach out to different groups and appeal across the interest groups. Now I need to connect them. It starts with empathy. We end up having better and a more respectful dialogue. It’s important to the success of the process.” Bradshaw will leave his position at Ketchum Innovation Center as president of the board. “KIC should continue to have city participation; it’s always had a member of city council on board,” he said. “I just think that I won’t have time. We’ll have a transition;

one, it’s the workload, and it should also be separate from the city. In the work/life/city balance, city has to come first.” Breen, an attorney, will also taper back on aspects of her legal practice. She ran four years ago for a council seat but lost. “I looked at the past four years and there didn’t seem to be much progress,” Breen said. “We needed to have some more action people, and I thought that could be me. I dove right into it. “We’re energetic people,” she added about her fellow victors. “That energy and team work is there between us and we are ready to get to work.” One aspect that affected the changes—the millennials were more engaged, Breen and Hamilton agreed, as did Bradshaw. “Courtney motivated them, which was good for our community,” he said. “In a sense, it shows the changing of the guard of the voter demographic. That’s a good thing because they’re the future of Ketchum and we need to be planning for them.” Breen’s main concerns are affordable housing, encouraging start-up businesses and having stronger regional participation with county and state legislature. “The voters told us ‘things need to get done,’” Breen said. “The first day in there I want to look into light industrial code changes.” Hamilton, 26, who grew up in the Valley, said that the younger “demographic is really engaged. I was so excited that voters saw this. It was an uphill battle but I talked to people face to face. Young people get it. My people were out on the streets in onesie ski suits with signs.” Hamilton earned her bachelor of arts in public policy at Pomona College in California. Not sure which direction she would take, Hamilton moved back to the Valley and worked on several different political campaigns, including those of Michelle Stennett, Dick Fosbury and John Davidson. She is concerned primarily with “housing, collaboration and culture,” she said. “It all comes back to looking at a long-term future for Ketchum, and getting people involved. People are working jobs but not having professional careers. They aren’t fully committed to the area yet. They need housing, but how do they afford housing? People have been willing to make sacrifices

Neil Bradshaw

on housing choices just to live in Ketchum. It comes full circle, to livable wages and job opportunities. “I want to do a better job of engaging with the younger generation,” Hamilton continued. “We can start that easily by changing our methods of outreach. You have to be in front of people’s faces, on social media, talking to people, and figuring out ways to get people involved.”

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PRICING

BY DANA DUGAN

Text (up to 25 words): $5 Additional Text: 20¢ per word Photos: $5 per image • Logo: $10 Deadline: Monday at 1 p.m Space reservations: bulletin@theweeklysun.com

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HOUSEKEEPING

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in the Wood River Valley. Images on notecards by local artist Edith Pendl. Available at the Hailey Atkinsons’ market and Chapter One bookstore in Ketchum. Mail them to your friends and family.

CROSSWORD

answer from page 15

THANK YOU

Thanks For Making ‘Homegrown’ A Success The “Homegrown Film Festival” benefiting the Sawtooth Avalanche Center was OVER THE TOP! Outstanding films, enthusiastic crowd and a wildly successful fundraiser! We would like to extend our heartfelt thanks to Black Diamond Equipment; the athletes, film makers and producers; the Liberty Theatre team; Jack Weekes; Sun Valley Company; Sawtooth Brewery; Atkinsons Market; The Haven Food Truck; Blue Heron Workshop; Copy & Print; the ticket vendors; the volunteers; and each and every one of you who attended (or tried) or gave the event a shout-out. Truly, the Sawtooth Avalanche Center is a community effort! Thank you for your continued support! With gratitude, the Friends of the Sawtooth Avalanche Center.

Want to do more for your community? The Ketchum Fire Department is now accepting applications for Paid-on-Call Firefighters. No experience necessary - we will teach you the skills. Come by the firehouse at 480 East Ave. N, Ketchum to apply. Call Sr. Lt. Tory Frank at 208-726-7805 for more information. Deadline is Tuesday, 11/28.

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Let the Games Begin Gymnastics Meet!! Local competition for Spirit n’ Motion Athletes. First session is beginners at 11:00, second Session Intermediate is 1:00 and advanced is at 3:30. FREE!


T H E W E E K LY S U N • N O V E M B E R 15 - 21, 2017

THE WEEKLY SUN CONTENTS

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fly SUN

in the air

THIS WEEK N O V E M B E R 1 5 - 2 1 , 2017 | VOL. 10 NO. 46

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Election News

Hailey Elects One Incumbent, One Fresh Face To Council

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Education News

Students Interpret Contested Issues In Moot Courts

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The Weekly Sun’s Calendar Stay In The Loop On Where To Be

ON THE COVER Continued from page 1: …graduating from an obedience course by Scotch Pines Dog Training. “He went from a wild and crazy boy to being off-leash after six weeks of the nine-week course,” said owner Fay Petersen. Courtesy photo by Fay Petersen

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FLYING INTO/FROM SUN VALLEY THIS WINTER? IMPORTANT INFO TO KNOW

Ah, winter - we sure do love that snow, but not when it affects air travel. Occasionally winter weather will affect flights into and out of our airport (SUN). But if that happens, fortunately our airlines, FSVA and the airport have partnered to provide a unique diversion busing program that will allow passengers to arrive and/or depart from an alternative nearby airport on the same schedule. If you are traveling to/from SUN this winter, please make sure you are informed about the diversion busing procedures here for your airline. GET FULL DETAILS AT www.flysunvalleyalliance.com/weather-diversions/ SUN Winter Weather Diversion Busing Program will run Nov 1 – April 15. Sign up here for airfare deal alerts and news too!

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“Carole King Tapestry: Live in Hyde Park” will be screened in Ketchum on Thursday, November 16. For a story, see page 12.

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Local artists & photographers interested in seeing their art on our cover page should email submissions to: mandi@ theweeklysun.com (photos should be high resolution and include caption info such as who or what is in the photo, date and location).

THE WEEKLY SUN STAFF 13 W. Carbonate St. • P.O. Box 2711 Hailey, Idaho 83333 Phone: 208.928.7186 Fax: 208.928.7187

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AD SALES Brennan Rego • 208.720.1295 • brennan@theweeklysun.com NEWS EDITOR Dana DuGan • news@theweeklysun.com CALENDAR EDITOR Yanna Lantz • calendar@theweeklysun.com COPY EDITOR Patty Healey STAFF REPORTERS • JoEllen Collins • Dick Dorworth • Maria Prekeges • Jennifer Holly Smith news@theweeklysun.com DESIGN DIRECTOR Mandi Iverson • 208.721.7588 • mandi@theweeklysun.com PRODUCTION & DESIGN Chris Seldon • production@theweeklysun.com ACCOUNTING Shirley Spinelli • 208.928.7186 • accounting@theweeklysun.com PUBLISHER & EDITOR Brennan Rego • 208.720.1295 • publisher@theweeklysun.com DEADLINES Display & Community Bulletin Board Ads — Monday @ 1pm brennan@theweeklysun.com • bulletin@theweeklysun.com Calendar Submissions — Friday @ 5pm calendar@theweeklysun.com www.TheWeeklySun.com Published by Idaho Sunshine Media, LLC

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T H E W E E K LY S U N •

NOVEMBER

15 - 21, 2017

NEWS ELECTION

HAILEY VOTERS FIRM ON CHOICES IN ELECTION

City of Ketchum Downtown Parking Lots Re-Open Beginning Nov. 20, two refurbished paid parking lots will be open to the public - Washington Ave. between 1st and 2nd Streets and 6th and Leadville. The Washington Ave. lot will allow overnight parking this winter. Join the Ketchum Team! The City of Ketchum has a variety of jobs available. Visit ketchumidaho.org for full job descriptions and application.

6th & Leadville Development RFP - EXTENDED The deadline for the city’s request for proposals for a development project at the corner of 6th and Leadville has been extended to Friday, Dec. 29, at 5 p.m. This project could consist of rental community housing and public parking or a public parking structure. Visit ketchumidaho.org/rfp for full description. Public Notice MUNICIPAL CODE TEXT AMENDMENT: On Dec. 12, at 5:30 p.m., the P&Z Commission will hold a Public Hearing on proposed zoning amendments 16.04 and 17.124, Ketchum Municipal Code, concerning avalanche design standards and development standards for commercial off-site snow storage The public is invited to comment through Dec. 12, 2017 at 5:00 p.m. Public Meetings CITY COUNCIL MEETING Monday • November 20 • 5:30 pm • City Hall PLANNING AND ZONING COMMISSION MEETING Monday • December 11 • 5:30 pm • City Hall

Keep Up With City News Visit ketchumidaho.org to sign up for email notifications, the City eNewsletter and to follow us on Facebook and Twitter. Email questions and comments to participate@ketchumidaho.org.

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BY DANA DUGAN

n Tuesday, the City of Hailey held an election for two city council seats and two referendums that could have affected Hailey’s coffers. Only 1,078 voters out of 3,949 bothered to vote. Despite the low numbers, voters were firm in their selections. Both propositions failed by a large percentage. Proposition One called for repealing and refunding development impact fees for construction other than residential. The second proposition would have eliminated the need to renew business licenses. Voters chose a new city council member, Kaz Thea, who received 726 votes over Henno Heitur, who received 310 votes. Longtime councilwoman Martha Burke held her seat with 647 votes over her opponent Jeff Bacon, who received 376 votes. Each will serve four-year terms beginning in January. Along with Burke, the other sitting council includes Colleen Teevin and Pat Cooley. Martha Burke, who didn’t respond to a request for comment, has been a councilwoman in Hailey for more than two decades.    Thea plans to use her time on the council beginning with several issues, including making Hailey more oriented to pedestrians and bikers. “I want to put people on notice that they have entered Hailey,” she said. Thea hopes to make Main Street more friendly, and less of a highway. “It’s a long-term plan, but we should make it go all the way from the north end to McKercher Park. I also want to see River Street be a heavily used bike street. I want to bring back a sustainability program in a big way. It has to have more visibility and more energy and be its own program. I will work hard to do that.” Thea, who has a background in natural sciences, will continue her work running the Bike-Ped program for Mountain Rides. She is also manager of the Wood River Farmers’ Markets. “I am looking forward to working with Bellevue about the annexation,” she continued. “I want to work with them closely to keep some dedicated open space for each town. The rest might be a mixed-use district, for the future.” The annexation would include the Eccles ranch land on the west side of Highway 75, between the

NEWS ELECTION

Kaz Thea

cities of Hailey and Bellevue. Quigley Farm and its progress is another issue with which Thea wants to be involved. “I look forward to working on the whole Hailey Greenway project, with the community, the Wood River Land Trust and the city,” she said. Thea also plans on working toward a Valley-wide fire department consolidation. “We need to interact across jurisdictions,” she said. “We are one Valley.” She stresses the importance of attracting new businesses, and creating affordable workforce housing, which was also the number one issue in Ketchum’s election discussions. “We need to use all the tools in the tool box,” she said. “It will take a lot of collaboration across jurisdictions. We have to be forward thinking. I’m progressive in everything I do. We have to really plan, not just for today or tomorrow, but to broaden our perspective and look to the future.” Thea added that her opponent, Heitur, “is totally tws awesome and I hope he stays engaged.”

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un Valley City Council President Keith Saks and Councilmember Brad DuFur were both reelected to fouryear terms. “I congratulate both of them and look forward to our continued collaboration on the issues in our fair city,” said Mayor Peter Hendricks.

As well, the voters passed the Bond Election Ordinance authorizing Sun Valley to issue up $17.5 million in Sun Valley General Obligation Bonds for the replacement, reconstruction and improvement of roads, paths, bridges and related infrastructure throughout the city. Preliminary work began last week on the bond issue and meetings will be held with staff and the city engi-

neer to discuss timeline issues for the roads and paths projects. “The tasks entrusted to the city’s elected officials and staff are formidable and weighty,” Hendricks said. “They will not be taken lightly. We promise diligence, transparency and dedication to perform and complete our duties.” tws

NEWS ELECTION

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n Tuesday, Nov. 7, voters in Bellevue reelected incumbent aldermen Shaun Mahoney and Kathryn Goldman. Anne Mulick did not run again. Ned Burns was elected to fill the vacant seat. There was no opposition for these

seats. In Carey, Lane Durtschi and Duane Edgington both won seats on the city council, unopposed. The mayor, Randall Patterson, also running unopposed, retained his position. tws


T H E W E E K LY S U N •

NOVEMBER

NEWS IN BRIEF

Marriott Names Best Mountain Towns

Sun Valley joined other resorts in a lineup of best mountain towns according to Marriott Traveler website. “Sun Valley’s origin story isn’t tied to mining or laying railroad tracks,” says the blurb. “Rather, it’s the birthplace of resort skiing in North America, following its 1936 founding by lifelong skier and Union Pacific Railroad chairman W. Averell Harriman. Snow-starved Hollywood celebrities (like Cary Grant and Earnest (sic) Hemingway) reinforced Sun Valley’s rep as the place to see and be seen, and a whole new generation fell in love with the central Idaho region. Today’s Sun Valley still delivers a singular skiing/snowboarding experience, now spread across two mountains broken into Dollar Mountain—the beginner’s peak, and Bald Mountain—a 3,400-foot vertical drop with legions of intermediate and advanced runs. Check out the Tyrolean-style pedestrian village with plenty of high-end dining, lodging, and après-ski pursuits like ice skating.” Interestingly, Cary Grant was not a visitor to Sun Valley. We think Marriott Traveler meant to write Gary Cooper.

Applications Being Accepted For Ketchum Fire Department

The Ketchum Fire Department is currently accepting applications for paid-on-call firefighters. The paid-on-call volunteer is compensated for their time responding on calls and participating in training. They train with all members of the department and respond on calls when they are available to help. This position is for individuals who care about their community and can commit the time to train and respond to emergency incidents, roughly 100 hours per year. The 173-hour class starts mid-January and runs through May of 2018 and includes cadets from all of the county’s fire departments. Those selected will then take the nationally-certified Firefighter I academy test. “The training is intense and requires a large time commitment on the part of our

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cadets,” Tory Frank, Ketchum Fire Department fire training officer, said. “It’s also a ton of fun and you come out of the academy fully prepared to be an integral part of our emergency response team.” After successfully completing the training, the students will be brought on as probationary firefighters. Applications can be picked up at the Ketchum Fire Department, 480 N. East Ave., in Ketchum. For more information, contact fire training officer Tory Frank at (208) 726-7805 or tcanfield@ketchumfire.org, visit ketchumidaho.org.

Idaho’s Ski Season Has Officially Begun

Lookout Pass, in Mullan, Idaho, near Coeur d’Alene, is the second Northwest ski resort to open this season. Now opened for weekends, Lookout is the seventh U.S. ski resort that’s opened to date and one of only 10 resorts currently operating in North America. Ski resorts throughout Idaho are gearing up for the season. Just across the border, in Alta, Wyo., Grand Targhee Resort received 90 inches of snow so far this season and plans to open Nov. 17. Yesterday, The Wall Street Journal named the mountain one of the five best-kept secret ski resorts in the U.S. Conditions permitting, other resorts opening soon will include Sun Valley on Thanksgiving Day, Nov. 23; Silver Mountain Resort on Nov. 24; Schweitzer Mountain Resort on Dec. 1; Brundage Mountain and Tamarack Resort on Dec. 8; and Bogus Basin on Dec. 9. The National Weather Service Climate Prediction Center forecast weak La Niña conditions in the Pacific Ocean this winter for the Northern Hemisphere. “The season is starting off wet and cool enough for snow, and the Climate Prediction Center’s December-through-February seasonal forecast gives Idaho a slightly above-average chance of above-normal precipitation across the state,” said Dave Groenert, a meteorologist with the National Weather Service Forecast Office in Boise. Idaho experienced a La Niña winter last year, with the wettest October-June on record.

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T H E W E E K LY S U N •

NOVEMBER

15 - 21, 2017

500 MILES THROUGH IDAHO WILDERNESS WITH LLAMAS

BY JENNIFER HOLLY SMITH

n July 5, 2017, Bob Jonas and his wife Sarah Michael set out on a 500-mile trek with a pack of llamas through the six mountain ranges that form a horseshoe around Ketchum. Jonas, a Ketchum native, founded Sun Valley Trekking Co. in 1982 and led clients in wild Idaho, Yellowstone and Alaska for 18 years. This ambitious walk was planned to raise money for the 2018 class of Wild Gift fellows. Jonas founded the nonprofit organization, Wild Gift, in 2002, with the idea that this world needed new leaders who had an appreciation of the natural world. “It was also a celebration of home country for myself and my 75th birthday, and the partnership that my partner and I have,” Jonas said. The llamas used for the couple’s trek were rented from Wilderness Ridge Trail Llamas, in Idaho Falls. The trip was broken into 10 different legs so the pair could resupply. They often met with family and friends, some of whom joined them for short periods, including Jonas’ daughter, Ketchum Mayor Nina Jonas; his niece’s son, Jonas Benson, 8, his father John Benson, and Louise Noyes. “It was nine days and he was spectacular,” Jonas said of his grandnephew. “He’s a 48-pound kid carrying a 15-pound pack and leading a llama.” The 10-day second leg of their trip took them through the Sawtooths after traversing the Smoky Mountains beginning just outside of Hailey up to Smiley Creek Lodge. “The Sawtooths were still, in the high country on the major mountain passes, under snow,” Jonas said. “It was too deep for four-leggeds, equines and llamas, and then the canyon streams were still raging—not safe passages. So we went around to the north end of the Sawtooths and did a loop.” The couple were able to keep in communication with a messaging and navigation device called InReach that uses satellite with a smartphone, allowing them to communicate from anywhere on the trail. This became essential on the third leg as they quickly ran into what Jonas called “the big problem in the Middle Fork country, deadfall.” The Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness, the largest wilderness in the continental U.S., has a let-burn policy. “The net of that is, 30 years, 40 years later, there’s a lot of dead timber,” Jonas said. They were forced to do a fair amount of work on the trails themselves, sawing and clearing downfallen trees. “If you can imagine pickup sticks, they’re interwoven, there’s that many,” Jonas said. “So you’re forced to the side of the trail to find a way around. And there’s so much crap there too that sometimes you’re scouting a route very circuitous to get the animals through. It slows your pace to less than a mile an hour.” In fact, the couple had to turn around and go back out. They contacted friends who dropped them at Big Creek to start again. Their next challenge was smoke from wildfires that burned around them; another fire eventually blocked their planned route, and so an alternate route was taken to the Bighorn Crags. “You don’t do a three-month, 500-mile journey through the wilderness without some appreciation that you may have to change your route,” said Jonas, who began plan-

Bob Jonas stands in a peaceful moment with a llama on the trail. Photo courtesy of Bob Jonas

ning the trip last winter. At this point, they were concerned that they would get “fired-in” and wanted to exit the Frank Church Middle Fork area for good. The llamas were on the trail for about 50 days and needed a rest, so they took a seven-day break. They sojourned at a friend’s ranch where they were able to watch the eclipse before heading back out on the trail. They went back into the Sawtooths and came out at Redfish Lake before heading into the White Clouds, where they met friends, who joined them on the smoky trail from fires throughout the Pacific Northwest. “It was so dense that everybody wanted to leave except for me and Louise,” Jonas said. “So they did, and we went on to our next route, which was the Jim McClure-Jerry Peak Wilderness.” From there, Jonas and Michael went into the Pioneers, where they were interviewed by a crew from the public television show “Outdoor Idaho.” The crew filmed them over a couple of days of trekking to be included in an episode called “Into the Pioneers,” which will air on Thursday, Dec. 7. In September, Michael decided that the injuries she had suffered earlier were enough and she decided to end her participation. “She joined for the filming of ‘Outdoor Idaho,’ but then left the trek at that point,” Jonas said. “She fell on her tailbone on a rock, and she had also injured her knee in the Middle Fork country.” Jonas was caught by a big storm in the middle of Sep-

jane’s artifacts

tember that dropped about a foot of snow. That drove him out of the Pioneers and he had to wait a few days to go back in for the last leg. “The most spectacular part you’ll see from Baldy right to the east is the last ridgeline of the Pioneers, which drops right on down to Craters of the Moon, which I did by myself,” Jonas said. After three days and with more threatening weather on the horizon, he decided that was the end. That was October 1. Together, and separately, Jonas and Michael trekked for 81 days, crossing 38 mountain passes, mostly above 9,000 feet. Throughout their journey they wrote about their adventures on a blog, wild-trails.weebly.com. “This trek was part for ourselves, personally, and part for Wild Gift,” Jonas said. “I’ve traveled wild country all my life and when I turned 60 I wanted to give back. It was imperative that new leaders appreciate the natural world. We all live in two worlds; one is the natural world, resources and gifts on which we all depend, and the other is the human world, [in] which we spend all our time, and we take the natural world for granted.” Wild Gift selects a group of social entrepreneurs each year for a 16-month fellowship that includes mentoring, seed funding, and two wilderness programs that teach leadership and business skills. Many fellows go on to receive national and international recognition for their innovative ideas and work. tws

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T H E W E E K LY S U N •

NOVEMBER

15 - 21, 2017

NEWS EDUCATION

STAYCATION PACKAGE

Sun Valley Lodge | starting at $185 | Oct 1 – Nov 21 only

EXPLORE ALL SUN VALLEY HAS TO OFFER Relax by the heated outdoor pool and explore the 20,000-square-foot spa, yoga and fitness center during your stay (20% discount on 50 and 80 minute massages available). With this package, enjoy a free movie ticket to the Sun Valley Opera House, free bowling alley pass, and free ice skating session (includes rentals)! Call (800) 786-8259 to book your “Staycation Package” today! Eleventh-grader Eliza Marks practices for her moot court appearance. Photo courtesy of Community School

COMMUNITY SCHOOL HOLDS MOOT COURTS

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BY FAYE PREKEGES INTERN FOR THE WEEKLY SUN

ommunity School in Sun Valley offers a class each year called Interpretations in Law and Literature, taught by Community School Upper School English teacher Phil Huss. Huss created the class when he realized that different literary interpretive modes, used to write English papers, are also used by Supreme Court justices when they interpret cases. Robert Frost, the Pulitzer Prize-winning poet, was the literary subject of the current course taking place this month at the Sun Valley private school. The moot courts, a mock court in which students argue imaginary cases for practice, are scheduled into the course after students study and write essays using different interpretive modes on the works of Frost, and a variety of Supreme Court cases. “The moot courts are not for debating facts but debating the reasonableness of the cases’ arguments,” Huss said. There are seven moot courts over the course of the class. The first covers the constitutionality of affirmative action. The second, which took place last week, covers abortion. The next are same-sex marriage, religious liberty, the juvenile death penalty, and the right to bear arms. Huss, who writes each hypothetical case himself, uses the seventh court to encourage students to look at how their own constitutional rights are being upheld or not, with topics like search and seizures in schools. For each moot court, Huss creates a hypothetical court case and assembles two lawyer teams of two students, with remanding students as judges. Lawyers submit their arguments to the judges beforehand and then have 30 minutes to present an argument. During the process, students wear formal courtroom attire, with judges in robes and lawyers dressed up for their presentations. The courts take place in the Community School Theatre, with parents welcome to watch. At the end of each, students use the interpretive modes learned in class to draft an argument on the topic presented. Huss then evaluates them based on their ability to go in and out of the interpretations in their arguments. “The students have a tremendous amount of fun during these courts that make the class even more enjoyable and educational,” Huss said. “They learn there are beautiful passages in the traditional opinions of law, are exposed to phenomenal persuasive nonfiction writing, and truly grow as writers while learning how to solidify their beliefs and hold their own in arguments on paper and in person.” tws

Closing Nov. 22

Bag Sale Sat. and Sun., Nov. 18 & 19 Choose Any 15 Movies For $20 208.788.8822 • 141 N. Main St. Hailey

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sun THE WEEK 8

T H E W E E K LY S U N • N O V E M B E R

15 - 21, 2017

the weekly

Gazzy Parman—front row, center—a world-famous pioneer in Brazilian jiu jitsu, and a member of the female BJJ “Dirty Dozen” (the first 12 women outside Brazil to reach the rank of black belt in the sport), poses with students and coaches at USA Grappling Academy in Bellevue on Saturday. Parman taught a seminar to adult and youth students at the academy. “Gazzy truly enjoyed her time in the Wood River Valley,” said academy owner Lee Anderson. “She rated our valley as one of the top three friendliest places she has ever been to in the world.” Photo courtesy of USA Grappling Academy

LETTER TO THE EDITOR GARY HOFFMAN

The People Have Spoken

As the cliché goes, “The people have spoken,” by a huge margin they are demanding new approaches and progressive change for Ketchum. But sweeping out the incumbents is no guarantee of success there; it will take determination and backbone for the new administration to join with the two incumbent councilmen in making the tough calls that are long overdue for our city Five generations of family can impede new ideas; smugness and condescension in City Council are no substitutes for action. The message is clear: Be part of the solutions or be prepared to be replaced… that goes for members of the city administration as well. I invite all members of our community to come to the new City Council meetings where streamlining in conducting meetings will be the new norm, where unpreparedness will be a thing of the past, where proposals from citizens will be given a quick but thorough evaluation so as to be put on the agenda for further deliberation and action. I call on the new administration to be in close touch with all city workers and departments for their thoughts and suggestions. I further call on them to do their homework when it comes to getting the pulse of the people. No more $23 million palaces. No more proposals without visual representations so that we know exactly what is being proposed (i.e., Forest Service Park/City Hall). And I call on ALL the people, voters or not, to give Neil Bradshaw and the Council the continued support that their overwhelming success has earned them. They need it but, more importantly, we need it. Gary Hoffman Ketchum resident

Submit A Letter To The Editor Do you have a response to a story or letter we’ve published, or some new thoughts you’d like to share with the community? Submit a letter to the editor. Please include your full name and in which city you reside (unincorporated Blaine County if you live outside city limits). Published letters don’t necessarily reflect the opinion of The Weekly Sun or any of its staff members. Email letters to publisher@theweeklysun.com.

NEWS IN BRIEF

Climate Change Summit To Be Held

Safeguarding Idaho’s Economy in a Changing Climate – Our Water, Our Land, Our Health, Our Future, will be held next week. This first-of-its-kind statewide summit will be an interactive two-day gathering with Idaho business and community leaders, including Idaho Power, Hewlett-Packard, American Lung Association, Sierra Club, and Monsanto. Attendees will work side by side with conference participants using facilitated Human Centered Design brainstorming sessions to gain insights, learn about new business practices, build collaborations and discover solutions that make sense for Idaho’s communities, economy, lands and waters. “The idea is to recruit everyone to the table and have real conversations about real solutions—small and large, individual and collaborative,” said David New with the Society for American Foresters, Idaho Chapter. “We all share the same opportunities and challenges.” The statewide summit will be held at Boise State University, Idaho State University, the Henrys Fork Watershed Council in Ashton, and at the University of Idaho. Morning keynote and panel discussions will be live in Boise from the Boise State Student Union Building and streamed online for participants to view at the ISU Pond Student Union Building in Pocatello, the Henrys Fork Foundation Office in Ashton and the UI Commons building in Moscow. Afternoon facilitated workshops will be held at all three venues.   To register and for more information on the schedule, visit idahoclimatesummit.com.

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Camp R upcoming Dec. 5 at t ty website review du In respo Rainbow G County Co whether t This me regarding potentially To learn ever-home

Sun Valley Arts & Crafts Applications

Artist applications for the Sun Valley Center for the Arts’ 50th Annual Arts & Crafts Festival will be available online beginning Friday, Dec. 1. The 2018 festival will take place Aug. 10-12 at Atkinson Park in Ketchum. Artists in all fine-art and fine-craft disciplines may apply. The outdoor juried Arts & Crafts Festival also includes artist demonstrations, live music, food vendors and a children’s activity area. “It’s wonderful to be able to celebrate the 50th anniversary of this Festival that has long been a mainstay of Sun Valley summers,” said Kristin Poole, artistic director at The Center. “Over the years, the Festival has welcomed hundreds of extraordinary artists and craftspeople from around the country. It is a treat every August to see some familiar faces and greet new makers to our community.” Detailed information about the Arts & Crafts Festival can be found at sunvalleycenter.org/ arts-crafts-festival. Questions about the application process may be directed to Sarah Stavros, festival director, at sstavros@sunvalleycenter.org or (208) 726-9491, ext. 121.

KIC To Hold Free Workshop

The Ketchum Innovation Center will hold a workshop called “Ideation & Brainstorming,” with Gabe Cherian, from 12-1:30 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 16. Cherian, holder of more than 40 patents and with four decades of designing, invites all creative, aspiring inventors to take advantage of the opportunity to test, demonstrate and hone

The Bla agency fun can help s years to co The BCE receive ta ming in all Accordi assistance school ins titions and students w implemen Anyone the Idaho For mor grams or i schools.or


KLY SCENE

T H E W E E K LY S U N • N O V E M B E R

15 - 21, 2017

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The Sun Valley Pee Wee hockey team was undefeated in the Missoula Blastoff Tournament this past weekend in Missoula, Montana. Photo courtesy of Sun Valley Youth Hockey

abilities in solving problems and coming up with new ideas, with a goal of working on ucts, inventions and, potentially, patents.

missioners Will Consider Camp Rainbow Gold’s Appeal

Rainbow Gold’s conditional use permit will be the main topic of discussion at the g Blaine County Board of County Commissioners meeting at 9:15 a.m. on Tuesday, the Old Blaine County Courthouse, located at 206 1st Ave. S.,. t the Blaine Coune. eport will be available at the Blaine County website. wwand Zoning Office for uring nor in Hailey. onse to the Blaine County Planning and Zoning Commission’s denial of the Camp Gold CUP application on May 17, CRG filed a Notice of Appeal to the Board of Blaine ommissioners. CRG stated its concern about potential bias but focused its appeal on the P&Z’s analysis was proper. eeting will mark the first public discussion between the county commissioners the conditional use permit application. The commissioners will review, discuss and y vote on the CUP application appeal. n more about Camp Rainbow Gold’s Forever Home, visit camprainbowgold.org/fore/.

Blaine County Education Foundation Establishes Endowment Fund

aine County Education Foundation board of directors has established an endowed nd at the Idaho Community Foundation. This development ensures that the BCEF students in the Blaine County School District reach their greatest potential for many ome. EF, a 501(c)(3) nonprofit, operates separately from the school district and does not axpayer money, but relies on grants and donors to support students and programl of the district’s schools. ing to BCEF executive director Kristy Heitzman, the Foundation provides financial e to students in a variety of ways, including assisting in the cost of field trips and surance, providing financial support for students to attend academic club comped after-school homework clubs, and helping defray the cost of school supplies for with financial need. The Foundation also provides financial support to teachers nting innovative ideas into their classrooms. e can donate to the Blaine County Education Foundation Endowment Fund through Community Foundation and receive a tax deduction and tax credit. re information on how to support the Blaine County Education Foundation’s proits Endowment Fund, contact Heitzman at (208) 788-5449 or kheitzman@blainerg.

Killebrew-Thompson Memorial To Donate To Cancer Research

Organizers of the Killebrew-Thompson Memorial, a leukemia and cancer research benefit held each August in Sun Valley, announced this week that their 2017 contribution totals $1 million. The funds are split between the event’s two beneficiaries: St. Luke’s Mountain States Tumor Institute in Boise and the Masonic Cancer Center of the University of Minnesota in Minneapolis. The donation marks the largest amount raised in the organization’s 41-year history, bringing the total contributed since the KTM’s inception in 1976 to more than $16.6 million. “We are overjoyed with the success of the 2017 KTM,” Hannah Stauts, KTM executive director, said. “The generosity our donors showed during the Auction Gala was astounding.” The Killebrew-Thompson Memorial is one of the leading fundraisers of its kind for cancer research, and is the single largest annual donor to St. Luke’s Mountain States Tumor Institute. On Nov. 30, KTM board members John Jackson, CEO of Jackson Energy, and Doug Oppenheimer, president of Oppenheimer Companies, will present a $500,000 check for MSTI’s portion of the event proceeds to St. Luke’s MSTI executive medical director Dr. Dan Zuckerman; CEO of St. Luke’s Health System Dr. David Pate; chairman of the St. Luke’s Health System board of directors Bill Whitacre; and chairman of St. Luke’s Health Foundation board of directors Bill Gilbert. The Killebrew-Thompson also plans to host a Sun Valley donor and volunteer appreciation event this winter, and will present their donation to the University of Minnesota next spring. The 42nd KTM golf tournament is scheduled for August 15-18, 2018 in Sun Valley. To learn more about the tournament, visit killebrewthompsonmemorial.com. 

Early Morning Accident Sends One To Hospital

At approximately 7:50 a.m. Tuesday, Nov. 14, a one-car accident occurred just around the curve from Cottonwood Drive north of Ketchum. A Ketchum ambulance and engine responded to the scene. The driver, a male, was released, but his passenger, a female, was transported to St. Luke’s Wood River, and then flown by air ambulance to St. Alphonsus Trauma Center in Boise. Friends transported the man to St. Luke’s to meet the ambulance. Witnesses said the woman had what appeared to be extremely severe head injuries.


COMME N TA RY

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T H E W E E K LY S U N •

Fishing R epoRt

NOVEMBER

15 - 21, 2017

PET COLUMN NO BONES ABOUT IT THE “WEEKLY” FISHING REPORT FOR NOVEMBER 15 - 21 FROM PICABO ANGLER

F

ly anglers remain in fall/winter limbo as we ease ourselves into the holiday season. On the right day, recently, when it is calm and a touch warm, we are still finding big fish rising on Silver Creek and a few other fisheries. The fishing windows for dry-fly fishing are short, but adding some Streamer fishing and Nymph fishing to the mix will produce plenty of action. Silver Creek remains open above the Highway 20 bridge and will stay open until the end of November. The river is closed upstream of the Highway 20 bridge on Dec 1st. The Creek remains open to fishing downstream from the Highway 20 bridge until the end of February. The last few days on the Silver Creek Preserve may be your last dry-fly opportunity of the season, until the winter Midge fishing begins. The Browns are off their spawning beds and they are hungry. Streamer fishing the deeper spots on the river can produce some nice-sized fish. The Big Wood is always a decent fishery in the late fall. The fish feel the water cooling and they want to plump up. Nymphing with a couple of beadheads under a strike indicator is the way to go. Try Copper Johns and Prince Nymphs. A Girdle Bug is another excellent choice. Fishing olive-colored Streamers is a great way to move the river’s biggest fish. The Lost River remains an enigma, as the flows continue to run higher than we are used to this time of the season. This could bode well for the winter fishery here as the fish are seeing a lot less fall pressure than other years and, frankly, the higher the flow, the healthier this river system will be. If you fish the Lower Lost, think about Nymphing with small flies like Zebra Midges, Brassies and Pheasant Tails. The South Fork of the Boise may have a few more days of fall fishing before winter sets in, although with snow in the forecast, pick your driving days wisely. Stay close to home as the first winter storms approach. If you head down the canyon to fish, take a Nymph selection and have everything from Girdle Bugs to Copper Johns to Micro Midge patterns. Get out there and enjoy the quietude right now. You can have whole sections of river to yourself this time of year and no shortage of fish to catch. Happy fishing, everyone!

Hwy 20 in Picabo info@picaboangler.com (208)788.3536 www.picaboangler.com

SAFE PUPPY SOCIALIZATION

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BY FRAN JEWELL

hear over and over from my clients that they are waiting until their puppy has all its shots before doing any socialization. This is not in the best interest of your puppy. However, it is imperative that socialization be safe both emotionally and physically for your puppy. Puppies are learning machines, just like children are. Not giving them learning and confidence-building experiences during the first 16 weeks of their lives is a huge mistake. This is the critical imprinting period. The only week that would concern me is week nine. That is a typical fear period. During that week it is important not to let any emotional harm come to your puppy. So, working on basic obedience and house manners is very good during this time. Many breeders will not let puppies go home before that nine-week fear period. Things you can do with your puppy to get the most out of this 16-week imprinting period include things like play dates with older, gentle dogs that are friends of yours that are up to date on their vaccinations and where there is a fenced yard. Letting puppies play in areas that can be accessed by unknown dogs is not safe. If an unknown dog leaves feces behind, it is possible for the transmission of parasites, Giardia, and Parvo to occur in your puppy. This means do not

take your puppy to the dog park! Unknown dogs can produce very dangerous results for your puppy. Unknown dogs can also emotionally traumatize your puppy with aggressive or even just very pushy behavior. Have a puppy party where you invite your friends over (without dogs) about 10 minutes apart. With each greeting, teach your puppy to sit and wait for a yummy treat from your guest. Let them see that the door knock or door bell is a good thing. Putting a leash on your pup so she cannot jump will help her to learn sitting is a very cool and safe thing to do. Invite polite children that have experience with dogs. Teach your puppy to lie down for treats when a child comes near. Have the child sit nicely next to her while your pup gets treats. Puppies usually see children as other puppies. Keeping your puppy lower than a child will help your puppy to understand that children should be respected, not bitten, as a pup would do with another puppy. Take your puppy to friends’ homes where they have safe dogs. Keep your puppy on a leash and let her drag it around so you can catch your pup if she gets too far from you, preventing an accident. If you want to walk your pup, go places no one else frequents. Do not expose your puppy to feces left behind by irresponsible dog owners in popular dog-walk-

Teaching puppies to lie down when children are near is a good exercise you can do with your puppy during that critical imprinting time. Here, Kalidor learned at 12 weeks old how to do this very thing.

ing places. Take your puppy in the car with you frequently, but please put your pup in a crate in the car. Puppies are very fast and a crate is like a seat belt for dogs. Just riding in the car is a good thing. Expose your puppy to noises; things to climb on, like a children’s snow saucer or steps; lots of odors; and using their noses to find bits of food hidden under a rug or behind the leg of a chair. What is important is that socialization and learning take

place during this critical period, but it must be done in a way that is both emotionally and physically safe. Fran Jewell is an Idaho Press Club award-winning columnist, IAABC-certified dog behavior consultant, NADOI-certified instructor #1096 and the owner of Positive Puppy Dog Training, LLC, in Sun Valley. For more information, visit positivepuppy. com or call (208) 578-1565.

ACTIVE ART COLUMN SKETCHBOOK HIKING

T

BY LESLIE REGO

MEADOW MOMENT

here is seeing and then there are the moments when seeing becomes part of my soul. A light bursts open and I observe every minute aspect in front of me. Colors group themselves and they also announce themselves separately. This is what happened early one morning after a rainfall. I passed by a meadow I had seen many times before, but this time it separated into millions of colors, each blade of November grass ablaze with its distinct color. The trees beckoned to me, delineating themselves amongst the play of light. The grass danced against their trunks, swaying to the music of the dawn. The light shimmered, reflecting off the trunks and leaves, warming up the ground beneath the canopy. Can there be so many reds, so many ochres, so many yellows? I had not thought so before this moment. The low sun hit each blade of grass distinctly creating a separate journey for each narrow leaf. The morning frost, which had just begun to melt, added to the complexity. The meadow shattered before my eyes into a whirlwind of kaleidoscopic movement. It was not a meadow, a swath of land, but rather melded movement held together by my ability to truly observe the combined forces at play. There was water: the frost and dew. There was light: the sun and the reflection of the sky. There were solid forms: the grass and the trees. And yet all together Leslie Rego, “Meadow Moment,” oil study. they frolicked with my senses. Color, light and shape swirled in and out of one anoth- early morning atmosphere having played a Leslie Rego is an Idaho Press Club er until they were imprinted deeply upon breathtaking trick on my mind. award-winning columnist, artist and Blaine my soul. Then I breathed, and once again County resident. To view more of Rego’s the colors settled into just a meadow, the art, visit leslierego.com


T H E W E E K LY S U N •

NOVEMBER 15 - 21, 2017

COLUMN ON LIFE’S TERMS

DAY OF THE DEAD

I can imagine some visitors saying that these ceremonies are relics of superstition, of misguided he simple graveyard near Pátzcuaro, Mex- or naïve adherence to a belief in an afterlife, or ico, was filled with masses of orange mari- of primitive, backward dominance by a religious golds and other bright blooms, the tradi- system that promotes slavish adherence to its tional decorations for that country’s Day of the rules and promotes some denial of reality. Dead, celebrated every October 31 and for many Over my many years of travel and living in days after. I focused on one grave, the burial other countries, I have learned not to malign or site of a man whose life span was judge negatively the places I have 1960-2015. The photo above the visited. For example, understanddates was probably taken in his late ing the mores and practices of thirties. Beneath that was a plastic, Hindus, Buddhists, Jews, Chrishalf-filled bottle of Coca-Cola, a tians, Muslims and other faiths not beverage he apparently loved. only encourages tolerance but also In addition to displaying such helps us examine our own attitudes mementoes of a past life, graves are about the death we all face. places for families to gather around We know that history abounds the hundreds of mounds in the with examples of the abuse of relismall cemetery. Leftover food platgious precepts and atrocities comters, burned candles, and personal mitted in the name of God or gods. notes are part of the celebration Though we may condemn these when, one night each year, spirits practices, if we keep open minds, of deceased Mexican families are JoEllen Collins—a longtime we can still find light and the possibelieved to return to their burial resident of the Wood River bility of grace in each faith. Valley— is an Idaho Press places and be remembered for the Club award-winning columIn Pátzcuaro and San Miguel de people they were. Allende, I was able to reinforce my nist, a teacher, writer, fabric At this and other gravesites, artist, choir member and admiration for those who live fulmany families honor their dead unabashedly proud grandma ly but also honor their dead, as do not only with food, but also with known as “Bibi Jo.” the Mexicans around those graves. prayers, occasional music and song, The prominent emotion I witnessed and conversation. Every gravesite is festooned was love—love for ancestors and living friends with replicas of the things the deceased enjoyed, and family, love evidenced in the music and art such as books, musical instruments, a bicycle in- associated with death, and also a sense of stabilitertwined with vines and flowers, small construc- ty despite a natural fear of the inevitable. A young tions of churches, riders on horses about to depart man I spoke to said he was proud of the way his from the earth below, or possessions like a boat fellows honored the dead, but he wasn’t ready to circling the grave but never to float again. have a Coke bottle placed near his remains. “Not Often in travels, it is easy for tourists to look yet!” he exclaimed. down their noses at other cultures and countries. tws

T

SPONSORED FEATURE STUDENT SPOTLIGHT

BY JOELLEN COLLINS

COLUMN SCIENCE OF PLACE

WILLIAM CLARK’S NUTCRACKER

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11

BY HARRY WEEKES

he Clark’s Nutcracker, or, more precisely, Clark’s Nutcracker—as though these birds are literally Meriwether’s companion’s birds. It is fun to think of why they named this raucous alpine jay after William. Was it his dashing lines? His love of high, mountainous areas? His incessant squawking? His ridiculous memory? Or was it his penchant for pine nuts and insect larvae? This past October, walking with students through the streets of West Hailey, we came across the remnants of a wasp nest (probably that of the baldfaced hornet—those somewhat menacing members of the yellowjackets and the family Vespidae)—one of those big, grey cones, shredded and lying in ragged scraps on the road. I simply assumed it was a casualty of the recent high winds and early snows. Then, a novella/text from my mother-—one of her wonderful missives that is part critical analysis of modern technology, part socio-anthropological rumination, and part natural history observation. The salient part of the text: “My walks have been eerily quiet, maybe a random magpie, some geese heading south on the early zephyrs. Have been totally aware, though, of how frequently I’ve seen the beautiful, striated grey paper from wasp nests strewn about. I chalked it up to wind but knew that wasn’t the answer with the cylindrical shape and usual protected posi-

tioning. Then, right in front of my driveway, I first hear such a shrill, raspy, squawk….” Coupled with this were photos and a video—a Clark’s Nutcracker ripping apart a wasp nest, the torn walls fluttering to the ground. My mom’s question, “Why would he do this?” I imagine the joy of this bird coming across such wasp larder. This must be pure delight—to find such a hidden reserve of food cocooned in tidy rows. What seems to me like the desecration of these painstakingly constructed nests is simply the bird getting to the real prize— wasp babies arranged in their larval sleeping bags. Or perhaps not. Perhaps the Nutcracker is as befuddled as I am to find the tail end of these colonial nests— empty. Previously filled cells, now empty husks—the wasps but a memory of a fading season. Are what appear to be squawks of delight actually bellows of frustration? My mom used to pick up black-and-orange woolly bear caterpillars and comment on the length of the white hairs coming out of their bodies. She would invariably mutter something about the Farmer’s Almanac and the coming winter, evoking some ancient, attentive, and predictive knowledge that was as mysterious as it was intriguing. It is easy to watch a Clark’s Nutcracker greedily tearing apart a nest and think, “What does this bird know that I don’t?” For something entirely dependent on survival in an environment such as ours, what does it sense that I am miss-

Clark's Nutcracker perched on a branch. Photograph taken by Michael Sulis, April 30th, 2006 at Crater Lake, Oregon.

ing? What clues and cues about its environment have worked over time to ensure it survives in the immediate wintery future? If it is finding nothing, is this some kind of desperation in advance of Snowmageddon, the Sequel? Maybe Clark himself mused on such things as he squirreled away pemmican in advance of the coming winter, or frustratingly knocked on empty stores as the Corps of Discovery crossed our part of the Rockies. Harry Weekes is the Founder and Head of School at The Sage School in Hailey. He has lived in the Wood River Valley and within five miles of the same mountain for the last 46 years.

Pablo Aguilar. Photo courtesy of Indie Landen

PABLO AGUILAR

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BY JOELLEN COLLINS

ablo Aguilar, a senior at Wood River High School, is especially happy right now that his soccer team, the Wood River Wolverines, won the state championship, the first-ever Idaho High School Activities 4A Championship, and the first since the Wolverines won in 3A in 2003. “We turned the doubters into believers,” Aguilar said. “We started off as a team and in the end we finished as family.” Playing hard is something Aguilar enjoys. “I like to work out and have a challenge. I want to have an athletic life, where I work to keep up my overall energy, push myself, and even be willing to put up a fight if necessary for my team. Being in sports is a wonderful way to have positive results for my efforts.” Aguilar is also a lacrosse midfielder with the Wood River Warriors and plays volleyball with a Boise team, “Strike.” “In order to be on this team, I spend two days of practice a week in the winter and many weekends for games,” he said. “Volleyball is my favorite sport, a place where I can run and feel free, experience the challenge of competition in tournaments like the one we just won in soccer and, most of all, be with other players who are friends and share my passion for athletics.” Aguilar hopes to become a physical therapist or athletic trainer. He will attend his first two years in an in-state college but plans to matriculate elsewhere. When not hiking or playing on a team, Aguilar volunteers

occasionally at the Animal Shelter of the Wood River Valley and at other environmental nonprofits. He is also a student aide in the main office at the high school. Aguilar’s favorite academic classes have also inspired his interest in writing. He credits teachers Sarah Allen and Stephanie Spindler with teaching him writing skills. He is now eager to translate his thoughts to paper. “I’m thinking that maybe I could be a journalist and be able to write about the things I encounter in my life, like ecology and the outdoors,” he said. Originally from Jerome but now living in Hailey, Aguilar was born a preemie at a hospital in Boise. “My family has always been strong, but from that experience, and dealing with my mother’s cancer diagnosis, I can say that my most important belief is to value life.” Fortunately, Aguilar’s mother caught the disease early and is now in remission. “At first, after the bad medical news, I isolated myself a bit, but eventually reached out to my family, the Wood River High School faculty, my wide circle of friends, and neighbors like our close family friends, the Radfords,” Aguilar said. “These relationships helped me return to my true personality, that of a friendly, grateful and gregarious person.” tws Editor’s Note: Anyone who would like to recommend a Blaine County School District student for The Weekly Sun’s “Student Spotlight” feature should contact JoEllen Collins at joellencollins1@gmail.com.

This Student Spotlight brought to you by the Blaine County School District

Our mission is to inspire, engage, educate, and empower every student.

BLAINESCHOOLS.ORG


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T H E W E E K LY S U N •

NOVEMBER 15 - 21, 2017

SPONSORED SENIOR CONNECTION

SUN CALENDAR THE WEEKLY

EVENT FEATURE

Senior Connection members are thankful for volunteers, partners and donors who makethe programs and services possible. Photo courtesy of the Senior Connection

GIVING THANKS EVERY DAY

In our families, it’s a common tradition to go hen we talk about around the Thanksgiving table T h a n k s g i v i n g , and have each person state the discussion why they’re thankful. Some almost always turns to food. reasons are personal, like an What we want to prepare, share engagement, sports victory or and eat, where we’ll go for our maybe a new family member. special dinner, the best feasts Other reasons might be more of past Thanksgivings. We worldly, like advances in look forward to the day all year medicine and science, cleanlong, and it brings out the best water initiatives, and improved in us. education programs around the We put lots of effort world. We’re thankful on so into producing the best many levels for the things and Thanksgiving meal ever. We ideas that make up each of our choose the best days. music to play W e ’ r e while we dine. thankful not As we approach We watch what only for the Thanksgiving, the good that we hope will be the best Senior Connection would has come parade and the like to extend its thanks our way, best football. to all the people who but also for We invite the brighten the days of fellow the bad that best people we seniors at the center.” hasn’t. If can think of to something our homes— negative our family and happens, friends. And w e ’ r e we do our best thankful to include those less fortunate, for what we refer to as a those who are lonely or in need. silver lining. If we avoid pain Our community is known or injury, we’re thankful for for being very generous with having been spared. We’re our neighbors who need our thankful that, once again, the help. We find shelter for the good has outweighed the bad homeless, offer physical labor this day. where needed and provide good As we approach food to those who wouldn’t Thanksgiving, Teresa Beahen otherwise have enough. We Lipman, executive director of share and donate and offer the Senior Connection, would care. Before Thanksgiving, we like to extend her thanks to help fill baskets with turkey all the members who brighten and all the trimmings. We the days of fellow seniors at give them to members of our the center. Thanks, also, to the community who then can enjoy many volunteers whose efforts a Thanksgiving meal much like keep the doors open and the ours, with our blessings. programs afloat. Thanks to the We do all of this because we staff and employees who work are grateful. We’re grateful very hard to uphold the quality because we have so much and of the work done at the Senior grateful because we’re able to Connection. Teresa gives share our bounty with others. thanks every day for these The message of gratitude people and the work that they may be hidden briefly by the do to make the lives of seniors beautiful presentation of such that much better. a significant holiday, but we know it’s there and it will be coloring all that we do. BY SENIOR CONNECTION

W

James Taylor, left, Carole King and Danny Kortchmar in concert. Courtesy photo by Elissa Kline

CAROLE GOES LIVE

Documentary On Carole King To Screen

T

BY DANA DUGAN

he Sun Valley Center for the Arts will present two screenings of “Carole King Tapestry: Live in Hyde Park,” at 4:30 and 7 p.m., Thursday, Nov. 16 at Magic Lantern Cinemas in Ketchum. A second show was added to accommodate the demand for tickets. People holding 7 p.m. tickets may exchange them with The Center for the earlier show, if desired. The documentary celebrates the 45th anniversary of Carole King’s masterpiece in front of more than 65,000 fans in the iconic Hyde Park in London, July 3, 2016. King has had a home in Idaho since the early 1980s. “She’s sung the ‘Tapestry’ songs for 40 years but no one had ever asked her to sing from the album from start to finish,” said Elissa Kline, longtime friend, photographer and employee. “That was intriguing and challenging.” Joining King was rhythm guitarist Danny Kortchmar, who played on the original album. They also perform some her favorite compositions from her impressive songbook. The concert also featured a full band with guest stars. These included King’s daughter, Louise Goffin, who joins her mother on several tracks, including “Will You Still Love Me Tomorrow,” which King, and Louise’s father, the late Gerry Goffin, wrote together in 1960 for The Shirelles. “It was so poignant,” Kline said. “She loves London but hadn’t played there for almost 30 years. You never know how these things will turn out but it was amazing when you hear 65,000 people singing together.

Carole King heads to her piano to begin the concert in Hyde Park, in 2016. Photo courtesy of Elissa Kline

It had rained earlier but it cleared up and was a glorious day and night. She has a history of filling big parks.” King was also joined by the Olivier Award-winning West End (London) cast of “Beautiful: The Carole King Musical.” Kline put together the archival images, from the “Tapestry” era, displayed on a giant screen behind the stage. At one point King sings a duet with her projected self, from a 1971 BBC performance video. “It was chilling,” Kline said. Images of Idaho, taken by Kline over the years, are screened during King’s performance of “Way Over Yonder.” Proceeds from the Nov. 16 screening of “Carole King Tapestry: Live at Hyde Park” will support The Sun Valley Center’s Professional Artist Residency program, which brings visiting musicians and artists into local classrooms to work with students and teachers at no charge to the schools. “Our Professional Artist

Residency program was a natural fit,” said Kristine Bretall, director of performing arts for The Center. “By bringing visiting musicians into schools, students in our Valley have an incredible opportunity to see world-class musicians, hear them speak about their craft, and make deeper connections to music and the world. By coming to see this film, your ticket purchase will offset some of the cost of this outreach program that reaches an average of 2,000 students per year and costs The Center $170,000 annually.” To purchase tickets, visit sunvalleycenter.org, call (208) 726-9491 or visit The Center’s box office at 191 Fifth Street East in Ketchum.

tws


T H E W E E K LY S U N •

NOVEMBER 15 - 21, 2017

EVENTS CALENDAR, CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE

SPONSORED ROBERT CUNNINGHAM, DDS

ASK DR. C

KETCHUM COMMUNITY DINNERS WEDNESDAY NOVEMBER 15 6-7PM / CHURCH OF THE BIG WOOD / KETCHUM Weekly free hot dinners are provided to anyone who wishes to join. Find Ketchum Community Dinners on Facebook for more information and weekly menu updates.

BALANCE IN HOLIDAY EATING THURSDAY NOVEMBER 16 12:15-1:15PM / ST. LUKE’S / KETCHUM St. Luke’s Center for Community Health will present a Brown Bag Health Talk titled “Finding the Balance in Holiday Eating.” For many, food options change dramatically during the holiday season. From Halloween through New Year’s Day, there is an abundance of sweet and rich foods and beverage choices. Higher levels of stress and chaotic schedules can also adversely affect energy levels, digestion, weight management and overall health. Haley Willison, registered dietitian, will address strategies on how to maintain healthy nutritional habits over the holidays, while still enjoying the treats of the season. This talk will take place at St. Luke’s in the River Run Rooms. All Brown Bag lectures are free and no pre-registration is required. Call St. Luke’s Center for Community Health for information on this or other educational programs at (208) 727-8733.

TNT THURSDAYS – AGES 10+ THURSDAY NOVEMBER 16 4-5PM / HAILEY PUBLIC LIBRARY TNT for teens happens every Thursday from 4-5 p.m. Here, kids ages 10 and up meet to play video games. Visit haileypubliclibrary.org to learn more.

BUSINESS AFTER HOURS THURSDAY NOVEMBER 16 5-7PM / BLACK OWL COFFEE / HAILEY The Chamber and Black Owl Coffee will host November’s Business After Hours. The public can enjoy food and beverages while catching up with the latest happenings at The Chamber and around the Valley. Bring a business card for a chance to win one of the great raffle prizes. Black Owl Coffee is located at 208 N. River St. in Hailey. Call (208) 788-3484 for details.

13

Sleep Apnea

BY DR. ROBERT CUNNINGHAM

Q. My husband’s snoring has become so loud that I’m thinking about sleeping in the spare room. I have tried everything, including waking him up and getting him to roll over. When I tell him about it, he claims he doesn’t snore. I’m thinking about recording his snoring to prove it to him. A. Snoring can put tremendous stress on a marriage. In addition, if “sleep apnea” is diagnosed, the condition can lead to serious health problems: • Excessive daytime sleepiness. • Hypertension. • Heart disease. • Driving and work-related accidents. • Inability to concentrate, with memory and learning problems. • Irritability, depression, mood swings and personality changes. • Decreased sex drive.

of St. Luke’s Hospital. This study is evaluated by a physician and sleep specialist at St. Luke’s Twin Falls. Once the study is scored, a decision can be made as to the type of treatment recommended. Both the study and the eventual treatment device is often covered by medical insurance. If you or your loved one would like a consultation on snoring or sleep apnea, I would make myself available for a complimentary consultation. Robert Cunningham, DDS 120 N. Second Ave., #202 Ketchum, ID 83340 (208) 726-3457 Dr. Cunningham is an honors graduate from the USC School of Dentistry. He has practiced dental excellence in Ketchum for 20 years. For a complete list of professional qualifications, contact our office by phone or email at cunninghamdds@yahoo.com.

This list begs the question of what to do about it. Well, once the patient agrees to deal with this dangerous condition, the first step is to get a “sleep study.” This is a simple take-home device that is supplied by the cardiopulmonary department

SPONSORED LOCAL FOOD FOR THOUGHT ‘BASQUE MOON’ THURSDAY NOVEMBER 16 6PM / HAILEY PUBLIC LIBRARY Author Julie Weston will discuss her award-winning mystery, “Basque Moon” (Five Star Publishing, 2016), set in the Stanley Basin in Idaho in the 1920s, at the Hailey Library. Visit haileypubliclibrary.org to learn more.

‘INDIANS IN THE WRV’ THURSDAY NOVEMBER 16 6:30-7:30PM / COMMUNITY CAMPUS / HAILEY Local author Tony Evans will speak about his new book, “A History of Indians in the Wood River Valley,” about Native Americans in the Valley, from ancient archaeological sites in Elkhorn and at Redfish Lake to the annual Camas Lily Days Festival in Fairfield. Evans has collected stories and dozens of historical photos that tell this important and little-known story. This event is sponsored by the Blaine County Historical Museum, which published the book. Signed copies will be available. The talk will take place in the Minnie Moore Room at the Community Campus in Hailey. Call (208) 788-4807 for more information.

ASTRONOMY AT THE GARDEN THURSDAY NOVEMBER 16 7-9PM / SAWTOOTH BOTANICAL GARDEN / KETCHUM Join Tim Frazier, avid amateur astronomer and president of the Magic Valley Astronomical Society, for Astronomy at the Garden. Frazier will have a few of his telescopes on hand. Participants will start inside at 7 p.m. with a basic night-sky orientation, before moving outside to observe deep-sky objects, early-winter constellations and the planet Neptune. Kristin Fletcher, SBG education director, will share lore about constellations visible with the naked eye. Dress warmly for the weather and bring binoculars or spotting scopes. Space is limited to just 20 participants and advance registration is required. Cost is $10 for Sawtooth Botanical Garden members and $12 for nonmembers; children under 16 can attend for free. Call (208) 726-9358 to pay and reserve a spot. SBG is located at 11 Gimlet Road, four miles south of Ketchum. Details at sbgarden.org. In case of bad weather the event will be held Saturday, Nov. 18.

RECIPE FOR A REAL THANKSGIVING BY LOCAL FOOD ALLIANCE

P

lan your freshest Thanksgiving feast yet with ingredients direct from Idaho farms. Start with Rasberrys pumpkin hummus and Kraay’s Market & Garden carrot sticks, and Pride of Bristol Bay smoked wild salmon on Wood River Sustainability Center sourdough garlic toasts. Top with Picabo Desert Farm goat cheese crumbles and fresh chopped Purple Sage parsley. With your Prairie Winds Heritage Farm organic pastured turkey serve homemade organic cranberry sauce. Serve special side dishes of mashed Idaho potatoes, warm kale salad and Chef Sean Temple’s autumn squash with spiced roast applesauce (Waterwheel Gardens apples, Agrarian Harvest squash and Five Bee Hives honey). Your real challenge: Save room for dessert! Try handmade local pumpkin pie with Toni’s Sun Valley vanilla ice cream, or easy sweet potato and pumpkin soufflé with pure maple syrup drizzle. Send leftovers home with family and friends in reusable glass Mason jars (avoid plastic if you can). Got extra turkey? Callie and Maime Rasberry recommend leftover turkey salad with apples, cranberries, squash & pecans.

THANKSGIVING FRESH FOOD GUIDE: Purchase fresh local produce and other homegrown ingredients through Atkinsons’ Markets (Atkinsons.com), Kraay’s (Kraaysmarketgarden. com), NourishMe (Jjnourishme.com), and Wood River Sustainability Center (Wrsustainabiltycenter.com). Email Kraay’s (sherry@ kraaysmarketgarden.com) for side dishes from Oak Street Foods and Chef Laura. No time to cook? Order locally handcrafted Thanksgiving entrées, appetizers, sides, and desserts from The Haven (T hehaven su nvalley.com), Rasberrys (Rasberrys.net), and Wood River Sustainability Center. Full menu and recipes are available at Localfoodalliance. org/thanksgiving-2017-menuplan. Local Food Alliance is a nonprofit whose mission is to create a vibrant local food system in the Wood River Valley. For more information, visit localfoodalliance.org.


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T H E W E E K LY S U N •

NOVEMBER 15 - 21, 2017

EVENTS CALENDAR, CONTINUED FROM PREVIOUS PAGE LADIES NIGHT FRIDAY NOVEMBER 17 4-7PM / SUE BRIDGMAN FLORAL / KETCHUM

GALENA LODGE OPENING DAY SATURDAY NOVEMBER 18 ALL DAY / GALENA LODGE

Head north for the season opening of Galena Lodge, in the Boulder Mountains, open daily serving lunch, special dinners, and operating as home base for cross-country skiers, mountain bikers, and hikers, and overnight lodging in semi-backcountry yurts. Call (208) 726-4010 to learn more. Ladies, join florist Sue Bridgman at her Floral Design Studio, at 871 Warm Springs Road in Ketchum, for a free Make & Take. Learn about bow making for wreaths, trees and gifts. Grumpy’s will have specials for the ladies across the street following the event. For more information call (208) 725-0606.

‘THE EXTERMINATING ANGEL’ SATURDAY NOVEMBER 18 11AM / BIGWOOD CINEMAS / HAILEY Sun Valley Opera and Metropolitan Theatres are co-sponsoring the live in HD broadcast of Thomas Adès’s “The Exterminating Angel.” Doors open at 10 a.m. with a pre-opera lecture by Dick Brown at 10:30 a.m. The opera begins at 11 a.m. The opera’s run time is 2 hours and 40 minutes. Following the rapturous response to his last opera, “The Tempest,” The Met presents the American premiere of British composer Thomas Adès’s “The Exterminating Angel,” inspired by the classic Luis Buñuel film of the same name. The opera is a surreal fantasy about a dinner party from which the guests can’t escape. Tom Cairns, who wrote the libretto, directs the new production, and Adès conducts his own adventurous new opera. With a few telling exceptions, Adès and his librettist, Tom Cairns, stick close to Buñuel’s screenplay. The film’s title may be a reference to the 19th-century Spanish Society of the Exterminating Angel, a death squad that hunted Spanish liberals. But it is more immediately a citation of I Chronicles 21:15, “And God sent an angel unto Jerusalem to destroy it” after King David ordered a census in contravention of biblical law. The subject of the film is divine vengeance against a corrupt elite that is incapable of extricating itself from its torpor. Tickets are $16 and can be purchased at any time at Bigwood Cinemas in Hailey. Visit sunvalleyopera.com to learn more.

BLOCK PARTY FRIDAY NOVEMBER 17 4-6PM / MAIN STREET / KETCHUM The block between First and Second streets in Ketchum will be the site of a casual block party at Lululemon, Thunderpaws, NourishMe and the reopening of the Limelight Hotel. There will be Julie Food appetizers served along with a cider tasting at NourishMe. Look for other specials at the neighboring businesses.

WILD WEST GAME DINNER FRIDAY NOVEMBER 17 5:30PM / LIMELIGHT ROOM / SUN VALLEY INN The Sun Valley Ski Education Foundation will host its 41st annual Wild West Game Dinner in the Limelight Room of the Sun Valley Inn. Since 1966, ski team families have celebrated the start of the ski season. The dinner is an opportunity for families and friends to reconnect, and to take a moment to reflect on the value and heritage that snowsports hold in this community. Proceeds from the event support local SVSEF athletes and enable any child wishing to participate in snowsports to do so. SVSEF subsidizes an average of 40 percent of program costs and, thanks to generous donors, was able to provide $340,000 this season in need-based financial aid to qualified athletes. The Western-themed evening will begin with cocktails and silent auction bidding, followed by dinner and a paddle-up auction. Guests will enjoy a gourmet game meal (with vegetarian option) prepared by executive chef Ken Pratt. The Sammy Steele Band of Seattle will provide a blend of alternative and traditional country music to round out the night on the dance floor. Seating is limited; 400 tickets are available at $150 each, and table sponsorships are also available. Some auction packages will include a “Five-Year Plan,” with climbers Ed Viesturs and Erik Leidecker. The pair will offer to climb five regional peaks over five years with three guests. Destination packages will bring top bidders to Oahu’s North Shore and a Hood River hideaway. Gourmet dinner options include a wine tasting and supper at Red Star, and the always-popular lobster dinner for 20. Additional items will be featured. For more information or to make a donation, visit svsef.org.

CHORAL EVENSONG SUNDAY NOVEMBER 19 5:30-6:15 P.M./ ST. THOMAS EPISCOPAL / KETCHUM Choral Evensong is an ancient service of sung evening prayer, brought into being at least 1,000 years ago. Daily choral evensong is offered at cathedrals around the world. This is the local monthly offering in this tradition. There is a freewill offering, with a reception to follow.

STORY TIME MONDAY NOVEMBER 20 10:30-11AM / COMMUNITY LIBRARY / KETCHUM Story Time is held every Monday at 10:30 a.m. in The Children’s Library, with host Lee Dabney. This week the theme is “Chickens & Turkeys.” Story Time is suitable for ages 3 and up and includes stories, songs and a fun craft or activity. Visit comlib.org/ kids for more information.

OLD DEATH WHISPER FRIDAY NOVEMBER 17

SOUPER SUPPER MONDAY NOVEMBER 20

9:30PM / SILVER DOLLAR / BELLEVUE

5:30-6:30PM / ST. CHARLES CHURCH / HAILEY

Enjoy live music this and every Friday night at the Silver Dollar Saloon in Bellevue. This week, groove to tunes by Old Death Whisper.

Weekly free hot dinners are provided to anyone who wishes to join. St. Charles Catholic Church is located at 313 1st Ave S., Hailey.

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T H E W E E K LY S U N •

NOVEMBER 15 - 21, 2017

15

Liquor Store Open Late

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MERCURY FOR SALE 2004 Mercury Mountaineer, newer tires and shocks. Great exterior and interior. Needs new transmission. Great for a mechanic. $600 OBO. Call 208-721-7588 for more details.

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THE WOOD RIVER VALLEY 7-DAY WEATHER FORECAST IS BROUGHT TO YOU BY:

PM Snow 90%

high 39º

low 18º WEDNESDAY

Rain/Snow 50%

high 39º low 18º THURSDAY

Partly Cloudy 10%

high 33º low 12º FRIDAY

Partly Cloudy 0%

high 33º low 21º SATURDAY

Partly Cloudy 20%

high 36º low 25º SUNDAY

AM Snow Showers 40%

high 35º low 23º MONDAY

Partly Cloudy 20%

high 37º low 25º TUESDAY

SKI. BIKE. LIVE!

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