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THE WEEKLY SUN RESPONSIBLE LOCAL JOURNALISM. • BELLEVUE • CAREY • HAILEY • KETCHUM • PICABO • SUN VALLEY • WHAT TO KNOW. WHERE TO BE.

FREE |

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APRIL 17 - 23, 2019 | V O L . 1 2 - N O . 1 6 | W W W . T H E W E E K L Y S U N . C O M

Idaho News Will The State’s New Laws Impact You?

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Nonprofit News Building Material Thrift Store Revamps To Improve Finances

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Education News Hailey Elementary Gets New Principal

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T H E W E E K LY S U N • A P R I L 1 7 - 2 3 , 2 0 1 9

NEWS IN BRIEF

Sheriff Accused Of Raping A Minor Gets Reduced Bail, Likely To Plead Not Guilty

Former Bellevue Marshal and recently resigned Lincoln County Sheriff Rene Rodriguez—charged with seven felony counts of a sexual nature, including two for raping a minor who was 17 years old at the time and more than three years younger than him—had his half-a-million-dollar bond reduced on Monday to $100,000. Appearing in Blaine County 5th District Court in front of Judge Ned C. Williamson, Rodriguez seems poised to plead not guilty when his arraignment is continued April 29. Rodriguez’s attorney requested two weeks to review the transcripts from the grand jury investigation, pushing the plea date out. Calling the charges “very serious,” Williamson said he did not believe Rodriguez was a flight risk, noting that the ex-sheriff knew about the investigation back in January but did not flee. As of press deadline Tuesday, Rodriguez had not posted bail. The judge’s bond reduction did not come without constraints. A no-contact order was issued by Williamson protecting both the victim and the victim’s mother from any direct or indirect contact. Rodriguez also cannot possess any firearms and may not visit his minor, biological children. Rodriguez also adopted children—now legally adults—when married to his now ex-wife. Williamson said he may allow visits in the future, but there would need to be adequate proof of supervision during those visits.

November Ballot May Ask Ketchum Voters To Fund Fire Dept. Upgrades, Affordable Housing

those two cities. According to Ketchum Rural Fire District Commissioner Jed Gray, Ketchum looks “squared away” on how to fund upgrades to fire equipment and fire department facilities that had earlier this year been described as “deplorable” in a third-party analysis done on the city’s fire protection services. The bond would have to be a November ballot issue since the funding mechanism is in its earliest stages. At a meeting between the city and firefighters union reps last week, Mayor Neil Bradshaw floated the concept but did not provide details. The mayor could not be reached for comment before press deadline Tuesday. “I think Ketchum voters understand the need for the bond and I believe it will pass,” Gray said. “The key is making sure they have all the information they want before agreeing to pay for something.” Among those details, Gray said, would be: Identifying the land that would house an emergency services facility Identifying the equipment that would be purchased to replace a 15-year-old fire engine city officials have described as nearly inoperable Showing the conceptual plans for the actual structures to be built Gray said that his separate talks with the mayor and city council members indicate a desire by the city to include affordable housing units on that same parcel of land. Meanwhile, the City of Sun Valley waits patiently for a response to its bid to contract with the rural fire department in providing mutual aid services. Ketchum has until the end of June to revise its existing contract with the commissioners. “We need to give Ketchum a chance to catch up,” Gray said. “I’m hoping that all of this leads to three strong entities between Ketchum, Ketchum rural and Sun Valley, and from there we can all enter into an agreement that makes sense for everybody.”

SUN BULLETIN BOARD THE WEEKLY

PRICING

A $10 million to $15 million bond may be the difference-maker for an effort to unify the emergency services of Ketchum, Sun Valley and the rural area surrounding

Text (up to 25 words): $5 Additional Text: 20¢ per word tws Photos: $5 per image • Logo: $10 Deadline: Monday at 1 p.m Space reservations: bulletin@theweeklysun.com

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NOW HIRING: Bloom Librarian I The Community Library seeks a Bloom Librarian I. This position is responsible for a number of areas of library operations, including circulation, technical services, and customer and patron service for the Bloom Truck. This is a part-time seasonal position.

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Programs and Education Manager The Community Library seeks a Programs and Education Manager to oversee all aspects of a robust yearround schedule of programs, special events, classes and educational outreach efforts to promote lifelong learning. This is a full-time, year-round salaried position with benefits. Regional History Museum Intern The Community Library seeks a Center for Regional History and Museum Summer Intern. This position will primarily focus on museum operations. This is a paid part-time seasonal position. Summer Reading Intern The Community Library seeks a Children’s and Young Adult Library Summer Reading Intern. This position performs a variety of tasks relating to the Children’s Library, the Young Adult Library, and the Bloom Truck. There are three paid part-time seasonal positions available. Application Instructions: Bilingual skills in English and Spanish are highly advantageous for all positions. For complete job description and application instructions, visit (comlib.org/about/employment-opportunities/).

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T H E W E E K LY S U N •

THE WEEKLY SUN CONTENTS

3

APRIL 17 - 23, 2019

FLY SUN

Sun Valley Center for the Arts doles out annual scholarships. For a story, see page 3. Photo credit: Sun Valley Center for the Arts

THIS WEEK A P R I L 1 7 - 2 3 , 2019 | VOL. 12 NO. 16

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Commentary

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Calendar

Doctors Warn: Prepare for Tick Season

SUN 2019 SUMMER FLIGHT SCHEDULE NOW OUT Delta SLC flights: 2-3x daily all year United DEN, SFO, LAX: daily June 20 - Sept 4 Alaska SEA: daily June 8 - Sept 8; 3x week (Thursday/Friday/Sunday) Sept 12 - mid Dec

Full summer flight schedule at www.flysunvalleyalliance.com

Award Winning Columns, Student Spotlight

There are many great options and reasons to FLY SUN! Always CHECK SUN FARES FIRST.

IMPORTANT REMINDERS… BUSING DIVERSIONS NOW FINISHED FOR SEASON

As of April 15, weather-related busing diversions have ceased operations for winter season. If for some reason a SUN flight is cancelled, passengers will be assisted by local agents or they can call the airline’s reservations phone number for help in re-accommodation on the next available flight.

Stay In The Loop On Where To Be

GET TO THE AIRPORT AT LEAST 90 MINUTES BEFORE YOUR FLIGHT

ON THE COVER

A well-dressed group revels at the top of Bald Mountain on Saturday, April 13, to celebrate the 2018-19 ski season during the resort’s Baldy Bash. The last day of the season on Baldy will be on Sunday, April 21, with access to the ski lifts via the Warm Springs side only. Photo credit: Thomas Smiley (www.smileysmtphoto.com) Local artists & photographers interested in seeing their art on our cover page should email submissions to: mandi@ theweeklysun.com (photos should be high resolution and include caption info such as who or what is in the photo, date and location).

THE WEEKLY SUN STAFF 13 W. Carbonate St. • P.O. Box 2711 Hailey, Idaho 83333 Phone: 208.928.7186 Fax: 208.928.7187 AD SALES Brennan Rego • 208.720.1295 • brennan@theweeklysun.com NEWS EDITOR Eric Valentine • news@theweeklysun.com ARTS & EVENTS, SOCIAL MEDIA EDITOR Dana DuGan • calendar@theweeklysun.com COPY EDITOR Patty Healey STAFF REPORTERS • Aimée Durand • Hayden Seder • Emilee Struss news@theweeklysun.com DESIGN DIRECTOR Mandi Iverson • mandi@theweeklysun.com PRODUCTION & DESIGN Chris Seldon • production@theweeklysun.com ACCOUNTING Shirley Spinelli • 208.928.7186 • accounting@theweeklysun.com PUBLISHER & EDITOR Brennan Rego • 208.720.1295 • publisher@theweeklysun.com DEADLINES Display & Community Bulletin Board Ads — Monday @ 1pm brennan@theweeklysun.com • bulletin@theweeklysun.com Calendar Submissions — Friday @ 5pm calendar@theweeklysun.com www.TheWeeklySun.com Published by Idaho Sunshine Media, LLC

Although SUN only has Delta SLC flights operating in April and May, the airport is reminding passengers that it is still very important to arrive at the airport well in advance of your flight, at least 90 minutes, in order to proceed through check-in and TSA security screening. Sign up here for airfare deal alerts and news too!

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Health News

www.flysunvalleyalliance.com

Check SUN fares first!

Fly SUN. Nonstop to DEN • LAX • ORD • SEA • SFO • SLC ONE STOP TO THE WORLD

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Scent work is a versatile sport that requires dog and handler to work together through communicating with each other in new ways. Anyone looking to connect with their pup should come check out what the sport is all about! Admission is $15/person. For more information or to purchase your ticket, visit us online at mountainhumane.org. *While we love your pets, this presentation is meant for humans only.


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T H E W E E K LY S U N •

APRIL 17 - 23, 2019

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NEWS IN BRIEF

Middle School Develops Week-long Challenge To Strengthen Environment

With Earth Day—April 22—fast approaching, Wood River Middle School students are gearing up for a challenging week; specifically, Earth Day Challenge Week—a competition aimed at inspiring kids to be more eco-friendly. All WRMS staff, students and community members at large are invited to join the challenge that runs from April 18 to 26. Participants are given a so-called tracking sheet that lists a variety of tasks, each worth a certain number of points. Tasks are anything from picking up five pieces of litter and wearing a green T-shirt to making an art project using only recyclable materials and organizing a carpool to school or work. Tasks must be signed off by a supervisor and, at the end of the week, points are tallied. The winners receive a yet-to-be-announced prize. Community members wanting to participate can visit the WRMS school website or the school itself to access and print out an Earth Day Challenge tracking sheet.

Ski Patrol Veteran Rich Bingham Retires

After 52 years on the Sun Valley Ski Patrol, Rich Bingham is set to retire after this season. A farewell party is being held for him at the River Run Day Lodge on April 18 from 5 to 7 p.m. to honor of one of Sun Valley’s most celebrated ski patrollers who spent each winter helping to ensure the mountain was safe and enjoyable for guests. “Rich has been a vital member of the Sun Valley Ski Patrol team for many years,” stated Mike Davis, Sun Valley Resort’s ski patrol director. “His experience and knowledge were a great contribution to the ski patrol family. We wish him good luck and many more runs on the mountain. We will miss him.” Bingham joined the highly coveted ski patrol in 1967. Just a few years later, he became the assistant ski patrol director in 1970, a position he held until 2010. Snow safety officer was also his responsibility from 1980-2015. With all of those seasons spent on the mountain, Bingham has skied 156 million vertical feet and over 100,000 miles on Bald Mountain.

329 new laws are on the books in third-longest session in state history

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BY ERIC VALENTINE

f duration serves as any indication, the 2019 legislative session at the state Capitol was an historic one. The 95-day stretch makes it tied for the third longest session in state history, and while 329 new laws may sound like a lot, the number is 11 fewer than last year and—with the exception of 2017—roughly the same as the last several years. Of those 329 new laws, which ones will impact you? It depends on your situation, of course, but let’s take a look at some of them as well as some the bills that didn’t pass or passed the legislature but got vetoed by the governor. Ballot Initiatives This bill was perhaps the most contentious one at the Capitol, seeing Democratic leadership call it the “Revenge on Voters” act. It was sponsored by Republicans in an effort, they say, to include more rural voters when it comes to getting petition-driven initiatives on the ballot. It would have increased the number of signatures required on petitions and increased the number of legislative districts represented by petition signatures. Democratic leaders called that explanation nonsense, pointing out that it originated after 61 percent of Idaho voters passed a ballot initiative that would expand Medicaid coverage to more residents and that the time to garner all those extra signatures was being cut in half. Two versions of the bill passed both the House and the Senate, but when they got to Gov. Brad Little’s desk, both were vetoed. Little explained why he shot them down in a letter to lawmakers. “Although [the bills] give rural Idahoans a greater voice in the initiative process, I believe these bills could give a lone federal judge the only voice in defining our initiative process,” Little said. “I cannot in good conscience let that happen.” Impact: For now, Idaho voters could see an increasing number of ballot initiatives in future elections. Medicaid Expansion Every bit as controversial were the Medicaid-related bills that did get signed into law. Essentially, Republican lawmakers sought to protect against any abuse of Medicaid funds by setting stronger work requirements on a segment of Medicaid-eligible residents. Democrats balked, calling it an unnecessary administrative hurdle that would cost the state millions in enforcement and leave thousands of people without insurance. Impact: Depending on your income level, you may be finding yourself without healthcare coverage soon. Concealed Carry Back in 2016, state lawmakers made it OK for anyone 18 and older to conceal carry a firearm in public places. But there was a caveat—the law did

NEWS IN BRIEF

not make it permissible within city limits. That caveat has now left the building. Impact: You could get more easily shot and/or killed by someone. Or, your life could get saved by a person who otherwise would not have had a weapon to protect you. Pet-Friendly Plates Let’s … paws … from the serious stuff for a moment and remind you that lawmakers have made it possible for you to purchase dog- and cat-punctuated license plates with proceeds going in part to help rehabilitate and find new homes for stray animals. Impact: You can own cuter and more expensive license plates, and help out some innocent animals at the same time. First Responder Protections Lawmakers passed a law to make certain first responders have the same protection against lawsuit when it comes to saving, for instance, a dog overheating inside a car that they would have when saving humans. Impact: Your dog that you left in the car during summer won’t die. As for your car window, that’ll need replacing. Marry As You May A bill that would have set the minimum age to marry—currently there is none—at 16 was killed in the House. Right now, 16- and 17-year-olds need parental consent and children younger than 16 can marry if the parents and a judge consent. A host of reasons against the bill were put out there by opponents. Among them: It didn’t sit well with conservatives that, let’s say, a 15-year-old girl could get an abortion in Idaho but couldn’t marry the father of the child. Impact: Status quo, with a hearty dose of national scrutiny when the rejection of the bill made national news. tws

Hot Water Inn Is Headed Out

Mark Oliver, the owner of the popular watering hole/hostel/music venue off Warm Springs Road, is shutting his business down and moving out of town. The longtime Valley resident posted a 4,721-word Dear John on Sunday in his Facebook feed. In it, he thanked the Ketchum community, reminisced about the joys of living and working in the Valley, and offered his two cents about what the city needs to do to prevent more businesses like his from leaving town. Oliver told The Weekly Sun that by summer he’ll be relocating to Boise and that the Inn will be serving food and taking reservations through April 21. The last event will be the night before. Oliver’s farewell specifically pointed out the spiral of affordable living he, and many others, see the Valley in, and addressed real estate owners—specifically, Airbnb landlords. “Know this—if you own a rental and currently do this, I don’t fault you for doing so, but know [that] doing this is killing this town,” Oliver wrote. “Because of the lack of workforce housing, it has driven up rental prices, which has gutted the workforce of people living and contributing to Ketchum. This in turn has left a select few people who will be willing to hash it out in SV dorm housing or in some closet of a space with eight other friends,” he added.


T H E W E E K LY S U N •

5

APRIL 17 - 23, 2019

NEWS NONPROFIT

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A note taped to the front door of Building Material Thrift informs customers of the reduced hours. Photo credit: Eric Valentine

CONSTRUCTIONFOCUSED THRIFT STORE RESTRUCTURING FOR RETAIL

PG

R

Wood River Land Trust seeks volunteer help

Where most thrift stores specialize in selling smaller wares, Building Material Thrift was ne of the Valley’s more unique nonprofit known for having a full inventory of large items, businesses—Building Material Thrift—is from sinks and oven ranges to sheets of tile and not closing, as many construction businesses door frames. In short, it’s where you’d go with and do-it-yourselfers in the community had worried. your truck, not your sedan. That all could change But it is restructuring, turning its construction-ori- if the land trust goes the way of, for instance, The ented sales focus into a more genCommunity Library in Ketchum, eralized retail-friendly one. Our goal is to not which operates The Gold Mine According to the Wood River have the store Thrift Store. That thrift keeps its Land Trust—the organization close, so we’re inventory limited to, among oththat operates the store—the shift er things, apparel, books, elecis being done to make the store restructuring.” tronics and some furniture. more profitable and would mir“They’ve been successful in Amy Trujillo ror the business models many that model and that’s maybe the Deputy Director of the Wood other area nonprofits use to supdirection we need to go,” Trujillo River Land Trust port their fundraising goals. said. “That’s what we’re trying to “Our goal is to not have the figure out now.” store close, so we’re restructuring,” the land trust’s While retail friendliness could trigger better deputy director, Amy Trujillo, said. revenues, the refocus could blur the nonprofit’s mission—to protect and restore land, water and Building A New Structure wildlife habitat. Reusing large-scale building Previously in operation Monday through Satur- materials and keeping tons of non-biodegradable day and staffed by paid workers, the store is now products out of landfills fit cleanly into that manonly open on Sundays, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., tra and filled a niche otherwise left vacant in the and run by volunteers from the Wood River Land Valley. Trust. “We like having a construction focus and we Trujillo said the reduced hours and volunteer hope to keep offering that,” Trujillo said. “But the staffing were necessary to make the store more first priority is keeping the store running.” profitable. However, if more volunteers step forward, hours could expand. For more information about the Wood River “If anyone wants to volunteer some time, we’d Land Trust or to volunteer, visit the organization love to have them come and work the store,” Tru- online at woodriverlandtrust.org or call (208) jillo said. “Any little bit helps.” 788-3947.

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BY ERIC VALENTINE

tws

An infographic from the Wood River Land Trust showing the impact private donations can make on the environment. Image credit: Wood River Land Trust

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T H E W E E K LY S U N •

APRIL 17 - 23, 2019

NEWS BELLEVUE

BELLEVUE VIEWS OPPORTUNITY FOR HEALTHCARE UPGRADE AND MORE If funding is approved, city may see health clinic by 2020

tion that we get the grant because they see a hole in the marketplace in terms of people getting the healthcare ig changes are on the horizon for the City of Bel- that they need and at a price they can afford.” levue, most notably the potential for a new health clinic. Mayor Ned Burns has other plans to upCity Lights and Streets grade the city, including changes to streets, lighting, waBringing attention to the problems of streets and lights ter metering and more. is the pedestrian crossing light at Main and Oak streets (on the north side of the Oasis Stop and Go) that has yet Health Clinic to be fixed after a traffic accident that occurred several The City of Bellevue recently asked for funding to months ago. open a Family Health Services clinic, which would offer Bellevue City Administrator Jim Spinelli explained medical, dental and behavioral health on a sliding scale that the parts are on order to replace the light but that the based on patients’ income and household size. Current- special parts take a little more time. Amplifying the danly, the closest clinic offering ger of the crossing is a lack of all three of these services It’s a big cost-savings to people the brightly colored pedestriis in Jerome, which Family who are in need of affordable an safety flags available there. Health Services CEO Aaron “We lost a number of street Huston says is overrun, with healthcare and I definitely think that lights over the winter to plowup to 30 patients a day being if there is the ability for us to facilitate ing and accidents,” Burns turned away. Huston also said helping a company like this come in said. “We’re getting bids toa large portion of the facili- and save people time and money, it’s gether to go forward and get ty’s clientele are residents of something we’d be all about.” those all replaced and, at the Blaine and Custer counties. same time, we had a man from “It’s a big cost-savings to peoNed Burns a lighting company approach ple who are in need of affordBellevue Mayor us at a city council meeting able healthcare and I definitely to propose replacing the street think that if there is the ability lights with bulbs that have a for us to facilitate helping a company like this come in comfortable light spectrum for the eye. Right now we and save people time and money, it’s something we’d be have teardrop lights that don’t have any sort of shielding, all about,” said Ned Burns, Bellevue mayor. so we’re looking at something more downward casting Results of Bellevue’s grant application won’t be known and compliant with the Dark Sky Reserve ordination.” until late fall, at which point Burns says the project will Burns and his team at the city are also still figuring out move rapidly forward, if approved. Huston agrees, saying temporary solutions for Bellevue streets until a time can that if the grant is received, a healthcare clinic in Bellev- be figured out to correctly pave city streets. ue should be up and running by the beginning of 2020. “St. Luke’s is on board with Bellevue getting this clinic,” Water Metering and Flood Mitigation Burns said. “They have written letters of recommendaFor a number of years, the City of Bellevue has been

B

BY HAYDEN SEDER

Staying Safe Around Electrical Equipment in Flooded Areas

Idaho Power crews are patrolling and working in areas at high risk for flooding in the Wood River Valley. Water can damage electrical equipment, creating a hazardous situation. As a reliability and safety precaution, Idaho Power may need to turn off power to some customers.

If you are in an area impacted by flooding: • Stay away from electrical equipment, including lines, poles, green transformer boxes and anything else that looks like electrical equipment or has electric-hazard warning signs. • Call an electrician if your home’s electrical equipment is impacted by flooding. • In advance of possible outages, charge your cell phone and ensure flashlights have batteries. If it is necessary to turn off your power due to flooding, Idaho Power will attempt to reach you via an automated phone call at the number associated with your Idaho Power account. A state electrical inspection may be required before service can be restored. We understand outages are inconvenient and appreciate your patience and understanding as we work to safely manage idahopower.com/outage the effects of flooding on our electrical equipment.

Bellevue Mayor Ned Burns with his dog Roscoe. Photo credit: Dev Khalsa

working to get its water metered. According to Burns, the project is getting close to completion, with just a handful of vaults waiting to be installed in the summer, after which the project will go online. Burns said he has also recently met with his public works director to discuss long-term sheet flooding mitigation in problem areas. “We’re getting preliminary work done and engineering costs figured out,” Burns said. “If we can budget for it, we’ll get those projects done, hopefully in the next year, so we don’t have to continually send out public works, the fire department and the marshal’s department to work on sheet flooding mitigation.” tws


T H E W E E K LY S U N •

7

APRIL 17 - 23, 2019

NEWS EDUCATION

HAILEY ELEMENTARY SCHOOL HIRES NEW PRINCIPAL TONI BOUSH 41 applicants vied for the position

BY HAYDEN SEDER

B

laine County School District has approved Superintendent Dr. GwenCarol Holmes’ selection for Hailey Elementary School principal, Toni Boush—a 28-year educator with elementary and middle school experience as well as international experience as principal of schools in Asia and South America. Of the 41 applicants for the job of Hailey Elementary principal, Boush stood out to Dr. Holmes for her work in mountain resorts as well as past principal and elementary experience. Boush worked for nine years as the middle school principal in Minturn, Colo., a part of the Eagle County School District, as well as assistant principal for two years in Roaring Fork, the school district around Aspen, Colo. “She was looking to get back to the mountains,” Holmes said. “When I get ready to hire a principal, I start by meeting with staff and parents and having a conversation with them about what they’ve accomplished at their school, what the next steps for the school should be and what kind of person it will take for those next steps.” In addition to her experience in the Mountain West, Boush has gotten worldly experience during her career. She was the elementary school principal at Ruamrudee International School in Bangkok, Thailand, for six years, and for the last three years has served as principal

at the American School of Brasilia, in Brazil. With so many candidates for the job, a certain set of criteria was important, including principal experience, elementary experience and an ability to establish relationships. “All of Toni’s references spoke to her strength in establishing relationships,” Holmes said. “One of the things Hailey Elementary is good at is being inclusive; they have a lot of subgroups of students with various needs and that’s something Toni is known for being very passionate about—including all students.” Boush’s qualifications also include improving student achievement, developing and strengthening early childhood programs, providing professional development based on student data and standards, providing strong support for English language learners, improving elementary literacy and incorporating outdoor programs into the learning at school. Now that Boush has been confirmed, she will begin her job this fall at Hailey Elementary. As a newcomer to both the school and the area, Holmes predicts that Boush will spend her initial time in her new position learning about the school, the staff, the parents and the kids. “In both the parent ‘meet and greet’ and staff ‘meet and greet’ that Toni did as part of the application process, she talked about the fact that Hailey Elementary School likes to call itself ‘the heart of Hailey,’” Holmes said. “She said she wants to know more about what that

New Hailey Elementary School principal Toni Boush. Photo credit: Toni Boush

means, what that sounds like and what that looks like.” Boush is still currently working in Brazil and was unavailable for an interview by press deadline Tuesday.

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T H E W E E K LY S U N •

NEWS HEALTH

TICK TOCK—IT’S TIME FOR TICK SEASON Mild temperatures and moisture make for high risk in 2019

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sun T H E W

APRIL 17 - 23, 2019

the weekly

BY HAYDEN SEDER

he snow is melting, which means getting outside is on people’s minds. But the heavy winter snowfall and recent rains make for a moist environment, and that means more ticks than usual. People, pets and livestock are all at higher risk for tick bites and infections, which means knowing where ticks are most prevalent, how to spot ticks and tick-bite symptoms, and what diseases are caused by ticks are important. Where to Find Ticks Everywhere! Tick exposure is a risk year-round but they are most active between April and September. Dr. Frank Batcha, a family medicine practitioner for St. Luke’s, warns that ticks can be anywhere in the outdoors, whether it’s the woods or your own backyard. “Since ticks are dependent on mammalian hosts, they have a tendency to have denser populations where there would be a lot of mammalian traffic, like game trails and hiking trails,” Dr. Batcha said. “The bottom line is, anywhere you can be outside, it’s possible to be exposed to them.” When outside, try to keep yourself and your animal out of high grass or to walk in the center of trails. Ticks are also sensitive to changes in humidity, which is why tick bites are more rare at the height of summer when high heat and low humidity kill many of them. “Tick exposures are much more prevalent in spring and fall when it’s damp and humid with cooler temperatures,” Dr. Batcha said. “That’s when people need to be more aware.” Diseases and Symptoms Related to Tick Bites According to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), the most prevalent tick for the local area is the Rocky Mountain wood tick, which transmits Rocky Mountain spotted fever, Colorado tick fever and tularemia. Rocky Mountain spotted fever is one of the deadliest tick-borne diseases in America, causing fever, headache and rash, and can be deadly if not treated right away. But, unlike the name implies, the disease is most prevalent in the Southeast and is somewhat rare in the Rocky Mountains. According to Dr. Batcha, the disease seen most in the Wood River Valley is Colorado tick fever, which has similar symptoms to all other tick-borne illnesses, including malaise, body aches, headaches and rash. “Tick-borne illnesses are all fairly difficult to distinguish, clinically,” Dr. Batcha said. “How we distinguish the non-specific symptoms of tick-borne illness from a virus is that a virus at- Adult deer tick. Photo by Scott Bauer via Wikitacks the respiratory system, which media Commons means there wouldn’t be any sneezing or coughing if it is a tick-borne illness.” Lyme disease is often what people think of first when thinking of tick-borne illness, but it’s incredibly rare to see Lyme disease in Idaho, as the Lyme bacteria does not occur naturally in Idaho and is typically seen more on the East Coast or Northwest coast. “All of our cases of Lyme disease here in Idaho have been imported from other places where Lyme bacteria is present,” said Dr. Batcha. Most victims of a tick bite won’t know they’ve been bitten, as the bites are painless. But if you or your animal have been outside during the spring or fall, do a full body check, making sure to look on the legs as well as collars and waistbands of clothing. Preventing Tick Bites “The best treatment for tick-borne diseases is prevention,” Dr. Batcha said. There are a number of ways to prevent tick bites on both yourself and your animals. One is to layer clothing and make barriers where ticks can’t get in, such as by wearing drawstrings at the bottom of pants or tucking your shirt into your pants. The insect repellent DEET is a good tick deterrent for both people and animals to wear on themselves, while products containing permethrin can be used to treat boots, clothing and camping gear for both ticks and mosquitoes. For Dogs Ticks aren’t just a nuisance for humans—they can affect dogs, as well. Preventative measures for dogs include topical creams, chewable pills, and collars, all of which work to prevent tick bites for certain periods of time. A topical cream is typically applied to the middle of the dog’s back and will be good for a month while the chewables are generally good for three months. “You have to be diligent and give your dog the preventative measure religiously or ticks will come back,” veterinarian Dr. Rhonda Aliah advises. Aliah advises checking your dog for ticks any time you come back from a walk or hike, particularly at the base of the ears, between their toes, along the belly and in the arm pits where the dog is more likely to come in contact with the shrubs and tall grasses that ticks live on. If you find a tick on your dog, it is recommended to remove it the same way you would on a person, a using a credit card or a fingernail and scraping against the skin to ensure you remove the head with the tick’s body. Some tick diseases can make an animal sick, so if you notice that your dog is breathing heavily, is very weak, lethargic or not eating well, bring it in to your local vet’s office. tws

Above and below: Skiers and boarders celebrate the 2018-2019 winter season during Sun Valley Co.’s B day, April 21, with access to the lifts via the Warm Springs side only. Photo credits: Thomas Smiley (smil

NEWS IN BRIEF

Cocaine Dealer Sentenced To 10 Years

Fifth District Judge Ned C. Williamson sentenced Hailey resident David M. Curren to 10 years in prison Monday for trafficking cocaine. The 59-year-old was arrested last summer during a traffic stop along Highway 75 in which 6 ounces of the drug was found in his vehicle by police. A search warrant for his residence then found drug packaging materials, firearms, roughly $13,000 in cash and approximately another half-ounce of cocaine. Curren’s defense vied for a lesser sentence, citing—among other arguments— federal guidelines that deliver lighter sentences for cocaine than drugs such as methamphetamine. Curren’s attorney, Andrew Parnes, claimed the death of the defendant’s wife was the impetus for his client’s increased drug dealing and that should be taken into account during sentencing. Williamson said it was no excuse. The judge acknowledged that federal sentencing guidelines are more lenient when it comes to cocaine compared to methamphetamine, but the amount of cocaine seized, Curren’s past DUIs (he’s had three), and Curren’s inability to prove that he had not been spending the last several years as a so-called “professional criminal” (by legal definition, someone who makes their primary living through

criminal Curre end of w “I wan amine, y

The C the publ chitectu Shorty’s This is Chambe attendee For m org, visit


W E E K LY S C E N E

T H E W E E K LY S U N •

APRIL 17 - 23, 2019

Baldy Bash on Saturday at the top of Bald Mountain. Baldy will stay open until Sunleysmtphoto.com)

Rick Hamlin, left, an historian for the National Ski Patrol, presents a plaque commemorating Nelson Bennett’s induction into the NSP Hall of Fame. Mike Davis, Sun Valley Ski Patrol’s director, received the plaque during a special ceremony held last week at the patrol’s headquarters on Bald Mountain. Photo credit: Sun Valley Resort

l behavior) all factored into the 10-year sentence. en will have to spend a minimum of four-and-a-half years in prison, at the which he’d be eligible for parole. nt this community to know that if you traffic cocaine or methamphetyou’ll serve a sentence,” Williamson said.

After Hours Event Slated For April 18

Chamber of Hailey and the Wood River Valley is inviting businesses and lic to attend this month’s Business After Hours at Lions Landscape Arure & Bliss Architecture. It will be held at 126 South Main Street (above s Diner) in Hailey on Thursday, April 18 from 5 to 7 p.m. s a free monthly event to meet local business owners and catch up on er- related news and events. Food and beverages will be provided, and es are encouraged to bring business cards to enter in the “BAH” raffle. more information, please contact The Chamber at Info@ValleyChamber. t ValleyChamber.org or haileyidaho.com, or call (208) 788-3484.

From L-R: Jaqueline Tellez, Aspen Vincent (two-time champion, 2018, 2019) and Danielle Nelson were winners of a $2,000 scholarship from the Culinary Institute of America after competing against 20 teams at the Family, Career and Community Leaders of America’s state competition in Boise. Photo credit: Joyce Pratt

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COMME N TA RY

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T H E W E E K LY S U N •

Fishing R epoRt

APRIL 17 - 23, 2019

COLUMN NO BONES ABOUT IT

THE “WEEKLY” FISHING REPORT FOR APRIL 17 - 23, FROM PICABO ANGLER

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he fishing conditions have begun getting tougher by the day as the local reservoirs are being prepped for the spring runoff. This means a lot of mud and poor fishing for a week or two. Don’t fret, though, as the reservoirs will come into shape soon and will again begin to produce nice fish and good fishing. In the meantime, your best options remain the Lost River, the Snake River and the Salmon River. Keep an eye on the flows for all of these. The conditions are changing daily and staying current on the flows and turbidity is a must for a good day on the water. The lower Lost River through Mackay is fishing well, but please keep an eye on the gauge: www.waterdata.usgs.gov. If the flows remain in the 300-CFS range, you can count on decent wading and great fishing if you hit the right day. Anglers are reporting great action on red-colored nymphs, like always, and with the right weather there can be some decent Baetis dry-fly action. If you see the gauge jump way up, then think about heading elsewhere. The Snake River provides a wonderful carp fishery this time of the season. With a quick look at Google Earth, anglers can find lots of shallow-water flats to hunt these fish. Fishing carp in shallow water requires the exact same technique you would use on a bonefish or permit. It is a great way to warm up for a saltwater trip or even learn how to saltwater fish before your first trip. Hunt these fish and then try to drop Damsel Nymphs right on their nose. A few strips and hopefully you can fool these big, hard-fighting fish! Finally, the steelhead are coming up the Salmon River and anglers are catching a few. Again, be sure to check the conditions, as clarity is an important factor, if not the most important as anglers look to site and stalk these fish. Be aware the steelhead are in the last few miles of their 900-mile journey into Idaho. They are here to spawn and the spawning beds, or redds, are apparent from the cleanswept gravels in the shallow water. Avoid fishing these areas and stepping on them. Don’t forget Picabo Angler is having another great party on the 24th of May. That is the night before opening day. Grab your tent, your friends and plan on another fun evening to kick off the season! Happy fishing, everyone!

Hwy 20 in Picabo info@picaboangler.com (208)788.3536 www.picaboangler.com

ARE YOU ENCOURAGING DOG AGGRESSION?

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BY FRAN JEWELL

one of us wants an aggressive dog! We want to take them with us everywhere and we want to be able to trust them that they will be playful and kind. We especially don’t want them to ever bite another human, especially children! In fact, most of us go overboard socializing our dogs, going with the belief that socialization is the key to friendly behavior, and sometimes it is. We take them to the dog park, we have play dates, and we even get multiple dogs so they have doggie friends to play with. However, what many people don’t do is to give their dogs guidance during those interactions. We allow unacceptable behaviors that escalate into dangerous behaviors. Many times we put our dogs into situations where other dogs teach our dogs bully behaviors (yes, there are dog bullies). Dogs will learn bully behaviors to defend themselves or to mask their fears. We think bully behavior is friendliness when in fact it is an attempt by the bullying dog to defend himself. Sometimes we label it “alpha dog” behavior when it is far from that. We think that taking a fearful dog into extreme social situations will help give them confidence. Most of the time these activities will encourage more defensive or aggressive behaviors for the fearful dog. We say things like, “Just let them work it out,” “He’s friendly!” or “He just wants to say ‘hello!’” We make excuses for poor behavior or our lack of control and training. We enable our dogs to become aggressive by not providing leadership and direction consistently. All dogs must have a leader, or they will make the decisions about how to deal with situations they are uncomfortable with. Some dogs revert to ancestral (feral) behaviors when they don’t know any other way to cope. It is our job, as owners, to let them know what acceptable behavior is and what is not. If we are not giving them that information clearly, it creates more stress for our dogs. Would it be fair to anyone to drop them into the deep end of the swimming pool without having had swimming lessons? Absolutely not! Would dropping someone into the deep end without swimming lessons create an intense fear of water? Most likely. It is the uncommon dog that can do that without emotional consequences. When we take dogs into new places we must be pro-active. We must give them coping skills (obedience). Our dogs must trust us that we will take care of them, no matter what. We must watch behavior of our dog and that of other dogs. Walking your dog while talking on your cellphone is not being the leader your dog needs. Chatting with friends, not paying attention to what your dog is doing, will not help your dog when something makes him afraid. We need to make the decisions about where to go so our fearful dog is not overwhelmed or bullied by other dogs. If we own a bullying dog, we need to teach him it is not acceptable to run up to another dog and posture them. Just because a tail is wagging doesn’t mean his intentions are friendly! We must know if our dog is fearful in nature, then we must protect

Teaching a dog to trust you goes hand in hand with teaching obedience skills. Here, Cloud can deal with huge distractions because he has been taught how to “watch me” and to “stay.” This gives him confidence that I will protect him. Photo credit: Helen Bond

him and give him skills to cope. Letting dogs work it out for themselves, taking them to over-stimulating situations where you don’t know the behavior of other dogs or children without giving your dog clear directions is a recipe for aggression. Our dogs need to trust us that we will not put them into situations they cannot handle. Build that trust through fair and honest obedience training. Live a life of leadership in your home. Fair leadership builds the trust a fearful or anxious dog needs. Fran Jewell is an Idaho Press Club award-winning columnist, IAABC-certified dog behavior consultant, NADOI-certified instructor #1096 and the owner of Positive Puppy Dog Training, LLC, in Sun Valley. For more information, visit positivepuppy.com or call (208) 578-1565.

COLUMN SKETCHBOOK HIKING

QUICKENING OF THE WATER’S MUSIC

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BY LESLIE REGO

e do not tend to detect the longer days in the springtime until there has been enough accumulation of light to tweak our awareness. But the creeks and streams notice. The water runs more quickly. The trickling sounds become louder from the lingering snowbanks that melt and are washed downstream. Snow that once sat in silence under the overhanging trees now becomes part of the river’s music. Glacial shelves of snow and ice melt away, showing the striations of various winter storms. The wind-blown debris is captured throughout the many layers, creating a fossilized record of the past months. Along with the quickening of the water’s music comes the return of the Canada geese. Most of us recognize the birds, but as often happens when something is so familiar, few of us spend much time observing them. It is so easy to pass over the ubiquitous. One looks at the bird and thinks, “Oh, those are Canada geese!” and thus they do not receive another thought. But if you really study the antics of the geese, they are quite charming. Their cumbersome walk is top-heavy. The legs appear as if they should not be able to support the large body. Speed is difficult. The bobbles and waddles of their land motions make for fun gestural drawings. Canada geese have extended necks so they can tip over and search for food in the water. If a goose is hissing, bobbing its head, or swinging its neck from side to side, the bird is feeling threatened. But the bird can

Leslie Rego, “From my Sketchbook, Gestural Drawings of Geese,” pencil and colored pencil, laid paper.

also swivel its neck up and over the back to tuck it into the upper part of the wing. This is a position the goose takes while sleeping, as do most other species of ducks and geese. I often wonder how the birds find this configuration remotely comfortable. Even if anatomically possible, I question if I would want to swivel my head and tuck it between my shoulder blades to sleep! The music of the water is quickening. Winter is shifting to spring, although the transi-

tion moves slowly in the mountains. It is as though we can hear each individual snowflake melt, until eventually we arrive to the very last one. Leslie Rego is an Idaho Press Club award-winning columnist, artist and Blaine County resident. To view more of Rego’s art, visit leslierego.com.


T H E W E E K LY S U N •

APRIL 17 - 23, 2019

COLUMN ON LIFE’S TERMS

THE SARABAND

of media depictions of violent events to the innocent, both human and animal, it was upsetting. framed quotation near my bathroom vanity I like Watkins’ use of the word “sharing” in this has struck home with renewed force this context, a word I recall often using, as one who week. The words by T.H. Watkins, a re- worked with students of all ages, suggesting that spected historian and environmentalist, appear on one of them “share” a certain analysis, or a samone of dozens of Christmas greetings printed and ple of personal writing. It is also one of our hardsent by a cousin every year of my adult life. I have est early lessons when we are told to share a toy kept them all. with another toddler. Sharing involves opening The inscription reads: “In wild country, where up oneself to others, perhaps giving up a thing or it is possible to encounter and truly idea or skill by not entirely owning experience other kinds of intellithat entity, learning to move in congence, we can learn with a clarity cert with others. I had not applied unobtainable elsewhere that we are this concept to our interactions not alone on this cooling cinder. with earth’s non-human creatures, This world and its creatures were but now realize the implications. In not presented to us; we were joined short, as Watkins says, “It is more to them in the exquisite saraband deeply complex than a responsibilof life. It was never meant to be ity.” a conquest, and it is more deeply Thus, Watkins asks of us a more complex than a responsibility. It is difficult challenge. We need to rea sharing.” spect and include other creatures Today, I had a haunting experiinto the dance of our lives, reence at the National Cowboy Musemembering that we are irrevocably um in Oklahoma City, where I am JoEllen Collins—a longtime joined to them. Good participants in experiencing my own life dance resident of the Wood River the lovely and formal 17th and 18th with my expanded, “new” family Valley— is an Idaho Press century “saraband” understood its and realizing how fortunate I am Club award-winning colum- patterns, rules and restrictions, and to have this fresh chance at posi- nist, a teacher, writer, fabric gloried in the dance. The earth’s artist, choir member and tive human connections just when unabashedly proud grandma non-human creatures also instincI have recently experienced too known as “Bibi Jo.” tively acknowledge the boundaries many losses. and conventions of their existence, On a far wall in a room depicting the paintings moving gracefully within those parameters. of and history about the buffalo hangs a huge old Joyous movement should be a gift for every photograph of hundreds of buffalo skulls with species, a life touched by the beauty of fulfilled a man posing atop the pyramid of death. It was existence. Life IS a dance, hopefully not recalled gruesome, of course, but it also symbolized the through celebrations showing off slaughtered often-mindless power of our country’s and hu- baby elephants or a mass of skulls to an audience mankind’s past and present sad history. Even who may not even understand our exquisite sarathough I am almost inured to the constant barrage band.

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BY JOELLEN COLLINS

COLUMN SCIENCE OF PLACE

ON BEAVERS

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BY HANNES THUM

couple of weeks ago, I had the opportunity to hear a lot about beavers. A writer named Ben Goldfarb came to town, visiting with my students and speaking at a public event in Ketchum, to tell us about beavers and the roles that they play within the ecosystems in this neck of the world (here’s a hint: they can play a big role). A few of the things I learned: the beaver is the second largest rodent in the world (after the capybara of South America); beaver tails store a lot of fat, and have more uses than just water-slapping; beaver teeth are orange because they are chemically fortified with iron; and, there was once a species of beaver, extinct now, that was as big as a black bear. Here’s another interesting little factoid: it is hard to visually determine if a beaver is a male or a female, and the most common way to determine the beaver’s sex is to pick the beaver up bodily and squeeze the scent glands near its cloaca (a cloaca is the orifice where a beaver’s urine and feces are evacuated from, as well as where its reproductive organs are) and see what smell emanates from them. If the secretion smells like motor oil, you have a male. If it smells like old cheese, you have a female. It turns out that if you want to be a beaver biologist, you need to get comfortable squeezing those scent glands. Beavers, as we all know, build dams in streams. They do so to make a safe area (the pond) for them to live, safe from terrestrial predators. But, if a pond already exists, or if a river is broad and slow enough for them to hang out in without getting washed away, they will build a lodge without having to build a dam first. That so much could be said about just one critter is fascinating. Beavers are charismatic in that sense—they are exceptional and weird and unique in all of the things they do. Of course, the fact that beavers like to dam up streams and flood valley bottoms is one of the reasons that their populations are so much lower in the West than they once were. Humans, too, like to live in homes alongside pretty creeks, and so conflict is going to be inevitable—generally, it’s the beavers that are going to be extirpated (or

The North American beaver (Castor canadensis). Photo credit: Steve from Washington, D.C., public domain photo, accessed via Wikipedia

killed) when flooding impacts our property. However, it is the goal of Mr. Goldfarb and his new book (which I have enjoyed so far) to get us to be a bit more tolerant of these critters. There is no animal quite like them, and there is no animal quite as important to natural systems in this area: they slow down spring runoff, store water and recharge aquifers, and create habitat for other species who like the ponds created by beaver colonies. It may be argued that learning to coexist with these creatures could be the next great ecological project to work on in the West. Hannes Thum is a Wood River Valley native and has spent most of his life exploring what our local ecosystems have to offer. He currently teaches science at Sun Valley Community School.

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SPONSORED FEATURE STUDENT SPOTLIGHT

ISABELLE GREEN

WRHS senior graduates early, readies for adventure

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BY EMILEE MAE STRUSS

sabelle Green is, technically, a Wood River High School senior, but she has already graduated. Green and her family moved to the Wood River Valley when she was in third grade, from Saratoga Springs, Utah. Her childhood memories are heavily steeped in the popular elements that make the Valley such a desirable place to live. Her father taught Green how to ski in third grade. She spent time outdoors, learning from the simple sounds of nature. And she received a high-quality education, which she is very thankful for today. “The teachers at Wood River High School are so amazing,” Green said. “You can get such a good education there, and I knew that before but I really realized it when I left.” Green left her junior year with her mother and two siblings for the adventure of a lifetime. They traveled to Asia for three months, staying mainly in Thailand. They also traveled to Vietnam and Malaysia, each for two weeks. “I really liked learning about the different cultures,” Green said. “It was an out-of-thisworld experience that not a lot of people get to have.” Green continued her schooling online and was able to finish high school a semester early. “I’ve always worked really hard to be ahead in school,” Green said. During her time at WRHS, Green played the cello in orchestra for eight years and took five years of Spanish. She says that the small class size and the genuineness of the teachers at WRHS are what make that school second to none. Green now lives in Provo, Utah. “Here (in Provo), the classes have a lot more kids, and I didn’t realize that, until I left, how lucky we were out there,” Green said. Next year, Green will attend Utah State University. She isn’t sure what she wants to study yet, but she likes helping people and spending time with kids. And she doesn’t have much time at Utah State— just one semester—before she leaves again.

WRHS senior Isabelle Green recounts the impact that the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in Hailey has had on her life and her plans to go on mission when she turns 19. Photo credit: April Lupus

“I will be leaving on an LDS (Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints) mission when I turn 19,” Green said. She will be on mission for a year and a half. Green isn’t sure where she’s headed yet but already cannot wait for the time to arrive. “It’s what I’ve been waiting for,” Green said. “I’m looking forward to more experiences and serving others. Then I will know more about who I am and what I want to do.” Green may not return to the Valley for more than a visit for some time, but her memories of this place are instilled in who she is today. Green says that the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in Hailey introduced her to many individuals whom she greatly looks up to today. She also mentioned her mother, NiCole Green, who is her biggest inspiration. And, a woman Green refers to as her ‘second mother,’ Jenn Merrick, and her family. “All of those people have had such a great impact on my life,” Green said. tws

Editor’s Note: Anyone who would like to recommend a Blaine County School District student for The Weekly Sun’s “Student Spotlight” feature should contact Emilee Struss at emilee.struss@gmail.com.


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T H E W E E K LY S U N •

Submit A Pet Obituary

“Frankie” — 2003-2018

Brand New For 2019: Honor the memory of your pet in The Weekly Sun. This year, we’re offering 20% OFF our regular obituary rate for pet obituaries. Pet obituaries cost just 16¢ per word and include a large color photo.

APRIL 17 - 23, 2019

SUN CALENDAR THE WEEKLY

EVENT FEATURE

To reserve space for an obituary or pet obituary, call Brennan at (208) 720-1295.

Arts and Humanities Scholarship winners pose with their certificates at a ceremony last week. Photo credit: Sun Valley Center for the Arts

NEWS IN BRIEF

The Argyros Performing Arts Center Names New Director

Sun Valley Performing Arts, Inc., has named Casey Wilder Mott as the executive director of the Argyros Performing Arts Center (The Argyros) in Ketchum/Sun Valley. “Following a national search, we are thrilled to have Casey, an accomplished filmmaker and creative team leader, returning to the Wood River Casey Wilder Mott. Photo credit: Sun Valley Valley to lead our Performing Arts, Inc. staff and join our board beginning on June 1,” Bill Lowe, board of directors chair, said. Mott has strong roots in the Wood River Valley, having completed high school at The Community School in 1999. That same year, he was a founding company member of the inaugural Sun Valley Shakespeare Festival. He has maintained close personal and professional ties to the Valley’s arts and culture community ever since, most recently by producing The Argyros’ own threeday opening showcase. Mott received his B.A. from Yale University as well as an MFA from the USC School of Cinematic Arts. He started working in Hollywood at the famed William Morris Agency, before becoming director of development at Flashlight Films. In 2015, Casey founded 5B Productions, an independent film production company based in Los Angeles. His feature film credits via that banner include the NASA/Google documentary The University; the SXSW/A24 drama Hot Summer Nights; and his own directorial debut, A Midsummer Night’s Dream. “I’ve watched and cheered from afar as the long-held dream of a world-class performing arts center in downtown Ketchum has become a reality. The Argyros’ talented staff and its dedicated board have done a fantastic job getting the facility on its feet. I hope I bring enthusiasm, experience, and a community-centric approach that will build on the organization’s early success. I’m coming home!” Mott said. The executive director search was led by Greg Phillips of CSTAR Development who has consulted on this project for four years and continues to help book The Argyros Presents.

THE CENTER FOCUSES ON ARTS SCHOLARSHIPS

Annual awards given to talented Valley residents The renewable Gaye V. Weake scholarship of $2,000 per year was awarded to Elva Chen, he Sun Valley Center for the Arts is a place a Wood River High School senior who plans to where magic happens, from art and human- study design at Rhode Island School of Design, ities, to live music and film. It also hosts an University of Southern California, University of enormous four-day wine auction each summer and Washington or UCLA. The scholarship is awarded a top-rated arts and crafts festival. annually to a high school senior or full-time colAs well, since 1998, it has awarded a total of lege student majoring in the arts or humanities, to $932,397 to local students through its Arts and be applied toward tuition at an accredited college Humanities Scholarship or university. program, made possible by Students from previous funds raised through the years who will receive re“To date, The Center has newed scholarships are Jorannual wine auction. The program provides monegiven nearly $1 million gen Lawrence, a 2018 gradtary awards to local stuuate; Lemuel Reagan, a 2017 in scholarships to local dents and educators to help graduate; Pierson Carlsen, a students and educators. advance their education 2016 graduate; Ashlie PulEvery year I am always blown and experience in the arts. leiro, a 2015 graduate; and away by the generosity of our Haylee Pettit, a 2015 gradThe total amount awarded donors. It’s amazing to see how in 2019 is $44,000. uate. The scholarship prothis money transforms students’ The Ezra Pound Scholgram is an important part arship, worth $5,000, is lives and how thankful the of The Center’s mission awarded to a high school students are for these amazing of enriching the education junior to pursue advanced opportunities.” of students and educators study in the visual arts through transformational during the summer between Sarah Stavros arts experiences. A prijunior and senior year. The Education Associate vate reception to honor this 2019 winner is Geneva DuFor SVCA year’s scholarship winners puis, a Wood River High was held at The Center’s School junior who will Ketchum location on Tuesstudy painting and drawing day, April 9. at the San Francisco Art Institute. “To date, The Center has given nearly $1 million Multiple high school Arts & Humanities scholin scholarships to local students and educators,” arships of up to $2,500 is given to students cursaid Sarah Stavros, education associate at the Sun rently enrolled in high school to further their forValley Center for the Arts. “Every year I am al- mal studies in the arts and humanities outside of ways blown away by the generosity of our donors. regular school hours. The 2019 winners are Ben It’s amazing to see how this money transforms Anderson, Leyla Ba, Gabe Delgado, Paige DeShstudents’ lives and how thankful the students are ields, Daniel Durand, Britta Heaphy, Ethan Hunt, for these amazing opportunities.” Jennifer Jordan, Murphy Kendall, Luke Mauldin, The 28 scholarships awarded by The Center fall Adri Meyer, Julia Ott, Daniel Pearson, David Tayinto five different categories, each of which allows lor, Elias Trevino, Ivan Varela, Samantha White, Wood River Valley students and educators to ex- and Sharom Yallico. pand their education in the arts and humanities. The Wendy and Alan Pesky Educator ScholarWinner of the Jack Thornton Memorial Schol- ship, of $1,200, is awarded to K-12 educators to arship is Emma Pulleiro, a junior at Wood River support formal professional development in visual High School who will participate in the Boston arts, performing arts or humanities. This year, the Conservatory Opera Intensive in Valencia, Spain, teachers awarded are Amanda Palan of Syringa this summer. This $3,000 scholarship is awarded Mountain School and Kimber Traue of Bellevue to an 11th- or 12th-grade student who has demon- Elementary School. strated their passion for the study of performing arts. tws

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BY DANA DUGAN


T H E W E E K LY S U N •

APRIL 17 - 23, 2019

EVENTS CALENDAR, CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE

SPONSORED SV INSTITUTE

10:30-11:30AM / HAILEY PUBLIC LIBRARY Story Time is held weekly on Wednesdays and Fridays at the Hailey Public Library. All ages are welcome. Parents should plan on staying with their children. For more information, call (208) 788-2036..

6-7PM / CHURCH OF THE BIG WOOD / KETCHUM Free hot dinners are provided weekly to everyone. Find Ketchum Community Dinners on Facebook for more information and weekly menu updates.

WORKING DOGS WED APR 17

6-7PM / MOUNTAIN HUMANE / HAILEY The Environmental Resource Center will host its first Spring Science Series. These will continue on Wednesdays through May 8. Working Dogs for Conservation will be held at Mountain Humane with a presentation and demonstration about conservation dogs by Pete Coppolillo, executive director of WD4C, at 100 Croy Creek Road, in Hailey. Presentations are free, interesting to all ages, and open to the public. For more information, visit ercsv.org or contact Alisa McGowan, ERC program director, at (208) 726-4333 or alisa@ercsv.org.

FREE UP TIME WED APR 17 5-6:30PM / KIC / KETCHUM

Megan McCann, co-creator of the Soul Success Summit, will offer “Free Up Your Time & Make More Money with Less Effort.” McCann’s purpose is to give women a vehicle to speak their undeniable truth through her programs, retreats, and business summits. Snacks and beverages will be provided. Bring a friend and become each other’s success accountability partners. Tickets to reserve a space can be found on Eventbrite.com. For more information, contact ethan@sawtoothavalanche.org.

TRIVIA & COCKTAILS WED APR 17

7-9PM / HOTEL KETCHUM / KETCHUM There will be two trivia games every Wednesday night through the season, along with drink specials and prizes for place winners. There is no entry free. Bring yourself and your friends, because you deserve a night of games and specialty cocktails.

AUDITIONS THU APR 18

3-5PM / BALLET & ARTS CENTER / HAILEY

The Sun Valley Ballet & Arts Center will hold open auditions for its Children’s Theater And Film School, every Thursday or call for appointment. The Sun Valley Ballet & Arts Center is located 111 N. 1st Ave. in Hailey. For more information, call (208) 366-4008 or visit svbartsdirector@gmail.com.

MOVIE: ‘DAKOTA 38’

THU APR 18

4:30-6PM / MAGIC LANTERN / KETCHUM In 2005, Jim Miller, a Native American spiritual leader and Vietnam veteran, dreamt he was horseback riding across the great plains of South Dakota. Just before he awoke, he arrived at a riverbank in Minnesota and saw 38 of his Dakota ancestors hanged. At the time, Jim knew nothing of the largest mass execution in U.S. history, ordered by Abraham Lincoln on Dec. 26, 1862. Four years later, Miller and a group of riders retraced the 330mile route of his dream on horseback from Lower Brule, S.D., to Mankato, Minn., to arrive at the hanging site on the anniversary of the execution. The screening of “Dakota 38” is part of The Center’s BIG IDEA project, “Unraveling: Reimagining the Colonization in the Americas.” For tickets and information, call (208) 726-9491 or visit sunvalleycenter.org. For more information, contact ethan@sawtoothavalanche.org.

13

BLAINE COUNTY IS A CLEAN ENERGY LEADER

STORY TIME WED APR 17 & FRI APR 19

KETCHUM COMMUNITY DINNERS WED APR 17

I

BY AIMÈE CHRISTENSEN

daho Power’s recent announcement that they will be supplying customers with 100 percent renewable energy by 2045 has led to justified celebration. Our community should be proud of its role in moving Idaho’s clean energy future forward. Idaho Power CEO Darrell Anderson said in making the announcement that customers want renewable energy. Blaine County residents, businesses and political leaders have long raised their voices for a clean, resilient energy future. Ketchum resident, naturalist and author Kerrin McCall has diligently researched, written about and advocated for local renewable energy for years. At Idaho Power’s 2009 annual meeting, local resident Kiki Tidwell drove a shareholder resolution calling on the company to address climate change—AND WON. In 2012, Kerrin McCall, then-Ketchum City Council member Nina Jonas, Sagebrush Solar founder Billy Mann (now with AltEnergy), engineer Andy Castellano, former American Public Power Association CEO Alan Richardson, former Apple executive Rick LeFaivre, and others started meeting regularly in my office to accelerate local renewable energy. Led by Billy Mann, we initiated exploration of a community solar project and

testified for renewable energy at the local and state levels. At the 2013 Sun Valley Economic Summit, I shared our local energy goals and, a few months later, Idaho Power told Mayor-elect Nina Jonas they heard our community’s interest in renewable energy loud and clear. A couple of months later, Idaho Power convened the Wood River Renewable Energy Working Group to develop their first 100 percent renewable energy product, now a possible local community solar project. And in 2016, Blaine County adopted solar at FIVE TIMES the rate of the year before through the Sun Valley Institute’s program, Solarize Blaine. Success has many parents, but let’s give credit to our community members for early courage and leadership. Blaine County is fortunate to have people who share their expertise and give many volunteer hours to moving our community and our state forward. The Sun Valley Institute invites you to join us to accelerate Idaho’s clean energy future, here, and far beyond.

NEWS IN BRIEF

Local Ski Patrol Legend Named To National Hall Of Fame

Nelson Bennett—otherwise known as the “Father of the Sun Valley Ski Patrol”—has been inducted into the National Ski Patrol (NSP) Hall of Fame. Recognized as one of the earliest pioneers in mountain safety and innovation, Bennett established effective communications on the mountain, along with training his staff to do lift evacuations. He also created the “Sun Valley” ski patrol rescue toboggan, which is still widely used today.

Ski patrol legend Nelson Bennett skis the local slopes. Photo credit: Sun Valley Resort

Sun Valley Ski Patrol is one of only a few ski patrols in the country with two inductees in the NSP Hall of Fame. Rick Hamlin, the national historian for the NSP, presented the plaque to Mike Davis, Sun Valley Ski Patrol’s director, during a special ceremony held last week at the patrol’s headquarters on Bald Mountain.

Bargain Books & Tasty Treats To Benefit Hailey Library

The Friends of the Hailey Public Library are having a spring Used Book and Bake Sale from April 18 to 20 in the Queen of the Hills Room at the Community Campus in Hailey. The sale goes from 9 a.m to 7 p.m. on Thursday and Friday and culminates in a “Bag Sale” from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Saturday. The bag sale is where the Friends of the Library provide a reusable bag for bargain hunters to fill up with books for only $7. The Used Book and Bake Sale is a major fundraiser for the nonprofit and is produced by The Friends of the Hailey Public Library to fund the enhancement of the programs, services and collections to an extent beyond what is possible within normal library budgets. “Our community has been extremely generous with donations, so we are having a spring sale AND a fall sale this year,” said sale coordinator Geegee Lowe. The Friends said they can still take donations of gently used books, CDs and DVDs in good condition, Monday through Wednesday, at the sale location at the Community Campus. Children’s books and recent titles are always popular. Due to limitations of space and storage, the Friends cannot accept encyclopedias, newspapers, older textbooks or collections of magazines. A donation receipt for tax purposes is available upon request. Help is always welcome for the book and bake sale and other Friends’ activities throughout the year. Visit the library front desk to sign up as a volunteer, or call (208) 720–7395 for more information.


T H E W E E K LY S U N •

APRIL 17 - 23, 2019

SPONSORED CHAMBER CORNER

Sudoku Is Sponsored by

BEING HUMANE

15

Hard way Pipeline

Jo-Anne Dixon And Her Team Become Shelter Leaders

T

BY MIKE MCKENNA

here are a lot of reasons why Jo-Anne Dixon loves the Wood River Valley, but one of them stands out a bit more than others. “This is a community that clearly loves its pets,” Jo-Anne said—and she should know. JoAnne is both the medical director and executive director for Mountain Humane. Raised in the Evergreen State, Jo-Ann moved to the Wood River Valley shortly after completing her doctorate in veterinary medicine at Washington State University in 1997. She then worked for nearly a decade at the Sun Valley Animal Center, which is when she first got involved with the local animal shelter. Jo-Anne began volunteering her time to give free exams at was then called the Animal Shelter of the Wood River Valley. After taking a short respite when her twins were born, Jo-Anne went to work for the shelter. Housed in a small, rundown building just west of Hailey, Idaho’s first no-kill shelter—like many of its pets—was struggling to survive. But instead of being overcome by the challenges, JoAnne and her team decided to see them as opportunities. “It was tough. We realized that the only way to tackle pet overpopulation was to address it at the source, so we decided to start our no-cost community spay/ neuter program, which is free for anyone in Blaine County,”

Jo-Anne said. “Animals don’t have checkbooks, and struggles for access to care are as real in animal medicine as they are for human medicine.” Within five years, the county’s stray pet population had been reduced by half. The stray numbers dropped so much that the shelter was able to start bringing in pets from high-kill shelters around the region. Despite its success, the shelter was still too small and dilapidated to properly handle all the animals. That’s why it called on the community to help, and help it did. In February of 2019, the nonprofit animal shelter opened a brand new 30,000-square-foot facility. It has become a model of what animal shelters are becoming in our country, places that do much more than simply adopt out animals. The 100 percent donor-funded organization also changed its name to Mountain Humane to encompass all it does for pets and our community. “Going from a small, converted janitors’ closet to this stateof-the-art facility is very rewarding,” Jo-Anne said. “We see our shelter as a leader for the state and this new facility will help us to be a catalyst to make Idaho nokill by 2025.” There’s no doubt that we love

Steel Fencing

Kelly Wardell 208-309-0916

How To Play Sudoku

The Classic Sudoku is a number placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so that each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once.

Jo-Anne Dixon and “Humpy.”‑ Photo credit: Mountain Humane

pets here in the Wood River Valley and it is a big reason why our community is such a special place. “Animals are a medium for people to care about each other, to give back and to connect,” JoAnne said. “We are an animal shelter, but it’s really about people. It’s about being humane.”

CLASSIC SUDOKU See answer on page 2

Mike McKenna is the executive director of The Chamber – Hailey & The Wood River Valley. He can be reached at Mike@ValleyChamber.org or by calling (208) 788-3484.

CROSSWORD SPONSORED BY

THETRADER TRADER THE THE TRADER Consignment for the home

Consignment for the home

Consignment for the home

Wednesday - Friday 11 to 6 Saturday 11 to 4

TRADER EADER TRADER

Always available by appointment and if we’re here.

Wednesday through Saturday 11:00 to 5:00 Always available by appointment and if we’re here.

ent for the 720-9206 or 788-0216 signment forhome the home

720-9206 or 788-0216 509 S. Main Street Bellevue, Idaho

the home

509 S. Main Street • Bellevue, Idaho

Wednesday Wednesday - Friday Wednesday - Friday 11:00to to 5:00 ednesday - Friday 11 to 611 to 6 available by appointment 11 to 6Always Saturday Saturday Saturday Saturday and if we’re here. 11 to 5 to 4 11 or to 788-0216 411 720-9206 11 to 4 Wednesday through Saturday

Always available by appointment and if we’re here.

509 S. Main Street • Bellevue, Idaho Always available by le by appointment andappointment if we’re here. and if we’re here.

720-9206 or 788-0216 or S. 788-0216 -9206 or720-9206 788-0216 509 Main Street S. Main Street 09 S. Main509 Street Bellevue, Idaho Bellevue, Idaho Bellevue, Idaho

See answer on page 2

THE WOOD RIVER VALLEY 7-DAY WEATHER FORECAST IS BROUGHT TO YOU BY:

Mostly Sunny 10%

high 53º

low 30º WEDNESDAY

Sunny 0%

high 58º low 36º THURSDAY

Mostly Sunny 0%

high 62º low 41º FRIDAY

PM Showers 40%

high 55º low 34º SATURDAY

PM Showers 40%

high 52º low 33º SUNDAY

PM Showers 40%

high 54º low 36º MONDAY

Partly Cloudy 20%

high 54º low 35º TUESDAY

SKI. BIKE. LIVE!

Elevate your experience. 340 N Main Street in Ketchum sturtevants-sv.com • 726-4501


T H E W E E K LY S U N •

APRIL 17 - 23, 2019

SPONSORED CHAMBER CORNER

Sudoku Is Sponsored by

BEING HUMANE

15

Hard way Pipeline

Jo-Anne Dixon and her team become shelter leaders

T

BY MIKE MCKENNA

here are a lot of reasons why Jo-Anne Dixon loves the Wood River Valley, but one of them stands out a bit more than others. “This is a community that clearly loves its pets,” Jo-Anne said—and she should know. JoAnne is both the medical director and executive director for Mountain Humane. Raised in the Evergreen State, Jo-Ann moved to the Wood River Valley shortly after completing her doctorate in veterinary medicine at Washington State University in 1997. She then worked for nearly a decade at the Sun Valley Animal Center, which is when she first got involved with the local animal shelter. Jo-Anne began volunteering her time to give free exams at was then called the Animal Shelter of the Wood River Valley. After taking a short respite when her twins were born, Jo-Anne went to work for the shelter. Housed in a small, rundown building just west of Hailey, Idaho’s first no-kill shelter—like many of its pets—was struggling to survive. But instead of being overcome by the challenges, JoAnne and her team decided to see them as opportunities. “It was tough. We realized that the only way to tackle pet overpopulation was to address it at the source, so we decided to start our no-cost community spay/ neuter program, which is free for anyone in Blaine County,”

Jo-Anne said. “Animals don’t have checkbooks, and struggles for access to care are as real in animal medicine as they are for human medicine.” Within five years, the county’s stray pet population had been reduced by half. The stray numbers dropped so much that the shelter was able to start bringing in pets from high-kill shelters around the region. Despite its success, the shelter was still too small and dilapidated to properly handle all the animals. That’s why it called on the community to help, and help it did. In February of 2019, the nonprofit animal shelter opened a brand new 30,000-square-foot facility. It has become a model of what animal shelters are becoming in our country, places that do much more than simply adopt out animals. The 100 percent donor-funded organization also changed its name to Mountain Humane to encompass all it does for pets and our community. “Going from a small, converted janitors’ closet to this stateof-the-art facility is very rewarding,” Jo-Anne said. “We see our shelter as a leader for the state and this new facility will help us to be a catalyst to make Idaho nokill by 2025.” There’s no doubt that we love

Steel Fencing

Kelly Wardell 208-309-0916

How To Play Sudoku

The Classic Sudoku is a number placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so that each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once.

Jo-Anne Dixon and “Humpy.” Photo credit: Mountain Humane

pets here in the Wood River Valley and it is a big reason why our community is such a special place. “Animals are a medium for people to care about each other, to give back and to connect,” JoAnne said. “We are an animal shelter, but it’s really about people. It’s about being humane.”

CLASSIC SUDOKU See answer on page 2

Mike McKenna is the executive director of The Chamber – Hailey & The Wood River Valley. He can be reached at Mike@ValleyChamber.org or by calling (208) 788-3484.

CROSSWORD SPONSORED BY

THETRADER TRADER THE THE TRADER Consignment for the home

Consignment for the home

Consignment for the home

Wednesday - Friday 11 to 6 Saturday 11 to 4

TRADER EADER TRADER

Always available by appointment and if we’re here.

Wednesday through Saturday 11:00 to 5:00 Always available by appointment and if we’re here.

ent for the 720-9206 or 788-0216 signment forhome the home

720-9206 or 788-0216 509 S. Main Street Bellevue, Idaho

the home

509 S. Main Street • Bellevue, Idaho

Wednesday Wednesday - Friday Wednesday - Friday 11:00to to 5:00 ednesday - Friday 11 to 611 to 6 available by appointment 11 to 6Always Saturday Saturday Saturday Saturday and if we’re here. 11 to 5 to 4 11 or to 788-0216 411 720-9206 11 to 4 Wednesday through Saturday

Always available by appointment and if we’re here.

509 S. Main Street • Bellevue, Idaho Always available by le by appointment andappointment if we’re here. and if we’re here.

720-9206 or 788-0216 or S. 788-0216 -9206 or720-9206 788-0216 509 Main Street S. Main Street 09 S. Main509 Street Bellevue, Idaho Bellevue, Idaho Bellevue, Idaho

See answer on page 2

THE WOOD RIVER VALLEY 7-DAY WEATHER FORECAST IS BROUGHT TO YOU BY:

Mostly Sunny 10%

high 53º

low 30º WEDNESDAY

Sunny 0%

high 58º low 36º THURSDAY

Mostly Sunny 0%

high 62º low 41º FRIDAY

PM Showers 40%

high 55º low 34º SATURDAY

PM Showers 40%

high 52º low 33º SUNDAY

PM Showers 40%

high 54º low 36º MONDAY

Partly Cloudy 20%

high 54º low 35º TUESDAY

SKI. BIKE. LIVE!

Elevate your experience. 340 N Main Street in Ketchum sturtevants-sv.com • 726-4501


16

T H E W E E K LY S U N •

APRIL 17 - 23, 2019

YOU CAN FIND IT IN BLAINE! SUN VALLEY 3D PHOTO

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Airport West | Hailey, Idaho 83333

sandbag services Advertise in this section! (includes full color & free ad design)!

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sun the weekly

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sun the weekly

Profile for The Weekly Sun

17 April 2019  

17 April 2019  

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