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THE WEEKLY SUN RESPONSIBLE LOCAL JOURNALISM. • BELLEVUE • CAREY • HAILEY • KETCHUM • PICABO • SUN VALLEY • WHAT TO KNOW. WHERE TO BE.

FREE |

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MAY 15 - 21, 2019 | V O L . 1 3 - N O . 2 0 | W W W . T H E W E E K L Y S U N . C O M

Emergency Services News Rural Fire District Chooses Sun Valley Over Ketchum

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Agriculture News New Flour Mill Opens Growth Opportunities

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Hailey News Voters Start Weighing In On Tax Hike Proposal

“Feel thyself abiding in all things, all things in self.” ~The Book of the Golden Precepts

ketchumworks.com | 192 Sun Valley Rd. | 208.720.0274

A pileated woodpecker enjoys some lunch on an aspen stump in Sun Valley on Monday, May 13. These woodpeckers are the largest in North America, but they are rare in the Rocky Mountains. Their staple food is… For more information about this photo, see “On The Cover” on page 3. Photo credit: Ralph Harris

Mindfulness & Insight Meditation

Tuesday, May 28 • 1-2:30 p.m. Light On The Mountains Center For Spiritual Living (12446 State Highway 75, Ketchum) • English Translation Provided Free And Open To The Public The Venerable Ajahn In-tha-wai Suntusako, Accompanied By Five Other Monks, Will Perform A Vipassana Meditation And Dhamma Talk. Enjoy this rare opportunity to join with the Dhamma community and meet a highly respected spiritual master from Thailand.

Traditional Food Offering Ceremony

Tuesday & Wednesday, May 28 & 29 • 9 a.m. Dang’s Thai Cuisine & Sushi Bar (310 N. Main St., Hailey) • Participate By Offering 3-6 Small Food Items Like Fruit, Juice Boxes, Etc. Open To All For More Information, Contact Tippy Marchioro (484) 222-9068 • tsmarchi@hotmail.com Dang’s Thai Cuisine Invites The Whole Community To This Event!

Lunch: 11am-3pm Monday-Friday Dinner: 3-10pm Monday-Saturday Closed Sundays

NOW OPEN AT 310 MAIN STREET IN HAILEY (208) 928-7111


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T H E W E E K LY S U N • M AY 15 - 21, 2019

EMERGENCY SERVICES

KETCHUM FIRE DEPARTMENT ‘ON ITS OWN, FOR NOW’ BY ERIC VALENTINE

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espite revitalized plans to upgrade Ketchum’s fire station and fire equipment, and a letter from Ketchum and Sun Valley firefighters claiming emergency services were being put at risk, Ketchum Rural Fire District commissioners voted to accept an emergency services contract with Sun Valley, officially ending ties that had been in place with the City of Ketchum since the 1950s. Commissioners voted 2–1 to contract with Sun Valley’s fire department starting Oct. 1. In March, the district cancelled its Ketchum contract, putting the city on a 90day notice to put together a plan for funding station and equipment upgrades all three jurisdictions agree Ketchum needs. Ketchum responded with a so-called Ketchum Fire Department 2.0 plan that included putting a $10 million to $15 million bond initiative on the November ballot that would have brought a number of significant facility and equipment upgrades. Also responding were a significant number of local firefighters who penned and signed a formal letter to the rural district stating they were “deeply concerned that the impending cancellation of the contract will result in immediate and severe disruption

NEWS IN BRIEF

Thai Spiritual Master To Be Featured At Meditation Seminar

On Tuesday, May 28, from 1 to 2:30 p.m., Light on the Mountains Spiritual Center in Ketchum will host a vipassana meditation and dhamma talk by Ajahn In-tha-wai Suntusako. This is a rare opportunity to meet a highly respected spiritual master from Thailand and the five other Monks who will accompany him. There will be a question-and-answer period after the main presentation. This is a free event and is open to the public. There will be a traditional food offering ceremony at Dang’s Thai Cuisine at 310 N. Main St., Hailey, on May 28 and 29 at 9 a.m. You can participate by offering three to six small food items like fruit, juice boxes, etc. Contact Tippy Marchioro at (484) 222-9068 or tsmarchi@ hotmail.com for more information.

and degradation of service for all three fire agencies.” Not good enough. “Ultimately, I’m trying to lead us to a path toward consolidation (of Ketchum, Ketchum rural and Sun Valley emergency services),” Jed Gray, Ketchum Rural Fire District commissioner, said. “All three commissioners want that. Just how we get there is a difference of opinion right now.” Gray was the lone vote against contracting with Sun Valley right now. He said the move would likely set the consolidation efforts back a step, but his fellow commissioners felt the opposite would happen. Who’s right remains to be seen. That’s because commissioners voted unanimously to extend the Ketchum contract until Oct. 1 as well as take action on any consolidation proposal brought to them jointly by Ketchum and Sun Valley before Oct. 1. Put another way, if Ketchum accepts the contract for services—or something similar—Sun Valley offered up earlier this year, all three fire departments could be operating under one agreement in the near future, an arrangement that has proved elusive for decades. tws

Sawtooth Botanical Garden To Host Wildflower Walks

You can join the Sawtooth Botanical Garden (SBG) and friends for its popular spring and summer Wildflower Walk series to some of our local area’s most diverse and spectacular habitats. The first Wildflower Walk of the season occurs on Thursday, May 23, for Birds & Botanicals: Camas Prairie and Centennial Marsh. All trips begin at the Sawtooth Botanical Garden, 11 Gimlet Road, four miles south of Ketchum, at 9 a.m. The full schedule is posted at sbgarden.org/wildflower-walks/. Carpools start from SBG, which helps reduce the group’s environmental footprint. Wildflower Walk destinations are to be determined by what is blooming where and when. Locations will be posted at www.sbgarden.org when they are known. Participants are encouraged to always meet at the Garden and carpool to the site. Call if you have questions: (208) 726-9358. Wildflower Walks are led by local experts and are free; donations to the Sawtooth Botanical Garden are very much appreciated. Walks happen rain or shine, so bring appropriate outerwear, sturdy walking shoes, water, sunscreen, hat and lunch. Some walks are appropriate for children age 7 years and older accompanied by an adult, but please leave your dog at home.

SUN BULLETIN BOARD THE WEEKLY

CLINICAL THERAPIST

Clinician will provide counseling services to clients in office, home or community settings throughout the Wood River Valley on a scheduled and unscheduled basis while maintaining client focus, compliance, ethical standards, safety, security and success. Applicant must have Master’s degree in a counseling/social work field from an accredited college. Licensed as a Licensed Professional Counselor, Marriage and Family Therapist or Licensed Master/Clinical Social Worker. All employees must be able to pass the state and federal back ground check. Submit resume or questions to: crice@positiveconnectionsusa.com or visit www. positiveconnectionsusa.com for more details.

HANDYMAN

Jack of all trades. Reliable, insured, clean. Small jobs to large remodel projects, or the “honey-do” list. Call Mark, (208) 573-1784

CLASE DE INGLÉS

PARA ADULTOS ¡Gratis! Donde: The Community Library, 415 Spruce Avenue North, Ketchum Cuando: Todos los martes, abril 23 – junio 25, 6:00 to 8:00 p.m. Abierto a todos los idiomas que quieren aprender ingles o mejorar sus habilidades. Para mas informacion, llama en la biblioteca @ 208.726.3493 x 1

ENGLISH CLASS

FOR ADULTS Free! Where: The Community Library, 415 Spruce Avenue North, Ketchum When: Every Tuesday, April 23 – June 25, 6:00 to 8:00 p.m. Open to everyone of all languages who wants to learn English or improve skills. For more information call the library at 208.726.3493 x 1

GARDENING POSITIONS

PRICING

NEWS

Text (up to 25 words): $5 Additional Text: 20¢ per word Photos: $5 per image • Logo: $10 Deadline: Monday at 1 p.m Space reservations: bulletin@theweeklysun.com

PROPERTY CARE 40+ YEARS Professional Contractor, Repairs & Decorating. Paul Gangnier: 208 720-7202

CLASSIC SUDOKU answer from page 15

Come join our team of professional, efficient and detailoriented Gardeners. If you are physically fit, love plants and working outdoors we would love to talk to you. Great pay, great work environment and nice people. May through October. Please call 208-309-0708.

PERSONAL ASSISTANT OFFICE MANAGER AVAILABLE Multitasking is my specialty. 20 years local experience. For more information: (208) 720-3780

PARA COMPRAR O RENTAR Casa en Ketchum para comprar. 2 cuartos. Muy fácil. (208) 720-3157

ACCEPTING NEW CLIENTS A Touch Of Class Hair Studio Anna McGehee Accepting new clients for cuts, color, Brazilian blowouts, perms.. Walk-ins welcome Salon: (208)788-9171 Anna’s: cell (208) 716-3114

HOUSEKEEPING

m Responsible, experienced & great references, housekeeper now accepting new clients. Free estimates available for: homes, condos & offices. beatrizq2003@hotmail.com, (208) 720-5973

CROSSWORD

answer from page 15


T H E W E E K LY S U N •

THE WEEKLY SUN CONTENTS

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M AY 15 - 21, 2019

FLY SUN

Sun Valley Ballet students Mia Castro, left, and Alyssa Durand, right, practice a duet in preparation for a two-part gala dance performance on Sunday. For a story, see page 12. Photo credit: Aimee Durand / Sun Valley Ballet

THIS WEEK M A Y 1 5 - 2 1 , 2019 | VOL. 12 NO. 20

Connie Grabow To Represent Ketchum In Heritage Court

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Commentary

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Calendar

Award Winning Columns, Student Spotlight, Fishing Report

SUN 2019 SUMMER FLIGHT SCHEDULE NOW OUT Delta SLC flights: 2-3x daily all year United DEN, SFO, LAX: daily June 20 - Sept 3 Alaska SEA: daily June 8 - Sept 8; 3x week (Thursday/Friday/Sunday) Sept 12 - mid Dec Full summer flight schedule at www.flysunvalleyalliance.com There are many great options and reasons to FLY SUN! Always CHECK SUN FARES FIRST.

IMPORTANT REMINDER…

Stay In The Loop On Where To Be

ON THE COVER

Continued from page 1: …carpenter ants living in fallen timber, dead roots and stumps. They excavate thumb-sized rectangular cavities, then use their enormously long sticky tongues to reach the ant burrows. Photo credit: Ralph Harris Local artists & photographers interested in seeing their art on our cover page should email submissions to: mandi@ theweeklysun.com (photos should be high resolution and include caption info such as who or what is in the photo, date and location).

THE WEEKLY SUN STAFF 13 W. Carbonate St. • P.O. Box 2711 Hailey, Idaho 83333 Phone: 208.928.7186 Fax: 208.928.7187

GET TO THE AIRPORT AT LEAST 90 MINUTES BEFORE YOUR FLIGHT Although SUN only has Delta SLC flights operating in May, the airport is reminding passengers that it is still very important to arrive at the airport well in advance of your flight, at least 90 minutes, in order to proceed through check-in and TSA security screening. Sign up here for airfare deal alerts and news too!

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Community News

www.flysunvalleyalliance.com

Check SUN fares first!

Fly SUN. Nonstop to DEN • LAX • ORD • SEA • SFO • SLC ONE STOP TO THE WORLD

Thank You to all Moms for all that you do!

Happy Mother’s Day from WRI

AD SALES Brennan Rego • 208.720.1295 • brennan@theweeklysun.com NEWS EDITOR Eric Valentine • news@theweeklysun.com ARTS & EVENTS, SOCIAL MEDIA EDITOR Dana DuGan • calendar@theweeklysun.com COPY EDITOR Patty Healey STAFF REPORTERS • Hayden Seder • Emilee Struss news@theweeklysun.com DESIGN DIRECTOR Mandi Iverson • mandi@theweeklysun.com PRODUCTION & DESIGN Chris Seldon • production@theweeklysun.com ACCOUNTING Shirley Spinelli • 208.928.7186 • accounting@theweeklysun.com PUBLISHER & EDITOR Brennan Rego • 208.720.1295 • publisher@theweeklysun.com DEADLINES Display & Community Bulletin Board Ads — Monday @ 1pm brennan@theweeklysun.com • bulletin@theweeklysun.com Calendar Submissions — Friday @ 5pm calendar@theweeklysun.com www.TheWeeklySun.com Published by Idaho Sunshine Media, LLC

Community. Compassion. Commitment.


School Day School Day Day y,School May 23rd May 23rd May 23rd 4

T H E W E E K LY S U N •

M AY 15 - 21, 2019

NEWS COMMUNITY

IDAHO’S FARMERS, FOODIES WELCOME NEW FLOUR MILL Fresher pastas, more artisan bread coming soon BY HAYDEN SEDER

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daho’s first specialty, grower-owned flour mill, Hillside Grain, has launched in the heart of the Bellevue Triangle. Started by Brett Stevenson, whose family home, Hillside Ranch, has grown barley for 45 years, the new mill will allow Idaho barley and wheat to be processed in state and to open up new market channels. It’s an opportunity for her business and for agriculture in the state Stevenson has seen untapped for years. “Idaho is one of the best grain-growing states—consistently producing some of the best-quality barley and wheat and also some of the largest volumes,” Stevenson said. “Much of Idaho’s barley and wheat leave the state. I wanted to be able to process some of this high-quality wheat and barley and have identity preserved and fresh flours available.” Stevenson grew up on Hillside Ranch, her family’s multigenerational farm, growing organic wheat and barley. Seeing her father growing grain her entire life instilled in Stevenson the desire to build on what her family had created and better the lives of consumers and Idaho’s wheat and barley farmers. “Hillside Grain is pioneering a new untapped market channel,” said Blaine Jacobson, Idaho Wheat Commission executive director. “They’re in touch with the way the market is evolving. There’s been a general trend nationally toward more local products and more fresh products; artisan bakeries have taken off significantly.”

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We encourage as many market channels as possible. Kudos to Hillside Grain because they are pioneering a new untapped market channel.”

Blaine Jacobson Idaho Wheat Commission Executive Director

Jacobson also points out the trend in traceability and knowing where ingredients are coming from and knowing the growers of one’s food. Already, Hillside Grain has had successful test runs of their milling line. They plan to primarily sell bulk and wholesale to artisan bakeries as well as local markets, including those in the Wood River Valley. “Hopefully, consumers will have a different experience eating bread, pasta, or tortillas made with fresh flour,” Stevenson said. “In Europe, bread and pastas are so delicious because it is constantly being made fresh, but the part I think we often overlook is that they are also using fresh flour. In the U.S., we typically process and enrich our flour for conditioning and shelf stability, which I think takes away greatly from the flavor, nutritional value, and perhaps even digestibility.” Starting an Idaho-based flour mill isn’t just a game-changer for consumers, but growers as well. While there is a large commercial mill owned by Grain Craft located

Hillside Grain flour mill owner Brett Stevenson in the mill. Photo credit: Brett Stevenson

in Blackfoot, this is Idaho’s first specialty, grower-owned mill. “Hillside Grain flour mill is unique because we are growers, stone milling, roller milling and sifting our flours,” Stevenson said. “This process allows us to retain some bran and germ, which is where all the flour and nutritional value is.” Hillside Grain uses custom, handmade stones from Holland in their milling process, a unique aspect hard to find in the United States. Stone mills are more artisan and provide more flavor in the flour, while roller mills, like the larger commercial mills, produce higher output. The flour also has no additives or enriching, nor glyphosate or GMO, in its grain. While Stevenson’s master’s degree in environmental studies has certainly helped in her crusade to bring flavorful, artisan flour to Idaho, growing up on her family’s ranch also provided her with generations of wisdom. “When we were kids and wanted to go to the lake on the weekends with friends, our dad used to say, ‘No way. The crops don’t stop growing on Sunday,’” Stevenson said. “Producing food is the same. People still eat on Saturday and Sunday.” Stevenson and her team at Hillside Grain are still fine-tuning their grain-cleaning section, bran collection and bagging, but be on the lookout for Hillside Grain’s artisanal flours coming soon. tws

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T H E W E E K LY S U N •

5

M AY 15 - 21, 2019

NEWS HERITAGE

HERITAGE COURT HONOREE: CONNIE GRABOW Growing ‘real roots here’ since 1980

F

BY ERIC VALENTINE

or the organizers of the annual Heritage Court celebration, the second time’s a charm when it comes to placing Connie Grabow on the court. Grabow is one of four honorees for the popular Blaine County Historical Museum event. And when the museum asked her to be on the court four years ago, she declined. “I wasn’t ungrateful, I just had my reservations because I didn’t think I had done all that much,” Grabow explained. “Looking back now, I realize I have been involved in a lot. I still do a ton of volunteer work, but not as a chairperson or director anymore. I do the stuff that doesn’t get written up.” Objectively looking at the Ketchum resident’s involvement over the years, it’s fair to say Grabow is understating her contribution to Valley life quite a bit. Born in New England and happily living in the Midwest after spending part of the 1950s and 1960s working in Germany for the U.S. State Department, she moved here in 1980 when her late husband Leonard unexpectedly said he’d like to improve his skiing. Where better than Sun Valley? Grabow immediately became involved in the Valley’s active cultural life. For years she was on the board of The Community Library, helping especially with fundraising, and was on the board of Moritz Community Hospital, where she delivered meals to patients and helped make wreaths and decorations for the annual fundraising ball. For Connie Grabow is one of four Heritage Court honorees two years she worked with a summer program of for 2019. Photo credit: Eric Valentine The Hunger Coalition. She found the tricky part was making sure the kids took at least one vegeta- said. “This is home. I have real roots here.” ble and didn’t just make a beeline to the desserts. The History of Heritage Court Some of Grabow’s favorite memories as a memThe Heritage Court is a seasonal program of the ber of the Sun Valley Ski Club are of helping out groups of visiting skiers, especially when they Blaine County Historical Museum. It honors four were mentally or physically challenged. Each Sun women from each part of the Valley every year Valley helper was responsible for one athlete and who are at least 70 years old and have lived here would provide transportation, housing, and enthu- for 30 years or more. The other common denomsiastic cheering during the races. An adventure inator of the honorees? They have to have made from her early days here was working with a BLM a significant contribution to the local history and program to preserve ancient Indian pictographs. culture over the years. Seasonal events include an invitation-only tea She and her teammates climbed to the sites and for former and current honorees copied the artwork as best they May 21, hosted by The Commucould, creating a record of a I wasn’t born and nity Library. June 9 is the big fragile past. Today, Grabow walks to the raised here, but I’ve event—the gala coronation at YMCA from her home three lived here longer than the Liberty Theatre with flowers, entertainment, and refreshments days a week for yoga and water anywhere else I’ve lived. I that is free and open to the pubaerobics classes and enjoys the lic. blossoming of the arts here. The have real roots here.” The Senior Connection in HaiSun Valley Opera, the CommuConnie Grabow ley will honor past and current nity Orchestra, jazz concerts, members of the court at a the film festival, live theater, the luncheon Aug. 8. And the ladies will participate writers’ conference, and the Summer Symphony are annual events Grabow says she regularly at- in all the summer parades, too. The museum’s website includes stories and pictends. “Most of my children live here. My grandson tures of everyone honored since the beginning of went to school here. My granddaughter went to the Heritage Court in 2004. Check it out at bchisschool here. My husband is buried here,” Grabow toricalmuseum.org. tws

NEWS IN BRIEF

Valley Radio Station Back 'On Air'

You can stream Drop-In Radio again, without the static and interference. That’s the message from KDPI Radio 88.5 FM—a listener supported, non-commercial, community radio station in the Valley. “We are so very happy to be back,” KDPI board member Michael A. Scullion said. “I say it now with much happiness—hit that ‘Listen Live’ button below the screenshot on the website!” KDPI’s mission is to connect and amplify the voices of the Wood River Valley, to build community through a sense of identity and belonging, to stimulate, inspire and educate.

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T H E W E E K LY S U N •

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Talk Business Over Sushi

The Chamber of Hailey and the Wood River Valley is inviting businesses and the public to attend this month’s Business After Hours at Mountain West Bank in Hailey. The event will be held on Thursday, May 16, from 5–7 p.m. The community is invited to attend this free monthly event to meet local business owners and catch up on Chamber-related news and happenings. Food and beverages will be provided by Zou 75. Don’t forget to bring your business cards to enter in the “BAH” raffle. For more information, please contact The Chamber at Info@ ValleyChamber.org, visit ValleyChamber.org or haileyidaho.com, or call (208) 788-3484.

K9 Sniff Search Leads To Felony Drug Arrest

One of Blaine County’s newest deputies has made its first drug arrest. On Friday, May 10, deputies from the Blaine County Sheriff’s Office arrested Karen M. Roscoe, age 64, of Hailey, for possession of a controlled substance—a felony, and possession of drug paraphernalia—a misdemeanor. The charges stem from an investigation by the Blaine County Narcotics Enforcement Team and a traffic stop con- Karen Roscoe. Photo credit: Blaine County ducted by Blaine County Sheriff’s depSheriff’s Office uties. The traffic stop occurred on May 7 on State Highway 75 at milepost 105, south of Bellevue. During the traffic stop, Blaine County Sheriff’s Office K9 “Kimber” was deployed and conducted an exterior sniff search of Roscoe’s 2005 Subaru Outback. K9 “Kimber” alerted on the vehicle, indicating the presence of drugs. During a subsequent search of the vehicle, deputies found approximately 10 grams of methamphetamine, two syringes containing methamphetamine and drug paraphernalia. The Blaine County Sheriff’s Office introduced its new K9 program on May 3, 2019, and this is the first K9 deployment where illegal drugs were found since the teams were put into service. Roscoe is scheduled for arraignment on May 13, 2019, at 1:30 p.m.

Sierra Stern, in front of her in-process tiny house. Photo credit: Sierra Stern

HIGH SCHOOL SENIOR CLOSE TO FINISHING TINY HOUSE PROJECT

talk about my project to the Valley’s news outlets being happy to talk about my project and publish ilver Creek High School senior Sierra Stern stories, as well,” Stern said. “It amazes me how has spent the better part of her senior year on kind and enthusiastic everyone is about my project a senior project, building a tiny house. When when I talk to them about it.” The Weekly Sun interviewed the student in January, In addition to Sali, who is the contractor on the Stern said she hoped to have the house finished by project, Jolyon Sawrey of Vital ink Environmental the end of the school year, a deadline that is fast Architecture has also been mentoring Stern. approaching. Named “Kintsugi” after the Japanese That support has been instrumental in the projart of fixing broken pottery with gold lacquer, the ect, particularly when Stern was faced with some house is an amalgamation of Stern’s newfound of the obvious challenges of learning a new skill. knowledge of architecture and design and help “I think it’s natural for humans to have worries from the community. that things won’t work out, but the line between Over the winter, Stern worked on Kintsugi with success and failure is whether or not you give in contractor Levi Sali of L.W. Builders LLC at his to those feelings,” Stern said. “I’m working hardworkshop in the induser than I need, and altrial sector of Woodside. I’ve received an amazing amount though doing the bare The project is close to minimum is appealing, of support from the community, my life won’t improve being finished although, like any project, there from people stopping me to talk about unless I put my heart have been a few snags my project to the Valley’s news outlets and soul into some hard here and there. work to improve as “It wouldn’t truly be being happy to talk about my project and much as I can. So I’ve an accomplishment if publish stories, as well. It amazes me how kept going, even in anxthere wasn’t any strugkind and enthusiastic everyone is about iety-inducing periods gle put into the project,” of this project, because Stern said. “As of right my project when I talk to them about it.” I promised myself I now, the walls are fully would finish this house. Sierra Stern I’m going to keep that built and we are priming/painting and waitpromise, no matter how ing for a few of our other components, like roofing, exhausting it proves to be.” to come through.” With all the work that has gone into the project, a The project relies on donations, which Stern big question on people’s minds: Will she live in it? has been securing through a gofundme website. “I sure am!” Stern said, enthusiastically. Donations received thus far have gone into some While she’s not sure where the house will be put of the most important elements, like lumber and yet, the 18-year-old is ecstatic to become a homethe woodstove. But to finish the project, Stern esti- owner at such a young age, especially of a home mates she needs about $1,000 more. that she helped build. “With all the support we’ve received so far, I Once the school year ends and Stern has wrapped really hope it continues, even to the end of this up the chaos of her project, she will take a summer project,” Stern said. “Every little bit helps, whether job and then, come fall, pack up to attend BSU and we’re buying a couple of screws or a central heat- pursue a degree in film and television. ing system, and each donation has its place in the “I’m not sure what the future holds, but I’ll still house.” be putting my best foot forward in hopes that I’ll At the end of the project, Stern plans to reward make my lifelong dream of writing and directing all the donors with an open house event. films a reality,” Stern said. “After a project like In addition to monetary support, the communi- this, what can’t I do?” ty has donated other forms of support to Stern’s For updates on Stern’s project, follow her on inscause, like mentoring, media support, and general tagram @kintsugitinyhouse. advice. To donate, visit gofundme.com/building-kintsu“I’ve received an amazing amount of support gi-tiny-home. tws from the community, from people stopping me to

S

BY HAYDEN SEDER


T H E W E E K LY S U N •

NEWS HAILEY

7

M AY 15 - 21, 2019

VOTING POWER

Hailey special election on 3% utility bill hike is May 21 BY ERIC VALENTINE

HAILEY—The city machine is doing its part to get out the vote for a special election May 21 that, if successful, will raise power bills for Hailey ratepayers and improve the quality of streets they drive, walk and do business on. From press releases to election mail fliers, the City of Hailey is trying to make it clear: Approve a power bill increase now or see the quality of local streets decrease over the next months and years. Early voting has already begun for the election that will determine whether Hailey ratepayers will fund a number of streetscape improvements to the city’s core. The city council decided back in March to ask voters to approve increasing the so-called franchise tax, seen in Idaho Power utility bills, from 1 percent to 3 percent. The hike would result in $120,000 of additional revenue per year, upping the city’s total franchise fee revenue to $410,000 per year. A franchise fee is something that cit-

ies can charge utility companies based on revenues garnered from local ratepayers, including businesses, tenants and landlords. Increasing this fee is a fairly common way to raise funds necessary for infrastructure and other improvements that are too expensive for existing budgets. How much will this new tax cost you? If it’s approved, someone paying $100 a month for their power would pay $103. While that doesn’t sound too steep, the winter months can bring much higher power bills for locals, making the increase a little more significant. For instance, a $500 power bill would have another $15 tacked on. And when you consider that franchise fees also exist for Intermountain Gas, Cox Cable TV and Clear Creek Disposal, the costs start to add up, especially for businesses trying to keep expenses low or anyone living paycheck to paycheck. But there are benefits ratepayers would reap if the initiative gets approved by a simple majority of voters. Nearly 30 different maintenance items, from police and fire

station maintenance to weed abatement and street-crack filling, were identified by city staff as items requiring routine maintenance that could go underfunded depending on weather and other circumstances if no new revenue sources are found. And when the city held town halls and conducted surveys to gauge resident opinion on what Hailey needs most, “improved maintenance of existing infrastructure” topped the list. For instance, in 2018, 5 percent of city streets received chip seal maintenance when best safety practices recommend 20 percent per year. “Without consistent maintenance, sections of complete road failure result,” the city says in its flier. May 21 is the last opportunity voters will have to weigh in when polls open at 8 a.m. and close at 8 p.m. Only voters living within the city limits of Hailey are eligible to vote in this election. Visit blainecounty.org and use the “Where do I vote” link to determine your voting precinct and eligibility. Early and absentee voting is open 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.

LEASE A NEW 2019

Hailey voters: Have you checked this off your to-do list? Image credit: Public Domain Pictures

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sun T H E W E E K LY S C 8

T H E W E E K LY S U N •

M AY 15 - 21, 2019

the weekly

A view of the snowcapped Sawtooths during springtime in Stanley, last week. Photo credit: Alex Simpson


CENE

T H E W E E K LY S U N •

M AY 15 - 21, 2019

9

NEWS IN BRIEF

Attention Sun Valley Area Drivers: Expect Closures

The City of Sun Valley is beginning construction work for the second year of the Road and Path Bond Program and is trying to let drivers know what to expect. Focus this past week has been on Elkhorn Road and Pathway. Work on Elkhorn will include rehabilitation and paving of the roadway and bike path, raising and lowering of manholes, new curb and gutter, culverts, and ADA accessibility improvements. Elkhorn Road has been closed to through traffic from Skyline Drive to South Village Way. Access to local traffic has remained open at all times with through traffic being detoured to Village Way. The bike path has been closed from Skyline Drive to South Village. Pedestrians and cyclists should use the Village Way bike path as a detour route. There will brief full closures of Elkhorn Road to local traffic for culvert replacements near Blue Grouse and Horseshoe Road. Flaggers will be onsite to direct local traffic to detours. Work is anticipated to occur between 7 a.m. and 7 p.m. Night work and weekend work is not expected. Access to residences will remain open at all times, although access points are likely to change to accommodate construction. Next up is construction on Parker Gulch Road, Defiance Street, Keystone Street, and Independence Creek Road instead of previously planned work in the Twin Creeks area due to wet soil conditions. Improvements in the Twin Creeks area are postponed until the soil is dry enough for construction work.

Google Pays Visit To Blaine County Schools

Since 2016, students in Blaine County have learned about the world from the comfort of their classrooms through Google Expeditions. Using recycled cellphones and an app, students can travel back in time, experience the Seven Wonders of the World, and even tour their own community, thanks to a collaborative project with Google that enabled schools to create their own expeditions and then share them with students across the country. “For the past three years, BCSD has been integrating virtual reality into the classroom. By using Google Expeditions, teachers are able to enhance their curriculum in entirely new ways,” said technology integration specialist Paul Zimmerman. “Our success caught the attention of the Google Expeditions team who flew in from New York to spend a day talking to staff, experience two AR and VR sessions, and see our approach to innovative learning firsthand.” With Expeditions AR, teachers can bring 3D objects, like one of Michelangelo’s statues, to the students’ desks so that everyone can examine the object together at the same time. The 3D objects are accompanied by text information that only the teacher can view. The objects are designed as a supplement to a teacher’s existing lesson plan to help bring the subject to life.

Lawsuit Targets Trump Administration Renewal Of Oregon Ranchers’ Grazing Permit

Conservationist groups filed suit last week challenging former Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke’s order to renew grazing permits for Oregon ranchers Dwight and Steven Hammond. Zinke’s January 2019 order, one of his last official acts, came despite the Bureau of Land Management’s 2014 decision to cancel the Hammonds’ privilege to graze on public lands following a series of arson fires. Today’s lawsuit, filed in U.S. District Court in Portland, Oregon, says Zinke’s order violates federal rules that require permittees to have a “satisfactory record of performance” in accordance with the terms and conditions of the grazing permit. The permit renewal also waived environmental review, violating federal laws that require such analysis before permits can be issued. “Secretary Zinke hijacked the public process for political reasons and ordered the local land managers to go against their own judgment and renew the grazing permit for public land permittees who had violated federal regulations,” said Erik Molvar, executive director of Western Watersheds Project. “The American public deserves better than management-by-decree, and we’re asking the court to order the agency back to the drawing board to ensure the decision complies with federal law.” Zinke said his order was based in part on President Trump’s July 2018 pardon of the father and son. The lawsuit says that Zinke misinterpreted the effect of the presidential pardon, which did not change the facts underlying the Hammonds’ convictions. The pardon does not negate evidence that the Hammonds’ conduct violated federal regulations and the terms of their permit, which makes them ineligible to renew their permit. The BLM canceled the Hammonds’ grazing permit in 2014 after the agency determined they did not qualify for a renewal based on a lack of “satisfactory record of performance.” Among other things, the permittees were found to have set a series of fires on federal lands without authorization and interfered with firefighters, leading to federal court convictions in 2012. As an administrative appeal was wending its way through the Interior Department, Zinke ordered the decision be transferred to his jurisdiction. On January 2, during the government shutdown, Zinke reversed the BLM’s 2014 decision and decided to renew the Hammonds’ grazing permit. “This was political interference at the highest levels of government,” said Judi Brawer, wild places program director at WildEarth Guardians. “There are no legal grounds for renewing the permit without a public environmental review. Letting a Trump appointee arbitrarily determine who does and doesn’t get the privilege of grazing on our public lands is an insult to public lands users.”

Fuelwood Permits On Sale At Local Vendors

Personal-use fuelwood permits for the Sawtooth National Forest are on sale starting May 15. Fuelwood permits are $6.25 per cord with a four-cord minimum and a 10-cord maximum per household. Permits will be available at Sawtooth National Forest Ranger District offices, the Sawtooth Supervisor’s Office at 370 American Ave. in Jerome, and private vendors in southern Idaho. The 2019 fuelwood season goes through Nov. 30. Cutting fuelwood within a closure area is prohibited. Check this year’s fuelwood brochure and current Motor Vehicle Use Maps to make sure you are cutting in an area open to fuelwood gathering and pay special attention to closed areas and roads with restoration activities. “Remember, the forest has regulations prohibiting the cutting of dead or living whitebark pine trees which are declining and are critically important to several wildlife species,” said Sawtooth National Forest Timber Program Manager, Scott Wagner. Fuelwood permits are valid within the Boise, Payette and Sawtooth National Forests. All motorized travel related to fuelwood gathering must be in full accordance with Forest Service travel regulations. Once the snow melts, permit holders are encouraged to cut fuelwood early in the year because fire restrictions may impact the cutting season later in the summer. Early-season fuelwood cutters are asked to use caution, avoiding wet muddy roads, where travel may cause resource damage. Fuelwood cutting is not allowed within riparian areas (adjacent to creeks and rivers). Sawtooth National Forest vendors include: • Camas Creek Country Store, Fairfield 208-764-2211 • Sawtooth Wood Products, Bellevue 208-788-4705 • Idaho Lumber, Hailey 208-788-3333 • Lower Stanley Country Store 208-774-3566


COMME N TA RY

10

T H E W E E K LY S U N •

Fishing R epoRt

M AY 15 - 21, 2019

COLUMN NO BONES ABOUT IT

I

THE “WEEKLY” FISHING REPORT FOR MAY 15 - 21, FROM PICABO ANGLER

n just under two weeks, Silver Creek and other local fisheries will open up for the 2019 season. Here in the Wood River Valley area we have been fortunate to have several winters with a healthy snowpack and resulting good flows in our rivers. The 2019 season is shaping up to be a great one. If you haven’t made plans to come out here and fish Silver Creek, the Big Wood River, the Salmon River or the Big Lost River, do so now! When the season opens on May 25, don’t expect solitude if you plan to fish Silver Creek. With all freestone rivers running high and dirty, Silver Creek will be our most prominent fishery for several weeks. While the creek will certainly be popular, plenty of water is available for all anglers. Remember to “be kind, stay kind!” For Silver Creek, be sure to have a good selection of BWOs, PMDs, Callibaetis, ants, and beetles, and don’t be afraid to throw a streamer or mouse pattern during low-light conditions. Here at Picabo Angler we’ve got plenty of new, custom patterns on hand. We’ll start our annual brown drake watch at the opener. Keep your eyes on our fishing report and social media for up-to-date drake info! As of this writing, the Big Lost River below Mackay remains fishable at 329 CFS. Don’t make the long drive (Trail Creek Pass is still closed) without checking stream flows first. Above 350 CFS, wading on the lower Lost becomes quite difficult. Look for good midge and BWO activity in the afternoons and be equipped with your favorite tailwater nymphs such as zebra midges, copper johns and princes. The Picabo Angler Opening Weekend festivities begin on Friday, May 24, at 5 p.m. Again this year we’ll have live music by Hillfolk Noir and storytelling by Hank Patterson, “your world-renowned fly-fishing expert and guide.” Sawtooth Brewery will be on hand to provide great local beers, and the kitchen at Picabo Angler will feature a great dinner. On Saturday, May 25, be sure to stop by the shop for great new gear and flies, and say hi to all of us at Picabo Angler. Throughout the weekend, numerous vendors and local resource agencies will be here to talk about new products and our local fisheries. We’ll be here, rain or shine, so be sure to come see us. Peace, love and fly-fishing!

Hwy 20 in Picabo info@picaboangler.com (208)788.3536 www.picaboangler.com

I

BY FRAN JEWELL

CANINE IDENTITY CRISIS

can hear it now: “You have got to be kidding!” I am hard serious! I talk endlessly about leadership and how critical it is to dog mental health. Very few dogs these days do not have some sort of anxiety, whether it is separation anxiety, approval anxiety, inability to calm themselves in the house, redirected aggression, even reactivity to events or other dogs. What is even more unfortunate is that so many people do not recognize the signs of anxiety and continue to let their dogs live in quiet misery. Our dogs cannot tell us or even talk about how they feel. To top it off, we place feelings on them as if they were people instead of dogs, which is good old-fashioned anthropomorphism. This doesn’t mean dogs don’t have feelings, but they do not have feelings for the same reasons as people do. This is where the dog identity crisis begins. We are so busy trying to inflict our feelings upon our dogs that we don’t see what is really happening to them. Let me give you an example. This is my favorite subject, service dogs, particularly fake service dogs. One day I am in a store in Boise. There is a person with a baby carriage and a small dog in the carriage. The dog has baby clothes on and a service dog vest. This owner leaves the dog to walk

around the corner to another isle to get something and the dog has a meltdown, crying and shaking. The owner hurries and comes back and then tells a friend that the dog is so worried about her that the dog cannot stand to be out of sight of the owner. “What a wonderful service dog she is!” the owner exclaims. The reality is that the dog is not providing service at all, but instead is expressing extreme separation anxiety. The owner is convinced that the dog must see her to be able to alert on a medical problem. I’m watching this entire interaction and it is clear to me the dog is horrified to be alone because the dog has been encouraged to be dependent upon the owner. Not the other way around. What anxiety for this poor dog! With such separation anxiety, I am not sure this dog could ever get past the emotional dependence to be able to do a job effectively. This dog is in an emotional identity crisis. How do we prevent this identity crisis in our dogs? Treat your dog like a dog and expect good manners. It sure can be difficult when pups are so cute and cuddly. However, we have to remember they are dogs, not humans. Say “No” when they do something that is not appropriate. Reward the things you like. Provide clear and reasonable rules for structure and be consistent about rules.

Dogs need to be dogs first, with manners, to be happy. Photo credit: Fran Jewell

Dogs need someone to guide them. In many cases, dogs that don’t have structure actually become so anxious they will revert to feral behavior that can be aggressive. They simply do not know how to deal with life without guidance. Dogs should not be making decisions about how they behave in our human environment, especially if they revert to the only thing they know to protect themselves—feral and often aggressive behavior. This does not mean you don’t love them endlessly. But, remember, they need structure to

be happy emotionally. Love your dog for being a magnificent species so different from ours, so loving and kind. Remember that they did not come into this world to be treated like a human baby. Fran Jewell is an Idaho Press Club award-winning columnist, IAABC-certified dog behavior consultant, NADOI-certified instructor #1096 and the owner of Positive Puppy Dog Training, LLC, in Sun Valley. For more information, visit positivepuppy. com or call (208) 578-1565.

COLUMN SKETCHBOOK HIKING

NATURE, CHARCOAL, AND INKS

I

BY LESLIE REGO

love drawing with an old-fashioned dip pen and a bottle of ink. For some reason I am afraid of using a fountain pen. I guess I fear that the ink will spray over my paper and ruin my drawing. Another age-old tool I like to use is a burnt stick (my rudimentary form of carbon ink), which I grab from a campfire when I am hiking. Generally, there is enough carbon left to create a drawing. The Greeks and Romans made ink from soot, glue and water. The ink was similar to charcoal sticks. It was very stable, but could be easily smudged and was not resistant to water. Chinese ink is made from fine soot combined with water. No binder is necessary. Shellac can be added to the ink to make it waterproof. Around 3000 B.C., the Chinese began to draw monochromatic paintings with this ink. The interest lay in creating texture and emotions through gentle strokes of black and grey. In India, the name for black ink was “masi.” It was a mixture of ashes, water and animal glue. Europe began to import this ink in the 1700s, which is when it began to be known as India Ink. In the Middle Ages, two kinds of black ink were used: carbon ink (India ink) and irongall ink made from oak galls. Iron-gall ink was used from the third century on by such artists as Leonardo da Vinci and Rembrandt van Rijn. The problem is that since the ink is made from iron salts and tannic acids, it is highly corrosive and thus not very stable. Oak galls are ball-like shapes that reside on branches or twigs of the oak tree. They are formed by the oak gall wasp and are generally harmless. When collected, crushed, soaked in water with gum arabic and a bit of ferrous sulphate, they produce ink.

Leslie Rego, “Moon over the Mountain,” charcoal sticks.

So I became curious. What other ways can I make ink from local trees? Small amounts of sap in pine trees oozes year-round, but it is particularly prevalent in the spring when new needles begin to form. This pine sap can be used to make ink. Combine a bit of the sap with gum arabic, add both to water and stir until the two are dissolved. The gum arabic thickens the liquid. Let it ferment in a jar for about a week and then strain. At this point you can add soot from a campfire or scraped from the sides of your fireplace, or even from the bottom of a pan you use for cooking over an open fire. The final color of the ink will depend upon how much soot you add. To make a deeper color, add a few rusty nails

to the sap and the gum arabic during the first fermentation. With the addition of tarnished nails, the ink will darken on the paper after it is exposed to oxygen but, of course, you run the risk of having your drawing become corroded over time. Walnuts, indigo, and peach pits have also been used to make ink. Nature has given us a lot of ways to put marks on paper. Some are more stable than others, but all are fascinating to explore. Leslie Rego is an Idaho Press Club award-winning columnist, artist and Blaine County resident. To view more of Rego’s art, visit leslierego.com.


T H E W E E K LY S U N •

M AY 15 - 21, 2019

COLUMN ON LIFE’S TERMS

KEEPING IN TOUCH

obituaries, was I finally able to reach her son’s wife, who informed me of her move from Washeeping in touch with friends is supposed ington, D.C., to California months earlier, her to be simple, with instant and worldwide tenure in a nursing home, and her demise. I was contact through social media. Nonethe- happy at least to talk to her lovely daughter-inless, even though we try to keep up with the latest law and share some stories and my affection for technology, some of us are bewildered by the vast this remarkable lady, but I never got to say “goodarray of options open to us, especially those used bye” to her. to writing on paper, telephoning, or using snail Recently, the Senior Connection held a “Navmail. igating Longevity Summit” at the Y to review Christmas of 2017 seemed esthe options and resources for those pecially odd to me, because cards facing old age or for their famfrom two of my college friends ily members. The speakers notwith whom I had exchanged simple ed things one should do, even as Christmas greetings for decades younger people, to make decisions didn’t arrive. Over the years, my and be of more help during family list of mutual seasonal exchanges emergencies, such as injury, fatal has narrowed, of course, due to illness or sudden death. Particimoves, illnesses, or simply the ease pants urged the keeping of vital of email greetings. Some seemed information close at hand, known, to disappear. I later was able to find and available to family and friends, one of the two friends and visit her such as legal and financial docua few weeks before she opted out of ments, wishes for home or nursing the drastic life she was living with care, lists of medications and docJoEllen Collins—a longtime complete liver failure. tors and securing advanced care resident of the Wood River Just today I received in my post Valley— is an Idaho Press (such as “Do Not Resuscitate”) dioffice box a beautiful tribute to the Club award-winning colum- rectives. other friend, Joy, my college room- nist, a teacher, writer, fabric I will add one other list as I mate, on the occasion of her burial artist, choir member and ponder my recent separation from just this past month in Arlington unabashedly proud grandma contact with beloved friends and Cemetery. I had hoped that I would known as “Bibi Jo.” family. I am recording the means be informed when this honor hapof contact of those I would want pened, but it has been, due to government regu- to know about a prolonged illness, change of adlations, awhile since I first learned of her passing dress, or an end of life happening to me, espealmost a year ago. cially if I still could communicate with them. I I had tried during all of 2018 to find her but would have loved to smile, one more time, with couldn’t locate her; all former contact sources my friend Joy, and now my elder cousin Mari, were nonexistent. Only because she has a fair- who seems to have vanished from this earth, no ly unusual last name, and through searching for matter how many ways I try to find her.

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SPONSORED FEATURE STUDENT SPOTLIGHT

BY JOELLEN COLLINS

COLUMN SCIENCE OF PLACE

SIGNS OF SPRING

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BY HANNES THUM

he signs of springtime are unmistakable, now. What seemed like the faintest dusting of green on the tips of the cottonwoods and aspens along the river is now an explosion of neon buds and leaves running through our valley, moving north each day as the snow upvalley retreats upwards. The sun climbs higher in the sky each day and lingers longer in the evenings. Life returns to the valley after being hunkered down through the snowstorms of winter. Sandhill cranes migrate through these parts this time of year, following their instincts or their senses or their whatever as they travel North America (the whole continent!). One of them flew over my neighborhood early one morning last week—I heard its rattling call long before I saw the bird itself, my head craned back to see this creature flapping above. The elk and deer and pronghorn are on the move again. The kestrels are back. The bears are awake. Insects are going wild with the new plant growth. Norman Maclean famously wrote, “All there is to thinking is seeing something noticeable which makes you see something you weren’t noticing which makes you see something that isn’t even visible.” The thing that we can see, plainly: that the trees are growing green buds and leaves on their slender branch tips. What we may not have been noticing: the systems of life busily (very busily) returning to our valley after a long and snowbound winter, moving and eating and growing and breathing and mating and raising. The invisible: the chemistry of photosynthesis underlying all of this, transferring solar energy into living tissue. Photosynthesis, the greatest of all of life’s inventions. There is hardly another process we could even imagine that could so effectively power life as we know it. Photosynthesis, the invisible but vital process where plants take carbon dioxide and water and sunlight and build their bodies, feeding in turn every other living creature you can name. Photosynthesis, the connection between the sun and life itself. We don’t know how many stars there are in this universe. We may never know. But, there’s a lot of them, and there are a lot of planets orbiting those stars. Are there creatures out there on those plan-

A yearling moose stands in the Big Wood River, swollen with spring runoff. Photo credit: T.P. Brown

ets that have figured out another way to live? Another version of something photosynthesis-like? Some other process to turn the energy of the universe into the energy of life? Maybe. Maybe not. That something-from-nothing alchemy. That creation of solid matter from a common liquid, from invisible air. The realignment of matter itself. Dormant all winter long, and suddenly awake again with the return of the sun. Turning basic ingredients from around the environment and making actual living creatures, as if the whole world was a scientist’s laboratory experiment and the sun was the power source striking inert materials into life. Life, in spring, suddenly with a new world to explore and a fresh chance to take in the energy of the sun, provided by the plants. What a world. Hannes Thum is a Wood River Valley native and has spent most of his life exploring what our local ecosystems have to offer. He currently teaches science at Sun Valley Community School

Antonia Avery is on a mission to transform an entire industry with body positivity. Photo credit: Dakota Sanders

ANTONIA AVERY Fashionista speaks on body inclusivity

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BY EMILEE MAE STRUSS

ilver Creek High School junior Antonia Avery is on a very specific mission. Besides taking extra online classes to graduate one year early, she is focused on transforming an entire industry. She wants to change the fashion industry— with body positivity. “I am a fashionista,” Avery said. “And I want to change the fashion industry.” Avery was very open during an interview, sharing about her own struggles with the current image of what “beautiful” means in the fashion industry. She noticed that the brands that she likes, including Louis Vuitton and Gucci, have a very specific type of model: 6 feet tall and size 0. “The brands that I love don’t even have clothes I can wear because they don’t fit my body,” Avery said. She recognizes her own emotions toward this unrealistic standard and it hits close to home here in the Wood River Valley. She says it has been difficult growing up in the Valley where many of the women do not look like her. “It’s hard when everyone looks opposite of you,” Avery said. “But I realized that even stick-thin, beautiful women have insecurities, too.” Avery’s realization that being thin doesn’t bring happiness

made her realize that the answer to all of it was inclusivity, and being an outward display of what is on the inside. The actions and personality of a person are what makes them beautiful, Avery says. “I want everyone to know that it does not matter what you look like,” Avery said. “It’s cliché, but it truly is what’s on the inside that matters.” Avery is attending the Institute of Michelangelo in Italy next fall for two months. She is on track to graduate this spring and currently works at the restaurant Enoteca, in Ketchum. “I love working at Enoteca,” Avery said. “It’s so nice to be at work and only there. It’s actually like therapy for me and I get paid to be there.” She is looking forward to meeting new people and experiencing a new place. Her hopes for this Valley, however, are quite specific. “It’s a tiny Valley,” Avery said. “And the people here are changing but I just encourage people to keep opening up to accepting people that are different from them.” tws

Editor’s Note: Anyone who would like to recommend a Blaine County School District student for The Weekly Sun’s “Student Spotlight” feature should contact Emilee Struss at emilee.struss@gmail.com.


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T H E W E E K LY S U N •

NEWS IN BRIEF

Free Art Therapy Available For Sufferers Of Alzheimer’s

The Sun Valley Center for the Arts is offering a new, free, museum-based art therapy program, “Stepping Out of the Frame,” designed especially for adults living with Alzheimer’s disease or other forms of dementia. During the six-week program, which will be held 1:30 to 3:30 p.m. on Tuesdays and Thursdays between July 23 and Aug. 29, participants will explore The Center’s summer visual arts exhibition, Mirage: Energy and Water in the Great Basin, through therapeutic art experiences both inside and outside the museum. The program builds upon The Center’s mission of enriching the community through transformational arts and educational experiences. Art therapy is an integrative practice that enriches the lives of individuals, families and communities through active art-making. Activities are facilitated by a professional art therapist and are designed to improve cognitive and sensory-motor functions, foster self-esteem and self-awareness, cultivate emotional resilience, promote insight, enhance social skills, and reduce and resolve internal and external conflicts. “I became interested in the profound possibilities that museum-based art therapy has to offer as a first-year graduate student, and I have since dedicated much of my academic research and professional development to designing and promoting those benefits with a wide range of populations,” said Jordyn Dooley, Art Enrichment coordinator at The Center, who holds a master’s degree in art therapy from Florida State University. “I have seen firsthand how the power of placing a handmade image on the wall of a museum offered the opportunity for an adolescent boy, who had never been into a museum, the chance to claim the space as his own and elevate his art to that of a professional artist. I have listened to women in their eighties with dementia discuss and appreciate abstract and controversial student artwork, demonstrating that no one is too old to broaden their scope and communicate their opinions.” Pre-registration for The Center’s museum-based art therapy program is required, but there is no fee to participate. Participants should plan to commit to all weekly sessions in order to gain the maximum educational and therapeutic benefit. To reserve a space in the program and for more information, visit www.sunvalleycenter.org or call (208) 726-9491.

Your Garden Improvements Can Help Cultivate Kids

The annual Papoose Club Webb Plant Extravaganza will be held Saturday, June 1. The event is a fundraiser for a variety of children’s programs and takes place from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. at both Webb Garden Center locations in Bellevue and Ketchum. Webb will donate a percentage of the day’s sales on everything except rocks and pavers to the Papoose Club. This is an ideal time to shop for all your garden and outdoor living needs, and at the same time contribute to a great local nonprofit. The Papoose Club—whose mission is to promote and assist educational, cultural, and athletic growth for local children—relies on several key fundraising events, including the Plant Extravaganza at Webb Garden Center. The club’s other major fundraisers include the Wagon Days Pancake Breakfast and the Holiday Bazaar at Hemingway Elementary School in December. Papoose Club members and the expert staff at Webb Garden Center will be on hand to help. Papoose Club members will also be available to greet you and offer refreshments.

Senator Risch Applauds Trump’s OK Of Shooting Range Safety Law

Senator Jim Risch (R-Idaho) is praising President Donald Trump’s signing of the Target Practice and Marksmanship Training Support Act into law. The bill was co-sponsored by Risch and passed by both the House and Senate earlier this year. “This law will better equip states to build and maintain public shooting ranges to safely and effectively train the next generation of sportsmen and recreational shooters to take part in one of Idaho’s most treasured pastimes, contribute to our recreational economy, and conserve wildlife,” said Sen. Risch. “I have worked to advance this legislation since my first year in the Senate, and I applaud President Trump signing it into law.” This law will: • Increase the amount of money states can contribute from their allotted Pittman-Robertson funds to 90 percent of the cost to improve or construct a public target range from the current limit of 75 percent • Reduce local and state matching requirements from 25 percent to 10 percent • Allow the Pittman-Robertson funds allotted to a state to remain available and accrue for five fiscal years for use in acquiring land for expanding or constructing a public target range, and • Encourage the federal land management agencies to cooperate with state and local authorities to maintain target ranges on federal land so as to encourage their continued use

M AY 15 - 21, 2019

SUN CALENDAR THE WEEKLY

EVENT FEATURE

Adrienne Kerr and Andrew Taft, dancers with Ballet Idaho, will dance in a special performance featuring excerpts from the Boise-based dance company’s 2018/20019 season. Photo credit: Mike Reid/Ballet Idaho

PERFORMANCE A DEUX Ballet Idaho to participate in fundraising gala with Sun Valley Ballet

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BY DANA DUGAN

pring remains the season of dance, as students across the Valley finish up their training for the year and present shows for the public. On Sunday, May 19, there will be two performances as part of the Sun Valley Ballet School’s spring fundraising gala “Season of Ballet” at the Argyros Performing Arts Center in Ketchum. At 1 p.m., the Spring Showcase will feature “Jeux d’Enfant” staged by the ballet students ages 3 through 16. The children’s show, in full costume, will present ballet, jazz, tap and hip-hop pieces that the students have worked on this semester. The choreography was created by Sun Valley Ballet staff and a couple of dancers who will display their own styles for the first time. “The students are the heart of what we do at SVB,” said Aimee Durand, school administrator. Tickets to the children’s performance are $5 for children and $10 for adults, or at the door on the day of performance for $10 and $15, respectively. “We encourage kids and their parents to give dance education a serious consideration because it is much more than dance,” said SVB School’s Artistic Director Alexander Tressor. “It’s also about creativity, musicality, culture, foreign language and, above all, discipline and teamwork.” Tressor, who grew up in the ballet world—his late stepfather was a principal dancer with the Bolshoi Ballet and a longtime ballet master with the American Ballet Theatre—was diagnosed with Parkinson’s in 2006. Since then, he’s gone on to become something of a guru on how to live with the disease. “He’s done a lot for our community in the nine months he’s been here,” said Jeff Nelson, vice chair of the SVB board and the person who recruited Tressor. “His Parkinson’s technique—Parkinson’s On the Move—has been big. We gave him the flexibility to continue his work around the country.” That evening, at 7:30 p.m., there will be nine special guest dancers from the Boise-based professional dance company, Ballet Idaho. The dancers from Ballet Idaho will perform highlights from their 2018/2019 season as well as excerpts of their newly premiered performance, “Cinderella.” “We’ve been working on getting them up here for a long time,” Nelson said. In fact, it’s through Tressor’s friendship with Ballet Idaho’s artistic director Garret Anderson, and months of hard work, that the gala performance will happen. For the show, Tressor choreographed a debut

Annika Dalbrat, a Ballet Idaho dancer, can be seen in ‘Season of Ballet’ Sunday at the Argyros Performing Arts Center. Photo credit: Mike Reid/Ballet Idaho

piece called “A Stroll in the Park” with music by Leroy Anderson. The performance will be danced by Ballet Idaho dancers. “It’s always rewarding to work with a professional dance company of a high level, and to be able to introduce them to new audiences who will have the pleasure to enjoy their artistry,” Tressor said. “My personal contribution to this gala is an homage to George Balanchine and his love of American music and dancers.” Premiere seats for the evening performance will be $80, which includes wine and appetizers prior to the show, as well as a meet and greet with the dancers after the show. There are also tickets for $60 and $40. All net proceeds will benefit the Sun Valley Ballet School. Tickets can be purchased at sunvalleyballet.org or at theargyros.org.

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T H E W E E K LY S U N •

M AY 15 - 21, 2019

EVENTS CALENDAR, CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE STORY TIME WED MAY 15 & FRI MAY 17

10:30-11:30AM / HAILEY PUBLIC LIBRARY

Story Time is held weekly every Wednesday and Friday at the Hailey Public Library. All ages are welcome. Parents should plan on staying at the library with their children. For more information, call (208) 788-2036.

MENTAL HEALTH IN WORKPLACE WED MAY 15 12-1PM / KIC / KETCHUM

Employers can make a difference for Mental Health Awareness Month by participating in an HR presentation in partnership with The Chamber, NAMI and Ketchum Innovation Center. The event includes information on mental health 101 in the workplace, what these challenges look like, what you can do as a supervisor or manager, and what resources are available for help. A free lunch from KB’s will be provided. KIC is located at 180 6th Street West in Ketchum.

KETCHUM COMMUNITY DINNERS WED MAY 15

6-7PM / CHURCH OF THE BIG WOOD / KETCHUM Free hot dinners are provided weekly to anyone in need in the church’s Family Life Center. Dine in or pick up a meal to go for you or a friend. Find Ketchum Community Dinners on Facebook for more information, how to participate and weekly menu updates, or contact bethward0709@gmail.com.

LINE DANCING WED MAY 15

6-7PM / THE MINT / HAILEY

Dust off your boots and join Vicki Aberbach for a fun and lively line-dancing lesson. The fee is $10. There will be an open dance afterwards to practice getting those boots moving.

‘IN GOOD FAITH’ WED MAY 15

6-7:30M / COMMUNITY LIBRARY / KETCHUM “In Good Faith” is a 57-minute documentary focusing on the Virginia City Treaty of 1868. Signed by Chief Tendoy, leader of the Mixed-Band of Shoshone, Bannock and Sheepeater Indians in southwestern Montana Territory, the treaty was negotiated in “good faith.” Tendoy then ceded 32,000 square miles of aboriginal territory in 1870 for a permanent treaty reservation in central Idaho. The treaty, however, was never ratified. In 1875, the U.S. took the 32,000-square-mile treaty reservation cession in exchange for a temporary reservation in the Salmon River country of Idaho. In 1905, the U.S. rescinded that reservation, moving the tribes instead to the Fort Hall Indian Reservation. The discovery of a National Archives document, highlighted in this film, reveals what is regarded as a violation of the Takings Clause of the Fifth Amendment. The Mixed-Band people are also known as “Sacajawea’s people.” For more information, visit comlib.org or call (208) 726-3493.

SAWTOOTH TRIVIA WED MAY 15

7:30PM / SAWTOOTH TAP ROOM / HAILEY Sawtooth Brewery presents free trivia games for the season. Each night there are two games consisting of three rounds each. Each round is based off of a popular game show. All ages are welcome. Sawtooth Brewery Public House is located at 110 N. River St. For details, visit sawtoothbrewery.com.

FOOD SYSTEM PLAN THU MAY 16

9-11AM, 5:30-7PM / COMMUNITY CAMPUS / HAILEY Food system analyst Ken Meter of Crossroads Resource Center conducted more than 60 interviews of food system leaders and analyzed regional economic data to come up with key action steps for our community, which he will present. The strategic plan is already leading to more unified action and new collaborations, including a wholesale producer partnership. The morning presentation will run from 9-11 a.m. with a report overview and Q&A with community leaders. The evening presentation will run from 5:30-7 pm at Sawtooth Brewery Public House in Ketchum with a report overview, Q&A and networking opportunities. These events are co-hosted by Blaine County Food Council, Local Food Alliance, Sun Valley Institute, The Hunger Coalition, University of Idaho Extension, Western SARE, and Sawtooth Brewery. Register at stateofourfoodsystem.eventbrite.com.

CHAMBER BAH THU MAY 16

5-7PM / MOUNTAIN WEST BANK / HAILEY The Chamber of Hailey and the Wood River Valley invites businesses and the public to attend this month’s free Business After Hours at Mountain West Bank in Hailey. Food and beverages will be provided, and don’t forget to bring your business cards to enter in the “BAH” raffle. For more information, contact The Chamber at Info@ValleyChamber.org, ValleyChamber.org or haileyidaho.com, or call (208) 788-3484.

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SPONSORED SV INSTITUTE

YOUTH TAKE ACTION FOR A RESILIENT WORLD BY LEXIE PRAGGASTIS SUN VALLEY INSTITUTE

“Kids these days—they don’t know what they’ve got.” So goes the generations-old saying of elders shaking their heads in disappointment toward a generation not realizing how easy they have it. Not anymore, as things have changed—fast: the United Nations’ recent devastating reports include warning of the imminent mass extinction of at least 1 million species due to human activities and the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change’s call to the clear and present danger of climate change. Kids these days know exactly what they have: a deadline. They also know that they can make a difference by claiming their future. “Since our leaders are behaving like children, we will have to take the responsibility they should have taken long ago,” said Nobel Prize nominee and 16-year-old Greta Thunberg, who sparked “Climate Strikes,” with 1.4 million youth participating worldwide on March 19. The Sun Valley Institute’s Youth Council, a group of high school students from across the nation, including the Valley’s own Sun Valley Community School, The Sage School and Wood River High School, are stepping up as leaders and change-makers. The Youth

Council organized the inaugural Claiming our Future: Youth Action for a Resilient World, July 23-25 at the Argyros Performing Arts Center in Ketchum, paralleling the Sun Valley Institute’s fifth annual Sun Valley Forum. The Youth Forum will unite up to 45 incoming high school freshmen to outgoing high school seniors for a three-day intensive retreat to be inspired, to engage and to take action. Participants can expect opportunities to learn from and collaborate with the exciting SVI Forum speakers, experts from across sustainability, security and the economy, as well as to workshop solutions to challenges we face locally and globally in food, transportation and plastic waste. On July 26, attendees will cap off a fantastic event by rafting the Salmon River. For more information and to apply, visit sunvalleyforum. com/youth-forum. Space and scholarships are limited, so apply early.

NEWS IN BRIEF Zions Bank Backs 2019 Trailing Of The Sheep Festival

The Trailing of the Sheep Festival says that Zions Bank has committed to being the Presenting Sponsor for the 2019 Festival. “We are grateful to be the beneficiary of this wonderful gift from Zions Bank,” shared Laura Musbach Drake, executive director for the Trailing of the Sheep Festival. “As a nonprofit festival, it is only through the ongoing support of companies like Zions Bank, as well as all of our individual, corporate and grant supporters, that we can continue to put on an amazing festival with many free or low-cost events for 25,000 people each year.” The annual Trailing of the Sheep Festival is celebrating its 23rd year October 9–13, 2019. Each fall, the sheep are the stars as the festival celebrates the 150-plus-year tradition of moving sheep (trailing) from high mountain summer pastures down through the Valley to traditional winter grazing and lambing areas in the south. This annual migration is Idaho living history and an extended weekend and family-friendly festival that highlights the people, arts, cultures and traditions of sheep ranching in Idaho and the West. The five-day festival includes activities in multiple venues, such as a Sheep Folklife Fair, a Wool Festival with classes and workshops, music, dance, storytelling, Championship Sheepdog Trials and, the always entertaining Big Sheep Parade with 1,500 sheep hoofing it down Main Street in Ketchum. For information and a detailed schedule of events, visit www. trailingofthesheep.org.

River Street Open House To Take Place

The City of Hailey is making plans to improve River Street downtown between Walnut and Galena streets, and it wants the community to chime in—specifically, to review and comment on a range of potential improvements at an open house event May 16 at Hailey City Hall. The event runs from 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. The range of River Street improvements could include: • Reconstructing pavement on River Street • Placing curbs and gutters • Addressing parking and bike lanes • Adding and widening sidewalks, including a pathway to Hop Porter Park • Improving landscaping and lighting


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M AY 15 - 21, 2019

EVENTS CALENDAR, CONTINUED FROM PREVIOUS PAGE EARLY DAYS OF HAILEY THU MAY 16 5:30PM / HAILEY LIBRARY / HAILEY

LIVE MUSIC SAT MAY 18 6PM / MAHONEY’S / KETCHUM

The Hailey Public Library will host a free talk on the early days of Hailey with local historian Rob Lonning, who will explore the dynamic local and national forces that intersected, leading to the establishment of Hailey in 1881. Iconic images from the Martyn Mallory and other historic photographic collections will illustrate the talk. For more information go to haileypubliclibrary.org.

Sergio and the Cremonatones will play live with no cover. The show is family-friendly. The band has played off and on together for more than 30 years in various bands, including with Pinto Bennett and The Famous Motel Cowboys. A Nashville resident, Sergio came to Idaho with Kip Attaway and made Idaho home for many years. He is a session and touring guitarist and primarily works and records with songwriters, including Gail Davies, David Olney and Richard Dobson. He toured throughout the U.S.; in Canada, Europe and Australia; played at the Grand Ole Opry many times; and has released six albums.

GENTLE YOGA THU MAY 16

5:30-6:30PM / ST. LUKE’S CLINIC / HAILEY This free yoga class with guidance is based on specific needs, unique health conditions and personal goals. Participants will learn the foundations of yoga and how to use yoga as an approach to physical and emotional wellbeing preventatively and in healing. Weekly through May 30. For more information, call Kristin Biggins at (208) 727-8281.

FARM OPEN HOUSE SUN MAY 19 11AM-3PM / KRAAY’S / BELLEVUE

ART & LIT FAIR THU MAY 16

Kraay’s Market & Garden Third Annual Open House and Farmer’s Market will include a tour of the farm, animals, see the plans for nature park and enjoy a lunch from vendors or bring a picnic to enjoy by the pond. Kraay’s is located at 171 Schoessler Lane. For more information, contact sherry@kraaysmarketgarden.com.

5-7PM / HEMINGWAY STEAM / KETCHUM The 28th annual Hemingway STEAM School Art and Literature Fair will feature artistic and literary accomplishments of all Hemingway students in their annual spring event. Bring the family and come celebrate education. Have a TACO FIX via Al Pastor tacos, quesadillas and veggie quesadillas, and cheese quesadillas. For more information, contact jfitzpatrick@blaineschools.org or call (208) 309-5050.

SUDDENLY SUNDAY SUN MAY 19 12-5PM / COMMUNITY LIBRARY / KETCHUM

THE CENTER’S TOUR THU MAY 16

The Community Library will offer a free special Sunday afternoon opening with several special activities. From noon-5 p.m., kids can drop in for pretend play with the puppet theater playscape. For teens, from noon–5 p.m., the teen lounge will be open to finish your end-of-school-year projects. Study break snacks provided. From 1–3 p.m. there will movies shown, including “Lon Po Po: A Red Riding Hood Story from China,” a short from the library’s new video streaming service, Kanopy. Then, “Mulan,” Disney’s animated musical action adventure film about a young girl who disguises herself as a male warrior in order to save her father. At 3:30 p.m. visitors can learn about Tanzania in a special program by Tanzanian conservationists from the Honeyguide organization. For more information, visit comlib.org or call (208) 726-3493.

5:30-6:30PM / SVCA / KETCHUM

Enjoy a glass of wine while touring “Unraveling: Reimagining the Colonization in the Americas” exhibition with The Center’s curators. Then head to The Community Library’s Regional History Museum for a tour of their exhibition: Who Writes History? Frontier Voice, Native Realities, an examination of the coexistence between Native Americans and nonnative newcomers to the Wood River Valley in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. The evening tour is a part of The Center’s BIG IDEA project, “Unraveling,” March 8–May 22. For more information, call (208) 726-9491.

SUNDAY 5BS SUN MAY 19 1-4PM / LIMELIGHT HOTEL / KETCHUM

LIVE MUSIC FRI MAY 17 9:30PM / SILVER DOLLAR / BELLEVUE

The Limelight Hotel, on Main Street in Ketchum, will offer 5Bs: “Beers, Bloodies, Bubbles, Burgers and Bluegrass” through June 2 with free public access to the pool for adults.

Old Death Whisper will play at 9:30 p.m. at the iconic Bellevue saloon. There’s never a cover and patrons have access to a free shuttle home, if needed.

SOUPER SUPPER MON MAY 20 5:30-6:30PM / ST. CHARLES CHURCH / HAILEY Weekly free hot dinners are provided to anyone who wishes to join. St. Charles Catholic Church is located at 313 1st Ave. S., Hailey.

CLIMATE ACTION COALITION TUE MAY 21 5:30-7PM / THE NATURE CONSERVANCY / HAILEY

ARBORFEST SAT MAY 18 & SUN MAY 19 10AM / VARIOUS / HAILEY

The Hailey Climate Action Coalition (HCAC) is working toward building a sustainable future via community-wide action on climate. Those who attend the first community meeting can learn how they or their organization can contribute to this effort. 116 1st Ave. N. (first floor meeting room).

Hailey Home, Garden and Outdoor Show will team up with Hailey’s Annual ArborFest celebration at Roberta McKercher Park at 10 a.m., and NAMI’s Biking for Mental Wellness StigmaFree Ride on the Wood River Trail bike path, finishing at ArborFest. Hailey Ice will host the Home, Garden and Outdoor Show on both Saturday and Sunday. There will be vendors providing everything from food and drinks, to home and garden wares and advice, to outfitters offering the latest gear and regional recreation options for the summer season. For more information, call The Chamber at (208) 788-3434.

LEARN ENGLISH TUE MAY 21 6-8PM / COMMUNITY LIBRARY / KETCHUM The Community Library will offer free English classes for adults every Tuesday through June 25. Abierto a todos los idiomas que quieren aprender ingles o mejorar sus habilidades. The class is open to everyone, of all languages, who wants to learn English or improve skills. For more information (para mas informacion) call (208) 726-3493.

LIVE MUSIC: GYPSY TEMPLE SAT MAY 18 8PM / THE ARGYROS / KETCHUM Gypsy Temple is a four-piece, alternative-rock band from Seattle. Bandmates Cameron Lavi-Jones (lead vocals, guitar), Hamoon Milaninia (bass), Kai Hill (drums) and Cory Cavazos (electric-cello) bring fun and rowdy energy to their live shows. These young rockers were all summoned from different backgrounds with the single purpose of telling their stories through heartfelt rock and roll. The band pulls its sound from alt rock to progressive rock to jazz to soul and even classical music. What sets Gypsy Temple apart from the usual 4–5-piece bass/drums/guitar rock band is the integration of a cello, which adds to the band’s alt-rock-with-a-twist sound. Gypsy Temple’s sound draws inspiration from such alt-rock greats as White Stripes, Royal Blood, Kings of Leon and Australia’s Gang of Youths. For tickets, visit theargyros.org.

SAWTOOTH TRIVIA TUE MAY 21 7:30PM / SAWTOOTH BREWERY / KETCHUM Sawtooth Brewery presents free trivia games for the season. All ages are welcome. Each night there are two games consisting of three rounds each. Each round is based off of a popular game show. Sawtooth Brewery Public House is located at 631 Warm Springs Road. For details, visit sawtoothbrewery.com.

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T H E W E E K LY S U N •

M AY 15 - 21, 2019

SPONSORED CHAMBER CORNER

MENTAL HEALTH AWARENESS MONTH MAKES AN IMPACT

15

Sudoku Is Sponsored by

Hard way Pipeline

BY MIKE MCKENNA

O

ne of the undeniable facts of life is that, sooner or later, we’ll all be impacted by mental health challenges. It may be personally—battles we face ourselves or try to help family members go through—or it may be of a more secondary nature, through challenges with a co-worker or a regular at your favorite hangout spot. Despite the fact that nearly a quarter of all Americans, including children, suffer from mental illness, there are reasons to be hopeful. And one of those reasons is you. “We all play a role in this all-important conversation,” Christina Cernansky, the executive director of the National Alliance on Mental Illness-Wood River Valley (NAMI-WRV), said. “Whether you like it or not, or even if you’ll admit it or not, at some point you will be forced to deal with mental health challenges. So you might as well join us in the conversation and help us support individuals and loved ones as they manage their recovery process.” Studies have shown that mental health issues, like anxiety disorders and depression, are no different than other health issues, like high blood pressure or diabetes. They can be successfully treated. In fact, 80 percent of mental health patients respond to treatment. It can be hard for most of us to ask for help, or even to ask how we can help. That’s why we’re lucky to have a strong local chapter of the National Alliance on Mental Illness. NAMI-Wood River Valley is here to help in a variety of ways. One of the best ways is through their workplace program, which includes a detailed, attainable plan to help companies combat mental health stigma. Untreated mental health challenges are the number one cause of worker disability. This Wednesday, May 15, at noon, NAMI will be putting on a Mental Health in the Workplace event at the Ketchum Innovation Center. “NAMI provides the resources to help employers and supervisors support their staffs,” Christina

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Kelly Wardell 208-309-0916

How To Play Sudoku

The City of Hailey’s council and staff support Mental Health Awareness Month. Photo credit: The Chamber — Hailey & The Wood River Valley

said. “We’re lucky to have NAMI in our community.” Since May is Mental Health Awareness Month, NAMI-Wood River Valley is also putting on their annual StigmaFree Bike Ride. This fun, family-friendly bike ride will connect all four local towns and this year it will finish at the ArborFest and Hailey Home, Garden and Outdoor Show celebration this Saturday. With all the fun festivities going on at Roberta McKercher and Wertheimer parks in Hailey, the ride is certain to be a success. Hopefully, you can take part in the StigmaFree Ride, but even if you can’t, you can still be part of the cure. As Christina advises, “Reconsider a judgment, reach out to a co-worker, support a friend, begin a conversation—there is much to be done to break down the barriers of stigma and shed the shame, but together we can achieve it!”

The Classic Sudoku is a number placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so that each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once.

CLASSIC SUDOKU See answer on page 2

To find out more about NAMI, please go to nami-wrv.org or call their non-crisis hotline at (208) 481-0686. Mike McKenna is the executive director of The Chamber – Hailey & The Wood River Valley.

CROSSWORD SPONSORED BY

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See answer on page 2

THE WOOD RIVER VALLEY 7-DAY WEATHER FORECAST IS BROUGHT TO YOU BY:

Cloudy 20%

high 68º

low 45º WEDNESDAY

PM Showers 60%

high 60º low 40º THURSDAY

Rain 90%

high 46º low 36º FRIDAY

PM Showers 40%

high 52º low 36º SATURDAY

Rain 80%

Rain/Snow Showers 50%

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low 32º MONDAY

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