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THE WEEKLY SUN RESPONSIBLE LOCAL JOURNALISM. • BELLEVUE • CAREY • HAILEY • KETCHUM • PICABO • SUN VALLEY • WHAT TO KNOW. WHERE TO BE.

F R E E | JUNE 13 - 19, 2018 | V O L . 1 1 - N O . 2 4 | W W W . T H E W E E K L Y S U N . C O M

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Arts News Summer Music To Kick Off Throughout Valley

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Municipal News Bellevue’s New Police Dept. Sets Goals

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Community News Faye Barker To Represent Bellevue In Heritage Court

“I don’t do well with snakes and I can’t dance.” ~Robin Williams

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For information about this photo, see “On The Cover” on page 3. Courtesy photo by Carolyne Goff

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Don’t miss the chance to sample some of the finest craft beer in the Northwest right here in beautiful Ketchum & Sun Valley, Idaho.


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T H E W E E K LY S U N • J U N E 13 - 19, 2018

NEWS

IN BRIEF

Lead In Concert To Be Replaced By Sutton Foster The Thomas S. Perakos Family Cares Foundation, producer, and Sun Valley Opera, sponsor, have announced a cast change for the Salute to America party, Saturday, July 7. Cynthia Erivo, who was originally scheduled to perform, had to bow out due to unforeseen circumstances. Instead, two-time Tony Award-winner Sutton Foster, “the best song and dance actress on Broadway,” will perform with Tony Award-winner Brian Stokes Mitchell. Foster has appeared in numerous on- and off-Broadway plays, winning Tony Awards for “Anything Goes” and “Thoroughly Modern Millie,” along with several other Tony nominations. She can currently be seen starring as the lead in the television series, “Younger.”

Idaho State Democratic Convention To Be Held In Caldwell The 2018 Idaho State Democratic Convention will be held at the College of Idaho in Caldwell on Friday and Saturday, June 29-30, with keynote speaker Jason Kander, president of Let America Vote and former Missouri Secretary of State. The convention will begin at 7:30 a.m. June 29 and will officially end Saturday night. General convention attendance is free, while the prices for other convention events will vary. Those who wish to attend should promptly register for events that interest them the most, as space is limited. The schedule of events and tickets can be found on our Eventbrite page, 2018idpconvention.eventbrite. com.

Kander will speak at the Les and Mary Peck Banquet, held at 7 p.m. Friday, June 29. “I’m excited to join the Idaho Democrats at their convention later this month and meet the impressive roster of candidates up and down the ballot,” Kander said. “Republicans in Idaho have been manipulating democracy to benefit themselves, and Idaho Democrats are fighting back.” Kander is a husband, father, former Army captain who served in Afghanistan, and Missouri’s 39th Secretary of State. He is the first millennial in the country to be elected to statewide office. He started Let America Vote in February 2017 to fight back against proposals across the country making it harder for eligible voters to exercise their constitutional right to cast a ballot. “Idaho Democrats are working hard and are proving that the party’s energy spans across red, blue and purple states,” Kander said. County delegates will be writing the Party Platform for 2018, and are encouraged to bring their politically active spouses to join them for a fun weekend of socializing with fellow Idaho Democrats and inspiring training.

Hands-Free Phone Usage To Be Enforced The Blaine County Sheriff’s Office will begin enforcement of Blaine County’s Cell Phone Ordinance No. 2016 – 06, which was passed September 2016. The ordinance makes it illegal to use a hand-held device while driving a motor vehicle in the county, outside of city limits. According to the ordinance, the use of “cell phones or hand-held mobile devices while driving a motor vehicle can distract the driver and create hazards for passengers, other drivers, pedestrians, and cyclists.” The citation is an infraction and subject to a $100 fine. Numerous cell phone ordinance signs have been installed all over Blaine County to educate and notify the public. “We have given plenty of warnings, but we want to make one last announcement before enforcement begins,” said Blaine County Sheriff Steve Harkins. “Distracted driving is a dangerous epidemic on our roadways,” Harkins continued. “We have seen too many accidents where cell phone usage was likely the cause. Please put down your mobile devices and wait until you are in a safe and proper place to use them.

Remind yourself every time you get in the car and help us educate your kids, family and friends—Just Drive—It can wait! This is an important message that will save lives and we ask that you help us spread the word.”

Boulder Mountain Tour Hires New Race Director The board of directors of the Zions Bank Boulder Mountain Tour announced that Jody Zarkos will be its new race director. Zarkos spent eight years with the Sun Valley Ski Education Foundation, the last four as its events director. In that role, she managed marquee events such as the Janss Pro-Am Classic, the Wild West Game Dinner, Olympic Day and Golf for Gold. Zarkos follows in the footsteps of Glen and Kelly Allison, who stepped down recently after four years. “Glen and Kelly took the Boulder Mountain Tour to a new level of professionalism,” said Ellen Gillespie, BMT president. “We are excited to have Jody take over from them. I am sure she will put her mark on a beloved event and make it even better, just as the Allisons did.” Zarkos is no stranger to the Boulder Mountain Tour; for more than 20 years she was the finish-line announcer. “I am thrilled to be part of the Boulder Mountain Tour once again and cannot wait to take the baton from Kelly and Glen,” Zarkos said. “I am looking forward to the 2019 race and working with everyone that has made the Boulder the time-honored event that it is.” The 2019 Boulder Mountain Tour will be held Feb. 2, 2019.


T H E W E E K LY S U N • J U N E 13 - 19, 2018

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THE WEEKLY SUN CONTENTS

Sun Valley Brewfest 2018 will take place from noon to 6 p.m. on Saturday, June 16, at Ketchum Town Square. For a story, see page 12. Public domain photo accessed via Wikimedia Commons

THIS WEEK J U N E 1 3 - 1 9 , 2018 | VOL. 11 NO. 24

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Nonprofit News

Chili Cook-Off Will Heat Up Father’s Day

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Commentary

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Calendar

Award Winning Columns, Fishing Report, Student Spotlight Stay In The Loop On Where To Be

ON THE COVER A rattlesnake swims in Magic Reservoir on Wednesday, June 6. “Never grab ‘sticks’ or ‘branches’ while swimming in lakes and rivers,” the U.S. Forest Service’s website states. “Rattlesnakes can swim.” Courtesy photo by Carolyne Goff Local artists & photographers interested in seeing their art on our cover page should email submissions to: mandi@ theweeklysun.com (photos should be high resolution and include caption info such as who or what is in the photo, date and location).

THE WEEKLY SUN STAFF 13 W. Carbonate St. • P.O. Box 2711 Hailey, Idaho 83333 Phone: 208.928.7186 Fax: 208.928.7187

KETCHUM & SUN VALLEY FIRE DEPARTMENTS invite you to LOS BOMBEROS Y LAS BOMBERAS DE KETCHUM Y SUN VALLEY te invitamos al

the family event of the year BL AI NE COUNTY

AD SALES Brennan Rego • 208.720.1295 • brennan@theweeklysun.com NEWS EDITOR Dana DuGan • news@theweeklysun.com CALENDAR EDITOR Yanna Lantz • calendar@theweeklysun.com COPY EDITOR Patty Healey STAFF REPORTERS • Jesse Cole• Dick Dorworth • Faye Prekeges • Emilee Struss news@theweeklysun.com DESIGN DIRECTOR Mandi Iverson • 208.721.7588 • mandi@theweeklysun.com PRODUCTION & DESIGN Chris Seldon • production@theweeklysun.com ACCOUNTING Shirley Spinelli • 208.928.7186 • accounting@theweeklysun.com PUBLISHER & EDITOR Brennan Rego • 208.720.1295 • publisher@theweeklysun.com DEADLINES Display & Community Bulletin Board Ads — Monday @ 1pm brennan@theweeklysun.com • bulletin@theweeklysun.com Calendar Submissions — Friday @ 5pm calendar@theweeklysun.com www.TheWeeklySun.com Published by Idaho Sunshine Media, LLC

Saturday, June 16 11 a.m. - 2 p.m. Festival Field on Sun Valley Rd Live Demonstrations • Air St Luke’s Helicopter • Smokey Bear Fire Extinguisher Training • Live Fire Skills • Kid’s Games Home Safety Planning • Free Smoke Detectors • auto extrication Ambulance Tours • Free BBQ and much more...

El sábado 16 de junio, de las 11 AM a las 2 PM en el campo de festividades en Sun Valley Road Barbacoa gratis, Consejos de Smokey Bear para un hogar seguro, Giras en helicóptero, Entrenamiento para el uso de extintores de incendios, Giras en ambulancia, Juegos para niños y niñas, Demostraciones en vivo, Extracción de coche, Detectores de humo gratis Come spend a day in the park with your local firefighters! Ven a platicar con tus bomberos y bomberas locales y a disfrutar de


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T H E W E E K LY S U N • J U N E 13 - 19, 2018

NEWS ARTS

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NEWS IN BRIEF

Catch Kenny And Its Crew Inspecting Bridges Across The State

With more than 4,200 bridges to inspect around the state, various crews with the Idaho Transportation Department are responsible for the safety of several structures, but this year there will be an under-bridge inspection truck (UBIT), known as Kenny. This Kenworth A-62 truck has an arm with a bucket that can extend 62 feet under, around and in the substructure of bridges. Equipment with greater reach, like Kenny, allows inspectors to examine every inch of a bridge’s underside for signs of stress, and recommend maintenance work based on what their inspection finds. Since the department put him into service this January, the UBIT has been hard at work. The team will complete more than 100 bridge inspections this year alone and, as such, it will be make tracks around the state.  To showcase employees’ efforts as they work tirelessly with the state’s most vulnerable infrastructure, ITD encourages social-media followers to #catchKenny out on the road. If you come across an inspection, you can participate in the fun by coming to a stop, pulling to the side, and safely snapping a photo and uploading it to social media using the hashtag.  For more information about specific bridge-inspection activities in each region of the state, so people can #catchKenny in their own neck of the woods, contact the appropriate Idaho Transportation Department representative, Jessica Williams, at (208) 886-7806.

'TIS THE SEASON FOR LIVE MUSIC

BY DANA DUGAN

ummers in the Wood River Valley, though short, are packed full of opportunities to enjoy live music outdoors under the sun and stars. These events take place from one end of the Valley to the other: from the Sun Valley Center’s concerts and the Sun Valley Summer Symphony, to Mahoney’s Summer Concert Series in Bellevue, Sun Valley Brewery’s Music Series and The Wicked Spud’s Wicked Wednesdays in Hailey, to Ketch’em Alive and Jazz in the Park in Ketchum, along with numerous other deck shows at such venues as Lefty’s and Whiskey Jacques’. To kick off the noteworthy fun, Ketch’em Alive will begin its 19th year with a little (cue the drum roll) free fall. Each year, a random group of Wood River Valley musicians gets together to form a one-off band to pay tribute to a musical group. Led by Hailey musician and former KECH DJ Johnny Valenzuela, the ragtag group began several years ago with the music of Pink Floyd, moved on to the Grateful Dead with a whole different set of cohorts, and this year will feature some classic rock ’n’ roll. Wildflowers: A Wood River Tribute to Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers will appear at the first Ketch’em Alive concert on Tuesday, June 19, in Ketchum’s Forest Service Park. The group will also perform Thursday, July 12, at Mahoney’s Bar & Grill in Bellevue and on Wednesday, Aug. 1, at The Wicked Spud’s Wicked Wednesday in Hailey. “We chose Tom Petty this year partly because he died, though that was not our intention,” Valenzuela said. “We were searching for the right project,” said musician Chip Booth, another band member. “It’s the right time to do it.” The band consists of Booth on guitar, Valenzuela on organ, Brian Carney on vocals, Mike Saul on guitar, Paul Gregory on keyboards, Jason Vontver on drums, and John Crowder on bass guitar, with special guests Kim Stocking and Ember Jensen on vocals. “These projects are a six-month opportunity to dig into this one artist and their personal style, and imitate it, and then incorporate it,” Valenzuela said. Valenzuela might be the driving force behind the tributes, but Booth has become his right-hand man and sparring partner, as evidenced in their conversational style. Booth came into the picture during the Dead tribute shows. “We had a great time with that,” Valenzuela said. “We had barely met, but our musical tastes were really similar, including the weird things. One of the things I love about these projects is that we’ve always picked artists who are iconic.” “It’s not about who passed away; it’s music we think is universally enjoyable,” Booth said. “Petty is so ingrained in the American way now,” Valenzuela said. “He’s as significant as Bob Dylan. Probably for most people, even if they don’t have Petty albums, they know his music.” “First thing we did was figure out what songs to do,” Booth said. “Petty had 51 hit singles,” Valenzuela said. “’Refugee,’ ‘Free Fallin’,’ ‘You Wreck Me,’ ‘Running Down a Dream,’ ‘The Waiting,’ ‘American Girl–’” “It’s almost Beatlesque,” Booth said. KETCH’EM ALIVE (Tuesdays)

June 19..........Wildflowers: A Wood River Tribute to Tom Petty June 26..........Yak Attack

July 3..............Swagger

July 10............The Heaters July 17............Tatanka

July 24............Pixie and the Partygrass Boys July 31............Brad Parsons Band August 7.........Afrosonics

JAZZ IN THE PARK (Sundays)

June 24..........Alan Pennay and Friends

July 1..............Sally Tibbs & Kevin Kirk Band

July 8..............Nicole Christensen & Chuck Smith Band July 15............Five Play

July 22............Frim Fram 4

July 29............Idaho Falls Big Band August 14.......Trevor Green

A bird’s-eye view of a Ketch’em Alive concert. Photo courtesy of Will Caldwell

“I’ve played in various bands and we always end up playing Tom Petty,” Valenzuela said. “To dig in deeper is…” “We’re doing our best to replicate the albums,” Booth said. “You’ll hear the tambourine parts,” Valenzuela said. “We’re going to make sure it’s there,” Booth said. They both smiled. Bands always have inside jokes. “You’ll hear all these extra things,” Valenzuela continued. “Without them, it doesn’t sound like Tom Petty,” Booth said. “You have to replicate all the elements.” “We almost take Petty for granted,” Valenzuela said. “There’s these nice three-minute pop songs, but when you dip into that catalog, you realize every one is a great song and you know the words to them. You can just pick up an acoustic guitar and there are no tricks. It’s pure rock ’n’ roll.” Bringing rock and roll to the community was the idea behind Ketch’em Alive. Held in Forest Service Park in Ketchum, it has become, over the past two decades, one of the highlights and must-dos of the summer season in the Wood River Valley. Started in 1999 by the Sun Valley-Ketchum Chamber & Visitors Bureau, a couple of years later Will Caldwell, a Ketchum-based artist and musician, came on as the producer of the event. He has managed to maintain a high quality of music ever since. He also produces Jazz in the Park, a free concert series held in Ketchum’s Rotary Park on Sundays. “Ketch’em Alive is notable for its nine weeks of diversity in music styles,” Caldwell said. “We have the Tom Petty tribute, electronic fusion, Irish rock, classic rock, reggae, Americana, country rock, Afro Indie, and indigenous didgeridoo. As usual, all bands have the energy to propel the crowd to dancing.” Picnics and chairs abound but there are also multiple food and drink vendors on First Street, between the park and the Limelight Hotel. Shows begin at 7 p.m. with a 30-minute opening act of local bands. This year there will be two shows featuring music school students. The headline bands play from 7:30-9 p.m.   Ketch’em Alive is sponsored by the Limelight Hotel, My Sun Valley Home, Atkinsons’ Markets, D.L. Evans Bank, The Springcreek Foundation, Pioneer Saloon, Barry Peterson Jewelers and Hailey Orthopedic. On Sundays, Jazz in the Park will bring some new bands to the Rotary Park stage to round out the lineup. Boise swing band Frim Fram 4 plays a jazzy swing that’s increasing in popularity, Caldwell said. “Valley-based Latin band Five Play has very seasoned musicians, and the last concert will feature the 17-member Idaho Falls Big Band.” This venue is a serene space, with thick green grass perfect for blankets and picnics along the banks of the Big Wood River. Support for Jazz in the Park comes from the City of Ketchum, Business As Usual, Ketchum Kitchens, Towne & Parke Fine Jewelry and several community tws members.   


T H E W E E K LY S U N • J U N E 13 - 19, 2018

NEWS MUNICIPAL

BELLEVUE HAS NEW OFFICERS IN BLUE

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ven in quieter communities like the Wood River Valley, citizens look to a city’s police system as an indicator of order, stability and independence. The City of Bellevue is no exception. After five months of contracting out to Hailey and Blaine County, Bellevue has its own fully-staffed and functioning police department under new marshal, Ross Scaggs. The Bellevue City Council Ross Scaggs. Photo courtesy of the and Mayor Chris Koch ap- City of Bellevue. pointed Scaggs on Nov. 27, and he was sworn in Dec. 11. In that short time, he expanded from a one-man operation and rebuilt the department from the ground up. In addition to the marshal, the Bellevue Marshal’s Office is now comprised of deputies Mike Thompson, Mynde Heil and Isaiah Day, as well as administrative assistant Priscilla Adamson. All of these officers each have nearly 10 years of experience. The addition of administrative personnel allows the officers to be out in the field more, as opposed to filing reports. “Something that Ross has done, that no other marshal has done in my tenure as mayor, is have a fully-staffed police department for the City of Bellevue,” Koch said. “In a very short amount of time, he is reaching milestone goals.” These achievements required much time and patience. After former Marshal Larry Clark’s retirement, there was a period in which the Bellevue Marshal’s Office was unable to provide constant police coverage. As an internal hire, Scaggs was already familiar with the system, but he faced the challenges that accompany understaffing. Nevertheless, he set clear goals for the team. “It was a hard road being the only officer,” Scaggs said. “But with the help of the Blaine County Sheriff’s Office and Hailey Police Department, the office stayed afloat.”

Something that Ross has done, that no other marshal has done in my tenure as mayor, is have a fully-staffed police department for the City of Bellevue.” Christopher Koch Mayor of Bellevue Now, with a fully functioning police department, the residents of Bellevue have the consistency necessary to build relationships with the officers upon whom their safety depends. “Since the new officers have been hired, I have noticed a dramatic increase in the number of Bellevue criminal cases that have come across my desk,” said Frederick Allington, Bellevue’s prosecuting attorney. “There is now a police presence in Bellevue 24/7 that is capable of responding to any situation.” This consistent coverage is further reflected by the department’s goal to increase its equipment in order to better serve the community. Koch said Bellevue is now adding three new patrol cars for the city as a result of Scaggs’s efforts to rework the previous marshal’s budget, and Scaggs is currently also working on some smaller grants for safety equipment, such as vests, radios and body cameras. “Our department is very community-oriented and ambitious to make the people of Bellevue safe and happy every day,” Scaggs said. “All of our officers and our administrative assistant make decisions to make us a stronger, more cohesive unit that can properly serve our community. We treat each other like family and consider ourselves to be just that.” tws

NEWS IN BRIEF

Idaho Milk Products To Expand Jerome Facility Idaho Milk Products, located in Jerome, will significantly expand its headquarters. The company produces specialized milk protein concentrate and dairy ingredients. The $26 million expansion will mean the facility can accommodate an additional 1 million pounds per day of locally sourced milk. It will also bring investments in research and development, employee facilities and a warehouse expansion. As part of the expansion, the company will hire 25 new employees in areas such as research and development, quality assurance and warehousing.

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NEWS IN BRIEF

The Center To Hold Watercolor Workshop

The Sun Valley Center for the Arts will offer a four-day workshop designed for adults who have little or no experience working with watercolors but would like to learn the basics. Taught by Sun Valley native and current Boise resident Jennie Kilcup, the workshop will be held from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Monday, June 18, to Thursday, June 21. “This class is the perfect skill-building class,” said Sarah Stavros, education associate at The Center. “Students can learn the basics of watercolor painting techniques, color theory and supplies with a very small commitment of time and money. This is a great opportunity to try something new and get creative.” Tuition for Jennie Kilcup’s Taking the First Step in Watercolor workshop is $175 for members of The Center and $225 for nonmembers. There is also a $25 supply fee, which covers all supplies for the class. For more information and to reserve a space in the workshop (limited to 12 participants), visit sunvalleycenter.org or call (208) 726-9491.

Highway Sealcoat Projects To Take Place In South-Central Idaho

Multiple sealcoat projects will take place this summer on highways throughout the region. Sealcoating is a roadway surface treatment that occurs during the summer months and helps preserve and extend the lifetime of Idaho’s roadways. It also provides a skid-resistant surface for better vehicle traction. The process requires hot temperatures and dry weather for chips to properly adhere to oil that is deposited on the highway.  When sealcoats are applied, roadways will be reduced to one lane. Motorists should anticipate short delays and watch for the presence of flaggers or pilot cars. Chips placed during the sealcoating process have potential to cause windshield damage, so drivers are cautioned to slow down and pay attention to reduced speeds and no passing zones throughout the work area. Sealcoating projects scheduled to occur this summer along with their anticipated start date, location, and length are as follows: June 10: Interstate 84 – approximately 10 miles from Wendell June 15: Interstate 84 – approximately 13 miles near Bliss  June 19: US-20 – approximately 15 miles from Fairfield and 10 miles from Picabo June 25: US-26 – approximately 12 miles from Gooding June 28: Idaho Highway 77 Spur – approximately 16 miles from City of Rocks  July 16: Idaho Highway 77 – about 8 miles near Malta and 12 miles from Declo  Aug. 15: Idaho Highway 46 – approximately 13 miles from Johnson Hill


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T H E W E E K LY S U N • J U N E 13 - 19, 2018

NEWS COMMUNITY

HERITAGE COURT RECOGNIZES FORMER POSTMISTRESS OF BELLEVUE Faye Hatch Barker honored

This is part four of a four part series

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BY EMILEE MAE STRUSS

he Heritage Court, a program of the Blaine County Historical Museum, is celebrating its 15th year. Every year communities in the Wood River Valley are asked to honor women that have lived in their communities for at least 30 years, contributing to history and heritage. Kelli Young, a board member of the Heritage Court, nominated Bellevue resident Faye Hatch Barker to the 2018 Heritage Court. Born in 1944 at the Hailey hospital, Faye graduated from Bellevue School in 1962. Her class was the last to graduate from Bellevue before it was consolidated into Wood River High School in Hailey [where Bellevue Elementary School is now]. One of 11 graduates in a school of 50 pupils, Faye was a cheerleader, on the drill team and basketball team, and was the queen of the Job’s Daughters, an international Masonic youth organization for girls between the ages of 10 and 20. Soon after her graduation, Faye became engaged to her high school sweetheart, Pat Barker, who had joined the Marines and was stationed in California. Three years later, Faye and Pat were married there. While Pat was stationed in California, Faye attended business school in Twin Falls. “We got engaged and then he left, but we worked through the good times and the bad,” she said. Together, the Barkers have three children, four grandchildren, and one great-grandchild. In 1965, upon returning to Idaho after Pat’s military service, he worked with his father on the family’s sheep ranch on Gannett Road. At the same time Faye began a 31-year career with the post office. She started at the old Bellevue post office location (formerly the Full Moon Café) and then worked at the post office in Ketchum. She

retired in 1999 as postmistress of the current Bellevue post office on East Pine Street. “I loved the bookwork, supervising and delivering packages on Christmas Eve,” Barker said. “On Christmas Eve, Pat and I would bring undelivered packages to the residents’ homes, kind of like Santa Claus.” Faye also has fond memories of volunteering for Bellevue’s annual Labor Day festivities. “We would sit there [in Bellevue City Park] and visit and shuck the corn in preparation for the Labor Day feast,” Barker said. The Barkers served free barbecue sandwiches with corn on the cob to hundreds of people for Labor Day. Faye also volunteered for the Bellevue cemetery for 14 years. She was responsible for the development and creation of a map to organize the cemetery for visitors. “Pat’s mother used to run the cemetery, and when she retired, I took over,” Faye said. “I’m proud of creating the map for the visitors to find their families.” Barker has fond memories of her husband’s sheep farm, and of hosting 14 years of family reunions. The couple also hosted two class reunions at their Bellevue home. “We’ve enjoyed having the family reunions here,” said Barker. “We just like getting everyone together.” Barker, like all of the Heritage Court ladies, has seen the Wood River Valley transform from gravel to pavement with families coming and going. The Heritage Court festivities included a tea, held on May 23 at the Sun Valley Museum of History, and the official gala coronation was held this past Sunday at the Liberty Theatre in Hailey. The ladies were escorted to the stage by their respective mayors and presented with flowers and tiaras. The Heritage Court ladies will ride in horse-drawn carriages in Hailey’s Days of the Old West Fourth of July Parade, the Carey Pioneer Days Parade, Ketchum’s WagFaye Barker has spent years finding ways to participate in her on Days Parade and Bellevue’s Labor Day Parade. tws

hometown’s activities. Photo courtesy of Faye Barker

Monster Trucks Hailey Rodeo Arena Pit Party: 6:00 PM show time: 7:30 PM

This saturday!

www.livealittleproductions.com


T H E W E E K LY S U N • J U N E 13 - 19, 2018

NEWS NONPROFIT

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BRINGING THE HEAT

Chili cook-off to support fireworks and fire department

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BY YANNA LANTZ

elebrate summer and Hailey firefighters at the Father’s Day Chili Cook-Off from noon to 6 p.m. Sunday, June 17. The event will take place in downtown Hailey at the intersection of Carbonate Street and 1st Avenue, near Java, and will help raise funds for Hailey’s Fourth of July fireworks display and the Hailey Fire & Rescue Department. “We’ve asked the restaurants and the community to participate, and we will have professional and non-professional categories for the chili competition,” said Mary Austin Crofts, Hailey Chamber executive director. “If you are a professional chef, you will compete alongside your peers, and community members will compete alongside community members.” Crofts said The Chamber would still accept vendors and chefs to compete this weekend. If interested in showing off your culinary heat, visit haileyidaho.com or call The Chamber at (208) 788-3484. A portion of the funds raised will go to the Hailey Fire & Rescue Department. “The Hailey Fire Department is just wonderful,” Austin Crofts said. “They are great people and are incredible at what they do.” Hailey Fire is a combination fire department. There are currently four full-time firefighter/ EMTs who provide administrative support to approximately 25 paid-per-call or “volunteer” members. The paid-per-call members of the department are paid to attend training sessions, and for responding to emergency scenes.    “Most people don’t realize that most of the firefighters in Blaine County are volunteer firefighters,” said Craig Aberbach, chief of both Hailey and Wood River fire departments. “None of the municipalities in the county can afford to have a full-time department without the support of volunteers who are paid on call. We don’t get everything that we want or need. We do have good equipment, but there are always opportunities to replace other things. We work on very, very lean budgets. Anything that we get extra, we want to put it to the best use possible.”

In the past, funds from the Chili Cook-Off have gone to training and bringing in instructors. “Last year, we bought joint uniform shirts for the Hailey and Wood River fire departments with both our names on there, because we’re working together to try and merge our departments,” Aberbach said. “Typically, these funds will go to something that we don’t have in our budget and we’ll use the money for something we can both use together.” Aberbach’s department responds to approximately 450 emergency calls per year. Of these calls, about 60 percent are emergency medical calls. The rest of the calls are a combination

of structure fires, wildland fires, mutual aid assistance, vehicle fires, rescue situations and false alarms. Austin Crofts hopes to see a great turnout at this year’s event. “When people get together and just have a good time while supporting something great, that builds community,” she said. “We will have some medals to give out, a bouncy house, raffle, music, classic cars on display, and it should be a really good time.” Learn more about the Hailey Fire & Rescue Department and the Father’s Day Chili CookOff by visiting haileyidaho.com. tws

The Hailey Fire Department responds to approximately 450 emergency calls per year. Photo courtesy of Hailey Fire Department

Discover Health! St. Luke’s Community Health Fair Join your neighbors and friends for a fun, engaging, multicultural, family-friendly event. Check out activities and exhibits from St. Luke’s and local and regional nonprofit agencies and organizations that are dedicated to keeping you and our community healthy. • Participate in fitness demonstrations. • Gain information about health, prevention, safety and fitness.

Saturday, June 16

• Learn about the amazing human anatomy.

10 a.m.-2 p.m.

• Gain understanding of mental health and emotional well-being. • Blood pressure checks and other screenings will be available; watch for updated details. • Prenatal and parenting information.

Community Campus 1050 Fox Acres Road, Hailey For more information, please call St. Luke’s Center for Community Health at (208) 727-8733.

• Cool raffle prizes, multicultural activities, giveaways and healthy snacks.

Father’s Day Chili Cook-Off will raise funds for nonprofits. If interested in entering, visit haileyidaho.com to register or call The Chamber at (208) 788-3484. Public domain photo, accessed via Wikimedia Commons

D I S C O V E R

HEALTH


T H E W E E K LY S U N • J U N E 13 - 19, 2018

NEWS NONPROFIT

7

BRINGING THE HEAT

Chili cook-off to support fireworks and fire department

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BY YANNA LANTZ

elebrate summer and Hailey firefighters at the Father’s Day Chili Cook-Off from noon to 6 p.m. Sunday, June 17. The event will take place in downtown Hailey at the intersection of Carbonate Street and 1st Avenue, near Java, and will help raise funds for Hailey’s Fourth of July fireworks display and the Hailey Fire & Rescue Department. “We’ve asked the restaurants and the community to participate, and we will have professional and non-professional categories for the chili competition,” said Mary Austin Crofts, Hailey Chamber executive director. “If you are a professional chef, you will compete alongside your peers, and community members will compete alongside community members.” Crofts said The Chamber would still accept vendors and chefs to compete this weekend. If interested in showing off your culinary heat, visit haileyidaho.com or call The Chamber at (208) 788-3484. A portion of the funds raised will go to the Hailey Fire & Rescue Department. “The Hailey Fire Department is just wonderful,” Austin Crofts said. “They are great people and are incredible at what they do.” Hailey Fire is a combination fire department. There are currently four full-time firefighter/ EMTs who provide administrative support to approximately 25 paid-per-call or “volunteer” members. The paid-per-call members of the department are paid to attend training sessions, and for responding to emergency scenes.    “Most people don’t realize that most of the firefighters in Blaine County are volunteer firefighters,” said Craig Aberbach, chief of both Hailey and Wood River fire departments. “None of the municipalities in the county can afford to have a full-time department without the support of volunteers who are paid on call. We don’t get everything that we want or need. We do have good equipment, but there are always opportunities to replace other things. We work on very, very lean budgets. Anything that we get extra, we want to put it to the best use possible.”

In the past, funds from the Chili Cook-Off have gone to training and bringing in instructors. “Last year, we bought joint uniform shirts for the Hailey and Wood River fire departments with both our names on there, because we’re working together to try and merge our departments,” Aberbach said. “Typically, these funds will go to something that we don’t have in our budget and we’ll use the money for something we can both use together.” Aberbach’s department responds to approximately 450 emergency calls per year. Of these calls, about 60 percent are emergency medical calls. The rest of the calls are a combination

of structure fires, wildland fires, mutual aid assistance, vehicle fires, rescue situations and false alarms. Austin Crofts hopes to see a great turnout at this year’s event. “When people get together and just have a good time while supporting something great, that builds community,” she said. “We will have some medals to give out, a bouncy house, raffle, music, classic cars on display, and it should be a really good time.” Learn more about the Hailey Fire & Rescue Department and the Father’s Day Chili CookOff by visiting haileyidaho.com. tws

The Hailey Fire Department responds to approximately 450 emergency calls per year. Photo courtesy of Hailey Fire Department

Discover Health! St. Luke’s Community Health Fair Join your neighbors and friends for a fun, engaging, multicultural, family-friendly event. Check out activities and exhibits from St. Luke’s and local and regional nonprofit agencies and organizations that are dedicated to keeping you and our community healthy. • Participate in fitness demonstrations. • Gain information about health, prevention, safety and fitness.

Saturday, June 16

• Learn about the amazing human anatomy.

10 a.m.-2 p.m.

• Gain understanding of mental health and emotional well-being. • Blood pressure checks and other screenings will be available; watch for updated details. • Prenatal and parenting information.

Community Campus 1050 Fox Acres Road, Hailey For more information, please call St. Luke’s Center for Community Health at (208) 727-8733.

• Cool raffle prizes, multicultural activities, giveaways and healthy snacks.

Father’s Day Chili Cook-Off will raise funds for nonprofits. If interested in entering, visit haileyidaho.com to register or call The Chamber at (208) 788-3484. Public domain photo, accessed via Wikimedia Commons

D I S C O V E R

HEALTH


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NEWS IN BRIEF

T H E W E E K LY S U N • J U N E 13 - 19, 2018

Patti Lousen Retires From Land Trust

PHOTOS THEWEEKLY SCENE

After more than a half dozen years as a project coordinator for the Wood River Land Trust, and many more teaching and working in education in the Valley, Patti Lousen retired at the end of May. “We have accomplished a lot of important and impactful projects, thanks to Patti’s efforts and dedication,” said Scott Boettger, the executive director of the Land Trust. “She has meant a lot to the Land Trust and to our community.” While with the Land Trust, Lousen led the Student Conservation Council; helped found the Wood River Water Collaborative, which in the last couple of years has done important restoration work along the river; put on a film festival; and is creating an informational kiosk and audio tour for the newly acquired bench section of the Colorado Gulch Preserve. Lousen also teamed up with the City of Hailey to create the recently completed Hailey Greenway Master Plan and revived the Trout Friendly program. Before joining the team at the Land Trust in 2012, Lousen taught science at Wood River Middle School and helped found the Waldorf-education-based Mountain School (now Syringa Mountain School) in Hailey.  “It’s amazing what the SCC has accomplished,” Lousen said about working with the high school students. “They made positive impacts and showed that they love the land, and when you love something, you’ll take care of it. I’m excited about the future.” She also worked on the Water Conservation Landscape Guidelines that were recently adopted by all local municipalities. For years, Lousen and Boettger wanted to create the Water Wise guidelines to help on a policy level for Blaine County governmental agencies. It’s what inspired the Land Trust to help create the Wood River Water Collaborative.   “The water guidelines initiative was a huge endeavor and having it passed is important and fulfilling,” she said. “We go from hiking boots and work gloves to getting dressed up for presentations at city council and commissioners meetings,” Lousen said. “I really appreciate the opportunity to be involved in making a difference, be it working on policy, on the land or with our limited resource of water. It has been very rewarding.”  

Magic Lantern To Host Benefit Screening Of Ginsburg Documentary

A benefit screening of the documentary “RBG” will take place at 7 p.m. Tuesday, June 19, at the Magic Lantern Cinema in Ketchum. Proceeds will benefit the campaigns to elect Muffy Davis to the Idaho State House of Representatives and re-elect Sen. Michelle Stennett and Rep. Sally Toone. The newly released movie tracks Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s rise from her humble beginnings growing up poor in Brooklyn, N.Y., to founding the women’s project for the A.C.L.U., to her rise to the highest court in the land. Along the way, she has been the ultimate champion for equal rights for women and minorities. “As a woman, I’ve been inspired by [her] strength and impact in our society for years,” Davis said. “I can’t wait to take my daughter to see this film. Many women are choosing to run for office in 2018 and it’s exciting to see more women get involved in shaping our communities.” Davis, who currently serves as an elected member of the International Paralympic Committee, previously served eight years on the IPC Women in Sport Committee. “I’m excited to put my leadership experience to work on my campaign for Idaho State House and, if elected, for all the Idahoans in our district.” According to the Center for American Women and Politics, nationwide, a little more than 25 percent of state legislators are women. In Idaho, just over 30 percent of the state legislative seats are held by women. Tickets for the event start at $20 and seating is limited. Tickets can be purchased at the door or online in advance. For more information on the candidates and the film screening or to purchase tickets, go to: muffyforidaho.com, toone4rep.com, michellestennett.com, or secure.actblue. com/donate/ld26film#.

Spring wildflowers add a beautiful purple tone to a field at Cape Horn in Salmon-Challis National Forest, just north

Ballet Sun Valley Announces Its Repertoire

Ballet Sun Valley 2018 will perform Tuesday and Wednesday, July 17-18, at the Sun Valley Pavilion. Under the artistic direction of American Ballet Theatre principal ballerina and Sun Valley native, Isabella Boylston, the festival will include two completely different mixed repertoires each night. Featured dancers hail from Paris Opera Ballet, The Royal Danish Ballet, The Royal Swedish Ballet, American Ballet Theatre, New York City Ballet, and San Francisco Ballet. Martin West, orchestra conductor for the San Francisco Ballet, will lead the live orchestra of top musicians to accompany the performances. “This promises to be another unforgettable event, one that showcases some of the world’s best dancers performing exceptionally creative works in a venue that is simply spectacular,” said Robert Smelick, founder of Ballet Sun Valley and executive producer of this year’s festival. As a part of the event, Ballet Sun Valley will offer a special Day of Dance Education on Thursday, July 19. Festival dancers will teach free dance classes for aspiring young dancers—a rare opportunity for those who are selected. Boylston will give a talk about her journey from her hometown to Lincoln Center. To be considered for a class, students must complete an application by Saturday, June 30, which can be found on the Ballet Sun Valley 2018 website.  Pavilion and lawn seating tickets are now available, at balletsunvalley. com, balletsunvalley.ticketfly.com or by calling the box office at (208) 622-2135. Viking Cruises is the lead sponsor of Ballet Sun Valley Festival 2018. For more information, visit balletsunvalley.com.

A dragonfly takes a moment to rest in Ketchum on Wednesday, June 6. Courtesy photo by Scott Smith


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T H E W E E K LY S U N • J U N E 13 - 19, 2018

SPONSORED ROBERT CUNNINGHAM, DDS

DO YOU HAVE A CRACKED TOOTH?

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BY DR. ROBERT CUNNINGHAM, DDS

hen you bite down, you feel a sharp pain. It quickly disappears and you ignore it. You even avoid certain foods or chew on the other side of your mouth. Does this sound familiar? You may have a cracked tooth. A cracked tooth can result from many causes—an accident, such as a blow to the mouth; grinding and clenching your teeth; uneven chewing pressure; or stress on a single tooth. Teeth that have lost a significant portion of the biting surface due to wear or large fillings become more brittle and susceptible to cracking. Tooth enamel that is exposed to extreme changes in temperature, or chewing nuts or crusty bread can contribute to cracking. A crack may appear as a hairline fracture and is often invisible to the eye, even with extreme magnification. X-rays usually don’t show cracks. This makes diagnosis difficult. Referred pain is common and sometimes makes it hard to pinpoint the tooth causing the problem. We have a device called a “Tooth Sleuth” that, along with special dyes, can make a crack more obvious. If you have ignored the discomfort of a crack for a significant amount of time, the nerve inside of the tooth will become damaged, making root canal or even extraction necessary. I often tell patients to “listen to your body.” When something is talking to you, do something about it before it becomes more serious. It’s common sense but, as Will Rogers said, “Common sense isn’t very common.” Robert Cunningham, DDS 120 N. Second Ave. #202 Ketchum, ID 83340 208-726-3457

of Stanley, on Sunday. Courtesy photo by Michael Edminster

Dr. Cunningham is an honors graduate from the USC School of Dentistry. He has practiced dental excellence in Ketchum for 20 years. For a complete list of professional qualifications, contact our office by phone or email at cunninghamdds@yahoo.com.

The Weekly Sun’s summer + fall 2018

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T H E W E E K LY S U N • J U N E 13 - 19, 2018

Fishing R epoRt

COLUMN NO BONES ABOUT IT THE “WEEKLY” FISHING REPORT FOR JUNE 13 - 19, FROM PICABO ANGLER

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ime to switch Drakes! Brown Drakes are winding down for the season on Silver Creek. With that said, a warm day at Silver Creek West and anglers could still expect to see some Brown Drake action. A few Green Drakes have been hatching most days and that’s all it takes to get the fish interested in them. The Green Drake on Silver Creek is a much brighter color green than the Drakes you would find on the Big Wood and Upper Lost. We like to use the Renee Harrop patterns on the Creek because of this. Once the Big Wood is fishable, the Green Drakes here should show up in huge numbers. Patterns like the Colorado Green Drake, Green Drake Cripples and the Epoxy Back Green Drake Nymph are awesome flies on these rivers. Silver Creek is also fishing well, with PMDs, Baetis and Callibaetis on the hot days in the slow-water sections. In addition, anglers can cast Ant and Beetle patterns. The Mouse fishing at night has been productive for those late-night sessions. There aren’t many anglers around between now and the Fourth of July, so it’s a great time to come down to the Creek and get some quiet days. If you’ve never fished the Creek, now is the time to give it a try. The fish are still happy to eat, the hatches are great, and the angler numbers are at a minimum. The Big Wood and the Upper Lost have come down a lot with the cooler weather early in the week. Watch the color as well as the flows. The color is the most important as we look for the glacier-green runoff. That is the first sign that the river is about to unlock. The fish will be hungry when the rivers do finally drop. Green Drakes, Stoneflies, Salmon Flies, Yellow Sallies and Crane Flies are all “must haves” in your fly box! The South Fork of the Boise is fishing pretty well for driftboat anglers. Small Stoneflies and some Cicadas are in the mix. The flows have dropped to normal boating levels. Be ready, as the Salmon Flies are the next bug to appear here. We are probably a week to two weeks away from this event, depending on what section of the river you fish. Odds are that the next few warm days down there will get the Salmon Flies in the canyon section going strong. Happy fishing, everyone!

Hwy 20 in Picabo info@picaboangler.com (208)788.3536 www.picaboangler.com

TOO MUCH FREEDOM?

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BY FRAN JEWELL

e live in a simply amazing area where we can take our dogs to unheard-of beauty and let them enjoy the smells, exercise and swimming to their heart’s content! We live where dogs belong to almost every family; every family lives here to enjoy the outdoors; and dogs participate in our family outings all the time. As a trainer, one of the biggest concerns I hear from everyone is that their dog will come extremely well execpt when there is a distraction. What is the distraction? Usually, other dogs; sometimes other people; and sometimes the distractions are wild animals. This can be very disconcerting and even life threatening for dogs running loose in our wild lands. The key is teaching your very young puppy early on that coming is not an option, but a requirement. This can be very difficult for many of us since we want our pups to learn confidence by experiencing the woods, streams and lakes that our area has to offer. Puppies can lure us into believing they will come every time when they are very young. What we don’t understand is that Mother Nature programs them to “follow the leader” until they are about 19 to 20 weeks old. We believe our pup has an excellent recall until that day comes when she turns around and looks at us and in her eyes we see, “So what happens if I don’t come?” If we are not prepared for this moment, we lose all those previous weeks of training when our little girl wanted to come for our treat, praise or toy. Now, the big world has become more intriguing than we are. It is much more fun for a puppy to explore than to return to us. Dogs are opportunists by nature—they will seize whatever opportunity looks better to them. If the environment provides a more interesting choice, then our puppy will grab that moment in glee.

Using a long line to teach and keep a strong “come” command is much easier than you may think. Cloud has graduated, after lots of practice, to a “shorter” long line and dragging it just in case I need to stop him. Photo by Fran Jewell

Fixing this behavior is so much harder than prevention. Using a long line for a long time is our best prevention. Many people shrug their shoulders and feel that a long line (as long as 30 to 50 feet) is such a hassle that they refuse to use one. The loss, unfortunately, is for both the dog and owner when we have to go back and retrain the “come” command all over, especially once the pup learns that the environment is far more interesting than we are. There are very simple techniques to using the long line that make its use pretty painless for everyone. It can even be better than using a short leash for walks! There are, of course, times when a long line is not appropriate, especially if you have a mobility disability and a long line might

make you fall, causing serious injury. There are other alternatives to teaching a very strong recall, but these options should be considered seriously; it is critical to our dogs’ safety and the safety of others and wildlife. Too much freedom too fast may very well put your pup at risk of learning something we don’t want her to learn! Fran Jewell is an Idaho Press Club award-winning columnist, IAABC-certified dog behavior consultant, NADOI-certified instructor #1096 and the owner of Positive Puppy Dog Training, LLC, in Sun Valley. For more information, visit positivepuppy.com or call (208) 578-1565.

COLUMN SKETCHBOOK HIKING

LUPINE AND BUTTERFLIES

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BY LESLIE REGO

he hillsides are brimming with flowering lupine, and where there is lupine, there will also be blue and yellow butterflies. There are many different species of blue butterflies, but most likely the one you see flitting amongst the lupine is Boisduval’s Blue. The male is a cerulean blue. The female has rusty brown wings with bits of grayblue peeking through the rust. The yellow butterflies belong to the sulphur species. Two common ones are Queen Alexandra’s Sulphur and Western Sulphur. The Western Sulphur is more of a lime green than yellow. On Dollar Mountain, a few days ago, I witnessed the graceful courting dance of two sulphur butterflies. The movements are delicate as the butterflies whirl around one another, constantly circling upward into the sky. One moment they are touching and the next they are twirling in close proximity. I was amazed by how high the two butterflies ascended. They continued to spiral up and up until they were just dots in the sky. I stood transfixed by the elegance of the dance. Even though lupine is one of the most commonly encountered wildflowers in our area, it is curi-

Leslie Rego, “Boisduval’s Blue Male Butterfly,” watercolor.

ous that the flower was unknown and uncategorized scientifically until Lewis and Clark collected a specimen in 1806. Lewis and Clark were not familiar with the plant, but it played an important role in Native American daily life. It was used to relieve gas, to quell hiccups, or as a diuret-

ic. It was formed into incense for dance rituals or the leaves were chewed ceremonially before beginning to apply face paint. It is best to stay away from trying out any of these Native American practices for lupine and just enjoy the dance of the butterflies amongst the flowers.

Leslie Rego is an Idaho Press Club award-winning columnist, artist and Blaine County resident. To view more of Rego’s art, visit leslierego.com.


T H E W E E K LY S U N •

JUNE 13 - 19, 2018

COLUMN ON LIFE’S TERMS

THE POSSIBILITIES FOR LOVE

self as Pollyanna, a cockeyed optimist, or someone who sees the past with rose-colored glasses. few years go I was visiting a friend in Pa- While that is certainly true, I must say that there cific Palisades, California, who was a rep- have been many time that that core belief has led resentative-agent for professional speak- to heartbreak and intense sadness. ers. One of them was with her in her office the day Even though my mother died when I was only I arrived. His topic was the idea that, after inter- 29, my grief, as horrible as it was, was tempered viewing you, he could capture in one sentence the by the knowledge that I had had all those years essence of your focus in life… the with a mother who adored me, and most dominant trait of your personwho gave me unconditional love. ality; in short, the core quality that No wonder I learned to look at the drives you. happiness that was available to me, He asked me and my friend even with resultant sadness. several questions on the order of I have loved dogs all my life. My our favorite movie, book, expefirst dog, adopted when she and I rience, family member, choice of were both 5, lived to be 17. My career, etc. He defined my friend parents had to take her to be “put to as one who is driven to help othsleep” when I was away counseling ers achieve their dreams. Nothing at summer camp. I still recall her could be more accurate than that comfort during my teenaged angst assessment: she is selfless, nurturand, even though I would wish she ing, optimistic and always willing JoEllen Collins—a longtime were here today, I can never cancel to help anyone. the devotion and love we shared for resident of the Wood River His core statement for me was Valley— is an Idaho Press 12 crucial years. The pain of loss is that I am a person who believes in Club award-winning colum- inevitable if we love intensely. the possibilities for love. nist, a teacher, writer, fabric Broken romances and the passI thought about that designated artist, choir member and ings of dear friends have tested label for me when I heard Michael unabashedly proud grandma my optimism, but I know that life Curry, the Episcopal Bishop of the known as “Bibi Jo.” does not guarantee us bliss. Hard United States, give his lively serwork, faith in others, a spirit of mon at the royal wedding of Harry and Meghan. open-mindedness, curiosity and loyalty, all with As he spoke about the possibility and the need the basic belief in the possibilities for love, has for love—all aspects of love, universal or ro- worked for me, even in the darkest times. Now I mantic—I was nodding my head in agreement, even have found a welcoming new family, the desmiling at the affirmation of something that has scendants of my biological mother. I am grateful blessed and, occasionally, plagued me through for the cherished moments of love, both past and my long life. present. I know why I am who I am. I often refer to my-

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SPONSORED FEATURE STUDENT SPOTLIGHT

BY JOELLEN COLLINS

COLUMN SCIENCE OF PLACE

BIRD EVENT

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BY HARRY WEEKES

hen I turned 40, I wanted to do something special. Something big. Something monumental. So, each day for the entire year I decided to write down every time I laughed. Or that was the goal. One of the things that I realized pretty quickly is there were days when recording all of the laughs was just not possible. These were mostly ridiculous conversations with my brother that I simply labeled “laugh events.” Periodically, birding is like this. You get into a bird event. The most obvious of these is the spring morning chorus. The songbirds have returned, the days are getting longer, and love is in the air. Each bird is bent on continuing its genetic legacy, a legacy that up until now has remained unbroken over the span of time. A good dawn chorus is a symphony to behold. There is another such event that must happen annually, even though it is only semiannually that my students and I find ourselves at Macks Creek Campground on Lucky Peak Reservoir in the spring. We kicked off June wrapping up a nineday bird odyssey asleep amidst the Ponderosas, poplars, and willows. Then, 4:30 a.m. came… along with the first twitter and buzz of birds in the trees. By 5:00, there is nothing short of a full cacophony. A din. A complete and total racket of birds. The main hosts are Bullock’s orioles, where this campsite has to be some kind of oriole epicenter. Their chattery squawk becomes the background for everything else. And while one’s initial response is understandably “What is this noise?”, the overwhelming bird yelling actually seems to sharpen your ears to everything else. There is the twittering of Western kingbirds. Spilling off the hills across the road is the clucking of chukar. The noticeably more melodious song of a house finch jumps out from its perch on the campground regulations sign. Somewhere in the shrubby tree near the water spigot comes the odd call of the male California quail, who has ascended to the high branches to greet the morning. Beneath him is a house wren, the complexity of whose call seems in direct contrast to its size.

Bullock’s Oriole. Public domain photo

As I pull apart the sounds, swiveling toward each, my eyes follow my ears in the growing light. A quail in the tree becomes a quail on the ground, its high-speed, upright running comically in time with the bell on its head. Robins chase one another through clusters of branches with impossible precision. A soft purring draws my attention to cedar waxwings, who look like porcelain ornaments on the branches. Over the course of the next 30 minutes, the quieter contingency shows up. A lone mallard female waddles through an adjacent camp. A crow hops around the sand, only to be mobbed by orioles. Two families of geese, with nearly 20 goslings, slip out of the water to graze on the grass like fantastic avian cows. In the distance, a Clark’s grebe slips to the east. I am not sure how every student is still asleep. As the sun creeps down the trees, I am watching a male kingbird on a branch above me. First, he is in the shadows. His placement, though, is perfect and the sun soon illuminates his buttery-yellow chest. As I wonder if that’s it, if I have been able to record everything, a spotted towhee’s buzz emerges, letting me know that there is always more. There is always more. Harry Weekes is the founder and head of school at The Sage School in Hailey. He has lived in the Wood River Valley and within five miles of the same mountain for the last 46 years.

Melissa Gonzalez. Photo courtesy of Melissa Gonzalez

MELISSA GONZALEZ Student ups her academic game

BY EMILEE MAE STRUSS

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elissa Gonzalez, a rising junior at Wood River High School, is on the cheerleading team and involved in several clubs, including Nosotros United, Business Professionals of America, and Idaho Drug-Free Youth. She currently has a 3.8 grade point average and speaks three languages, including English, Spanish and French. Gonzalez attributes her success in school and extracurricular activities to her parents, who came from Mexico “My parents came here just to give my sister and me a better life,” said Gonzalez. “And they haven’t stopped working really hard for us. It makes me want to do better.” This past year, however, Gonzalez noticed a shift in her motivation for excelling in and out of school. “I used to do all of these things for my parents, but this year I realized that I was doing it for myself and to give myself a better life.” Gonzalez, who is a resident of Ketchum, will begin her first job this summer by selling raffle tickets to win a Ford Raptor pickup truck in support of The Drug Coalition, a nonprofit in Hailey. She will also attend many cheerleading practices and prepare for a fellowship program that’s new to the Wood River Valley. Organized by the Idaho Institute for Organization and Action, the program was only offered in Boise. This year, 11 youth from Blaine County expressed interested in the program, and they will run it locally this summer. In the fall, Gonzalez plans to continue with the clubs she was involved in during her sopho-

more year, including Nosotros United, of which she will become co-vice-president. She also looks forward to snowboarding in the winter, which she started two years ago with the Sun Valley FreeRide Team. “My freshman year I didn’t join many clubs and I just did what my friends wanted to do,” Gonzalez said. “Now I am much more independent and don’t care if other people go or not.” Her sophomore year, Gonzalez qualified for state with BPA in two events: Team Management and Integrated Office Applications. For her events, she worked with Microsoft Office to create an Excel spreadsheet, a poster using Word and a PowerPoint presentation. “It was a nice experience because I don’t know what I want to do in the future, but I do like working with computers,” Gonzalez said. Gonzalez was very proud that her GPA improved by three points since this past year. She finished Honors Algebra II one year ahead of her class and completed AP Spanish and French V. “I used to hate math because I thought I was bad at it, but now I realize that I can do it,” Gonzalez said. While she isn’t sure what she wants to do in the future, Gonzalez is quickly discovering she has great interest in linguistics, connecting people and growing in confidence. tws

Editor’s Note: Anyone who would like to recommend a Blaine County School District student for The Weekly Sun’s “Student Spotlight” feature should contact Emilee Struss at emilee.struss@gmail.com.

This Student Spotlight brought to you by the Blaine County School District

Our mission is to inspire, engage, educate, and empower every student.

BLAINESCHOOLS.ORG


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T H E W E E K LY S U N •

SPONSORED BETTER HOMEOWNERS NEWS

JUNE 13 - 19, 2018

SUN CALENDAR THE WEEKLY

EVENT FEATURE

SELLING YOUR HOUSE ON YOUR OWN COULD COST YOU

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n this extremely hot real estate market, some homeowners might consider selling their homes on their own, which is known as a For Sale by Owner (FSBO). They rationalize that they don’t need a real estate agent and believe that they can save the fee for the services a real estate agent offers. However, a  study  by  Collateral Analytics  reveals that FSBOs don’t actually save anything and, in some cases, may be costing homeowners more, by not listing with an agent. In the study, they analyzed home sales in a variety of markets. The data showed that: “FSBOs tend to sell for lower prices than comparable home sales and, in many cases, below the average differential represented by the prevailing commission rate.”  Why would FSBOs net  less  money than if they had used an agent? The study makes several suggestions: • “There could be systematic bias on the buyer side as well. FSBO sales might attract more strategic buyers than MLS sales, particularly buyers who rationalize lower-priced bids with the logic that the seller is ‘saving’ a traditional commission. Such buyers might specifically search for and target sellers who are not getting representational assistance from agents.” In other words, ‘bargain lookers’ might shop FSBOs more often. • “Experienced agents are experts at marketing, presenting, and ‘staging’ homes for sale,” which could bring more money for the home. • “Properties listed with a broker that is a member of the local MLS will be listed online with all other participating broker websites, marketing the home to a much larger buyer population. And those MLS properties generally offer compensation to agents who represent buyers, incentivizing them to show and sell the property and again potentially enlarging the buyer pool.” If more buyers see a home, the greater the chances are that there could be a bidding war for the property. Conclusions From The Study • FSBOs achieve prices significantly lower than those from similar properties sold by Realtors using the MLS. • The data suggests the average price was near 6 percent lower for FSBO sales of similar properties. Bottom Line As Dave Ramsey, America’s trusted voice on money, explains: “Research has shown that, between mistakes, lack of negotiating skills, pricing errors and general exposure on the market, you’ll cost yourself more than the real estate commission… You’ll come out slightly better and with a lot less hassle if you use a topshelf agent.”

ANNA MATHIEU

Realtor®, Associate Broker, GRI, MBA This Year’s Winner of the Windermere Cup for Outstanding Performance Windermere Real Estate/SV, LLC (208) 309-1329 AnnaMathieu@Windermere.com 5b-realestate.com To subscribe to the Better Homeowners newsletter: tinyurl.com/y8koftym

Thirty craft breweries will participate in this year’s Brewfest, with over 200 beers to sample from. Photo courtesy of Sun Valley Brewfest

DRINK FOR A CAUSE Sun Valley Brewfest take over Town Square

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BY YANNA LANTZ

oin the community for the fifth annual Sun Valley Brewfest, a beer-centered event to raise funds for Ketchum/Sun Valley Rotary charities in the Valley. Brewfest will take place from noon to 6 p.m. on Saturday, June 16, at Ketchum Town Square. “The Ketchum/Sun Valley Rotary is all about giving back to the community,” said Holden Morgan, Rotary member and Brewfest co-chair. “Rotary’s motto is service above self, and it’s that simple. We have young and old coming together to raise money for Rotary charities in the Valley, and this event is a big part of that. It’s an opportunity to drink beer for a cause.” Thirty craft breweries will participate in this year’s Brewfest, donating their beer to the cause. “Craft breweries make, brew and market their own beer with their own recipes,” Morgan said. “They are small, independent, and you would compare them to very small wineries. It’s amazing how much love and craft goes into their work.” Attendees can sample from 200 different beers throughout the day. “When they are pouring the beers at the event, the brewers will tell you all about how they made it and will describe the components that went into your beer,” Morgan said. “It’s a great way to learn about how beer is made and what it takes to brew. They are putting more and more types of ingredients in beer nowadays and it’s really interesting.” Morgan said that there is great interest from breweries to participate in Brewfest, but Rotary tries to keep the number to around 30. “This is a great venue and we have a lot of interest,” he said. “The breweries that started with us are always invited back and we will invite a few new breweries each year.”

A participant at Brewfest tries his hand at Hammerschlagen, a nail-driving game from Germany often played at beer fests. Photo courtesy of Sun Valley Brewfest

Friday night, before Brewfest, the brewers will assemble at the Power House in Hailey. “Billy [Olson] at Power House has generously offered to feed all the brewers who come early and give them a pint of beer,” Morgan said. “It’s a really great way to show respect for these guys who are giving us their product.” On Saturday, attendees can enjoy beer, music from DJN8 Entertainment, food, and pub games such as Hammerschlagen, cornhole and giant Jenga. Mahoney’s, KB’s, Mason Family Restaurants and Sun Valley Brewery Public House will have food for sale. Additionally, there will be $5 raffle tickets for a Sun Valley ski pass and four tickets to Citizen Cope, who will play later that evening at the Sun Valley Pavilion. A $30 donation will get the first 1,200 drinkers unlimited beer samples, plus a souvenir pint glass. “It’s a super-fun event that

kicks off summer in the Valley,” Morgan said. “We always do it the third weekend in June, when the Valley is kind of waking up for the summer season. It’s an every man’s, or every woman’s, kind of festival, and you don’t have to come and drink to still have a good time.” Valley Apothecary is the title sponsor for Sun Valley Brewfest 2018, with additional support from D.L. Evans Bank, Blaine County Title, Sun Valley Company, A.C. Houston Lumber, ArborCare Resources, Inc., Bisnett Insurance, Inc., Davis Embroidery, Inc., Hennessy Company, Luboviski, Wygle, Fallowfield & Ritzau, P.A., Power House Pub & Bike Shop and Sun Valley Auto Club. Visit sunvalleybrewfest.com to learn more about Sun Valley Brewfest 2018.

tws


T H E W E E K LY S U N •

JUNE 13 - 19, 2018

EVENTS CALENDAR, CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE ‘BEES’ & POLLINATORS ALL WEEK 5:30PM / THE CENTER / KETCHUM Sun Valley Center for the Arts’ BIG IDEA project, “Bees,” is open to the public. “Bees” explores the critical role that pollinators play in maintaining the health of food supplies and ecosystems. The project also considers the many challenges that pollinator species are facing, from colony collapse disorder to shrinking habitat. The “Bees” visual arts exhibition will be on view through June 22 at The Center. For more information about other events associated with the “Bees” BIG IDEA project, visit sunvalleycenter. org or call (208) 726-9491.

WILDFLOWER WALK WEDNESDAY JUNE 13 8:30AM TO 1:30PM / BOTANICAL GARDEN / KETCHUM Join the Sawtooth Botanical Garden and Idaho Native Plant Society for a midweek wildflower walk. The exact destination will depend on which lower-elevation areas around the Wood River Valley are at their peak. Local wildflower enthusiasts Jeanne Cassell and Lisa Horton will lead the walks. Walks are free; rain or shine. Participants should bring appropriate outerwear, sturdy walking shoes, water, sunscreen, a hat and lunch. These walks are appropriate for children 7 years and older, if accompanied by an adult. Leave dogs at home. Carpooling from the SBG is encouraged to help reduce the group’s environmental footprint. For more information, visit sbgarden.org or call (208) 7269358. SBG is located at 11 Gimlet Road, 4 miles south of Ketchum.

DISCOVERY CLUB WEDNESDAY JUNE 13 10-11AM / BOTANICAL GARDEN / KETCHUM Sawtooth Botanical Garden invites children ages 4 to 8 to join them this summer for Discovery Club. Similar to Story Time at the library, these onehour, drop-in sessions are free with no need to register in advance. Each week will feature a different theme, such as “Worms,” “Fruits & Seeds” or “Observing Our World,” to be accompanied by stories, activities and exploration of the Garden. Discovery Club will run on Wednesdays throughout the summer. For more information, visit sbgarden.org or call (208) 726-9358. SBG is located at 11 Gimlet Road, 4 miles south of Ketchum.

HAILEY FARMERS’ MARKET THURSDAY JUNE 14 2-6PM / MAIN STREET Hailey Farmers’ Market, back on Main Street between Galena and Carbonate streets, offers seasonally available and locally grown and raised fruits, vegetables, eggs, sheep, goat and cow cheeses, organic cuts of beef, chicken and lamb, fresh herbs, pastries and so much more. Shoppers are encouraged to bring their own bags. Fresh Buck food stamps may be used.

KIP ATTAWAY THURSDAY JUNE 14 6:30-9:30PM / MAHONEY’S / BELLEVUE This week, for Mahoney’s first show of its annual music series, enjoy songs by Kip Attaway, who’s been making country music since the 1970s with the Braun family and Pinto Bennett, among others. Attaway has released 12 CDs, and his live acts combine comedy, music and mayhem. He has entertained all over the world, including Hawaii, Bermuda and Australia.

OLD DEATH WHISPER FRIDAY JUNE 15 9:30PM / SILVER DOLLAR / BELLEVUE Enjoy live music this and every Friday night at the Silver Dollar Saloon in Bellevue. This week, groove to jams by Old Death Whisper.

13

SPONSORED LOCAL FOOD FOR THOUGHT

SCRATCH MADE SIMPLE: SCONES WITH STRAWBERRY-RHUBARB SAUCE

S

BY AMY MATTIAS

avor the flavors of early summer with a Scratch Made Simple recipe: scones topped with seasonal, farm-fresh strawberry-rhubarb sauce. Sauce: 1 lb. fresh rhubarb, cleaned and diced, from Kraay’s Market & Garden 1 pint fresh strawberries, hulled & halved, from Waterwheel Gardens 3 tablespoons maple syrup* 2 tablespoons balsamic vinegar* 1 teaspoon vanilla extract* Pinch of salt and dash of sugar, to taste* Toss rhubarb with maple syrup, vinegar, salt, and sugar. Cook in saucepan over low heat. Add strawberries once rhubarb has released some juices. Cook slowly until thick and soft, approximately 20 minutes. Turn off heat. Scones: 2 cups all-purpose flour, sifted, from Kraay’s 1 tablespoon baking powder* 1/2 teaspoon sea salt* 2 tablespoons sugar* 5 tablespoons cold butter, cut into pieces* 1 egg, beaten, from The Farm Idaho 3/4 cup cream, from Treasured Sunrise Acres 1 teaspoon vanilla extract*

1/4 cup powdered sugar (Available at NourishMe or buy organic at Atkinsons’ Market.) Preheat oven to 450 degrees. Mix dry ingredients into a bowl. Cut in butter using your fingers, a pastry cutter, or food processor. Mix together to form a mealy dough. Add in egg, vanilla and most of the cream. Use more cream or flour, as needed, until dough is slightly sticky. A few pulses on food processor or minutes of gentle kneading will do. Form 3/4-inch-thick round of dough on a baking sheet lined with parchment paper. Brush with cream and sprinkle with sugar. Space out each piece and bake for 12-15 minutes, until golden brown. While scones bake, whip cream in a cold metal bowl until peaks form. Fold in up to a 1/4 cup powdered sugar. Enjoy scones warm with strawberry-rhubarb sauce and whipped cream as breakfast or dessert! All parts can be made ahead of time and assembled at room temperature. Local Food Alliance is a nonprofit whose mission is to create a vibrant local food system in the Wood River Valley. For more information, visit localfoodalliance.org.

Whipped Cream: 1 cup cold cream, from Treasured Sunrise Acres

SPONSORED THE ATTITUDE DOC

‘HOW ARE YOU?’

I

BY ALEXANDRA DELIS-ABRAMS, PH.D.

f you are a bank teller, cashier at a market, customer care person for any online business, etc., and your job is to be of service—to me, please, would you be so kind as to refrain from saying, “Hi, how are you?” When I feel playful, I say, “Great. Today is the best day of my life,” but mostly I ignore the question because I know the individual doesn’t really care how I am. It’s rote. It’s a cultural habit. It’s annoying—to me, anyhow. Something more appealing might be, “Beautiful morning, yes?” Or “Enjoying the rain?” Any ideas? I am particularly sensitive to this after the suicides this past week of two highly visible people. Certainly cause to look deeper and examine our inner world—maybe ask some important questions, such as: “How good of a listener am I? How significant are my friendships? How often do I take time to read, journal, be still, just be? How identified am I to my role in the outer world? How much of a front do I portray? How aware am I of my feelings?”

Years ago I compiled a feelings dictionary with 650 “feels” words. While researching the subject on the Internet, I discovered a self-study test online that will give you an insight as to your emotional literacy. Emotional Intelligence Self-Study: Identifying Emotions, Understanding Emotions, Managing Emotions, Using Emotions to facilitate thoughts. I dare you to take it. Call The Attitude Doc if I can offer support in evaluating your answers. Alexandra Delis-Abrams, Ph.D. alexandra@theattitudedoc. com


14

T H E W E E K LY S U N •

JUNE 13 - 19, 2018

EVENTS CALENDAR, CONTINUED FROM PREVIOUS PAGE COMPASSION GARDEN SATURDAY JUNE 16

CITIZEN COPE SATURDAY JUNE 16

8:30AM TO 2PM / BOTANICAL GARDEN / KETCHUM

6:30PM / SUN VALLEY PAVILION

Sawtooth Botanical Garden offers free guided tours of the Garden of Infinite Compassion every Saturday. The Compassion Garden was created to honor the 2005 visit of the Dalai Lama to the Wood River Valley. The Garden hosts a rare Tibetan prayer wheel, one of two of its size in North America. The beautiful prayer wheel was built by Tibetan monks and blessed by His Holiness. Designed by landscape architect and Zen teacher Martin Mosko, the many intentional features of the garden have special meaning. SBG education director Kristin Fletcher leads the walks. SBG is located at 11 Gimlet Road, 4 miles south of Ketchum. For details, visit sbgarden.org or call (208) 726-9358.

Citizen Cope is an American songwriter, producer and performer with music commonly described as a mix of blues, soul, folk and rock. See Citizen Cope live with special guests G. Love & Special Sauce at the Pavilion. For tickets, visit ticketfly.com/purchase/ event/1664186/tfly.

MONSTER TRUCK INSANITY SATURDAY JUNE 16 7:30-9:30PM / HAILEY RODEO ARENA The Monster Truck Insanity Tour will turn the Hailey rodeo arena into a battleground with a huge show on Saturday. Come check out a large lineup of monster trucks as they compete in straight-up, tailgate-dragging wheelie contests, heads-up racing and car crushing. Stop by early for an autograph pit party at 6 p.m. and enjoy the show at 7:30 p.m. Pre-sale tickets are available at all area Atkinsons’ Markets and at livealittle.userlite.com/tickets.

BLAINE COUNTY FIRE EXPO SATURDAY JUNE 16 11AM TO 2PM / FESTIVAL MEADOWS / SUN VALLEY The Blaine County Fire Expo is an annual community event featuring local firefighters sharing their expertise, skills and talents in vivid, real-life demonstrations. Attendees can see a car extrication, rescue drills, enjoy a free BBQ, live fire, helicopters, fire safety for kids, home safety, engine tours, free smoke detectors and so much more.

HAT TRICK SUNDAY JUNE 17 6-9PM / LEFTY’S BAR & GRILL / KETCHUM Enjoy free live music on the deck at Lefty’s this and every Sunday throughout the summer. This week, hear music by Hat Trick. Visit leftysbarandgrill.com for a full schedule of performers.

STATE CHAMPIONSHIP CRITERIUM SATURDAY JUNE 16 3-8PM / VARIOUS LOCATIONS / KETCHUM

SOUPER SUPPER MONDAY JUNE 18 5:30-6:30PM / ST. CHARLES CHURCH / HAILEY

The 2018 State Championship Criterium (USA Cycling approval pending) is hosted by Sturtevants and the Limelight Hotel. The race course is in West Ketchum near Atkinson Park and attendees can enjoy food carts, beer, music, a huge prize list, an after party at the Limelight Hotel and more. Search “2018 Ketchum Criterium & Idaho State Championship” on Facebook for details.

Weekly free hot dinners are provided to anyone who wishes to join. St. Charles Catholic Church is located at 313 1st Ave. S., Hailey.

SCIENCE TIME TUESDAY JUNE 19 11AM / COMMUNITY LIBRARY / KETCHUM The Sawtooth National Recreation Area will guest-host Science Time in the Children’s Library. Science Time is held every Tuesday at 11 a.m. Check out comlib.org to learn more.

KETCHUM FARMERS’ MARKET TUESDAY JUNE 19 2-6PM / KETCHUM TOWN SQUARE

SAGEBRUSH SATURDAYS SATURDAY JUNE 16

Ketchum Farmers’ Market offers seasonally available and locally grown and raised fruits, vegetables, eggs, sheep, goat and cow cheeses, organic cuts of beef, chicken and lamb, fresh herbs, wines and so much more. Live music is scheduled weekly and kids’ activities are available. Meet the farmers and artists who sell the homemade and homegrown products and enjoy a relaxing afternoon at the open-air markets. Ketchum Farmers’ Market is in downtown Ketchum at Town Square, next to Giacobbi Square.

6PM / ROCK CREEK RANCH

KETCH’EM ALIVE TUESDAY JUNE 19 7-9PM / FOREST SERVICE PARK / KETCHUM

Learn about Idaho’s iconic rangelands and enjoy a free BBQ at Rock Creek Ranch. To get to Rock Creek Ranch from the traffic light in Hailey town center, turn west on Bullion Street (becomes Croy Creek Road), follow this 4.5 miles to Rock Creek Road on left, then follow Rock Creek Road 6.5 miles. For more information visit rangelandcenter.org.

Ketch’em Alive is held every Tuesday evening from 7-9 p.m. at Forest Service Park in downtown Ketchum. Enjoy dancing, music and a fun-filled community party. Picnics are encouraged; food and drink vendors will be set up on First Street.  The free weekly concerts begin with “Wildflowers,” a Wood River Tribute to Tom Petty. The opening act is Kiana Chapman at 7 p.m., and the headliner will perform from 7:30-9 p.m.

IAN TIMONY SATURDAY JUNE 16 6-9PM / LEFTY’S BAR & GRILL / KETCHUM Groove to free live music on the deck at Lefty’s this and every Saturday throughout the summer. This week, catch Ian Timony. Visit leftysbarandgrill.com for a full schedule of performers.

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T H E W E E K LY S U N •

JUNE 13 - 19, 2018

15

SPONSOR THIS PUZZLE!

The Weekly Sun Is Currently Looking For A Person Or Business To Sponsor Our Popular Sudoku Puzzle

For Just $35 Per Week, You Could Run An Ad In This Space

And Bring The Joy Of Sudoku To Our Thousands Of Readers

Contact Brennan At (208) 720-1295 Or publisher@theweeklysun.com

How To Play Sudoku

MOTORCYCLE FOR SALE BMW Motorcycle for Sale. K1200LT with 28K miles. Excellent condition. Custom saddle, wired for headsets. 3 cases. $3500. Call 208-720-2874

TREES FOR SALE

15’ to 25’ Blue Spruce, $150-$500. Referral to tree service for transplanting if all purchased together. Seventeen trees available. John 208-720-2243

The Classic Sudoku is a number placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so that each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once.

CLASSIC SUDOKU See answer on page 66

WADERS FOR SALE New Fishing Waders. Frogg Rama II Ultra-Lite Hipper. Cleated soles. Men’s size 7, Women’s size 8 - 9. $75. Julia 208-721-7391

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ent for the home 720-9206 or 788-0216 nsignment the homefor the home 509 S. Main Street • Bellevue, Idaho

Wednesday through Saturday Wednesday Wednesday - Friday Wednesday - Friday 11:00to to 5:00 ednesday - Friday 11 to 611 to 6 available by appointment 11 to 6Always Saturday Saturday Saturday Saturday and if we’re here. 11 to 5 to 4 11 or to 788-0216 411 720-9206 11 to 4

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See answer on page 16

THE WOOD RIVER VALLEY 7-DAY WEATHER FORECAST IS BROUGHT TO YOU BY:

Sunny 20%

high 80º

low 50º WEDNESDAY

Mostly sunny 0%

high 71º low 43º THURSDAY

Cloudy 20%

high 66º low 44º FRIDAY

AM Showers 30%

high 65º low 43º SATURDAY

PM Showers 30%

high 63º low 45º SUNDAY

PM Showers 50%

high 66º low 46º MONDAY

AM Showers 30%

high 71º low 49º TUESDAY

SKI. BIKE. LIVE!

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T H E W E E K LY S U N • M AY 23 - 29, 2018

SUN BULLETIN BOARD THE WEEKLY

HELP WANTED

HELP WANTED

jane’s artifacts

Text (up to 25 words): $5 Additional Text: 20¢ per word Photos: $5 per image • Logo: $10 Deadline: Monday at 1 p.m Space reservations: bulletin@theweeklysun.com

HANDYMAN

Jack of all trades. Reliable, insured, clean. Small jobs to large remodel projects, or the “honey-do” list. Call Mark, 208-573-1784.

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PRICING

16

HOUSEKEEPING

Now Hiring: Library Assistant The Community Library seeks a part-time Library Assistant. This individual will work in the Children’s library on Saturdays and the Main Library on Mondays, with the possibility of additional hours on a substitute basis. Individuals with strong communication and computer skills will thrive in our dynamic, public facing work environment. Knowledge of literature and digital technologies are helpful.

PARKING AMBASSADOR

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CLASSIC SUDOKU answer from page 15

Processing Associate The Gold Mine Thrift Store seeks a part time Processing Associate to help with donation sorting, pricing and assisting with store setup, restock and sales. The successful candidate will be professional and hardworking. This job requires the ability to use sound judgement, follow directions, and lifting up to 45 pounds at a time.

ABOUT YOU You enjoy meeting new people so much it’s like you’ve never met a stranger. You often find yourself starting up conversations when your waiting in line. You enjoy helping people learn new things and are the first one to volunteer to assist in training. Your desire to be active and help people means you are always in motion. WHAT WE NEED A customer service superstar who will provide helpful and friendly service to our customers. A positive attitude and willingness to go the extra mile is a must! Our parking ambassadors provide not just great customer service but also assist our customers by providing accurate change for cash transactions and instruction on the use of the automated parking equipment. WHAT WE OFFER Advancement opportunities and flexible schedules. A generous compensation package that includes medical, dental and vision coverage and a company sponsored health savings account. We also offer, paid time off (PTO) and paid holidays. Oh, and you get to work with a truly awesome team. Pay Rate: $13.00hr (DOE) Schedule: Various schedules available including both full and parttime positions. Must be able to successfully pass a pre-employment background check and drug screen. Apply at TheCarPark.com/JoinOurTeam or send your resume to HR@ TheCarPark.com

Programs and Education Manager The Community Library seeks a Programs and Education Manager to design and implement a robust schedule of programs, special events, and educational outreach. This full-time salaried position involves leadership and creativity in overseeing programs, collaboration with other organizations, and public presentation skills.

CROSSWORD

answer from page 15

Application Instructions: Bilingual skills in English and Spanish are highly advantageous for all positions. For more information, please visit www.comlib.org, click on “about” and then “employment opportunities.”

GARAGE SALE

Red Door Home + Design. Parking Lot Sale!! (Weather Permitting) June 14, 15, 16, 10:00 - 4:00

REIKI HEALING

My name is Joshua. I am taking new Reiki clients at my new space in the Tranquility wellness center. Call anytime (208) 718-8078 or email me joshuacambrige@gmail.com blessings see you soon.

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3 June 2018  
3 June 2018  
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