Page 1

sun HAILEY

KETCHUM

SUN VALLEY

BELLEVUE

the weekly

CAREY

S TA N L E Y • FA I R F I E L D • S H O S H O N E • P I C A B O

Freestyle Spectacular PAGE 3

Pray For Snow Party READ ABOUT IT ON PAGE 7

Habitat For Non-Humanity PAGE 11

Banff Film Festival PAGE 16

J a n u a r y 2 9 , 2 0 1 4 • V o l . 7 • N o . 6 • w w w .T h e W e e k l y S u n . c o m

Maria Maricich Rides The Midas Touch

Toasting The 50th M

With Snowshoe Tours STORY AND PHOTO BY KAREN BOSSICK

T

rack wolves, view goats and examine the riparian corridor of the Big Wood River. The Idaho Conservation League and Sun Valley Trekking are toasting the 50th anniversary of the Wilderness Act with six snowshoe tours. The series kicks off from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Sunday with a two-mile, round-trip, family-friendly snowshoe hike along the Big Wood River. Molly Reeve of Sun Valley Trekking will describe the way plants and animals adapt to the winter environment along the way. There will be a Mountain Goat and Ecology tour from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Feb. 23, March 2 and March 16. That will be followed by a Wolf Tracking and Ecology tour from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. March 30 and April 6. All the hikes are on Sundays. “This adventure series is one of a number of things we will have during the year celebrating wilderness,” said Betsy Mizel, the ICL’s new Central Idaho outreach associate. “With this series we want to get people outside, participating in some hands-on activities in hopes they will develop a lifelong relationship with the land. Part of it is about showing people areas we’re trying to protect.” The treks will take place against the backdrop of the Smoky, Pioneer and Boulder mountains. Costs range from $55 to $85. ICL members get 10 percent off. To register, contact Sun Valley Trekking at 208.788.1966. Visit idahoconservation. org or call the ICL’s Ketchum office at 208.726.7485 for more information.

BY KAREN BOSSICK

aria Maricich would seem to have the Midas touch. She won the first and only figure skating competition she entered at age 12. She won scads of ribbons and trophies riding atop a hunter-jumper pony that went on to become a national champion. She won the bicycle races and foot races she entered to keep in shape. And when she cast her lot with skiing, she rode her skis to the top of the skiing world, becoming the fastest downhill female racer in America, the second fastest in the world. One of the few Olympians born and raised in Sun Valley, Maricich was part of America’s 1984 women’s dream team that raced down the Olympic Mountains of Sarajevo during the 1984 Winter Olympics. She’ll be honored on the 30th anniversary of that fete by being inducted into the Sun Valley Ski Hall of Fame in a ceremony at 5 today at the nexStage Theatre in Ketchum. The ceremony is free and open to the public. “She was very talented. You have to be a great glider to go downhill like she did,” said Michel Rudigoz, head coach of the women’s team that included Sun Valley’s Christin Cooper, Debbie Armstrong, Tamara McKinney and Cindy Nelson. “But it doesn’t matter how much you train. You have to have a certain natural ability and she always had that.” “She was a very strong, very independent person—very focused,” he added.

Good Genes

Maricich’s father—Sun Valley’s ice skating guru Herman Maricich—had her skating by the time she was 1. She was just 3 when she became part of a family act, twirling over her dad’s head, the bow her mother Connie insisted putting in her hair fluttering in the whirlwind the two created. By 7 she was jumping rope on ice skates.Her mother Connie took her skiing, putting a 2-year-old Maria in her lap as she rode the single chair up Dollar Mountain while Maria’s older brother Nick hung off the chair in front like a monkey. Intent on keeping up with her brother, who was three years older, Maria was in a hurry to grow up. She stashed her bicycle behind the Catholic Church on her way to kindergarten so no one would see her training wheels. And when Nick went into a tuck skiing straight down Rotarun ski hill, she followed suit. “I said, ‘I can do this!’ And I remember feeling so accomplished at the end. To this day, Nick claims he was my best coach,” Maricich recalled. “My horse also taught me about being brave. People couldn’t believe how he could jump, how we could jump.” Still, Maricich’s Olympic dream very nearly didn’t happen. She quit the ski team in third grade and her father balked at letting her return in the fifth grade

Maria Maricich, left, celebrates her second-place World Cup finish in Megeve, France, on Jan. 21, 1983, with Switzerland’s Maria Walliser and French skier Marie-Luce Waldmaier.

when an influx of California transplants, like Christin Cooper, joined the team. “All the cool kids were on the team so I wanted to be on it, too. I begged and begged and my dad said, ‘No.’ Finally, he relented,” Maricich recalled. “I won a whole bunch of stuff in my age group and that set the foundation for my sticking with it. The success made me feel good about myself and gave me the impetus to stay with it. It was like having a carrot out in front—it made me want more.” It was Franz Klammer’s historic 1976 Olympic gold medal run, one that has been called the greatest downhill run of all time, that turned an impressionable 14-year-old Maria onto the Olympics. “He was on the edge of disaster the whole time. I sat there watching that and thought, ‘How cool would that be!’ That set me in motion,” she said. There would be no stopping her.

Taming

The Mental Side

The ease with which she skated across the ice on a blade an eighth-inch thick helped her keep a flat ski when she pointed boards three inches wide downhill. And soon she was one of five girls on a Sun Valley ski team that dominated the Intermountain Division, which included Idaho, Utah and Wyoming.

It was her introspective side—the side that scoured books seeking ways to gain more success in life—that propelled her to the top of that team. When Maricich was 16, she read “The Inner Game of Tennis,” which details overcoming the self-doubt and lapses of concentration that can keep an athlete from winning. “It talks about tuning into the body’s innate knowledge, which knows how to do whatever you’re trying to do. It talks about taking your inner critic out of the picture and trusting that your body knows what it’s doing,” Maricich recalled. “I’d run out Trail Creek and on my way back I’d face the mountain, feeling its energy, connecting with the mountain in sort of an altered state. I’d do the same thing on the course, trying to connect and be one with the mountain, to feel the energy of the mountain. It’s not you against the mountain. It’s you with the mountain. It’s not trying to conquer the mountain. It’s you uniting with the mountain.” Applying the principles in the book revolutionized Maricich’s skiing. She aced the NorAm races she competed in, and she made the Junior National team at 16, allowing her to train with the U.S. Ski Team. “At one point she was my little sister, following me around the hill. Then overnight she turned into one of the best in the

CONTINUED ON PAGE 13

Valentines Day Special Open House Special - Thursday only 10% off all Pur Minerals, Cosmedix and Results RX Skin Care Products Free Consults with Leigh from Cosmedix Headquarters Libations and Light Fare will be provided

Dani Mazzotti and Betsy Mizel, pictured here against a photograph of the Sawtooth Wilderness taken by Ed Cannady, are planning a number of hikes and other events to celebrate the 50th anniversary of the Wilderness Act.

Botox “The Most Kissable Neck” Special

COSMEDIX OPEN HOUSE

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 6TH 4-7PM


THINK SNOW - THINK SNOW - Microwave

Roaster SPECIAL $ 99

39

- #CSR-1712R - 17” x 12” - Non Stick Interior/Exterior

Rice Cooker

10˝ Slicing Knife

- Cooks fluffy rice and cereals within minutes

- #4519-1/26 Gourmet

Stop in for a Demo

10” Fry pan

9˝ Sushi Knife

SPECIAL $ 99

99

KK SPECIAL $89.99

VitaMix SPECIAL $ 99

- Performs hundreds of culinary tasks

SUGG. LIST $165.00

KK Regular $155.00

- Soups, smoothies, frozen desserts, dips/sauces and more

Chinese New Year’s Special

Super Bowl Sale!

20% OFF

“exce p Tag t&red Adver Speciatised ls!”

EVERYTHING sale good through tuesday february

Spice Rubs

4th

Pizza Stones

Sun Valley Mustard & Pretzels Chips

SPECIAL

2 FOR $ 99 8

All Stock 20% OFF

-Whole Range of Fresh, Handmade Rubs for any Meat, Fish or Vegetable

- Round or rectangular

FROM $3999 Enjoy the Super Bowl

Super Bowl Special!

KK Regular $5.99

Microwave Potato Elki Paella Pans Chip Maker Gourmet Dips, Spreads & Crackers ONLY 99

All Stock 20% OFF

19

Red Cup Living

Reusable Drinkware - Cup, mug, wine, shooter, martini and margarita

FROM 4

$ 99

La Paella

-13.5, 15 or 17” -Carbon Steel -Made in Spain

-Make Fat Free Crispy Chips in only 3 minutes -Includes Food Slicer

$

49

Sugg. List: $110.00

99

- # 4526-7/23 Classic

- #41106 - Stainless * Includes Lid

ONLY 99

39

$

SUPER SPECIAL $ 99

Electric Fondue

- Delicious right from the jar - Simplify your entertaining

ONLY 99

79

$

-#CFO-1000 -4 Serving Cups -Non-Stick 3qt. Pot

Enjoy the Super Bowl!

SALE GOOD THRU TUESDAY, FEB 4, 2014

9-6 MON-FRI • 10-6 SAT & SUN (208) 726-1989 GIACOBBI SQUARE, KETCHUM SERIOUS KITCHENWARE 2

T H E W E E K LY S U N •

JANUARY 29, 2014


Freestyle Spectacular Turns Into Three Ring Circus

T

BY KAREN BOSSICK

hirteen-year-old Will Griffith perched on the edge of the starting gate, staring at the jumps and rails below him. His heart was pounding so hard he figured his middle school classmates could hear it back at their desks. Then he swooped onto the slopestyle course, flipped through the air and everything slowed down to the point where he could see the trees on the edge of Dollar Mountain go by in slow motion. “I tend to overthink things when I’m awaiting my start,” said Griffith. “I try to tell myself it’s just another day in the park.” Griffith was one of nearly 300 competitors who took part in the Sun Valley Ski Education Foundation’s Freestyle Spectacular over the weekend. Competitors came from Utah, Idaho, Montana and California for four days of competition in Sun Valley’s Olympic-sized halfpipe, on its slopestyle jumps and rails and in mogul and dual moguls events. The mogul competition on Saturday fielded 103 skiers—one of the largest fields of competitors ever for an Intermountain Division event. “The weather was postcard perfect, the freestyle vibe from decades past was flowing,” said the Ski Education Foundation’s Program Director Andy Ware. “It was classic Sun Valley.” Skiers and boarders taking advantage of Sun Valley’s $40 lift tickets to raise money for air service were simply trying to keep their boards under their feet, avoiding the ignominious yard sale. But the freestyle competitors were going up, down and all around in what amounted to a three-ring circus between the pipe specialists, rail artists and mogul masters.

I

n head-to-head competition 16-year-old Zac Maricich-Siele scissored his way down bumps the size of elephant’s behinds, his knees handcuffed together as his Fisher GS skis made quick tight turns. He sailed up a 3-foot-tall ramp of snow and performed a Lincoln Loop, popping off the lip of the jump, driving his shoulder down and his hips up in a sideways cartwheel. Boom! He landed, sending up a splash of snow. Then he performed more fancy footwork—a series of short-radius turns—until he hit a second jump, landed and made a mad dash to the finish line, coming in ahead of his opponent. “Whooo!” exclaimed his mother, Maria Maricich, herself a 1984 Olympic downhill racer. “They weren’t doing these kinds of things when I was racing—not even close.” “Watching Zac is scary,” she added. “I have to disconnect. It’s scary for me, just as I’m sure it was probably scary for my mother when I was racing.” By Sunday afternoon, Maricich-Siele was one of the only mogul specialists still standing in the Sun Valley program. A

half-dozen teammates—many of whom started out in the racing program—had fallen Saturday. One separated his shoulder. Another suffered a broken collarbone. Still another injured the vertebrae in his back. But Maricich-Siele pressed on under the tutelage of head moguls coach Joey Cordeau, a four-time World Mogul Skiing champion who happened to be a member of the U.S. Ski Team at the same time as Zac’s mother. Cordeau was there when Sun Valley hosted the first U.S. Freestyle Championships in 1973. And at 57 he’s still a hot-dogger who wants nothing more than to teach youngsters how to rip it up in the bumps. “I came here from Maine to ski moguls. They said, ‘You want to ski moguls—Sun Valley’s the place,’ ” he recalled. “What I like about skiing moguls is it’s variable—it’s not like you just do the same thing all the time.” With Cordeau at the helm, the moguls program has grown from two competitors five years ago to a hundred-plus skiers. He’s a straight-shooter with his young charges—a straight-shooter who exudes an energy that fires them up. “He’s just a fun-loving guy—a kid himself—whether he’s snow skiing or water skiing. And the kids love him,” said Roger Lato, whose son Jeremy Lato is a coach on the freestyle program. “He teaches the kids how to have fun—and that’s something they can carry with them through life.” And is it hard to learn to let loose of yourself in the air? “ You start small—with the pizza wedge, just like everyone else,” shrugged Maricich-Siele. “And before you know it you’re doing back mutes, where you flip and grab your skis.” Maricich-Siele, who took first place at Montana’s Snowbowl a couple weeks ago, passed his qualifier for the dual moguls on Roundhouse slope. He beat one competitor. Then another. “Holy sh#t! That’s my kid!” a happy Maria Maricich announced to a small crowd lined up against the fence netting as she watched her son skid across the finish line, handily beating one more competitor. Finally, the mogul maniacs were down to one final race. Maricich-Siele glanced over at his opponent, then down the course. And in a flash the two were off. The other guy pulled slightly ahead but, hold on… it looked as if Maricich-Siele might pull off it off with one of his characteristic strong finishes. The two spun through the air, landed and scissored their way down the last row of bumps and—ay yi yi—Maricich-Siele crossed the finish line a mere foot behind. The judges calculated their final scores, awarding 25 percent for speed, 25 percent for air displays, 50 percent for the technicality of the turns. And the win went to the other guy in a close 13-12 decision. “That’s the way it goes,” Maricich-Siele shrugged. tws

SEE PAGE 4 FOR FREESTYLE RESULTS Let’s Talk

Health Insurance...

Valentines Day Special COSMEDIX OPEN HOUSE

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 6TH 4-7PM

Botox “The Most Kissable Neck” Special- $11 Unit (Reg. $14 Unit) On all units used on any part of the body as long as neck is included. (Remit by February 14th, Book by March 31st)

Open House Special - Thursday only

10% off all Pur Minerals, Cosmedix and Results RX Skin Care Products Free Consults with Leigh from Cosmedix Headquarters Libations and Light Fare will be provided

CALL FOR YOUR APPOINTMENT NOW!

208-788-3255

Harrison insurance

208-788-7700

Kathy Harrison, an Authorized Select Independent Agent Individual Plans, Large and Small Group Plans Medicare Supplements and Medicare Advantage Plans 101 E. Bullion #2A Hailey, ID 83333 kmharrison@harrisonins.com

An Independent Licensee of the Blue Cross and Blue Shield Association

T H E W E E K LY S U N •

JANUARY 29, 2014

3


WHAT YOU’LL FIND IN THIS ISSUE

Feng Shui Beyond Page 6

Local Musher Moves Up Page 8

Heck, Ma Nature, We’ll Do It Ourselves!

Nordic Patroller Carmen Northen pats down the snow that she just shoveled onto the finish line of the Boulder Mountain Tour. BY KAREN BOSSICK

Sun Valley Ski Hall Of Fame Inductees Page 14-15

sun the weekly

PHONE / FAX, MAILING, PHYSICAL

Phone: 208-928-7186 Fax: 208-928-7187 613 N. River St. • P.O. Box 2711 Hailey, Idaho 83333

WHEN YOU CAN FIND US HERE

Mon– Friday 8 a.m. - 5 p.m. THE FOLKS WHO WORK HERE

OWNER/PUBLISHER: Steve Johnston • 208-309-1088 steve@theweeklysun.com SALES AND MARKETING: Steve Johnston • 208-309-1088 steve@theweeklysun.com Jennifer Simpson • 208-309-1566 EDITOR: Jennifer Simpson jennifer@theweeklysun.com STAFF WRITER: Karen Bossick • 208-578-2111 kbossick@cox-internet.com COPY EDITOR: Patty Healey PRODUCTION & DESIGN: Mandi Iverson Carson Johnston ACCOUNTING: Shirley Spinelli • 208-928-7186 accounting@theweeklysun.com DEADLINES • GET IT IN OR WAIT

DISPLAY OR CLASSIFIED ADS Monday @ Noon CALENDAR OR PRESS RELEASES Friday @ 5 OUR ENTIRE EDITION IS ONLINE

www.TheWeeklySun.com or www.TheWeeklyPaper.biz

www.facebook.com/WeeklySun twitter.com/#!/TheWeeklySun

4

If Mother Nature won’t provide the snow, we’ll shovel it ourselves! That’s the attitude Nordic skiers took last Wednesday and Thursday as they held a shovel-in at the southern end of the Harriman Trail in preparation for Saturday’s Boulder Mountain tour. The race, which begins at 10 a.m. at Galena Lodge, will draw hundreds of competitors who will ski more than 20 miles to the finish line opposite the Sawtooth National Recreation Area headquarters. More than a dozen skiers shoveled snow at the finish line on Wednesday, piling up some of the best powder snow in Idaho as they took it from underneath the local aspen and pine trees. On Thursday, more volunteers shoveled snow onto the course as it winds through the willows a little north of Murphy’s Bridge. Workers at Sun Valley Nordic Center, meanwhile, have been using a snowblower and shovels to build up ski trails there. The trails that are open are looking better and better with each passing day. tws

erc beat

Repair, Maintain, Pass Along

T

Here’s A Look At The Top Local Freestyle Finishers Last Weekend

Halfpipe: Sun Valley had six men in the top 10 in the first event. Jacob Beebe took second; Eli Roberts, third; and Harper Mallett, ninth. In the second event, Eli Roberts took the overall title and Alvaro Jiraldo finished third. Devon Brown took third overall in the women’s event. Slopestyle: Jacob Beebe took first overall in both events. Justin Kennedy finished third overall and second in the first event. Alvaro Jiraldo was third overall and second in the second event. Other age class winners were Attie Murray (F6), Noa Hecht (M2), Jed Waters (M4), Joey Markthaler (M5), Anton Holter (M6) and Tucker Smith (M7). Moguls: Morgan Shaver was second (F1), tied for second overall and was awarded third according to the tie-breaking rules of the USSA. Zac Maricich-Siele narrowly missed the podium finishing fourth overall and third (M2). Alysha Herich was third (F1); Addison Rafford, second (F4); Frances Cherp, third (F5). Men’s age class podiums went to Wyatt Wilson, second (M1); Cutter Grathwohl, third (M1); Alex LaFleur, first (M3); Luke Rizzo, third (M4); Toby Rafford, second (M5); and Alex Austin, third (M5). Dual Moguls: Zac Maricich-Siele finished second overall. Morgan Shaver was second (F2) and third overall. tws

he most important of the three ecological R’s is Reduce, but the American way of buying, throwing away and buying more is the absolute opposite behavior. Why don’t we have more things that people want to repair, maintain, and pass along to another generation? We’re being somewhat forced into it by the economy, but a major move away from disposable and into heirloom is crucial to the planet. Other countries have a thriving repair culture—something we’re just beginning to see in the USA. A string of Repair Cafés that originated in the Netherlands pairs people who know how to fix things with people who have items in need of repair. Whether the problem is a loose chair leg, holey sweater, buttonless shirt or lamp needing a new socket, the Repair Café stocks the tools and fix-it books, and provides a fertile environment for sharing knowledge. The Repair Café concept has spread to the U.S., and the closest one to us is in green trend-setting Portland. Although the Netherlands puts less than 3 percent of its municipal waste into landfills, there is still room for improvement, and the green-minded Dutch see the Repair Café as an effective way to change social awareness. After all, a broken object may still have a lot of miles in it. Can’t get your weed eater to Portland? Check out wikihow.org and YouTube for fix-it tips or start your own Repair Café! Post your own repair and maintenance tips at Facebook/ERC Sun Valley.

BRIEF

Bigwood Fitness Weight Loss Challenge

Bigwood Fitness is challenging the Valley to a weight-loss challenge!! The time frame is from Feb. 5, 2014 to May 7, 2014. Weigh-in dates are Feb. 3 and 4, with the final weigh-in on May 8, 2015. All participants must sign in prior to the weigh-in dates to qualify. Entry fee $10 for members, $15 for nonmembers. Three-month special for nonmembers $95 for unlimited gym access. Winners with the highest percentage of weight loss will be crowned the winner. Top four places will win prizes for a total of eight winners. Prizes include cash, and membership to both Bigwood Fitness and KDR CrossFit for teams of two. Teams to receive additional support from Bigwood Fitness, including the following: workout programs, eating tips, all access to classes, and a discount supplement package for those interested. For more information, please call Bigwood Fitness at 208.788.2124 or visit us online at www.bigwoodfitness.com.

Maria Maricich Musings

Favorite place to ski on World Cup circuit: Arosa, Switzerland. There are no trees at the top and the view is amazing. The weather was good there, too, although I did get frostbite on my nose. Favorite place to ski: Sun Valley, or course, with its long downhills and good snowmaking, which keeps the runs from getting rutty. I was lucky enough to have been born here. Her most memorable run: Zell am See Aut, a ski resort on a lake in Austria. It was really foggy-—you couldn’t see the end of your nose. And the downhill was filled with rutty bumps. But I felt as if I was one with the mountain—I sailed through, trusted my body and felt good. And then as I made one turn I could see the lake through the haze—it felt as if I was falling into the sea. Favorite downhill racer: Lindsay Vonn is amazing—she weebles and wobbles. She gets hurt and she still comes back. And Picabo Street, too. They both fulfilled the dream I didn’t make. Olympic highlight: Walking into the opening ceremony in a Western sheepskin coat, cowboy boots with fleece liners and a cowboy hat—one of 1,272 athletes from 49 countries. “You’re standing there representing your country and everyone is cheering. I also enjoyed sitting in the Olympic Village and talking with other athletes—I first met skater Judy Blumberg there. Pet peeve: You spend your entire career toiling on something people in this country know nothing about. Then, when you tell someone you went to the Olympics, the first thing they ask is: Did you get a medal? They don’t see all these things that you did to get to the Olympics. The Olympics happen to be one day—a day that was not a good day for me. Advice for Olympians headed to Sochi: I tell them the same thing I tell my son—the most important thing is to have fun. Will she watch the downhill at Sochi? Certainly, but maybe the emotions everyone is going through is heightened for me because I know the pain and the glory. tws

T H E W E E K LY S U N •

JANUARY 29, 2014

tws


Burn Jake Adicoff To Represent U.S. At Excess To Success Calories, Eat More Paralympics Cookies S S movie review

BY JONATHAN KANE

BY KAREN BOSSICK

un Valley’s Jake Adicoff received his official invite to the 2014 Paralympics in Sochi, Russia, this week. Adicoff, a longtime racer with the Sun Valley Ski Education Foundation, will compete in the games March 7 through 16. Reid Pletcher, another Nordic racer who grew up in the Ski Education Foundation, will ski ahead of Adicoff who has partial sight. Pletcher said the two will compete in Italy for 10 days beginning in late February as a pre-Paralympics warm-up.

BRIEFS

Wake Up Hailey Please join the Hailey Chamber of Commerce for Wake Up Hailey on Tuesday, Feb. 11, from 9 to 10 a.m. at Wood River Insurance with the new owner, Mark Balcos. Wood River Insurance is located at 410 N. Main St. (next to Zou 75), in Hailey. Come and enjoy a cup of coffee, light treat and some Chamber chatter. Find out what is going on in Hailey. We hope to see you there. For more information, please call the Hailey Chamber at 208.788.3484.

Blaine County School District is Offering FREE Developmental Screenings This is for children ages 3-5 (preschool age) on Feb. 5. Screenings will look at the following areas of development: vision, hearing, speech, behavior, physical, and learning. Appointments are required, and Spanish interpretation is available.  Please contact Kelly Choma to schedule an appointment at 208.578.5436. Spanish speakers may contact Gloria Giraldo-Hurst at 208.578.5429 for an appointment. Las personas que prefieran ayuda en español pueden llamar a Gloria Giraldo-Hurst al 208.578.5429 para hacer su cita.

Friday Nights in February are Fun Nights at Rotarun Feb. 7 Backgammon Tournament Until the snow comes and racing resumes, Friday Nights in February are game nights at Rotarun. Feb. 7 will be a backgammon tournament to determine the 5B backgammon champion. Sign up and learn to play at 6 p.m.; dice roll at 7 p.m. Food, beverage and bonfire provided.  Join the group snow dance at 9 p.m.  Suggested donation $5 for kids and beginners, $20 for want-to-be champions. For more info call Troy at 208.788.9893.

trap yourself in for the ride of a lifetime when you sit back and watch Martin Scorsese’s new masterwork, The Wolf of Wall Street. Not only is it the fastest three hours that you will ever spend at the movies, it is also far and away the most entertaining American film of the year. Telling the story of one young man’s rise and fall on Wall Street before everything went bad in 2008, Scorsese, with the immense help of a remarkable performance by Leonardo DiCaprio, has crafted one of the great films of his illustrious career and certainly his best film since Goodfellas. The director, now in his seventies, still has the touch, and this darkest of dark comedies shows him to be in peak form with all the dazzle you expect from him – a dizzying pace, spectacular camera moves and perhaps the best use of music and rock and roll in the history of film. The story, written by Terence Winter (Sopranos, Boardwalk Empire) is based on the autobiography of Jordan Belfort and tells the sordid tale

BY KAREN BOSSICK

Jon rated this movie

of his rise from selling penny stocks out on Long Island to his creation of the faux WASP firm of Stratton Oakmont to his raking in millions of dollars with a life of sex and drugs to match to his eventual downfall. The tone is set in an incredible luncheon scene with his mentor played by Mathew McConaughey in which he is advised to fuel his life with hookers and cocaine and the mantra that, as brokers, we don’t make anything but instead capitalize on the greed of others. The supporting cast is outrageous and a delight, with tremendous performances by Jonah Hill, Rob Reiner, Spike Jonze and others. Yes, the leading character is despicable but it sure is fun watching him weave his magic. tws

G

ot a shovel? Join the shovel-in!This winter hasn’t given any of us much opportunity to shore up our flabby arms shoveling snow. But you’ll get your opportunity today and Thursday. Snow shovelers are needed to shovel snow onto the final kilometer of the Boulder Mountain Tour course opposite the Sawtooth National Recreation Area headquarters on Highway 75 seven miles north of Ketchum. The shovel-in will be held from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. both days. “The Boulder Mountain Tour brings in over $2 million in revenue to our town. Let’s make it a good experience so people come back and stay in our hotels, eat at our restaurants and shop in our shops,” said Muffy Ritz, who heads up the Vamps Women’s Nordic program. “You can burn calories and eat more cookies, and you will earn good karma and a tail wind for race day,” she promised. tws

banners FULL COLOR

Starting at only $29.99!*

SHORT TERM BANNERS CAN NOW ALSO BE RENTED!

tws

788-4200 • 16 West Croy • Hailey

Now offering FREE Delivery to Bellevue, Hailey, Ketchum, & Sun Valley! Call 309-0615 for details

Mon- Fri, 11-6 • Sat 11-4 • The Valley’s Destination for All Things Dog & Cat!

T H E W E E K LY S U N •

JANUARY 29, 2014

5


Taking Feng Shui Beyond

BRIEFS

A Lecture with Peter Blodgett: On the History of Railroads and Tourismen The Sun Valley Center for the Arts will present a lecture on railroads and tourism with Peter Blodgett, curator of Western American History at Southern California’s Huntington Library. Blodgett lecture, “Defining America’s Playgrounds: Railroads and the Promotion of Tourism in the Rocky Mountain West, 1915–1945”, will take place at The Center in Ketchum on Tuesday, Feb. 11, as part of the multidisciplinary project Wish You Were Here. Admission for the Feb. 11 lecture is $10 for Center members and $12 for nonmembers. Tickets can be purchased at sunvalleycenter. org or 208.726.9491.

FAMILY DAY: Wish You Were Here Postcard Printmaking The Sun Valley Center for the Arts invites families for a special exhibition tour and postcard printmaking workshop on Saturday, Feb. 8. Family day exhibition tours will be offered at 3 and 4 p.m. on Saturday, Feb. 8, at The Center in Ketchum. This is a free event. For more information visit www.sunvalleycenter.org or call 208.726.9491

One might use it, for instance, to address a lack of money. You could encourage attainment of wealth by adjusting your environment or even adjusting someone in the workplace, such as a mentor or boss whom could give you the help you need to attain more wealth, Post said. It might involve not only creating a magnet to draw money but realizing that you are a treasure, he added. “The Supreme Yogas of Black Sect Tantric Buddhism,” which he will teach in the workshop, explores nine meditation stages. It gives people tools for self-exploration and a system of self-development that Post says is not difficult to practice. It will address such issues as how we can become calm if agitated and how we can get rid of negative emotions. In one stage people will learn how to send their energy or chi to a distant location and bring it back safely. “Often, I use that principle talking with a client on the phone,” Post said. Other stages involve learning to foresee what will happen in the future, learning how to go inside someone to see who’s really there and learning to express the spirit of the divine. “A person can use it to advance his cause, whether that involves attaining more money, protecting family or achieving better parenting or more intimacy,” Post said. “I follow Joe Lewis’ fight plan: Plan your work. Then, work your plan. We create a mission, then fulfill it through adjusting the environ-

BY KAREN BOSSICK

In modern Western practice, Feng Shui is perhaps most often associated with arranging your house to attract good energy. But Steven Post’s view of Feng Shui goes beyond rearranging your furniture to utilizing Feng Shui principles to address bigger issues, such as the effect of climate change on humans. Post has even addressed a group of United Nations employees who are Feng Shui practitioners about some of his ideas about how we could create a more humane environment in the face of climate change. “Look at the profoundly significant water issues that the planet will experience. Some of the big rivers of China like the Yellow River may become seasonal rivers as the glacial ice melt up in the Himalayas gets used up,” said Post, a Feng Shui practitioner for 40 years. “You could apply Feng Shui principles to address some of those problems.” Post, author of “The Modern Book of Feng Shui,” was a speaker at the 2013 Sun Valley Wellness Festival. He will conduct a Winter Wellness Workshop titled “The Supreme Yogas of Black Sect Tantric Buddhism” in Sun Valley on Feb. 8 and 9. Feng shui is a Chinese system of harmonizing the human existence with the surrounding environment. Historically, it was used to orient buildings, such as tombs. Addressing furniture, as Feng Shui principles do, is what Post calls “kindergarten level.”

Save with State Farm Bank . ®

Certificates of Deposit 3 month 6 month 12 month 24 month 36 month 48 month 60 month

Patrick Buchanan, Agent State Farm Agent www.5binsurance.com patrick@5binsurance.com Bus: 208-928-7888

0.05% APY* 0.10% APY* 0.30% APY* 0.60% APY* 1.05% APY* 1.45% APY* 1.90% APY*

Money Market Account $0 - $99 $100 - $9,999 $10,000 - $24,999 $25,000 - $49,999 $50,000 - $99,999 $100,000 +

Savings Accounts $0 - $24,999 $25,000 - $49,999 $50,000 - $99,999 $100,000 +

0.12% 0.17% 0.42% 0.51%

APY* APY* APY* APY*

0.00% APY* 0.30% APY* 0.40% APY* 0.50% APY* 0.60% APY* 0.65% APY*

ment or self.” While in Sun Valley, Post will also perform a sacred “Blessing for Sun Valley” at noon Feb. 7 in Ketchum Town Square. The event is free and open to the public. Tuition for the two-day workshop is $360. Post also will offer private consultation sessions for residences or businesses during the week following the workshop. For information or registration go to sunvalleywellnessinstitute. com. tws

financial planning

F

BY WENDELL CAYTON

rench writer Antoine De Saint-Exupery wrote that a goal without a plan is just a wish. A good plan might focus on helping clients define goals and implement plans to accomplish those goals. But a really good plan goes beyond the typical analytical process of planning and incorporates a vision of the results. Its important for a client to have a clear vision of his future because it is this vision that opens up the possibilities for planning. Defining vision can best be done by illustrating some examples. A planning vision for a man in retirement might be “I see myself relaxed, playing golf when I want, fishing from my boat and enjoying my grandchildren,” which is quite different from a goal stated as, “I wish to retire at age 65 with enough money to enjoy my retirement.” The first is an expression of hopes and dreams, the second is a quantifiable goal with no defined outcome. But planning visions will change over time. A 30-year-old, just married, might have a vision that includes three children, a four-bedroom house and two big dogs. Fifteen years later his vision might include the thought of seeing three children graduate from college. Next is a retirement life, and, finally, his vision might be good health, shooting his age on the golf course and cruising the world… with someone else handling his luggage!

When applied in a financial planning context, these examples of visions are not goals… goals are quantifiable waypoints that one works toward. Goals are measurable… we can tell when we get there. If we are off track, we make strategic and tactical adjustments to the plan, always keeping in mind the ultimate vision of the quest.

“What the mind can conceive and believe, and the heart desire, you can achieve.” -Norman Vincent Peale

Vision in the planning process might be thought of as the start of a journey. Each step of the way brings a different outcome, a different set of successes and failures, all to be adjusted as part of the planning process. Sometimes, when starting out, the vision might seem out of reach, or downright impossible to achieve. For many, the solutions may come, not so much

from how much wealth is accumulated, but from the power of positive thinking. For generations, those interested in exploring the power of positive thinking have read “As a Man Thinketh” by James Allen. Allen makes the point that there are few things in life we truly have control over. One of those things is how we think about things either positively or negatively. Holocaust survivor Dr. Viktor Frankel in “Man’s Search for Meaning” relates how his ability to maintain control of his mind and how he thought about things while a concentration camp prisoner helped him to survive the ordeal. Throughout his life he continued to teach that man is ultimately self-determining. While it is important to have well-stated goals and plans for achieving those goals, it is the vision we should work toward and, more often than not, one needs to let the power of positive thinking help make adjustments and find solutions along the way. So when contemplating your financial plan, instead of dwelling on your ability to accumulate wealth, try thinking instead how you want your life to be along the way. How do you see yourself living in your 60s, 70s and beyond? What do you see as your legacy in your estate plan? How do you want to be remembered by your family or your community? What’s your vision?

banners

Bank with a good neighbor . CALL ME TODAY FOR MORE INFORMATION.

FULL COLOR

*Annual Percentage Yields as of 01/01/14. Rates subject to change without notice. Minimum balance to open an account and obtain the stated APY is $500. Rates apply to deposits less than $100,000. A penalty may be imposed for a withdrawal prior to maturity. Certificates automatically renew at maturity at the then-current rate for the same term.

6

Save the date for Reggae in the Mountains. The greatest show on snow will present an all-ages winter concert at Ketchum Town Square on Saturday, Feb. 1, featuring the nine-piece roots Bob Marley-inspired band Sol Horizon from Sonoma County, Calif., and the nine-piece roots music-inspired band Natural Roots from Salt Lake City. A concert pre-party will take place at Lefty’s Bar and Grill in Ketchum at 4 p.m. The concert will take place at 5 p.m. at Ketchum Town Square followed by an after-party show at Whiskey Jacques’ in Ketchum, which will begin at 10 p.m. with Soul Medic, Jah Wave and Lions Den Unlimited Sounds. “This is the only on-snow reggae event that happens in the country,” said organizer Danny Walton. Tickets are on sale at Atkinsons’ markets in Ketchum and Hailey, Johnny G’s Subshack, Backwoods Mountain Sports and Zenergy, and online at http://tickets.frontgatetickets.com/choose.

What’s Your Vision?

®

1001294.1

Reggae in the Mountains on Saturday, Feb. 1 at 5 p.m. Ketchum Town Square

State Farm Bank, F.S.B. Bloomington, IL

Starting at only $29.99!*

SHORT TERM BANNERS CAN NOW ALSO BE RENTED!

788-4200 • 16 West Croy • Hailey

T H E W E E K LY S U N •

JANUARY 29, 2014

tws


Uncorking Prayers For Snow

BY KAREN BOSSICK

W

J2 Hadden would have rather been skiing. But more pressing matters, like praying for snow, had him frying bacon instead Sunday afternoon.

hile East Coast church congregations were huddled in church praying for it to stop snowing, Sun Valley skiers staged a pray-in for snow Sunday afternoon on the deck of Sun Valley’s historic Roundhouse Restaurant. With the sun beating down from the bluebird sky that has colored Sun Valley for the past month, JZ Hadden fried bacon on a Coleman stove. Others, like Christy Luby, Dave Johnson and Angie Hansen, poured champagne for each prayer that was said. “It’s a Pray for Snow Champagne Jam,” said Hansen, who never could quite explain how the bacon fit in. By 3 the prayer warriors had uncorked about two dozen bottles, which they lined up on the deck railing. Now it remains to be seen what prayer, champagne and tws bacon can do.

BRIEFS

CSI Hires New Director (PHOTO)

Snow hopefuls check out the growing line of empty champagne bottles on the Roundhouse deck.

e c i v r e S n w o n t o i e t m c o a H n Satisf w o t e m o H

920 S Main Hailey • 208-788-2216 • www.SilverCreekFord.com

The College of Southern Idaho is pleased to announce that Hallie Kelly Star has been hired as the new director of the College of Southern Idaho’s Blaine County Campus. Star was preceded by Dr. Jenny Emery-Davidson, who has taken a full-time faculty position at the College of Southern Idaho. Star began as director of CSI on Dec. 16, 2013. A longtime resident of the Wood River Valley, Hallie Kelly Star comes to the College of Southern Idaho after serving as director of development for the Lee Pesky Learning Center. Prior to her work at the Lee Pesky Learning Center, she served as development officer at the Wood River YMCA. Hallie Kelly Star holds a bachelor of fine arts from Pacific Northwest College of Art in Portland, Ore., a master’s degree in media studies from the New School in New York, and is currently pursuing a doctoral degree in education from the University of Idaho. “I am thrilled to be at CSI and to have the opportunity to expand the academic courses and community education classes offered at the Hailey campus,” says Hallie Kelly Star. “We serve over 1,000 students per year through academic courses, community education programs, ESL classes and GED preparation at the Hailey campus. CSI’s presence in the Wood River Valley is an essential educational component of our community. Through CSI, local students can earn an associate’s degree without having to leave the Valley, gain technical skills that increase employment options, and access to a wide variety of lifelong learning opportunities. We are also building our dual credit options for high school students and will be offering children’s summer programming.”

T H E W E E K LY S U N •

student spotlight

Student Spotlight: Haley Montgomery BY JONATHAN KANE

H

aley Montgomery, a Wood River High School senior carrying a 3.7 grade point average, has a great deal of activities to fill her day. Besides being an avid Nordic skier, Montgomery immerses herself in community service through the Key Club and the Compassionate Leaders program and is a budding artist. Born in Dansbury, Conn., she moved to the Wood River Valley when she was seven years old after a stop in Arizona. “It was a little different at first,” she said. “It was really laid back here and I had never lived in a really cold climate before but I liked it much more than Arizona. My first memories are of snowboarding on Dollar and then joining the Nordic ski team, which has had a big impact on my activities and has shaped my friendships. I also really like the fact that this is a close-knit community with a lot of community events and in a small town people really get involved. I guess the downside is that sometimes it’s hard to find things to do because everything is so structured, but we just get creative.” Last year Montgomery became a Compassionate Leader and made the trip to India on a goodwill mission. “I had never joined a club like that but my friends really enjoyed it and I wanted to be in a completely different setting and to learn about a new culture. Visiting a place like New Delhi was shell shocking because there were so many people in a small area and because it was 105 degrees with high humidity.” But there was a lot to take out of the experience. “It really taught me to not judge people as much and to be more open minded. You really need to step back and enjoy life.” In the Valley, Montgomery throws herself into community service as a member of the Key Club, which works closely with the Kiwanis Club. “I started my sophomore year because I wanted to be more involved and this seemed liked the perfect outlet. This year I’m the secretary. A lot of the work I do is at the senior home and I’ve also helped with Christmas fairs at the Armory and at Hemingway Elementary. What I’ve really taken out of it is that older people and kids have a lot in common and their relationship is not stereotypical. Doing service is also not just about the hours. It’s about the relationships and the people that you meet and it really makes you feel good when you do something for someone else.” At Wood River Montgomery has immersed herself into a variety of Advanced Placement

“I had never joined a club like that but my friends really enjoyed it and I wanted to be in a completely different setting and to learn about a new culture “

classes including U.S. history, language and composition, government, statistics, literature and psychology. She has also immersed herself in the visual arts by taking Introduction to Art, Studio Art and two ceramic courses. “At first I needed an art credit for college but once I started I really liked it. It turns out to be really therapeutic because I can go and just clear my head. Also, since I’m not naturally talented, I have to really work at it and that’s a great thing.” But it’s nothing new for a student that works hard at everything.

tws

Each week, Jonathan Kane will be profiling a local high-school student. If you know someone you’d like to see featured, e-mail jennifer@theweeklysun.com

This Student Spotlight brought to you by the Blaine County School District Our Mission: To be a world-class, student focused, community of teaching and learning.

For the latest news and happenings at BCSD sign up to receive our BCSD Weekly Update on our website: www.blaineschools.org

JANUARY 29, 2014

“Like” us on Facebook and sign up for RSS Feeds from our home page and each school’s home page too. Go to “News” at www.blaineschools.org

7


Does that favorite vehicle in the garage need some work? Then, let’s fix it up for next Season! We Specialize in Restoration of Vehicles Body Work • Paint • Rust Repair • Upholstery Mechanical • Electrical • Specialty Needs

Making Your Vehicle a Desirable Classic!

www.ClassicDriversInc.com

117 B Honeysuckle St.

Bellevue

928.7139

Wood River Freshman Scores Big In The Mushing World BY KAREN BOSSICK

O

Storewide Sale 20% OFF! Sale Room 30% - 60%

n weekdays, Julia Larsen looks out over life from the desk at Wood River High School. On weekends, the freshman sees life from the platform of a musher’s sled. And last week she saw the finish line first as she took first place in the Darby Dog Derby in Darby, Mont. “It was a 15-mile race and she took the A-team dogs because her father wanted her to get used to them. He took the B-team dogs and came in sixth,” said Julia’s mother Linda Larsen. Julia and her father Troy, who owns Windy City Arts, got involved in dog sled racing six years ago. “We saw an ad for dogs for sale and we went for one and got three. Then we had four. Then we needed a sled. It’s an addicting sport because the dogs have so much fun and they make it fun,” said Linda Larsen. Julia competed in dog sled junior races until last race season where she competed in open class and adult classes. This year she is competing in the adult 6 dog classes with six dogs. The others in a race have to agree to let a junior like Julia race with them, Linda said. They don’t want incompetence on the trail because it endangers themselves and the other dogs. “It’s not a matter of standing on the back of the sled. You’ve got to drive that sled,” said Linda. “You have to lean correctly. You have to watch the dogs so they don’t get hurt—there’s a lot of responsibility involved. The fact that she’s been allowed to race with the adults shows how well she’s done and how well she’s proven herself.” This past weekend Julia Larsen raced against world champion dogs from Canada in two seven-mile sprints at the Rocky Mountain Sled Dog Championship in Soda Springs. She came in ninth out of 20 racers. Six racers ended up dropping out. Julia’s father will compete in Ashton this weekend. Julia’s next race will be March 1. Their team—Five Degrees—donates a wheelchair to freewheelchairmissions.org. every time they win. The team is sponsored by Windy City Arts, KLiM, Sweet Bee Magic and Alaska Fur Gallery. tws

Heinz Renews Commitment To Galena Lodge STORY AND PHOTOS BY KAREN BOSSICK

T 1/30/14, 1/31/14, 2/1/14 Thursday, Friday, Saturday 11–5 15 w. Carbonate, Hailey • 721-7091

eresa Heinz, whose $325,000 contribution sealed a drive to save Galena Lodge 20 years ago, offered up another big check at the Galena Lodge Benefit Saturday night. Heinz offered a $75,000 donation to make sure the lodge is around “20 years from now and 20 years beyond.” Heinz was not able to attend the banquet held at the Sun Valley Inn but wrote a lengthy letter in which she praised the rustic Nordic ski lodge as “a rare, very special place” of peace

FOR DAILY CALENDAR UPDATES, TUNE INTO 95.3FM Listen Monday-Friday MORNING 7:30 a.m. AFTERNOON 2:30 p.m. …and Send your calendar items or events to live@TheWeeklySUN.com 8

T H E W E E K LY S U N •

and tradition in a world full of change, “a place where our souls may reconnect with our true selves.” “We tend to take it for granted,” she wrote, “and that’s a mistake.” Heinz’s challenge to others to make a contribution toward the future of the lodge and the North Valley ski trails seemed to hit a strong chord. Organizers are still crunching numbers. But the sold-out crowd of 450 helped contribute to a record amount, said organizer Jenny Busdon. Wood River Valley residents offered a number of unusual items for the silent auction. Among them, a scrimshaw ostrich egg crafted by Karen Simpson and 2014 U.S. Ski Team jackets. Six Nordic enthusiasts, including Tom Pomeroy, Joan Scheingraber, Ann Scales, Char Roth and Trish Klahr, offered six desserts on demand. Among them: organic pecan chocolate chip cookies; rum chocolate mousse; crunchy-top apple pie; Moosewood brownies; and carrot cake. And Sun Valley Ski Education

JANUARY 29, 2014

Foundation skiers offered to serve as sherpas for a backpack trip to Cramer Lake. A week in the Mediterranean fetched $10,000. A gourmet dinner for 16 with 11 Magnums of wine at Galena Lodge raised $9,000. Vamps head coach Muffy Ritz presented a check from her women’s program to the trail groomers—a tribute to their hard work during a low snow year. And Jenny Busdon made a toast to Bonni Curran, a Nordic enthusiast who died in a bicycle accident last summer in Ketchum. “The whole evening was a huge success from the dedication to Bonni to the donation from Teresa to the great dancing to the High Street Band,” said Jenny Busdon. “It was a celebration and a hats-off to all that has been achieved over the past 20 years of purchasing Galena Lodge and the trails surrounding it. “It is really hard for me to even think of not having all those trails up north had we not been successful,” she added, “especially in low snow years like this one!” tws


Whatever Super Entendre’ Bowl Easy Super Bowl Snacks ! Happened To A Simplicity? BY CHRIS MILSPAUGH

BY STELLA STOCKTON

I

often joke that ‘doing nothing’ is my favorite thing. Can you remember the last time you did absolutely nothing at all? Just texting or surfing doesn’t count! In our increasingly busy lives, it seems we all multitask; our culture seems to insist on it. Yet, as you may well know, this incessant busyness can be very stressful and chaotic. You may find yourself asking, like I often do, whatever happened to simplicity? Sadly, it seems that we are rapidly moving toward what

application of effort. I invite you to spend just a few moments this week doing absolutely nothing; 10 to 15 minutes will do, initially. Stop everything. Turn off all devices and simply sit or lie down. Allow all thoughts to settle and fall away (this may take a few minutes). Focus intently on your breathing. See how deeply you can settle into the quiet and just be. Honor your need to relax and rejuvenate. You may be surprised at what you discover.

“Multitasking is a rapidly growing phenomenon affecting all segments of the population but is rarely as successful as its proponents believe. Although personal electronic devices provide many benefits, their adverse effects are frequently overlooked. Recent scientific literature supports the view that overuse of personal electronic devices promotes cognitive overload, impairs multitasking and lowers performance at all ages.” has been termed the ‘distraction epidemic.’ According to a recent article from the NIH, Mindfulness can be considered the opposite of, and antidote to, distraction. It’s a way of being and living that deepens the quality of our moments. Mindfulness can be defined as focusing our full concentration on any given task, one task at a time. Life only happens in the now, one moment at a time. When we are present, we have more clarity, are more efficient, and able to make better choices in each moment. Clearly, we all need tools to both de-stress and be more effective in all we do. Meditation is one very powerful tool that cultivates focus and mindfulness. In the act of stopping, we learn to be present, fully alert and awake to our lives. John Kabatt- Zinn, meditation teacher and author of the now classic, Wherever You Go, There You Are, states, “People think of meditation as some kind of special activity, but this is not actually correct. Meditation is simplicity itself. A famous Zen joke says: ‘Don’t just do something, sit there.’ Are you able to come to a stop in your life, even for one moment?” We can choose to simplify our lives by making time to develop our ‘tranquility muscle,’ as I like to call it. Learning to stop and quiet our inner landscape cultivates a sense of stillness and peace. I often compare meditation practice to building strength at the gym, cultivating a garden, or any activity that requires patience and consistent

ll right, ever since it was known that the Seattle Seahawks were going to play the Denver Broncos in the championship game making the only two of the fifty states that have legalized marijuana rivals, tweeters everywhere have been having a field day celebrating the fact that they will meet in the Super Bowl, perhaps the strongest reference to cannabis than any other. It doesn’t end there, however. What’s going to happen when the “Bud” commercials come on or the Bud Bowl begins? I would think absolute hilarity will emerge from your living room. What will be the reaction when the announcer says something like, “Wow, Troy, he really took a big hit on that play.” Or, what if he says, “Why doesn’t he pass it?” Then, everyone in the room says, “Yeah, stop “bogarting” pass it, Peyton!” How about if The Doobie Brothers join Bruno Mars at halftime and sing, “Takin’ it to the Streets” and everybody leaves? And, what about the commercials? Every single one will become a reference to “weed.” If an ad comes on with someone talking about their aching “joints,” four out of five folks will light up and commiserate with the spokesman. “I’ve fallen and I can’t get up” will send many folks remembering their first experimentation. Any fast food product ad will cause your living room to empty as you and your guests run to your cars and speed away to buy snacks at the nearest convenience store. Then, when there’s 4:20 left in the game and everyone goes wild for no apparent reason, we’ll all know that the Super Bowl will never be the same, again.

SUDOKU ANSWERS

Cheesy Buffalo Chicken Dip

2 (10 ounce) cans chunk chicken, drained 2 (8 ounce) packages cream cheese, softened 1 cup Ranch dressing 3/4 cup pepper sauce (such as Frank's Red Hot®) 1 1/2 cups shredded Cheddar cheese 1 bunch celery, cleaned and cut into 4 inch pieces 1 (8 ounce) box chicken-flavored crackers

Heat chicken and hot sauce in a skillet over medium heat, until heated through. Stir in cream cheese and ranch dressing. Cook, stirring until well blended and warm. Mix in half of the shredded cheese, and transfer the mixture to a slow cooker. Sprinkle the remaining cheese over the top, cover, and cook on Low setting until hot and bubbly. Serve with celery sticks and crackers.

Easy Cheese Ball

2 (8 ounce) packages cream cheese, softened 1 (1 ounce) package ranch dressing mix 2 1/2 cups shredded mixed cheeses 1 1/2 cups chopped pecans

In a medium size bowl, mash cream cheese. Mix dressing mix and shreddedcheese into the cream cheese. Shape the mixture into a ball. Roll the ball in the chopped nuts. Refrigerate covered until ready to serve. Yum!

What can be done Sunday for everyone to keep a straight face during the greatest game of the season? We could all get it out of our systems now before the big day. Laugh all you want the rest of the week but when the whistle blows for the kickoff, it’s time to get your colors on, get serious and cheer your lungs out for your team. Just because it’s going to

be played in rotten weather in New Jersey, a state that doesn’t even have a team is no reason that you shouldn’t enjoy a wonderful game. It won’t be a waste of time. Now, get out there and get wasted this weekend. It’ll the biggest bowl of all time! Nice Talking to you. tws

THE PUNCH LINE

Stella Stockton Certified Personal Fitness Trainer Certified Tai Chi Instructor PO Box 2682 Hailey, Idaho 83333 208.726.6274 stellartaichi@gmail.com tws

National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI) A free 12-session/6-week education program for family members, partners, and friends of individuals living with any mental illness, including depression, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, OCD, Anxiety and Panic Disorders, and PTSD.

Barry hates when Maggie sends him to the store with a non-specific list. PHOTO: SUSAN LITTLEFIELD

Avid weekly paper reader, Susan Littlefield, who has lived in the Valley for over 35 years, claims that laughter is the best medicine. She creates these scenarios in her husbands N-scale model railroad.

Each session is structured to help caregivers understand and support individuals with mental illness while maintaining their own well-being. The course is taught by a team of trained NAMI family member volunteers who know what it’s like to have a loved one struggling with one of these brain disorders. Classes are held twice a week beginning on February 4th on Tuesdays and Thursdays from 6:00pm to 8:00pm, and continue for six (6) weeks at the offices of NAMI – Wood River Valley located at the southeast corner of South Main and East Maple Streets in Hailey, Idaho.

210 Sun Valley Road East, Sun Valley (next door to Smoky Mountain Pizza)

(208) 726-0110 10-6, Mon-Sat www.ketchumpawn.com

We Buy & Sell Electronics!

For more information and to register (class size is limited), please call Nancy Kennette at 788-4347, Roger Olson at 309-0979, or the NAMI Helpline at 309-1987.

GOT NEWS? SEND IT TO EDITOR@THEWEEKLYSUN.COM

T H E W E E K LY S U N •

JANUARY 29, 2014

9


Fishing R epoRt THE “WEEKLY” FISHING REPORT FOR JAN. 29 FROM PICABO ANGLER

W

inter fishing around the Sun Valley area is in full swing. The streamer fishing on Silver Creek is very, very good right now. Cloudy days provide the best opportunity to catch big fish. The low light, coupled with the slightly off-color water, makes these big bank-dwelling fish brave. They tend to come out from under the banks in these conditions and forage for minnows and insects in the center of the river and throughout the troughs and potholes on the river bottom. We have had outstanding luck with sparkle minnows, as well as standard buggers in black and olive. Casting to the far banks and swinging the fly with a periodic twitch will do the trick. Fish a heavy fluorocarbon leader in 1X or 2X and, when the fish hits the fly, hit them back. The lack of stretch in the fluorocarbon leader will plant the hook firmly in the fish’s mouth. If you have a drift boat, it is not a bad idea to bring your drift boat net with you. The long handle will provide you a way to land, unhook and release the fish off the ice shelves without having to get into the river. The only time you probably need to get in the water is if you have a tired fish that needs to be revived, but if you fish heavy leaders you shouldn’t have to play the fish very long. The Big Wood also continues to show its outstanding winter fishing. The Big Wood is a great place to catch numbers of fish with nymphs and dry flies. Silver Creek is the place to catch big winter fish. Anglers are having a great time on the South Fork of the Boise. The catch rate isn’t high, but the quality of the fish is excellent. Big healthy rainbows are taking midge imitations subsurface. If you haven’t been, and are curious about the extreme changes that came in the aftermath of last summer’s fires, now is the time to go. The season will close soon and when it reopens there will more than likely be higher flows and probably some off-color water. Local waterfowl hunters are done for the season, but the upland hunting stays open for many birds until the end of the month. The weather continues to cooperate, so get out there while you still have time!

{CALENDAR}

send your entries to live@theweeklysun.com or ente

S- Live Music _- Benefit

ONGOING/MULTI-DAY CLASSES & WORKSHOPS ARE LISTED IN OU

Theatre

WEDNESDAY, 1.29.14

Rise & Shine Yoga w/Katherine Pleasants - 8 to 9 a.m. at MOVE StudioB 600, Ketchum. Info: 208-720-5824 or studiomoveketchum.com Yoga and Breath with Victoria Roper - 8 to 9:15 a.m. at Pure Body Pilates, Alturas Plaza, Hailey Booty Barre, Itermeditate level with Alysha 9:30 a.m. at Pure Body Pilates, Alturas Plaza, Hailey Yoga w/Leah - 9:30 to 10:30 a.m. at the Wood River YMCA, Ketchum. Adults work out while children do yoga. For YMCA/child watch members. Info: 7279622. Books and Babies - 10 a.m. at the Bellevue Public Library. Bouncy Castle Wednesdays - 10:30 a.m. to 12 p.m. at the Wood River YMCA, Ketchum. Info: 727-9622. FREE to the community Fit and Fall Proof - 11 a.m. at the Senior Connection in Hailey. Info: 788-3468. Hailey Kiwanis Club meeting - 11:30 a.m. at the Senior Connection, Hailey. New Moms Support Group - 12 to 1:30 p.m. in the River Run Rooms at St. Luke’s Hospital. Info: 727-8733 Gentle Yoga with Katherine Pleasants 12 to 1 p.m. - YMCA, Ketchum. Info: 7279600. Kundalini Yoga as taught by Yogi Bhajan - 2 to 3:30 p.m. 416 Main Street, North entrance, Hailey. Info: HansMukh 721-7478  Intermediate bridge lessons - 3 to 5 p.m. at Our Lady of the Snows Catholic Church Community Room, Sun Valley. Reservations required, 720-1501 or jo@ jomurray.com. SunValleyBridge.com Gentle Yoga with Katherine Pleasants 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. - YMCA, Ketchum. Info: 727-9600. Taize Services - 5:30 p.m. at St. Thomas Episcopal Church, Ketchum. Ketchum Community Dinner - free meal: dine in or take out - 6 to 7 p.m. at the Church of the Big Wood. Info: Beth at 208-622-3510 Oil Painting Class with Deanna Schrell’s 6:30 to 9 pm at the Sawtooth Botanical Gardens. For more info call Deanna 7265835 Kettle Bells, Intermediate/Advanced with Erin 6:30 pm at Pure Body Pilates. Trivia Night - 8 p.m. at Lefty’s Bar & Grill in Ketchum. $15 per team up to six people - 1/3 of entry fee goes back to local non-profits. Info: Gary, 725-5522

TH THURSDAY, 1.30.14

Yoga Sauna - 8:10 to 9:40 a.m., Bellevue. Info: 208-709-5249. Pilates Mat, Beginners with Christina 8:30 am at Pure Body Pilates. Yoga and the Breath w/Victoria Roper - 9 to 10:15 a.m. at the BCRD Fitworks Yoga Studio, Hailey. Stella’s 30 minute meditation class (beginner level) - 11 to 11:30 a.m. at the YMCA, Ketchum. FREE. 726-6274. Vintage Ski Wander along Trail Creek at the Sun Valley Nordic Center. Info: nordictownusa.com Ski the Harriman with the Vamps Coaches - 10 a.m. Info: nordictownusa.com Vintage Ski Wander along Trail Creek at the Sun Valley Nordic Center. Info: nordictownusa.com Connection Club - 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. at

the Senior Connection, Hailey. Info: 7883468. Movie and Popcorn for $1 - 1 p.m. at the Senior Connection, Hailey. Duplicate Bridge for all skill levels - 3 p.m., in the basement of Our Lady of the Snows Catholic Church, Ketchum. Info: 726-5997 WRHS Chess Club - 3:30 to 5:30 p.m., Rm. C214 at the Wood River High School, Hailey. FREE for all ages. Info: 450-9048. Downtown Jam/Nordic Town USA Sprints - 4 to 8 p.m. across from the Post Office in Ketchum. Info: nordictownusa. com TNT Thursdays for tweens and teens, ages 10-18 - 4 to 5 p.m. at the Hailey Public Library. Enjoy an hour of crafts and gaming. Come solo or bring a friend. 4th Annual XC Party - 5 to 8 p.m. at Perry’s Restaurant in Ketchum. 15% of sales will go to Galena & North Valley Trails, and donations for BCRD gladly accepted. Info: 208-726-7703 Teen Cupcake Making with Leann Baidy 6 to 7 pm at the Hailey Public Library. Community Accupuncture with Erin 4 -7 pm am at Pure Body Pilates. (Please schedule with Erin 208-309-0484) FREE Souper Supper (meal to those in need) - 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. at the St. Charles Parish Hall, Hailey. Restorative Yoga, All levels with Jacqui 5:30 pm at Pure Body Pilates. Knitting and Crocheting Maker Space - 6 p.m. at the Hailey Public Library. All skill levels are welcome. the library provides the space and time for you to meet as well as helpful books and online resources. GriefShare, a non-denominational program for persons suffering from the death of a loved one - 6 p.m. at he Church of the Big Wood in Ketchum. Ladies’ Night - 6 to 9 p.m. at The Bead Shop/Bella Cosa Studio, Hailey. Info: 788-6770 Kundalini Yoga as taught by Yogi Bhajan  - 6 to 7:30 p.m. 416 Main Street, North entrance, Hailey. Info: HansMukh 7217478 Sturtos Hailey Beginner Fly-Tying with Paddy McIlvoy. $100 6 - 8 pm at Sturtos in Hailey.

FRIDAY, 1.31.14

Wake up and Flow Yoga, All levels with Alysha 8 am at Pure Body Pilates. Booty Barre, Itermeditate level with Jacqui 9:30 a.m. at Pure Body Pilates, Alturas Plaza, Hailey Boulder Mountain Tour Expo - 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. at the Wood River Community YMCA, Ketchum. Info: nordictownusa. com Super Bowl Weekend Sale! February 2nd 30% OFF Retail Store-Wide! FREE Demos for Women All Weekend at Sturtevants SWIX Boulder Mountain Tour and Half Boulder Mountain Tour. Info: nordictownusa.com Fit and Fall Proof - 11 a.m. at the Senior Connection, Hailey. 788-3468. Therapeutic Yoga for the back with Katherine Pleasants - 12 to 1 p.m. at the YMCA, Ketchum. 727-9622. Alanon Meeting - 12 p.m. at The Sun Club, Hailey. Info: thesunclub.org Afternoon Bridge - 1 to 4 p.m. at the Senior Connection, Hailey. 788-3468. Kundalini Yoga as taught by Yogi Bhajan  2 to 3:30 p.m., 416 Main Street, North entrance, Hailey. Info: HansMukh 7217478 S Aprés Ski with Freeway Revival

- 2:30 to 5:30 p.m. at River Run Lodge. FREE Duplicate bridge for players new to duplicate - 3-5:30 p.m. at Our Lady of the Snows Catholic Church Community Room, Sun Valley. Reservations required, 720-1501 or jo@sunvalleybridge. com. SunValleyBridge.com. Downtown Jam/Nordic Town USA Sprints - 4 to 8 p.m. across from the Post Office in Ketchum. Info: nordictownusa. com Cribbage tournaments double elimination - 6 p.m., location TBA. $20. Call for info: 208-481-0036 T Kids Clay - 3:30 to 5 p.m. at Bella Cosa Studio, Hailey. Learn the basics of hand-building and sculpture from artist Sarah Long. Call 721-8042 to reserve a space. Community Accupuncture with Erin 4 -7 pm am at Pure Body Pilates. (Please schedule with Erin 208-309-0484)

_

Banff Film Festival - 6 to 10 p.m. at the nexStage Theatre, Ketchum. Advance tickets are $15 at the Elephant’s Perch and Backwoods Mountain Sports. Proceeds benefit the Sawtooth Avalanche Center. Line DancZen Class - 7 to 8 p.m. at MOVE Studio in Ketchum. $10, no partner required. No experience. RSVP/Sign Up: Peggy at 720-3350. T Natural Roots is kicking off Super Bowl weekend of reggae with a special show at the Sun Valley Brewery at 9 pm. Chinese New Year, the year of the Horse, with...THE FABULOUS BOBO’S, opening band TBAplaying live at 9:30 pm at the Silver Dollar

SATURDAY, 2.1.14

Kettle Bells, Intermediate/Advanced with Erin 8 am at Pure Body Pilates. Storytime, 10:30 am at the Children’s Kecthum Library. Reggae in the Mountains. For more info reggaeinthemountains.com Super Bowl Weekend Sale! February 2nd 30% OFF Retail Store-Wide! FREE Demos for Women All Weekend at Sturtevants Paws to Read, 11 am at the Children’s Kecthum Library. SWIX Boulder Mountain Tour and Half Boulder Mountain Tour. Info: nordictownusa.com S Aprés Ski with Marinade - 2:30 to 5:30 p.m. at River Run Lodge. FREE Restorative Yoga with Katherine Pleasants - 4:30 to 5:45 p.m. - YMCA, Ketchum. Info: 727-9600.

SUNDAY, 2.2.14

Kundalini Yoga as taught by Yogi Bhajan  5 to 6:30 p.m., 416 Main Street, North entrance, Hailey. Info: HansMukh 7217478 Super Bowl Weekend Sale! February 2nd 30% OFF Retail Store-Wide! FREE Demos for Women All Weekend at Sturtevants

Happy Fishing and Hunting Everyone!

Hwy 20 in Picabo info@picaboangler.com (208)788.3536 www.picaboangler.com 10

T H E W E E K LY S U N •

MONDAY, 2.3.14

Wake up and Flow Yoga, All levels with Alysha 8 am at Pure Body Pilates. Toddler Story Time - 10:30 a.m. at the Bellevue Public Library. Connection Club - 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Senior Connection, Hailey. Info: 7883468. Fit and Fall Proof - 11 a.m. at the Senior Connection, Hailey. 788-3468. Toddler Time, 11 am at the Children’s Kecthum Library. Gentle Yoga with Katherine Pleasants 12 to 1 p.m. - YMCA, Ketchum. Info: 7279600. Laughter Yoga with Carrie Mellen - 12:15 to 1 p.m. at All Things Sacred (upstairs at

JANUARY 29, 2014

the Galleria), Ketchum. Basic Bridge Lessons - 3 to 5 p.m. at Our Lady of the Snows Catholic Church Community Room, Sun Valley. Reservations required, 720-1501 or jo@jomurray. com. SunValleyBridge.com Feldenkrais - 3:45 p.m. at BCRD. Comfortable clothing and an inquiring mind are all that is needed to join this non-competitive floor movement class. Yin Restorative Yoga, All levels with Mari 5:30 pm at Pure Body Pilates. NAMI - National Alliance for the Mentally Ill “Connections” Recovery Support Group for persons living with mental illness - 5:30 to 7 p.m. at the NAMI-WRV office on the corner of Main and Maple - lower level, Hailey. Info: 309-1987 Sturtos Hailey Beginner Fly-Tying with Paddy McIlvoy. $100 6 - 8 pm at Sturtos in Hailey.

TUESDAY, 2.4.14

Yoga Sauna - 8:10 to 9:40 a.m., Bellevue. Info: 720-6513. Pilates Mat, Intermediate level with Alysha 8:30 am at Pure Body Pilates. Kundalini Yoga as taught by Yogi Bhajan 8:15 - 9:45 am and 6:00 - 7:30 pm. New: Kids Class Ages 3 - 8. 3:30 - 4:30 pm. 416 Main Street, North entrance, Hailey. For questions: HansMukh 721-7478 Travel Books Class with Sharon Payne Bolton at The Center for the Arts in Hailey. 10 am to 4 pm. Register at sunvalleycenter.org or 208.726.9491 Connection Club - 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Senior Connection, Hailey. Info: 7883468. Let’s Grow Together (Wood River Parents Group): Let’s Make Smoothies With Nurture, open tumbling - 11 a.m. to 12 p.m., at the Wood River Community YMCA, Ketchum. Info: 727-9622. FREE to the community Rotary Club of Ketchum/Sun Valley meeting - 12 to 1:15 p.m. at Rico’s, Ketchum. Info: Rotary.org Guided Meditation - 12:15 to 1:15 p.m. at St. Luke’s Wood River, Chapel. Info: 727-8733 Blood Pressure Check - 12:30 p.m. at the Senior Connection, Hailey. Info: 7883468. BINGO after lunch, 1 to 2 p.m. at the Senior Connection, Hailey. 788-3468. Sewcial Society open sew - 2 to 5 p.m. at the Fabric Granary, Hailey. Kundalini Yoga as taught by Yogi Bhajan - 2 to 3:30 p.m. and 6 to 7:30 p.m. 416 Main Street, North entrance, Hailey. Info: HansMukh 721-7478  Duplicate bridge game for those new to duplicate - 3 to 5:30 p.m. at the Wood River YMCA, Ketchum. Reservations required, 720-1501 or jo@ sunvalleybridge.com. SunValleyBridge. com Yoga Flow, Intermediate level with Jacqui 4:30 pm at Pure Body Pilates. Weight Watchers - 5 to 6:30 p.m. at the Senior Connection, Hailey. Info: 7883468. Community Meditation all welcome with Kristen 5:30 pm at Pure Body Pilates. FREE Hailey Community Meditation 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. at Pure Body Pilates, across from Hailey Atkinsons’. All welcome, chairs and cushions available. Info: 721-2583 Belly Dance Class for women of all ages and abilities - 6:30 p.m. at Pure Body Pilates in Hailey. $10/class. Info: 208-7212227 FREE acupuncture clinic for veterans, military and their families 6:30 to 8 p.m. at Cody Acupuncture Clinic, Hailey. Info: 720-7530.


e r o n l i n e a t w w w.T h e w e e k l y s u n . c o m

{CALENDAR}

UR TAKE A CLASS SECTION IN OUR CLASSIFIEDS - DON’T MISS ‘EM! JANRIC CLASSIC SUDOKU

Fill in the blank cells using numbers 1 to 9. Each number can appear only once in each row, column and 3x3 block. Use logic and process elimination

to solve the puzzle. The difficulty level ranges

from Bronze (easiest) to Silver to Gold (hardest).

© 2014 Janric Enterprises Dist. by creators.com

RATING: GOLD

SUDOKU ANSWER ON NEXT PAGE

WEDNESDAY, 2.5.14

Yoga and Breath with Victoria Roper - 8 to 9:15 a.m. at Pure Body Pilates, Alturas Plaza, Hailey Trivia Night - 8 p.m. at Lefty’s Bar & Grill in Ketchum. $15 per team up to six people - 1/3 of entry fee goes back to local non-profits. Info: Gary, 725-5522 T Booty Barre, Itermeditate level with Alysha 9:30 a.m. at Pure Body Pilates, Alturas Plaza, Hailey Yoga w/Leah - 9:30 to 10:30 a.m. at the Wood River YMCA, Ketchum. Adults work out while children do yoga. For YMCA/child watch members. Info: 7279622. Books and Babies - 10 a.m. at the Bellevue Public Library. Bouncy Castle Wednesdays - 10:30 a.m. to 12 p.m. at the Wood River YMCA, Ketchum. Info: 727-9622. FREE to the community Fit and Fall Proof - 11 a.m. at the Senior Connection in Hailey. Info: 788-3468. Hailey Kiwanis Club meeting - 11:30 a.m. at the Senior Connection, Hailey. New Moms Support Group - 12 to 1:30 p.m. in the River Run Rooms at St. Luke’s Hospital. Info: 727-8733 Gentle Yoga with Katherine Pleasants 12 to 1 p.m. - YMCA, Ketchum. Info: 7279600. Kundalini Yoga as taught by Yogi Bhajan - 2 to 3:30 p.m. 416 Main Street, North entrance, Hailey. Info: HansMukh 721-7478  Intermediate bridge lessons - 3 to 5 p.m. at Our Lady of the Snows Catholic Church Community Room, Sun Valley. Reservations required, 720-1501 or jo@jomurray.com. SunValleyBridge.com Gentle Yoga with Katherine Pleasants 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. - YMCA, Ketchum. Info: 727-9600. Pilates Mat, All Levels with Alysha 5:30 pm at Pure Body Pilates. Taize Services - 5:30 p.m. at St. Thomas Episcopal Church, Ketchum.

HURSDAY, 1.1

Ketchum Community Dinner - free meal: dine in or take out - 6 to 7 p.m. at the Church of the Big Wood. Info: Beth at 208-622-3510 6.14 Oil Painting Class with Deanna Schrell’s 6:30 to 9 pm at the Sawtooth Botanical Gardens. For more info call Deanna 7265835 Kettle Bells, Intermediate/Advanced with Erin 6:30 pm at Pure Body Pilates. Trivia Night - 8 p.m. at Lefty’s Bar & Grill in Ketchum. $15 per team up to six people - 1/3 of entry fee goes back to local non-profits. Info: Gary, 725-5522 H

THURSDAY, 2.6.14

Yoga Sauna - 8:10 to 9:40 a.m., Bellevue. Info: 208-709-5249. Pilates Mat, Beginners with Christina 8:30 am at Pure Body Pilates. Yoga and the Breath w/Victoria Roper - 9 to 10:15 a.m. at the BCRD Fitworks Yoga Studio, Hailey. Travel Books Class with Sharon Payne Bolton at The Center for the Arts in Hailey. 10 am to 4 pm. Register at sunvalleycenter.org or 208.726.9491 Stella’s 30 minute meditation class (beginner level) - 11 to 11:30 a.m. at the YMCA, Ketchum. FREE. 726-6274. Stella’s 30 minute meditation class (beginner level) - 11 to 11:30 a.m. at the YMCA, Ketchum. FREE. 726-6274. Connection Club - 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Senior Connection, Hailey. Info: 7883468. Movie and Popcorn for $1 - 1 p.m. at the Senior Connection, Hailey.

Duplicate Bridge for all skill levels - 3 p.m., in the basement of Our Lady of the Snows Catholic Church, Ketchum. Info: 726-5997 WRHS Chess Club - 3:30 to 5:30 p.m., Rm. C214 at the Wood River High School, Hailey. FREE for all ages. Info: 450-9048. TNT Thursdays for tweens and teens, ages 10-18 - 4 to 5 p.m. at the Hailey Public Library. Enjoy an hour of crafts and gaming. Come solo or bring a friend. Community Accupuncture with Erin 4 -7 pm at Pure Body Pilates. (Please schedule with Erin 208-309-0484) FREE Souper Supper (meal to those in need) - 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. at the St. Charles Parish Hall, Hailey. Restorative Yoga, All levels with Jacqui 5:30 pm at Pure Body Pilates.

FRIDAY, 2.7.14

Wake up and Flow Yoga, All levels with Alysha 8 am at Pure Body Pilates. Booty Barre, Itermeditate level with Jacqui 9:30 a.m. at Pure Body Pilates, Alturas Plaza, Hailey Fit and Fall Proof - 11 a.m. at the Senior Connection, Hailey. 788-3468. Therapeutic Yoga for the back with Katherine Pleasants - 12 to 1 p.m. at the YMCA, Ketchum. 727-9622. Alanon Meeting - 12 p.m. at The Sun Club, Hailey. Info: thesunclub.org Afternoon Bridge - 1 to 4 p.m. at the Senior Connection, Hailey. 788-3468. S Shook Twins with Freeway Revival - 2:30 to 5:30 p.m. at River Run Lodge. FREE Duplicate bridge for players new to duplicate - 3-5:30 p.m. at Our Lady of the Snows Catholic Church Community Room, Sun Valley. Reservations required, 720-1501 or jo@sunvalleybridge. com. SunValleyBridge.com. Kids Clay - 3:30 to 5 p.m. at Bella Cosa Studio, Hailey. Learn the basics of hand-building and sculpture from artist Sarah Long. Call 721-8042 to reserve a space. Community Accupuncture with Erin 4 -7 pm am at Pure Body Pilates. (Please schedule with Erin 208-309-0484) Cribbage tournaments double elimination - 6 p.m., location TBA. $20. Call for info: 208-481-0036 T Line DancZen Class - 7 to 8 p.m. at MOVE Studio in Ketchum. $10, no partner required. No experience. RSVP/Sign Up: Peggy at 720-3350. T

SATURDAY, 2.8.14

Kettle Bells, Intermediate/Advanced with Erin 8 am at Pure Body Pilates. The Sawtooth Society is hosting a free skate skiing clinic at the Park Creek Nordic trails, 6 miles west of Stanley on Highway 21 at 9:45 am Please contact Kelly Conde at kelly@sawtoothsociety.org or (208)994-1654 if you would like to participate. S Shook Twins with Freeway Revival - 2:30 to 5:30 p.m. at River Run Lodge. FREE Restorative Yoga with Katherine Pleasants - 4:30 to 5:45 p.m. - YMCA, Ketchum. Info: 727-9600.

SUNDAY, 2.9.14

port Group for persons living with mental illness - 5:30 to 7 p.m. at the NAMI-WRV office on the corner of Main and Maple - lower level, Hailey. Info: 309-1987

TUESDAY, 2.11.14

Yoga Sauna - 8:10 to 9:40 a.m., Bellevue. Info: 720-6513. Pilates Mat, Intermediate level with Alysha 8:30 am at Pure Body Pilates. Science Time With Ann Christensen, 11 am at the Children’s Kecthum Library. Kundalini Yoga as taught by Yogi Bhajan 8:15 - 9:45 am and 6:00 - 7:30 pm. New: Kids Class Ages 3 - 8. 3:30 - 4:30 pm. 416 Main Street, North entrance, Hailey. For questions: HansMukh 721-7478 Connection Club - 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Senior Connection, Hailey. Info: 7883468. Let’s Grow Together (Wood River Parents Group): Let’s Make Smoothies With Nurture, open tumbling - 11 a.m. to 12 p.m., at the Wood River Community YMCA, Ketchum. Info: 727-9622. FREE to the community Rotary Club of Ketchum/Sun Valley meeting - 12 to 1:15 p.m. at Rico’s, Ketchum. Info: Rotary.org Guided Meditation - 12:15 to 1:15 p.m. at St. Luke’s Wood River, Chapel. Info: 727-8733 Blood Pressure Check - 12:30 p.m. at the Senior Connection, Hailey. Info: 7883468. BINGO after lunch, 1 to 2 p.m. at the Senior Connection, Hailey. 788-3468. Sewcial Society open sew - 2 to 5 p.m. at the Fabric Granary, Hailey. Yoga Flow, Intermediate level with Jacqui 4:30 pm at Pure Body Pilates. Community Meditation all welcome with Kristen 5:30 pm at Pure Body Pilates. 2014 Artist Education Series: The Business of Art. 5:30 pm at The Center in Hailey. Belly Dance Class for women of all ages and abilities - 6:30 p.m. at Pure Body Pilates in Hailey. $10/class. Info: 208-7212227

Join us at

CK’s Real Food… LUNCH: M - F • 11 AM TO 2PM DINNER: 7 NIGHTS A WEEK 5-10 PM ~ outdoor dining available ~

Voted Best of the Valley for: Best Overall Restaurant & Best Chef

Kundalini Yoga as taught by Yogi Bhajan  5 to 6:30 p.m., 416 Main Street, North entrance, Hailey. Info: HansMukh 7217478

MONDAY, 2.10.14

Wake up and Flow Yoga, All levels with Alysha 8 am at Pure Body Pilates. Toddler Story Time - 10:30 a.m. at the Bellevue Public Library. Connection Club - 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Senior Connection, Hailey. Info: 7883468. Fit and Fall Proof - 11 a.m. at the Senior Connection, Hailey. 788-3468. Gentle Yoga with Katherine Pleasants 12 to 1 p.m. - YMCA, Ketchum. Info: 7279600. Laughter Yoga with Carrie Mellen - 12:15 to 1 p.m. at All Things Sacred (upstairs at the Galleria), Ketchum. Basic Bridge Lessons - 3 to 5 p.m. at Our Lady of the Snows Catholic Church Community Room, Sun Valley. Reservations required, 720-1501 or jo@jomurray. com. SunValleyBridge.com Feldenkrais - 3:45 p.m. at BCRD. Comfortable clothing and an inquiring mind are all that is needed to join this non-competitive floor movement class. Yin Restorative Yoga, All levels with Mari 5:30 pm at Pure Body Pilates. NAMI - National Alliance for the Mentally Ill “Connections” Recovery Sup-

habitat for non-humanity

Life And The Game Of Chess A

fter I had passed The first mile was out briefly and flat, then came the recovered, I stood last obstacle, a 1000proud and confident, foot snow slope with a pounding my chest like 50-degree incline. We Tarzan, ‘I’m OK, I’m had managed to catch OK!’ No sooner said up, and we started up, than undone. The world but I wasn’t part of that turned into a photo neg‘we.’ I started, and said, ative, lights were dark ‘Uh-oh.’ I was tired alBali Szabo and darks were light. ready. At this altitude, People had shifting a steep section, or even ghost images, as if I could see a lesser incline, called for the their auras. I strained des‘rest step’ technique. For every perately for clarity and focus, step or two, you stop, breathe, only to land on the snow again. and step again. I took a step Witnesses said my eyes looked and collapsed on my ice ax. I like the rotating images of a was falling behind. Jack, in slot machine, and then I went the lead, came down and said, ‘plop.’ I had a little dream, and ‘Come with me, and why don’t came to. I felt like I had just emerged from anesthesia. A ring of concerned faces hovered above me. Leader Jack Turner and the Sherpas swung into action. They got me an ensolite pad, covered me with a sleeping bag and administered a full flow of oxygen. My boots were taken to the fire and Ang Tsiring tirelessly massaged my numb feet. I laid there waiting for the sun. I kept saying, ‘I’m OK’ -critic Diana Trilling (typical male). But our doctor, Andy, wasn’t buying it. We knew one thing—I wasn’t goyou lead?’ ‘You’re kidding. I’m ing to be taken back. We only sucking wind. I’m the perhad 1000 feet of vertical to go, petual laggard,’ I answered, and if they had to, they’d drag amazed by his offer. Together me over the 19,000-foot pass. we made our way to the head The plan was set. Andy was go- of the pack of about 16 people ing to give me a physical once (the rest were long gone.) This the sun arrived. A few people was the day I started to believe stayed behind with me; the rest in miracles. Suddenly, I moved took off for the pass. I was feelsteadily up the slope, taking ing fine. The sun had arrived five steps for every rest. I at some nearby high ground. I looked back and saw everyone suggested we go there to save a well below me. In another few half hour. Once up and about, minutes, I stood on the saddle, I was shaky, weak, lacking my hands raised in gratitude. muscular cohesion. We found This was a brilliant psychologa good rock, and I got naked ical move by Jack. He shook to the waist. He examined my my hand and said, ‘You’re the head, eyes and throat. Lacking greatest Hungarian I know.’ a stethoscope, he used his ears Ang Lagpa said, shaking his to check my breathing (edema). head, ‘I’ve never seen this He tapped my knees, checked before. Congratulations.’ I was my coordination, and found just glad I didn’t let people nothing wrong. I got dressed, down. Ang Lagpa carried my hefty tws daypack, and we were off.

“There’s much to be said for challenging fate instead of ducking behind it.”

BRIEFS

The Hunger Coalition Receives $20,000 Grant To Support The Hope Garden 208-788-1223 Hailey, ID www.CKsRealFood.com

Apple Certified Technician Timur Beriker wkcsv.com • Ketchum 208-622-9191

T H E W E E K LY S U N •

Apple Desktop Laptop iPhone iPad Service Repair Training Data Recovery Diagnostics On-Site, In-House, and Remote Service Purchasing Consultation Setup Installation

The Hunger Coalition has received $20,000 from the Gordon R. and Mary M. Howard Family Foundation to support The Hope Garden in downtown Hailey. The Hope Garden is an outdoor classroom for children and adults and a highly productive fruit, vegetable and herb garden. From its inception in 2010 through the 2013 growing season, The Hope Garden has contributed nearly 6,000 pounds of organically grown fruits, vegetables and herbs to The Hunger Coalition’s Mobile Food Bank. “We are so honored to have the generous support of the

Howard Family Foundation,” states Executive Director, Jeanne Liston. “Their gift will go a long way toward ensuring families have fresh food on their tables and the ability to participate in growing and harvesting their own food.” The Hunger Coalition strives to end hunger in our community by providing wholesome food to those in need and by promoting solutions to the underlying causes of hunger through collaboration, education and advocacy. For more information, visit www.thehungercoalition.org.

JANUARY 29, 2014

11


DENTS OF BL AINE C U T S 0 0 0 OUN E 4, Y ” T H I N U T M M O T O TY “TEACHIN G GENEROSIT Y STRON G E R C FOR A

Inspiration Nature Wow-Students and Sun Valley Center for the Arts

I A

understanding of art as well as the impact it can play in a community. Inspired by the works of Lyman Whitaker, a sculptor with over 40 years experience who’s installations depend on natural elements for movement, the students donated their time and creativity to complete a leaf to be installed on wind sculptures. Each leaf represents 15 students who were served by The Center’s free gallery tour program, which reached over 1200 Blaine County students in the 20122013 school year.

rtistic inspiration comes in many shapes and sizes. In the Wood River Valley it is no surprise that nature is one of the more popular muses. With high mountaintops, low flowing streams and changing seasons to highlight them all, the opportunities for appreciation are endless and taken in by both local and visiting artists. During the 20122013 school year, Wowstudents and Sun Valley Center of the Arts partnered with Hailey Elementary 3rd grade students to enhance their

The goal of this project was to give the kids a better understanding of how many students The Center reaches annually through their gallery tour program and also to reinforce an appreciation and understanding of public art in a new way. In addition, the students learned that artists can be generous with both their time and talent to benefit the community. Wowstudents looks forward to partnering with Sun Valley Center for the Arts in the 2013-2014 school year and growing the artistic culture among the youths of our valley.

Meet the ValleyDanica Robrahn

’m pretty sure I have one of the best jobs in the Wood River Valley. As the art teacher for the Sun Valley Center for the Arts, it is my pleasure to look at, talk about, and make art with the talented young movers and shakers of Blaine County. I am so thankful to be a part of a team that is supported and embraced by a community who value the importance of art. The continued generosity of The Center’s donors and patrons allows us all, regardless of age, opportunities to experience and grow through the arts. Being able to visit schools in Ketchum, Hailey, Bellevue and Carey has opened my eyes to what the future holds and I am hopeful. The kids in this valley are so generous with their creativity, ideas, and problem solving. I wish I could bottle it up (like Roald Dahl’s BFG) and store it up high on a shelf for future use. I am thankful to have a job in a place I love, made possible by the generosity of others. GET TO KNOW ‘EM • GET THEIR STATS!

J Name

Danica Robrahn

J Occupation Art Teacher

J Favorite Blaine County Activity

things. In “Rich” can mean many l rich? fee u what ways do yo

Hiking, Snowboarding, and Making Stuff

J Favorite Song on Your iPod

Too many to name- random shuffle and mixes

WOW-Students mission is to inspire and expand generosity in Blaine County. WOW empowers students to make a difference and take responsibility for their community, inspiring others to follow.

wow-students.org 12

WOW-students is a 501c3 non-profit T H E W E E K LY S U N •

JANUARY 29, 2014

Like us on Facebook


MARIA MARISICH, from page 1 world,” said Nick Maricich, who was a pro skier before becoming Sun Valley’s technical and race supervisor. “She had the talent, the drive. And she was not dissimilar to our father when it came to her need for perfectionism. When she made the decision to do something, she didn’t let anything stand in her way.”

A whole new world

At 17 Maricich made the U.S. Ski Team. She had gotten noticed as a giant slalom skier. But when she blew away U.S. Ski Team downhillers in a national competition in Aspen, speeding through challenging turns, flats and catching air over small dips, her coaches made her a downhill racer, ending her slalom and giant slalom days. “Downhill racing is an exhilarating feeling—like flying. But it can be scary at times,” said Maricich, who speed skated for training. The team became her family, winter and summer. She learned to put closet doors underneath sagging mattresses in French hotels to get a good night’s sleep on the road. A vegetarian, she learned to protest “kein fleisch” (“no meat”) to Germans who reluctantly plied her with sauerkraut and bread instead of bratwurst. “Once in a while we’d go to an American military base and go wild, loading up on peanut butter and oats, nuts, dried fruit and nutritional yeast, with which to make granola,” she said. Maricich and her teammates learned agility steps from a Green Bay Packers football player. They trained in Hawaii, running up mountains. And they stretched their comfort level with scuba diving and mile-long swims in the ocean. “We didn’t have the scientific know-how or technology they do today. They were just beginning to measure strength in legs. And they didn’t talk to us about nutrition at all,” she said.

M

aricich served as the forerunner/alternate at the Lake Placid Olympics. And at 18 she competed in her first World Cup race at Lake Placid. But just after placing 15th in her second downhill, her inaugural World Cup season came to an end when she tore the ligaments and cartilage in her right knee during a training run. She rationalized it as a lucky break: “It gave me two months to catch up on my studies. Had I not come home, I might not have graduated.” Maricich walked out of the Wood River High School graduating class of 1979 glad she knew where she was going—to training camp that summer and the World Cup circuit following that. But her drive to the top was short-circuited by another ACL tear. “I don’t think I ever mentally or emotionally recovered from that one. I thought things were going great. I had been making the top 10 in my training runs. I was about to break in and God yanked the carpet out from under me and I fell flat on my ass. It was so painful to have it taken away,” she recalled. She soldiered on but with a fear she hadn’t known before. “I was always wondering if something was going to happen. And to win a World Cup, you have to push—beyond 110 percent. I’d probably go 99 percent, but you’ve got to give it 110 percent to win in a world where races are won in hundredths of a second.” She paused, throwing back her mane of blond hair that hangs below her shoulders, her piercing blue eyes that seem to soak in everything around them looking off into space for a moment. Slowly, dimples formed in her cheeks as she offered a wistful

smile. “Somewhere along the way I forgot the thing of trusting my body. I wish I had remembered to do that more.” Still, she enjoyed reasonable success with top-15 finishes. And in January 1983 she surprised everyone with a second-place World Cup downhill at Megeve, France. “I felt like I was in an altered state the whole day. I woke up in a good mood—I just felt different. I showed up a little late for the start, freaking out the coach. And I told him, ‘Don’t worry. I’m okay.’ ” She paused: “I saw that same look in Debbie Armstrong the day she beat Christin Cooper for Olympic gold in the giant slalom, even though Christin had won several World Cups. Debbie was happy-go-lucky that day—she wasn’t stressed out at all.” Maricich’s elation at taking second in her own race was short-lived. The very next race she took a spill, breaking her collarbone and ending her season.

Dateline: Sarajevo

Going into the 1984 Olympics in Sarajevo Maricich was ranked the No. 1 downhiller in the United States—No. 10 in the world. All of the host country Yugoslavia, it seemed, had adopted her as one of their own because of her Yugoslavian heritage. “I had as much attention from Yugoslavians as Americans. Even Yugoslavia’s radio interviewed me,” she said, recounting how distant relatives journeyed from the coast to see her compete. But Maricich’s race was delayed for five days by foggy, blizzard-like, blustery weather. Finally, officials started the race but abruptly cancelled it after a Canadian skier lost a ski in the rutted course. “I had never seen them stop a race before. It made people angry because downhillers are supposed to get two training runs. And, now, six people had received extra training runs,” Maricich said. The next day officials—pressured by TV cameramen—resumed the race, even though the weather was no better than it had been the day before. A couple inches of new snow topped the course but underneath it the race course was like a vertical ice rink.

I

t was windy, foggy, blustery. Maricich drew the No. 1 run. “All that day I was thinking they were not going to have the race. Even when we went out to the starting gate, I couldn’t get my mind around the idea that we were actually running a race. I thought they’d start it and then stop it, like they had the day before,” she said. Maricich went through the motions, following her normal ritual. She meditated for a few minutes, visualizing the course as she mentally tried to create good intentions. She ran uphill to warm her muscles. She checked her ski bindings, checked the wax on her skis and spent a few minutes talking to her coach. She tugged on her favorite red turtleneck, which she always wore with her red “good luck” ski socks. She adjusted her No. 1 bib, which hung over her skintight red aerodynamic suit and slid into the starting house. At 28 seconds, she buckled the size 3 ski boots that she wore on her size 5 feet. At 15 seconds she pushed her goggles out from her face a couple of times to dispel any lingering fog created by her warmup run. At 10 seconds she planted her poles. She heard the “beep, beep, beep”—a sound that’s ingrained in her consciousness today. And when the stopwatch reached three seconds, she used her broad swimmer-like shoulders to propel her out of the starting gate.

But it still didn’t feel like a race. And her body responded as if she was in a dream. One minute and 15 seconds later she was at the finish line—two miles from the starting gate. She had beaten some of the top downhill racers in the world. But she had arrived two seconds behind the eventual gold medalist Michela Figini of Switzerland. And she knew she hadn’t run her best race. “I remember three-quarters of the way down thinking, ‘This is it. This is the Olympics.’ I felt like I had skied well, but I didn’t race. “I was disappointed in myself that I had convinced myself that we weren’t really racing, that I hadn’t put more into it. I thought, ‘I worked so hard all these years for this one thing— and this is how it turned out,’ ” she said. Still, she finished in 19th place, effectively making her the 19th fastest woman in the world. “It’s hard to make a comeback after the injuries she had. But she was a very solid ski racer and she represented herself well, even though she didn’t have the success she wanted at the Olympics,” said Sun Valley’s Head Alpine Coach Ruben Macaya, who was coaching a U.S. men’s team that included gold and silver medalists Phil and Steve Mahre.

T

oday, Maricich sees a silver lining to her Olympic race: “If I had had greater success, I would’ve probably stayed in the skiing world, coaching or something. And I love what I’m doing.” Today, Maricich is a Ketchum chiropractor, helping other Olympic athletes achieve their peak performance and helping non-athletes achieve their personal best health. Her 16-year-old son Zac Maricich Siele has intuitively avoided the pressure of having an Olympian for a mom by choos-

Maria Maricich, shown here wearing her U.S. Ski Team jacket) says one of the reasons the 1984 women’s team was unsurpassed for such a long time was because of head coach Michel Rudigoz’s ability to keep morale high. “I don’t think I got a lot of technical skill from him—he’d tell us, ‘You ski like sheet,’ ” she recounted, mimicking the Frenchman who now owns The Christiania restaurant in Ketchum. “But he was good at picking up those who were down.”

ing to compete in freestyle, rather than ski racing. And his mom makes a point of not pressuring him. “I tell him the most important thing is to have fun. And I tell him the story of Debbie Armstrong—how she was out there training every day for the pure love of the sport, whereas some of the team was out there more because they were good at it. “I praise him when he does well and I’m thrilled for him when he does well. But he also knows I love him no matter how he does in skiing. And I tell him: ‘Life will have plenty of interesting things besides skiing in it for you.’ ” Maricich often draws on her Olympic experience to see what worked, and what didn’t, as she problem solves in her work today. “Being an Olympian is a huge honor,” she said. “I have that now— that’s part of who I am. It affects who I am today.” tws

Winner of the New York Drama Critics Circle Award

GOOD PEOPLE

by David Lindsay-Abaire

pay what you feel wed FEB 12, 7pm

FEB 12 - MAR 1

Liberty Theatre, Hailey

208.578.9122 companyoffools.org

COMPANY OF FOO LS

A PROUD PART OF SUN VALLEY CENTER FOR THE ARTS

this show made possible in part thru the generosity of Linda & Bob Edwards, Marcia & Don Liebich, Main Street Market and John & Mary Ann Underwood.

T H E W E E K LY S U N •

SCOTT MILEY ROOFING JANUARY 29, 2014

13


Griffith To Be Inducted Into Hall Of Fame BY KAREN BOSSICK immy Griffith never had a formal ski lesson. As a boy who came of age when Sun Valley—America’s first destination ski resort—opened to the world, he simply watched others and emulated them. He learned well, becoming the first Sun Valley native to be named to represent the United States at the Winter Olympics. Griffith, the grandson of a Montana mining superintendent who founded Ketchum in 1879—was one of three Sun Valley skiers chosen to compete at the 1952 Winter Olympics in Oslo, Norway.

J

But the bright, driven, 22-year-old with a winning

Jimmy Griffith was touted for being an exemplary, hard-working young man by myriads of Ketchum residents.

smile never boarded the Pan American flight bound for Oslo. He hit a patch of wind-packed crud on a training run at Alta in December 1951, crashed into a grove of aspen and died of a fatty embolism that formed three days after he broke his right leg. “When we got the news that he was in a coma, Sun Valley’s general manager Pappy Rogers lined up a driver to take my parents

Jimmy Griffith learned to ski jump while competing for the University of Colorado. He won the Harriman Cup, which went from the top of Baldy down Rock Garden and Canyon.

to Salt Lake City that night so they were with him when Jimmy passed away the next morning,” recalled Griffith’s sister, Mary Jane Griffith Conger. A gregarious, dark-haired boy, the Valentine’s Day baby tagged along with his sister as they jumped off low-hanging roofs into snow banks, skated on a tiny ice rink in their yard and took turns riding the family burro. Members of the hickory fraternity, they skied over the top of the 4-foot fence hemming in their yard and climbed up the backside of Dollar Mountain. There they emulated Felix Schaffgotsch—the Austrian skier who “discovered” Sun Valley for Union Pacific—carving figure eights down Julio to the Bitterroot flats. “When Sun Valley came into being, my father got us some modern skis. Before, we had leather straps over our boots and no poles—we sat on big willow sticks going downhill,” Conger recalled.

When Union Pacific cleared its first three runs—Ridge, College and River Run—on Baldy, Mary Jane and Jimmy helped the ski patrol pack them by side stepping on them with their skis in exchange for a free lunch and lift ticket. And in the days before there was a bridge over the Big Wood River, 12-year-old Jimmy joined Ski Patrol Director Nelson Bennett climbing to the top of the 9,150-foot Baldy to get snowdepth readings. They ended their 3,400-foot descent by fording the Big Wood River holding skis, boots and poles overhead. At 15 Jimmy entered the University of Colorado where his sister had excelled as a ski racer for the Buffalos. He learned to ski jump and ski cross-country so his college could field a team that competed in four alpine and Nordic events. A fierce competitor, Griffith was on pace to upset the Italian Zeno Colo in an International FIS downhill at Aspen in 1950. But he fell 50 feet from the finish

line when he jumped 70 feet through the air and smacked into a snow wall along the side of the course. His skis all tangled up, he couldn’t stand. So he dug his elbows into the snow and crawled over the finish line to an 18thplace finish. It was French triple world ski champion Emile Allais, known as “the flying Frenchman,” who seemed to have the most influence on young Jimmy’s skiing. The man who would go on to become the U.S. Men’s coach for the 1952 Olympics taught with the Sun Valley Ski School for a year and his presence ignited the 6-foot, 175-pound Griffith. Griffith won the 1950 national downhill championship—the Harriman Cup—at Sun Valley. Then he swept the downhill, slalom and combined in Chile and Argentina, skiing at speeds of up to 94 miles an hour. Some said he had the potential to be one of this country’s greatest skiers. In April 1951 he entered the

U.S. Air Force as a medical technician—one more step in his long-held childhood dream to become a doctor alongside his mentor, Dr. John Moritz, at Sun Valley. But he secured a leave to pursue his Olympic dreams. Too quickly those dreams were over. Alf Engen, one of the first men to reach Griffith following his accident, quietly took an axe the next day and chopped down the aspen. “You don’t expect someone to die so young,” observed his sister. “He had a perseverance that didn’t stop. He did everything to perfection, whether he was playing ‘Rhapsody in Blue’ on the piano or pursing his Eagle Scout badges.” Griffith was inducted into the National Ski Hall of Fame in 1972. He will be inducted into the Sun Valley Ski Hall of Fame at 5 this afternoon at the nexStage Theatre. tws

JOIN THE SUPERINTENDENT SEARCH

The Blaine County School District Board of Trustees is seeking community input as it selects a new superintendent. The community can help by completing an online survey and/or attending an open forum to help identify the most important characteristics for a new superintendent. The forums are scheduled for the following dates and times:

Monday, February 3, 8:15-9:15 a.m. Wood River YMCA Tuesday, February 4, 10:30-11:30 a.m. Community Campus Tuesday, February 4, 4:00 p.m. Carey School*

Monday, February 3, 6:00-7:00 p.m. Tuesday, February 4, 1:00-2:00 p.m.

Community Campus Community Campus

* This will be held in conjunction with the Girls Basketball game. Consultants will be available and the survey will be promoted during the game.

Anyone is invited to the forums. The forums are conducted entirely by consultants from Ray and Associates. No Blaine County School District administrators or Board members will be present during the meetings. Comments made during the meetings are compiled into main themes and participants are not identified individually. For questions please contact Heather Crocker, Communications Director, 578-5005.

Visit www.blaineschools.org for more information.

14

T H E W E E K LY S U N •

JANUARY 29, 2014


Climb the Medal Podium

Where The Heart Is

BY KAREN BOSSICK

S

BY KAREN BOSSICK

L

ongtime Nordic enthusiasts Bob Disbrow and Kim Kawaguchi can always be found in the thick of things when it comes to honing their Nordic skills—they even took lessons from Norway’s Olympic racers when the team trained in Sun Valley prior to the 2010 Winter Olympics in Vancouver. But their real contribution to Nordic sports comes out of their pockets—a generosity, along with their hard work, that will earn them a place in the Sun Valley Ski Hall of Fame during today’s induction ceremony at 5 p.m. at the nexStage Theatre in Ketchum. Kawaguchi has been among the women who have championed the Harriman Trail, opening her Elkhorn home on occasion for the annual Harriman Tea. And the couple not only donated a Pisten Bully groomer to Galena Lodge but made a $50,000 donation to the Sun Valley Ski Education Foundation. “Their full-time home is Vancouver, B.C., so as Canadians they get no tax write-offs for their donations,” observed Jenny Busdon, who has helped raise funds for Galena Lodge and the North Valley Trails since fundraising began in 1994. “That is why it is so commendable that both Kim and Bob have given so generously to the Help Save Galena campaign and the Power Galena campaign. “They’re big contributors each year at the Galena Benefit and, when asked if they would consider a donation toward buying a new Pisten Bully a few years ago, Bob bought it outright. It is known as ‘Bob’s Bully,’ it has a Canadian flag on its side and, because of its size, it’s stationed at the lodge,” Busdon added.

Alison Owen Kiesel Bradley, shown here looking at her winning time on the scoreboard of the Telemark World Cup in 1978, broke ground for female competitors in Nordic skiing. She won eight U.S. national titles and what was then proclaimed the first FIS World Cup ski race. Learn more about Alison’s amazing Nordic career in the Feb. 5 issue of The Weekly Sun.

The Sun Valley Ski Hall of Fame will honor these inductees at 5 p.m. today at the nexStage Theatre in Ketchum. The ceremony is open to the public.

Locally Programmed Non-Commercial Radio Sponsors Welcome

Jon Engen won a silver spoon jumping in his first ski-jumping championship at age 4. He went on from there to compete in three Winter Olympics for the U.S. Biathlon Team. Engen, who leads the Sun Valley Masters Nordic ski program at the Sun Valley Nordic Center, is also cross-country chairman for the U.S. Ski and Snowboard Association and vice-president of Idaho Olympians.

Better Than the Alarm Clock with Mike Scullion Monday-Friday, 7-10 a.m.

tws

Bob Disbrow and Kim Kawaguchi, sandwiched in between two Norwegians from whom they took lessons at Sun Valley Nordic Center, are enthusiastic supporters of Sun Valley’s Nordic experience.

eeing American skiers climb the medal podium at the Winter Olympics is commonplace now. But the first American to earn a ski medal in the Olympics was a pigtailed housewife who was born in Tacoma, Wash., but who trained in Sun Valley where she ended up making her home. Gretchen Kunigk Fraser won a gold medal in slalom and the silver medal in combined at the 1948 Olympics in St. Moritz, Switzerland. She had waited patiently for her chance, as she made the 1940 team only to see the 1940 and 1944 Olympics cancelled because of World War II. She and her husband Don Frasier will be inducted posthumously into the Sun valley Ski Hall of Fame today during a cermony today at 5:00pm. Gretchen, for whom Gretchen’s Restaurant is named, played Sonja Henie’s stunt double in the movie “Sun Valley Serenade.” She was among the first to

Holding-Up BY KAREN BOSSICK

E

arl and Carol Holding hardly knew how to ski when they purchased Sun Valley Resort in 1977. But a bloodied schuss down Bald Mountain during the big drought of 1976-77 convinced them that the resort needed vastly improved snowmaking if it were to thrive during periods of drought. The two armed Sun Valley with the world’s biggest and best snow gun arsenal. They covered the mountain with high-speed quads.

Then they placed some of skidom’s finest mountain lodges on Bald and Dollar mountains—from Seattle Ridge Lodge perched atop 9,150-foot Bald Mountain to the Warm Springs and River Run lodges at the bottom and Carol’s Dollar Mountain Lodge on Dollar Mountain. As a crowning touch, they remodeled the historic Roundhouse Restaurant and built a gondola to reach it. Earl didn’t do all this with the intention of realizing a payback, reflected former Ski School Director Hans Muehlegger as he took visitors on a ski tour of the mountain a few years ago. “He did it because he loved Sun Valley,” Muehlegger said. tws

T H E W E E K LY S U N •

Blind Vinyl with Derek Ryan Thursday, 6:30-8:30 p.m.

It’s Relationship with Ellie Newman Monday 11 a.m.-12 p.m.

The Ketchum Cruise: Rock, Rhythm & Blues with Scott Carlin Thursday, 8:30-10:30 p.m.

Democracy Now Monday-Friday 1-2 p.m.

Le Show with Harry Shearer Friday, 10-11 a.m.

The Southern Lowdown with Dana DuGan Monday, Tuesday & Thursday 4-6 p.m.

New Economy with Jeff Nelson Friday 12-1 p.m

The Ripple Effect with Jordan Hawkes Monday 6-8 p.m. Carol Holding cuts the ribbon on Sun Valley’s gondola as Earl and the rest of the family look on.

use skiing as a means to help wounded and disabled veterans with their rehabilitation. Her husband Don Fraser—also an Olympian—skied in Sun Valley’s first Harriman Cup in 1937 before becoming the resort’s sports director. Both died in 1994. Muffy Davis, an aspiring young racer who went on to medal as a monoskier in the Paralympics after becoming paralyzed in a ski accident, said she used to get “fan mail” from Gretchen as a junior ski racer. “She was so supportive of the local racers,” Davis recalled. “After my accident, I had the blessing of getting to personally know Gretchen and Don—the most loving and wonderful couple ever. “Gretchen taught me that winning medals is wonderful. But what is more important is what you do after winning the medals—that is, how you can use that success to bring goodness to the world. She was and always will be my greatest hero, and she is always in my heart.” tws

Le Show with Harry Shearer Tuesday & Friday, 10-11 a.m. For A Cause with Dana DuGan Tuesday, 11 a.m.-12 p.m. The Audible with Jon Mentzer Tuesday, 6:30-7:30 p.m.

Newsed with Vernon Scott Friday 4-5 p.m. Scull Von Rip Rock with Mike Scullion Friday, 6-8 p.m. TBA with Nate Hart Saturday, 5-7 p.m. InversionEDM with Nathan Hudson Saturday, 8-10 p.m. Here Comes Classical Sunday 9-10 a.m.

The Attitude Hour with Alexandra Delis-Abrams Wednesday 10-11 a.m.

Gospel Mash Sunday 10 a.m.-12 p.m.

World at Lunch with Jean Bohl Wednesday, 12-1 p.m.

The Natural Space with Eloise Christensen Sunday, 8-10 p.m.

Radio Deluxe with John Pizzarelli Wed., 2-4 pm & Sun. 4-6 pm Spun Valley Radio Show with Mark & Joy Spencer Wednesday, 6-8 p.m. Our Health Culture with Julie Johnson Thursday, 10-11 a.m.

JANUARY 29, 2014

(208) 928-6205 streaming live on www.kdpifm.org 15


Film Festival Returns Heinz To Be Inducted BY KAREN BOSSICK

O

Images courtesy of Banff Film Festival BY KAREN BOSSICK

W

hen Inge Wegge and Jom Ranum decided to go surfing, the young Norwegians bypassed the warm waves of some of the world’s best surfing towns, like Hanalei, Kauai, and Florianopolis, Brazil. Instead, they packed some expired food their local grocery stores were about to throw out and headed to a remote Arctic island off the coast of northern Norway. There, they built a cabin out of driftwood and other cast-off materials that washed up on shore and spent the next nine months skiing and surfing in the glow of the Northern Lights. “North of the Sun,” which also touches on the wider impact of garbage, even in remote, uninhabited environments, will be among the films that will be shown Friday and Saturday during the 2014 Banff Mountain Film Festival World Tour in Ketchum. Doors open at 6 p.m. at the

nexStage Theatre both nights, giving moviegoers a chance to buy pizza and other refreshments, peruse some of this year’s winning photos and buy raffle tickets for the Friends of the Sawtooth National Forest Avalanche Center raffle. The raffle always has some great prizes from local outdoor shops and organizations like Sun Valley Heli-Ski. The program starts at 6:30 p.m. and the films at 7 p.m. Proceeds go to the Friends of the Sawtooth National Forest Avalanche Center and The Satipo Kids Project, which makes it possible for 40 impoverished children to attend school in Peru. Tickets are $14 when purchased in advance at Backwoods Mountain Sports, The Elephant’s Perch and Chapter One Bookstore. Any available at the door will cost $15. Some of the world’s best films focusing on outdoor sports and adventure travel will be shown during the two-night festival, which Boge said he plans to expand to three nights next year. tws

n a warm sunny day during the Christmas holidays, a familiar couple joined hundreds of Nordic skiers and young families sledding and playing outside the rustic Galena Lodge 24 miles north of Ketchum. A line of would-be diners, anxious to partake of lodge manager Don Shepler’s Grownup Grilled Cheese Sandwich piled high with bacon, apples, caramelized onions and Havarti cheese, Curried Chicken Wraps, Idaho Lamb Burgers and Asian Chicken Salad, stood patiently on the wooden deck. Shepler’s wife Erin Zell quickly seated Sen. John Kerry and his wife Teresa Heinz inside the lodge underneath a picture of the late Sen. John Heinz. If it hadn’t been for Teresa Heinz, there likely would have been no Galena Lodge. She and her three sons saved the picturesque mountain lodge from the wrecking ball in the mid-1990s by donating the $325,000 necessary to purchase the lodge in memory of her late husband who had died in a helicopter crash. Heinz reaffirmed her commitment to the lodge at Saturday’s Galena Lodge Benefit, offering up $75,000 to make sure the lodge is around “20 years from now and 20 years beyond.”

SEE FULL BANFF FILM FESTIVAL SCHEDULE ON NEXT PAGE

Teresa Heinz expressed her love for Galena Lodge during a Galena Lodge Benefit.

For her starring role in saving a community treasure, Heinz and her family will be inducted into the Sun Valley Ski Hall of Fame at 5 p.m. tonight at the nexStage Theatre in Ketchum. When Heinz’s son Chris brought the effort to save the lodge to her attention, the community had raised $15,000, recalled Jenny Busdon, who helped spearhead the campaign. Heinz made her donation with the understanding

that the community raise $250,000 more as an endowment. “We were all, in effect, being given an opportunity to own this historical lodge that everyone loved so much,” Busdon said. “Losing the lodge came to be a very close reality in 1994 and so this community has a lot to be thankful for for the Heinz family’s generosity those 20 years ago!” tws

inklink Let Copy & Print be your

rd ink ca L k n I ur for yo etting y b rt g Drop to sta

$ D R A EW R !! ! G S I E B I EB E R F and

We have the Valley’s largest selection of in-stock ink and toner. We also feature same or next day ordering and delivery.

Sale priced ink starting at only

12

$

50

Corner of Croy & River in beautiful downtown Hailey

208-788-4200 • 208-788-4297 Fax 16

T H E W E E K LY S U N •

JANUARY 29, 2014


K

Banff Mountain Film Festival Schedule FRIDAY “Poor Man’s Heli”: A group of skiers launch themselves across a valley to remote slopes via paragliders. “Sensory Overload”: Blind kayaker Erick Wiehenmayer turns whitewater into a new form of Braille. “Sufferfest”: Wall climber Alex Honnold and Cedar Wright try to link all of California’s 14,000-foot peaks via bike. “North of the Sun”: Chosen for the festival’s Grand Prize Winner and People’s Choice Award. “The Questions We Ask”: Bruce Kirkby crosses the Pacific from Vancouver to Victoria on a stand-up paddleboard. “High Tension”: This film examines the 2013 incident at Camp II on Everest where fisticuffs and death threats had climbers like Ueli Steck running for their lives. Ketchum’s own Melissa Arnot proved to be the calming force. “Kayak Free Kayaking: World Kayak Champion Trip Deacon pushes the limits of the new sport he created in Northern California. “Spice Girl”: Hazel Findlay, the first woman to climb the British grade of E9, puts the guys to shame as she climbs loose rock on super sketchy dangerous routes with dodgy gear. “Valhalla”: This naked snow segment features naked chairlift riding and snowsuits consisting entirely of avalanche beacons. SATURDAY “Cascade:” Paddler and cinematographer explore a world beyond the unexpected. “The Last Ice Merchant”: This film features one Baltazar Ushca, who harvests glacial ice from the tallest mountain in Ecuador, wrapping it in hay and loading it on his donkey for delivery to his customers. “Heavens Gate”: Wingsuit pilots attempt to fly through Heaven’s Gate, an archway carved out of the Tianmen Mountain in China. “Dubai—A Skier’s Journey”: Desert dwellers embrace the local ski hill. “Keeper of the Mountains”: Elizabeth Hawley began chronicling Himalayan expeditions out of Kathmandu for The Himalayan Database in 1960—and she continues to do so today, even as she turns 90. “Flow: The Elements of Freeride”: Creative graphics bring viewers uncomfortably close to the action as geophysicist Rex Flake takes a high-adrenaline mountain bike ride through the Cascade Mountains identifying flora, fauna and geology. “The Last Great Climb”: Rock stars Leo Houlding, Sean “Stanley” Leary and Jason Pickles try a new line up the unclimbed Ulvetanna Peak, a remote spire in Queen Maud Land, Antarctica. “The Burn”: Skiers revel in new lines in newly charred forest.

etchum audiences have helped send up to 40 children in Satipo, a city of 20,000 on the eastern side of the Peruvian Andes, to school with their attendance at the Banff Film Festival. Michael Boge, a former Sun Valley Ski Patrolman who organizes the film festival in Ketchum, Sandpoint and Coeur d’Alene, started using proceeds from ticket sales to help families with no means to put their children in school eight years ago. His wife Anavel, who grew up in Satipo, and daughter Laura procure the school supplies, shoes and school uniforms in Lima. They have to get it right the first time—you can’t just run down the street in Satipo to purchase another pair of shoes. Willy Vasquez, who is the “man on the ground,” checks students’ grades to ensure they’re keeping up with their studies. This year Laura’s second-grade teacher from Sandpoint had her class make mobiles of winter activities in Idaho to take to the children. The Peruvian kids will respond with crafts educating the Sandpoint children about their jungle area. Next year, Boge says, he and his supporters plan to figure out ways to send kids who have gone through the Peruvian school system on to higher education. One—Rosa Vivanca—wants to become an accountant. “Our long-term goal is to bring the families of these 40 students out of poverty,” said Boge. tws

Broadcast your love to the stars on Valentines Day with Star 107.5 Record a personal message to your valentine to be played over the air on Valentine’s Day Schedule your Recording w/ our DJ’s by Feb 11 Call (208) 788.7118 Space is limited!

You will receive 3 broadcasts of your message on Valentines day, a cd memento of the message and a chance to win dinner for two at the Ketchum Grill! [208.788.7446]

high 34º

high 34º

high 33º

high 28º

high 28º

high 28º

high 24º

WEDNESDAY

THURSDAY

FRIDAY

SATURDAY

SUNDAY

MONDAY

TUESDAY

low 21º

low 10º

low -4º

low -1º

low 0º

low -1º

low 4º

THE WOOD RIVER VALLEY 7-DAY WEATHER FORECAST IS BROUGHT TO YOU BY:

T H E W E E K LY S U N •

JANUARY 29, 2014

Custom Signs & Graphics CUSTOM SIGNS 17


sunclassifieds T H E W E E K LY

Ask the Guys

Dear Classified Guys, With the current real estate market, my wife and I thought it would be a great opportunity to find a new home. This time we wanted a more country-like setting with some nice garden areas. It wasn't long before we found one and immediately fell in love with the place. Things were going very smooth at first. We agreed on a price and closing date with the owners, but then it got complicated. It seems this couple really loved their dog, Barney, a basset hound. When he passed away, they placed his remains in the flower garden and turned it into a memorial. Now they want rights to keep the garden intact, the right to visit the garden up to four times a year and hold a memorial service for Barney each spring. We love the place, but this seems ridiculous. It would be quite an inconvenience for us. Do you think these are realistic requests or are these owners just crazy?

Carry: When is comes to the

fine print of buying and selling a home, absolutely anything is possible, even incorporating the right

Fast Facts Rested

Duane “Cash” Holze & Todd “Carry” Holze 01/26/14 ©The Classified Guys®

to visit dear old Barney. Cash: Selling a home is an emotional process for many sellers. It can take time for people to adjust to the idea of leaving behind a place where they have lived for many years. Additionally, you've come across a family who has trouble letting go of their departed pet as well. Carry: Regardless of how unrealistic it may seem to you, Barney was important enough to the sellers for them to attach visitation rights to the sale of their home. That’s just a stipulation you’ll have to settle in order to purchase the house. Cash: However, that doesn't mean you need to agree with their

requests. It may be possible that the sellers don't realize the imposition they are placing upon new owners. You should be honest and share your concerns with them. Carry: If you haven't already tried, you could also suggest a compromise. For example, you could offer to have Barney moved to a more convenient location. They can create a resting place for him at their new home or at a pet cemetery where they can visit. Cash: If you're truly interested in this property, then it's worth working with the sellers and coming to a resolution. Otherwise, you might need to look for a different country home, hopefully one where the owners didn't have pets!

A beloved pet can be like one of the family. So it is no surprise that many people memorialize their pet in the same manner they memorialize a member of the family. The oldest pet cemetery in the world is located in Hartsdale, NY, just outside New York City and dates back to 1896. Back then, a veterinarian named Dr. Samuel Johnson offered his apple orchard as a resting place for a bereaved friend's dog. Now over 100 years later, this cemetery is the resting place for over 70,000 pets.

Companionship

Let's face it. It's a great feeling to be greeted by your dog wagging its tail or curling up with your cat on a comfy chair when you come home. It's one of the many reasons over 74 million people own a dog and more than 88 million people own a cat. And sometimes one just isn't enough. Nearly 37% of dog owners have more than one and 56% of cat owners have two or more. With this many pets around, it's no wonder they can steal our hearts. •

DEADLINE 12 p.m. on Friday

PLACE YOUR AD • Online: fill out an auto form on our submit classifieds tab at www.TheWeeklySun.com

Reader Humor Being Neighborly

• E-mail: include all possible information and e-mail it to us at classifieds@theweeklysun.com

When my wife and I were looking for a home, our real estate agent was very good. We communicated well and actually found a house that looked terrific on our first trip out. At first I was a little hesitant, since it was located next to an old cemetery from a neighboring church. However after walking the grounds, I realized it would actually be a very quiet neighborhood. Our agent told us that the house was in great shape as the owners took care of it until they moved on. "That's good," my wife said. "And where did they move to?" Realizing she misunderstood, he looked at the cemetery and replied, "Well, they're right next door." (Thanks to Andy J.)

• Fax: 208-928-7187 attn: The Weekly Sun • Mail: PO Box 2711, Hailey, ID 83333 • Drop By: we are located in the Gateway Building at 613 River Street, Hailey, ID 83333

COST All Line Ads 20 words or less are FREE in any category. After that, it is 17.5¢/per word.

Laughs For Sale

Add a photo, logo or border for $7.50/per week in b/w, or $45 for full color.

This cemetery sounds like a "hard" sell.

e in ots availabl Plenty of pl rever Pet Fo Friends . Call Today. Cementary

Do you have a question or funny story about the classifieds? Want to just give us your opinion? Email us at: comments@classifiedguys.com.

Classified Display Ads are available at our open rate of $10.98/column inch

www.ClassifiedGuys.com

10 help wanted Busy Ketchum Salon is seeking a hairdresser/nail technician. 208-7271708 “Rich Broadcasting/KECH Radio is looking for a dynamic, self-motivated Account Executive, who can generate radio advertising sales at the client and agency levels. The ideal Account Executive will be able to work with prospective and existing clients to determine their current and future advertising needs while maximizing Rich Broadcasting’s revenue opportunities. Applicants should have minimum of 2 years experience in sales, advertising and/or marketing. For a brief job description and complete list of requirements, please visit our website at www.richbroadcasting. com. Resumes only accepted when accompanying our standard application. For additional information please call 208-788-7118

11 business op Established Sales Route For Sale

Deliver tortillas, chips, bread, misc. from Carey to Stanley & everything in between. $40,00. Or, with 2 trailers and a pick up: $58,000.

Call Tracy at 208-720-1679 or 208-578-1777. Leave a message, I will call you back

Choose Your Hours, Your Income and Your Rewards - I Do! Contact: Kim Coonis, Avon Independent Sales Representative. 208-720-3897 or youravon.com/kimberlycoonis

dering of your home or business. Drawing includes detail to your specifications. Free estimates. 7884925 Nordic Wax Clinics - FREE Thursday, Jan. 30, 5:30 pm Friday, Jan. 31, 1:00 pm Sturtevants in Ketchum 208-726-4501 Still wanting to travel but find the mind more willing than the body? Retired male home Health RN in good health seeking a position as a Travel Companion mkd@pmt.org

12 jobs wanted NEEDED: Previous B&B owner/ inn-keeper looking for place to rent as trade to manage VRBO, AIRBnB owners properties. I will manage, supervise and cook. 208-721-3551.

16 health care Rehab, Respite & Elderly Care Companionship top priority Jordana Bryan 208-308-2600 IrisHouseAlternativeLiving.com

Deck Refurbishing, sanded and restained or painted. Reasonable rates. 720-7828 Alterations - Men’s, woman’s and children. Fast and efficient. Call 7208164 Twin Falls Train Shop & Hobbies trains and parts, lionel trains, repairs. Consignment, buy, sell, and trade. 144 Main Ave. S., Twin Falls, Idaho. Call Simon at 208-420-6878 for more info. Professional Window Washing and maintenance. Affordable rates. 7209913. Books can change the life of another person, so if you have some that are taking up space, and would like to donate them, call Fabio at 7883964 and we’ll pick them up for free.

18 construction 2 sets of scaffolding for $50 each. 788-3080 NEEDED: 1 1/2’’ Maple butcher block countertop at least 36’’ x 25’’. Call 720-2509 Some cherry Kraft maid cabinets. Lower lazy susan and upper corner, 12’’ wide fridge high with full depth pantry, some other upper and lowers. Complete cherry island with heavy stone top. Take all for $500 OBO. Antique white double laundry sink from original Flower’s Mill. $200 OBO. 720-2509

19 services Experienced tutor and former teacher available to help students of all ages organize work and establish good study habits, specializing in improving reading and writing skills. Please call Leigh at 788-2449. Private Chef Peter Weisz owner/ chef of Peter’s restaurant, European Trained Available now for private dinners and parties. Please call. 7211770 UNIQUE GIFT!? A pen and ink ren-

Two guys and a truck - Furniture moving & hauling. Dump runs. No job too small. 208-720-4821. MOVING MADE EASY - The little ladies will pack’em and stack’em and the mighty men will load’em and totem. We’ll even do the dreaded move out clean. Call 721-3543 for your moving needs. JACK OF ALL TRADES - One call does it all, whether your job be big or

Pick a Winner! Your chance to WIN with Copy & Print!

Just fill this out and return it to us by 5pm, Friday, January 31. One lucky winner will receive $100 in local restaurant gift certificates!

Winner: Score: Denver 1st Team to Score:

Seattle

small. Drywall, paint, small remodels, maintenance, tiling, woodwork, electrical plumbing, framing, etc. Don’t stall, give a call, 720-6676.

Antique office chair by Marble Chair Co. $150. 309-0917 Antique rocking horse. Very unique. $100 720-2509 Original and unusual artworks three original Nancy Stonington watercolors, varied sizes and prices from $500 - $1,000. Also an unusual poster from the Sunshine Mine’s 100th anniversary, nicely framed $150. Call Ann (208) 726-9510

21 lawn & garden Thank you from the Black Bear Ranch Tree Farm for another successful season! See you in the Spring! 

22 art, antiques and collectibles

24 furniture

Dan Marino football card for sale. A year 1999 “Collector’s Edge Odyssey,” Mint 9, #181. $25.00. Call 208309-1959. Peyton Manning football card for sale. A year 2000 “Collector’s Edge EG”, Gem Mint 10. $25.00. Call 208309-1959. Huge basketball card collection for sale. 1980-2000. Great condition. Well organized. $275 for all. Call 208309-1959. Antique small table. 12’ wide by 18’ tall. beautiful end table. 309-0917

Brand new , Fullsize Ikea Stora Loftbed Black and Sulan Spring Mattress Needs 8’10” ceiling. $400 firm. call 720-3345. 7’ sofa/matching chair (neutral-beige/grey $300. Moving - prefer email:gerrip2749@gmail.com or lv msg 720-3431. Round coffee table $45 (glass top/ walnut base & trim). Moving - prefer email:gerrip2749@gmail.com or lv msg 720-3431. Pine shelf unit - $75. Moving - prefer email:gerrip2749@gmail.com or lv msg 720-3431. Victorian desk $200. Moving - prefer email:gerrip2749@gmail.com or lv msg 720-3431. Large, beautiful designer armoire,

Antique MFG Enterprise meat grinder. $200. 309-0917 Two western prints with frames. One $45 other $50. 309-0917

Want to get involved in grass-roots politics?

!

Consider becoming

a precinct chair in your voting district - or running for Blaine County Commissioner in Districts1or 2.

!

!

Please join us on Feb. 11 at 6:30 p.m. at the Senior Connection, 721 3rd Ave. South, in Hailey.

(for tie breaker)

Name:

Phone:

Copyand OfPrint fice Supply! 16 West Croy St. OR Fax 788-4297 OR jeff@copyandprint.biz

For information: Contact Scott Freeborn, Blaine Co. Republican Central Committee Chair. 720-5959 or scottblainecounty1@gmail.com.

No purchase necessary. Winner will be notified Monday, Feb. 3, 2014

18

T H E W E E K LY S U N •

JANUARY 29, 2014


C L A S S I F I E D A D PA G E S • D E A D L I N E : N O O N O N M O N D AY • C L A S S I F I E D S @ T H E W E E K LY S U N . C O M could hold up to a 45’ tv, or great for storage. Retailed for $3,000 asking $600. Must see! 309-0917 Unique beautiful, solid round table. 36’ by 29’ high. Great breakfast or game table. Must see! $125. 3090917 Twin bed. Mattress, boxspring, frame, and designer solid wood headboard. $200. 309-0917 The Trader is now accepting consignments for furniture, home accessories and collectibles. Call Linda at 208-720-9206. Blonde Oak Dresser with hand carving - (3 drawer) $250. 788-2566

25 household Greco baby buggy stroller. very good condition. hardly used. make offer. 788 -4929 Refrigerator $50. 788-3080 NESCO 18 Qt. Roasting Oven. $25 call 788-4347. New Moen shower head & tub faucet w/adaptor $60 (both stainless). Moving - prefer email:gerrip2749@ gmail.com or lv msg 720-3431. Banana, Jute, Sisal area rugs - 4’ x 6’ and 6’ x8’. Both for $150. Retail is $1,200. 309-1088 Nice, warm, low operating cost far infrared heaters for sale. Two sizes. Call 788-2012

32 construction/bldg. Some cherry Kraft maid cabinets. Lower and upper corner, pull out 12” wide, fridge high, full depth pantry, some othe upper and lowers. Complete island with heavy stone top. Come and make an offer. 720-2509

34 cameras Sony Handycam 8mm video camera w/ extra battery, cords, etc. for sale. Great condition. $125.00. OBO. Call 309-1959. NO TEXTS. 1970’s Vivitar 35mm camera. With 2 lenses, electronic flash, book, and bag. Great working condition. $115.00. Call 309-1959. NO TEXTS. CAMERA - OLYMPUS OM77af SLR Camera (not digital) $75. Includes 2 lenses (wide angle & 35-70mm) and hard case. Please email for photo’s: gerrip2749@gmail.com or lv. msg 720-3431

37 electronics Cable for Cox HD (HDMI) Television. 6 ft Premium 1.4 Blueray 1080P. In other words: cable works perfect to connect your Cox HD to your television! Brand New. $10, call: 721-2144 HP 13X PRINTER black ink CARTRIDGE. Opened box but never used. Wrong cartridge for my printer. $120 retail. Yours for $20 720-2509 XBOX 360 Games - gently used, all rated M. Red Dead Redemption 3-part package (game, map & level book) - $20 OBO; Gun - $10 OBO; Viking, Battle for Asgard - $10 OBO; Conan - $10 OBO; and Turock - $10 OBO. Call 309-1566

40 musical I am looking for Harmonica lessons

here in Hailey, Idaho. 788-4929 Professional Unionized Performer, Vivian Lee Alperin, now accepting students for voice, piano and drama. Children and beginners especially welcome. 720-6343 or 727-9774. ROSEWOOD MUSIC - Vintage, collectibles and pawn, instrument repair and restoration. Why leave the Valley?! Call Al at 481-1124 SALMON RIVER GUITARS - Custom-Made Guitars. Repair Restoration since 1969. Buy. Sell. Vintage. Used. Authorized Martin Repair Center. Stephen Neal Saqui, Luthier. www.SalmonRiverGuitars.com. 1-208-838-3021 Rehearsal Space for Bands Available - area has heat and restrooms. Call Scott at 727-1480. Guitar and drum lessons available for all levels of musicians. Our studio or yours. Call Scott at 727-1480.

42 firewood/stoves Wood burning stove: Vermont Iron Stove Works. size 35H, 21D, 19W. Lg. Firebox. Window door, 6” Flue. New 2K now $650.00. 788-4929.

48 skis/boards, equip. Men’s Snow Boots-size 13. Brand New-$30.00. call 788-4347 Great Skis at Rock Ski Prices! Baldy Sports, 312 S Main, Hailey Race ready 210 Atomic DH 10-18 Atomic bindings $450 206-9634141 Best Baldy groomer made Atomic 174 Supercross $300 206-9634141 Volkl Mantra 177 Fitfchi Bindings $350 206-963-4141 Volkl Gotama 184 W/O bindings $150 206-963-4141 Dalbello womens kryzma with I.D. liner. Brand new, in box. Retail $695, sell for $275. 309-1088 2013 Volkl Code Speedwall S. 173cm. Brand new with marker DIM 16 binding. Retail $1235, sell for $600. 309-1088

50 sporting goods AB Lounge Ultra: Great core builder and tummy tucker. Hardly used. $50.00. 788- 4929 Brand New Sports Gear @ 30-70% off Retail! Baldy Sports, 312 S Main, Hailey No matter the weather, we gotcha covered: Skis -o- Rollerblades, Skates -o- Bikes. BALDY SPORTS, 312 S Main, Hailey Winchester Model 70 XTR 7mm Featherweight . Leopold 3x9 scope. Like new condition .$700.00. or would trade for pre 64 270. Call 7205480 Vintage Archery Hunting Outfit 2830 draw length. Top of the line. Good Beginner Bow Outfit $350. 208-6226687 Rocky Mountain Element 50. 18” Medium. Fox fork & shock XT/LX Drivetrain. Formula hydraulic brakes, Mavic 317 wheel set. Mechanic owned and maintained. Pristine condition. New $3,000 - asking $995. Call Greg at 721-0188.

TERRA SPORTS CONSIGNMENT is accepting all gear. Ketchum is the best place to sell. Check our website for info. www.terrasportsconsignment.com Weight bench and treadmill. Call for info. 720-5153 Masi Road Bike for sale - excellent condition. $1,000. Call for more info 208-720-5127 We pay cash for quality bicycles, fly fishing and outdoor gear - Ketchum Pawn. 208-726-0110.

56 other stuff for sale For Parties,Art Shows,Catering. 3 Folding Tables 20X48 inches. Only used 4 times. $30.EACH 208-6226687 AVONPRODUCTS.-www. youravon.com/beatriz5 PRODUCTOS AVON: Puedes ver los catalogos y hacer tus pedidos en www.youravon.com/beatriz5 Double half barrel charcoal grill on countertop high stand with expanded metal grill and raised warming rack. $100 721-2558

60 homes for sale HUNTING-FISHING out your back door. 2 homes/5 bed/3 bath on 4.43 acres in Buhl, ID., $395,000. MLS#98534971, 1000 Springs Realty, Call Judy 208-539-9926 SALMON RIVER: 2+1 log home, studio +1, bunkhouse, 2-car garage (1,500-sf total living), 3-stall barn on 3.14 level fenced acres w/350ft river-frontage, 80-miles north of Ketchum w/hunting, fishing, riding @ $199,900. Adjacent 3.76 level fenced acres w/350-ft river frontage available @ $119,900.  Both parcels (6.9-acres + improvements) @ $299,900. Betsy Barrymore Stoll, Capik & Co. 208-720-4455. Beautiful 3 bed/2 bath mountain lodge-style home on nearly 2 acres 3.6 miles west of Stanley (Crooked Creek Sub.). Asking $495,000. Jason Roth, Broker, Legacy Group, LLC, 208-720-1256 Fairfield - 3bd/1ba, big fenced yard, fire pit, 2-car garage, outbuildings, chicken coop, woodstove. On 3 lots in town, walk to bars and restaurants. 1,792 sf, 2-story, propane, city water and sewer. Call 208-329-3109. Owner carry.

64 condos/townhouses for sale

For Sale in Hailey: $195,000 2bdrm 2ba 2car garage. Granite counters, GFA, energy efficient twnhm at Sweetwater Community ‘on the park’ location w/ northern mtn views! Luxury at a low cost! 917 Heartland. Call Today! Karen and Sue, The Realty

Advisors of Sun Valley , 208.788.2164 www.SWHRealty.com Sweetwater • Hailey, ID

77 out of area rental

Started with 49 Homes 48 SOLD • 1 Under Contract Sweetwater Townhomes KEYS TO NEW HOMES COMING SOON. Pricing Available Soon, Call or Stop by For More Information. Green Neighborhood www.SweetwaterHailey.com Village open 7 days a week (208) 788-2164 Sales, Sue & Karen The Realty Advisors of Sun Valley

70 vacation property Views, deck, Kitchen, Lg. bath sleeps 2. furnished. Available Feb. Mar. 12 min. from River Run. Rent: night, week, month. 788-4929 Spectacular Williams Lake, Salmon, ID 2BR 2BA 120’ lake-front cabin see www.lakehouse.com ad #1418 Hey Golfers!! 16 rounds of golf & 2 massages included w/ luxury 2 BR/ 2 Bath unit on beach in Mexico. Choose between Cabo, Puerto Vallarta, Cancun on availability $2900/ week. 788-0752.

73 vacant land ONLY 2 acre lot/Phase II., Allows horses. Gorgeous views, community park and water in Griffin Ranch. $335,000 OBO. 425-985-2995 ALL lots in Tews Ranch Subdivision on Highway 20 REDUCED 50%.. Has electricity & phone. Call Canyon Trail Realty 208-731-7022 REDUCED! 19 river front acres, 4 miles S. of Mackay. Fenced, fishing, wildlife, views, gorgeous!. $110,000. photos available jjgrif@gmail.com. 208-726-3656. 50% REDUCTION SALE by owner - 2.5 acre lots near Soldier Mountain Resort and Golf Course. Great skiing, underground power and telephone completed in scenic subdivision. $24,500. 720-7828. SALMON RIVER: 3.76 level fenced acres w/350-ft river frontage, 80-miltes north of Ketchum w/fishing, hunting, riding @ $119,900. Adjacent 2+1 log home, studio +1, bunkhouse, 2-car garage (1,500-sf total living), 3-stall barn on 3.14 level fenced acres w/350-ft river-frontage, 80-miles north of Ketchum @ $199,900. Both parcels (6.9-acres + improvements) @ $299,900. Betsy Barrymore Stoll, Capik & Co..208720-4455. Hagerman. Vacant lot in North view mature sub-division with own well system. Poor health forces sell. Great neighborhood. Hot springs,

84 carey, fairfield, or picabo rentals Carey. 4+ bedroms, 2 baths, fully remodeled, new paint, new carpet, fenced yard. 1st, last + damage. No smoking. $750 per month. Call 7881363 or 481-1843.

85 short-term rental 3bd/2ba house located on the bike path, great views convenient location fully furnished weekly and monthly rates. Please call 208-7885362 or 208-720-2900.

89 roommate wanted Roommate wanted. Mature, moderate drinking, no drugs. 2bd available for 1 person. North Woodside home. $350 + utilities. Wi-fi avail-

Latex Valentine Balloons

reduced from $1.50 to $1.00

• QUALIFIED TO FILE INDIVIDUAL, BUSINESS, CORPORATE, PARTNERSHIP AND NONPROFIT TAX RETURNS

Mylar Valentine Balloons

• FREE CONSULTATIONS

81 hailey rentals 3 BD/2 BA duplex, Just remodeled! No smoking, pet possible, avail early April. $1100/month + utils. Brian at 208-720-4235 or check out www. svmlps.com Nightly/weekly/monthly! 2 BD/1 BA condo, fully furnished/outfitted. Prices vary depending on length of stay. 208-720-4235 or check out www.svmlps.com

Place orders early for:

• BUSINESS REGISTRATION AND SETUP SERVICES AVAILABLE

OPEN SATURDAYS 10-3

80 bellevue rentals Rent with option to buy. 3BD/2BA, Private home, new roofing, landscaped, quite neighborhood, appliances stay. Pets negotiable. Available May 1st. 720-3157

All Valentine Makings Supplies in Stock!

(INCLUDES FEDERAL & STATE)

-SE HABLA ESPAÑOL CON CITA PREVIA-

78 commercial rental Bellevue Main Street 254 sq-ft to 1193 sq-ft Office/Retail & Fully Operational Bank 2619 Sq-ft, Allstar Properties, Jeff, 578-4412 Ketchum Main Street Office/Retail 1946 sq-ft, Allstar Properties, Jeff 578-4412 Cold Springs Business Park 2 Shop/ Storage Spaces across from St. Luke’s Hospital & US 75. Space H: 1120sf with 7’bay door, small office, bathroom; Space C: 480 sf with full bay door access,office, bath. Great rates for winter or long term 622-5474 or emil@sun valleyinvestments.com PARKER GULCH COMMERCIAL RENTALS - Ketchum Office Club: Lower Level #2-198sf, #4-465sf. Call Scott at 471-0065.

Valentine’s Day Buy 2 Valentine Cards, Get one free!

TAX PREPARATION STARTING AT $79

TAX NIGHTMARES?

Great house for rent, Fairfield. 6’ privacy fence. Pets welcome. Reduced rent to $550. Call for info 208727-1708 2bd, 1ba home on Salmon River Furnished - $650 month plus utilities. No smoking. First, last and deposit, pets neg. References requested. Located across from Old Sawmill Station between Stanley and Challis with easy access to River. Call Denise at 788-2648.

Don’t forget your sweetie!

Abacus Tax Services

I CAN HELP STOP GARNISHMENTS, FILE BACK TAXES, SET UP PAYMENT PLANS AND MORE.

Snake River and bird hunting near surrounding area. $29,000, owner consider carry paper. 208-788-2566

IN THE KETCHUM GATEWAY BLDG 251 S. MAIN, STE 200B, KETCHUM

OFFICE 726-7279 • CELL 720-5788 OPEN MONDAY THRU FRIDAY 9AM to 5PM, Year Round Early, Late and Weekend Appointments Available

T H E W E E K LY S U N •

reduced from $4.99 to $2.99

jane’s artifacts arts / / crafts / / papers /

/ party

Conveniently Located at 106 S. Main, Hailey • 208.788.0848

JANUARY 29, 2014

19


able. Dog possible, fenced yard. 720-9368. Looking for someone to share the cost of living these days? Say it here in 20 words or less for free! e-mail classifieds@theweeklysun.com or fax to 788-4297

100 garage & yard sales List Your Yard Sale (20 words or less is always free) ad and get a Yard Sale Kit for only $9.99. Your kit includes 6 bright 11 x 17 signs, 6 bright letter-size signs, 100 price stickers, 10 balloons, free tip book. What are you waiting for? Get more bang for your buck when you list your ad in The Weekly Sun!

201 horse boarding Barn for Rent - 2 stalls w/ 12’ x 36’ runs. Small pasture area, large round pen, hay shed, storage area, heated water. North Hailey near bike path. $200 a month per horse. Call 7882648 Horse Boarding available just south of Bellevue; experienced horse person on premises; riding adjacent to property. Shelter and Pasture available. Reasonably priced. Call 7883251.

203 livestock services Ariat Volant Vented Tall Boot. Never used . Size 7.5, New 499.95, now 200.00. 788- 4929

302 kittens & cats Please call Edna Benziger 914319-0692. Blessings and gratitude Big Fluffy Female Kitty needs home; indoor/outdoor. Great w/kids; potty trained (will go outside too). Great mouser. Move forces finding a new home. Free to a good home. 208721-0447.

303 equestrian Shoeing & Trimming: Reliable, on time. If you don’t like my work, don’t pay. (208) 312-5165 Farrier Service: just trim, no shoeing. Call 435-994-2127 River Sage Stables offers first class horse boarding at an active kid and adult friendly environment, lessons available with ranch horses. Heated

indoor arena and many other amenities included. Please contact Katie (208) 788-4844.

400 share the ride Need a Ride? http://i-way.org is Idaho’s source for catching or sharing a ride! For more information or help with the system, visit www.mountainrides.org or call Mountain Rides 788.RIDE.

5013c charitable exchange Does your non-profit have a service, product or item that you need or could share with another organization who needs it? List it here for free! Say it in 20 words or less and it’s free! We want to help you spread the word. Just e-mail classifieds@ theweeklysun.com

502 take a class NAMI Family-to-Family class starts February 4th for family & friends of someone living with mental illness. Call 309-1987 to register. Concealed Carry Class Idaho Utah Carey Senior Center, January 25th. Fairfield Senior Center Feb 1st class size limited. reservation 208-8800490 Sculpt Your Inner Goddess – class registration in progress. Call Sarah with Bella Cosa Studio at 721-8045 for details. Limited to eight participants. Ongoing Weekly Writing groups with Kate Riley. Begin or complete your project! 2014 Writing Retreats and more! Visit www.kateriley.org Hot Yoga in the South Valley - 8:10 to 9:40 a.m. on Tuesdays and Thursdays. $10/donation. Call for location/ Info: 720-6513. Tennis 101. Fun, family, fitness, a tennis program designed to teach the basics to all ages. 9-10:30 a.m. at WR High School, 1250 Fox Acres Road. Register at idtennis.com, (208) 322-5150, Ext. 207.

506 i need this long black gloves (prom type or like what Audrea Hephern worn is Breakfast at Tiffany’s. Can I borrow for a

week end. call Nancy 788-4347 will pay for space to store crated piano for 3 months. apx. size is 5’x2’x5’. needs temperature control. Erin 721-0254 BOOKS CAN CHANGE THE LIFE OF ANOTHER PERSON: So if you have some that are taking up space and would like to donate them, call Fabio at 788-3964 and we’ll pick them for free. NEEDED - Aluminum cans - your donation will support new play ground equipment Hailey. Drop donations off at 4051 Glenbrook Dr., Woodside Industrial Park or call Bob 788-0018 for pick-up.

509 announcements From Margot’s Table to Yours— Specializing in small B&B styled menus. Parents, enjoy special time with your family and let Margot do the cooking. Contact Margot for all of your cooking needs including special occasions or parties. 208-7213551 margot6@mindspring.com or blog.tempinnkeeper.com. From Margot’s Table to Yours Specializing in Small B&B styled Menus. Parents, enjoy special time with your family and let Margot do the cooking. Contact Margot for all of your cooking needs including special occasions or parties. 208-7213551 margot6@mindspring.com or blog.tempinnkeeper.com THE OCTOPUS HOOK MURDERS happened in the Wood River Valley. In Kindle or Paperback. Amazon. com books. We pay cash for quality bicycles, fly fishing and outdoor gear - Ketchum Pawn. 208-726-0110. Are you struggling to make ends meet? Not always enough to pay the bills and buy groceries? The Hunger Coalition is here to help. Hundreds of local families individuals have food on their table and some relief from the daily struggle. Confidential. Welcoming. Supportive. There is no reason to face hunger alone. Call 788-0121 Monday - Thursday or find out more at www.thehungercoalition. org. Have an announcement you’d like to share? Send someone wishes for their special occasion, or list events

for your businesses, etc. Say it here in 20 words or less for FREE! E-mail classifieds@theweeklysun.com or fax 788-4297.

510 thank you notes Thank you for your caring kindness! Show your appreciation! Say thanks with a FREE 20-word thank you note, right here. e-mail your ad to classifieds@theweeklysun.com.

good, good tires. 73,000 orig. miles. $2,500 OBO. 208-329-3109.

611 trailers 1962 Vintage Airstream like trailer by Avion, 20 ft. Call for more details, $4,700. 788-3674 Small enclosed specialty trailer. Perfect to tow with compact vehicle or small SUV. $2,250. 788-3674

612 auto accessories 512 tickets & travel Frequent trips to Boise. Need something hauled to or from? Call 208-320-3374

514 free stuff (really!) FREE BOXES - moving, packing or storage. Lots of sizes. Come and get ‘em or we’ll recycle them. Copy & Print, 16 W. Croy St., Hailey.

BMW tires w/rims size P)195/75R14 921. 2 New-2 used slightly. $400.00. 788-4929

620 snowmobiles etc. 1997 700 RMK - custom paint, skis. Always garaged. $1,500 OBO. Call 208-721-1103. PROGRESSIVE INSURANCE - For all of your snowmobile needs. Call 208-788-3255

DEADLINE

518 raves Like something? Don’t keep it to yourself! Say it here in 20 words or less for free. e-mail your ad to classifieds@theweeklysun.com or fax it over to 788-4297 by Noon on Mondays.

602 autos under $5,000 1988 Range Rover for Sale! Spotless interior, white exterior, 4wd, and 68,964 miles. Starting at $4,500. 208-788-3854 for more details.

12 p.m. on Friday

PLACE YOUR AD • Online: fill out an auto form on our submit classifieds tab at www.TheWeeklySun.com • E-mail: include all possible information and e-mail it to us at classifieds@theweeklysun.com • Fax: 208-928-7187 attn: The Weekly Sun

604 autos under $10,000 2004 GMC Yukon SLT 4WD, good condition, 215k miles, one owner, $8,500. 208-308-2550 MERCEDES BENZ “CLASSIC 1994” E320 - Square Grill - Best MB engine. Perfect Condition - 109K miles. Immaculate w/ Michelin Tires (plus 4 studded snow tires.) $5380 OBO Must Sell Now.

606 autos $10,000+ PROGRESSIVE INSURANCE - For all of your automotive needs. Call 208-788-3255

610 4wd/suv 1982 Ford Bronco - 4x4, white, standard 351. New battery, runs

• Mail: PO Box 2711, Hailey, ID 83333

COST All Line Ads 20 words or less are FREE in any category. After that, it is 17.5¢/per word. Add a photo, logo or border for $7.50/per week in b/w, or $45 for full color. Classified Display Ads are available at our open rate of $10.98/column inch

You You Can Can Find Find ititin in Blaine! Blaine! happy new year 33-50% off clearance!!! Everything!

25%Display off everything All for Sale clearing out old, making way for new Wed-Sat 12-5 wed-sat 12-5 closed new year’s day bellevue • 788-9879 bellevue square square • 788-9879

Lago Azul

FULL SERVICE Warranty Shop

Valley Paint & Floor 108 N. Main, Hailey (208) 788-4840 775 S. Main St., Bellevue • (208) 788-4705

8-5:30 Mon-Fri • 9-12:30 Sat www.logproducts.com

Roof to

Your Rain We Offer Gutter, We’ve Got Catering

we are the Wood CATERING Any Occasion River Valley’s Big & Small Parties NEW Serta iComfort Open 11am-10pm mattress store!

Open 11am-10pm

578-1700

578-1700

Hailey (next to Hailey Hotel)

Hailey (next to Haileyfully Hotel) insured & guaranteed

208.788.5362

726.2622 • 491 E. 10th St., Ketchum • www.fisherappliance.com

Starting at

829

$

00

0% INTEREST for 24 months! We are the Wood River Valley’s NEW Serta icomfort mattress store!

SCOTT MILEY WeROOFING now carry

From Your Roof to Your Rain Gutter, We’ve Got You Covered!

FREE DELIVERY in the Wood River Valley FULL SERVICE Warranty Shop

Come check us out!

775 S. Main St., Bellevue • (208) 788-4705

726.2622 • 491 E. 10th St., Ketchum 8-5:30 Mon-Fri • 9-12:30 Sat www.logproducts.com

www.fisherappliance.com

T H E W E E K LY S U N •

Airport West | Hailey, Idaho 83333

THE THE TRADER TRADER Consignment for the home Consignment for the home

Everclean & Magic Fresh

Valley Paint & Floor 208.788.5362 108 N. Main, Hailey (208) 788-4840 fully insured & guaranteed

Airport West | Hailey, Idaho 83333

There’s like home! There’sno No place Place Like Home! 20

You Covered!

14 W. Croy

14 W. Croy

$ Kahrs Flooring 82900

FREE DELIVERY in the Wood River Valley

ROOFING

Salvadorian & Mexican Cuisine From Your

Salvadorian & Mexican Cuisine

We now carry Starting at

0% INTEREST for 24 months!

Lago Azul SCOTT MILEY

JANUARY 29, 2014

Wednesday through Saturday Wednesday through 11:00 to 5:00Saturday 11:00 to 5:00 Always available by appointment if we’re Always and available byhere. appointment and if we’re here.

720-9206 or 788-0216 or• 788-0216 509720-9206 S. Main Street Bellevue, Idaho 509 S. Main Street • Bellevue, Idaho

The Weekly Sun - 01/29/14  
Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you