{' '} {' '}
Limited time offer
SAVE % on your upgrade.

Page 47

But VR has greater potential than simply entertainment. The Neverland team realizes that it can advance the education experience for students of all ages. This motivated their partnership with Garnet Valley High School last summer. They installed two full VIVE Pro stations, loaded with various educational experiences that were in line with the high school’s syllabus. There’s adaptive physical education, for students who may be in a wheelchair to have the opportunity to play sports like tennis. To make the entire process of dissection less unpleasant, the frog dissection simulator is perfect for biology students. A particularly unique experience is in learning the composition of the human eye; students can literally delve into the eye and can see how each component works from the inside. Neverland stays in touch with the school to see how the students are using the technology, and if there are any programs that they can install to integrate VR further into daily instruction. The founders aim to continue building partnerships with schools and teachers in the area and even had the opportunity

to present the possibilities of VR in academics at last year’s Science Teachers Association Conference. But they also understand that the technology may be overlooked because of cost. The alternatives to installing a full Premier station include field trips for students to Neverland, or bringing Neverland to the school with the pop-up stations. VR headsets can also be put on a cart that can circulate around classrooms, just like the laptop carts some of us had in schools. “This is the world that my kids are going to live in. VR is going to transform a lot of industries,” says Lynn, “It’s much more than gaming.” The possibilities for adapting this rapidly developing technology for educational use are endless. One brilliant use of it is for psychologists, who can use VR to build certain scenarios to help patients. There has been research done on the effectiveness of this technology in “exposure therapy” of anxiety disorder treatment. This kind of therapy is all about guiding patients in facing their fears so that they can overcome certain psychological barriers. VR creates social and sit-

uational simulations that the psychologist can use in therapy sessions. This can address the fear of public speaking, but it has also been noted to help with PTSD. Lynn hopes to apply this locally and partner with psychologists this year to see what kinds of programs can be beneficial to their practice. For older students, particularly those requiring specialized skills and scenarios, VR can offer valuable learning experiences. For example, the field of medicine is rapidly developing VR software for its students to practice important surgeries in simulations as many times as necessary, without consequences. “How can surgeons practice not only basic surgeries, but also rare surgeries?” posits Lynn. Neverland aims to grow and make waves in the local community, expanding partnerships with educators while exploring how other industries can also benefit from its services. To get the word out about what they have to offer, Neverland applied to a program at West Chester University’s entrepreneurship program to partner with

FEBRUARY 2020 THEWCPRESS.COM

47

Profile for The WC Press

The WC Press Digital Issue - February 2020  

Voice of the Borough

The WC Press Digital Issue - February 2020  

Voice of the Borough