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CONTENTS F E AT U R E

18

THE NEW DOWNTOWN

Mayor Chuck Reed, city developers, residents and some of Downtown’s biggest supporters tell us how the city’s cultural and residential renaissance is transforming San Jose into a thriving urban center.

38

70

INTERVIEW 70

SETH ROGEN

The comedy megastar’s latest film, Pineapple Express, is packed with comedy, cops, car chases and cannabis… lots of cannabis.

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22

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DEPARTMENTS UPFRONT 06

LETTERS { you talk }

10

SPOTLIGHT { local news }

16

HIT LIST { editors’ picks } LIFESTYLE

22

26

72

MOVIES Reviews and Previews: Pineapple Express, Bottle Shock, Swing Vote and more.

74

ARTS Feature: SoFA, so good: Brazilian artist Bruno 9Li’s exhibition META demonstrates the strength and scope of Downtown’s growing gallery scene.

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FAMILY & COMMUNITY Feature: Downtown San Jose features an astonishing array of family style fun.

SPORTS & ADVENTURE Feature: Why Guadalupe Park & Gardens in San Jose may soon be the answer to New York’s Central Park. HEALTH & BEAUTY Feature: With Tova Day Spa, Plum Spa and Beautiful By Design, Downtown residents need not go far for their spa experience.

36

STYLE & SHOPPING Feature: Could Downtown San Jose soon be home to a hip shopping district?

38

HOME & DESIGN Feature: Expert tips plus inspiring pics on making a penthouse feel like home. 14 DAYS

46

50 WAYS TO LEAVE YOUR SOFA { top events }

48

DINING Feature: Lobster corn dogs, Kobe beef sliders, great Thai curry and chorizo burritos are just a few of the many delicacies you’ll find Downtown.

COLUMNS 08

DREGULATOR { media watchdog }

77

HOT TICKET { arts alert }

86

THE FINAL LAST WORD { local opinion }

16

SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTIONS SV GUIDES: 25 EXERCISE & LIFESTYLE 37 FASHION 56 ONLINE MENUS 66 WINERIES 81 WEDDING PLANNING

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NIGHTLIFE & MUSIC Feature: A fail-safe guide to the bars, pubs and clubs of Downtown’s buzzing nightlife scene.

SV MARKETPLACE:

26

78

84 HOME IMPROVEMENT

5VOTE NOW!

READERS’ CHOICE BALLOT ON PAGE 17

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MASTHEAD

OUR PEOPLE W R I T E U S @ T H E W AV E M A G . C O M

The Wave Magazine Silicon Valley's Finest Entertainment & Lifestyle Magazine Volume 08, Issue 16 | July 28 - August 10, 2008

THE WAVE MEDIA President/Publisher: B. Peter Brafford Associate Publisher: Chris Rhoads

Vice President, Corporate Relations: Dan Ferguson Vice President, Sales: Bill Hargreaves

EDITORIAL Events Editor: Johnny Brafford Senior Editor: Jo Abbie Assistant Editor: Mitchell Alan Parker Copy Editor: Ed Robertson

Contributing Writers: Seanbaby, Fred Topel, Cintra Wilson, Michael J. Vaughn, Tom Lanham, Damon Orion, Irene Kew Editorial Intern: Kellen Dickinson

ART / PRODUCTION Design Director & Photographer: Chris Schmauch Graphic Designer: Jon Sontag

Contributors: Lisa Ferdinandsen

[ DESIGN ]

SALES / ADVERTISING Advertising Director: Bill Hargreaves Online Sales / Marketing: Chris Rhoads Traffic Manager: Yvonne Gonzalez

Marketing / Traffic Coordinator: Rebekah Hollister District Sales Managers: Ken Sorensen, Ray Klopp, Janette Deuerling, Carol Zimring

CLIENT SERVICES Account Managers: Yvonne Gonzalez, Rebekah Hollister

ONLINE IT Support: Jenny Phan Design / Code: Chris Schmauch

Online Publishing: Jon Sontag

CIRCULATION Director of Circulation: Matt Smith

Circulation Representatives: Javier Segura, Guillermo Merino, Heather Deveraux, Luis Barreto, Alberto Velarde, Rogelio Galvez, Bertha Fernandez

EMAILS Display Ads: advertising@thewavemag.com Marketplace Ads: marketplace@thewavemag.com Editorial: writeus@thewavemag.com Events: events@thewavemag.com

Design: design@thewavemag.com Employment: jobs@thewavemag.com Distribution: distribution@thewavemag.com

ADVERTISING INFORMATION Bill Hargreaves (408) 467-3260 advertising@thewavemag.com

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Send to writeus@thewavemag.com or use the mailing address below.

P UBLICAT ION INFORMAT ION

SUBSCRIPTIONS to The Wave Magazine run

The Wave Media publishes The Wave Magazine.

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All content of this issue is copyright Š2008 by The

tion, call (408) 467-3200 or visit

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whole or in part without the express written consent of the publisher. The Wave is available throughout

ED IT O RIA L C O N T RIBU T IO N S

the Silicon Valley; one copy of each edition of

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SUBSCRIP T ION INFORMAT ION BACK ISSUES of The Wave Magazine are available for $5. Please submit your request for a back issue to: 1735 Technology Dr., Suite 575, San Jose, CA 95110.

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manuscripts, artwork and photographs to: The Wave Magazine, 1735 Technology Dr., Suite 575, San Jose, CA 95110

Phone: (408) 467-3200 Fax: (408) 467-3401


MY DOWNTOWN KEYWORD: CONVENIENT. Downtown San Jose living means that within walking distance is a host of great restaurants like Paragon, where I can enjoy lunch or dinner and get some work done. It also means convenient access to museums, theaters, health clubs and other services like my favorite salon Umbrella. DAVID WAIN COON lives downtown and is the President of Evergreen Valley College.

WHAT’S YOUR KEYWORD? | DOWNTOWN SAN JOSE. YOU’RE INVITED. | SJDOWNTOWNLIVING.COM


LET TERS

WRITE US@TheWaveMag.com LETTERS FROM YOU

When sending letters, please include your full name, city, state, and daytime telephone number. Letters may be edited for clarity or length and may be used in any medium owned by The Wave Media. Send snail mail to 1735 Technology Dr., Ste. 575, San Jose, CA 95110 and email to writeus@thewavemag.com. A while back, you guys did an article on teaching babies to swim [“Playing Along,” Vol. 8, Iss. 10]. I want to learn to swim, but I’m no baby. When I turned to the internet to find somewhere to learn to swim, all I found was a bunch of swimming classes for babies. Okay, so there were a few adult ones, but all at odd times and in weird places. You guys seem to be pretty informed about things like this. Do you have any tips for an adult who wants to swim? Jenna San Jose

Try San Jose Aquatics (Call their Swim Lesson Hotline, on 408-799-4645), Club One’s Silver Creek Sportsplex (408-226-8080, www.clubone.com) or the good old YMCA of Santa Clara Valley (www.scvymca.org). Good luck with your freestyle. A few weeks ago, I promised my fiancé that I’d take her on a date. (Do people really go on dates after being together for eight years?) I had no idea where to take her, and I had a feeling that half-pound cheeseburgers and onion rings followed by the new Batman movie was out of the question. You guys totally saved me! I picked one of the local restaurants from the Michelin article [“Star Treatment,” Vol. 8, Iss. 15] and bought tickets to West Side Story, as listed in your 50 Ways. Thanks a million… I’ll send you the bill next week. Mike Santa Clara Good grief, sunblock is expensive. Thanks for the article on sun protection [“We’ve Got Your Back,” Vol. 8, Iss. 15]. I honestly think that 90 percent of people are absolutely clueless on how to protect themselves from skin cancer and sunburn. I have to say, I thought I was pretty knowledgeable, but I’ve never used an entire tube in a sunny weekend! I cringe when I buy one and it lasts a month, especially when the good stuff is pricey. But, better safe than sorry! Nadine Campbell Is it, like, a rule that you guys have to have any superhero that’s about to hit the box office on your cover? I do want to see The Dark Knight, but I have to say that every time a new frickin’ comic book movie comes out, I get so overwhelmed with all the hype that it starts to drive me crazy. I am so tired of seeing everything Batman! Dave San Jose While I find the article on co-working interesting [“Co-working in Silicon Valley,” Vol. 8, Iss. 15], I don’t buy that people are more productive when sharing a space. I get way more work done when I’m by myself at home, regardless of what I’m wearing or what’s on TV. When I do go out to do work at a coffee shop, it’s because, yes, I get tired of being at home. But I never get as much work done, and end up spending more time drifting off or checking out cute girls or reading whatever papers or magazines are lying around than actually working. And when I did work in a cube, at a regular job, I’ll admit that I spent at least 40 percent of my time either surfing the web or chatting about sports with the guy next to me. James Los Gatos

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LET TERS

THEWAVEMAG.COM JULY 28 - AUGUST 10, 2008

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COLUMN: THE DREGUL ATOR

THE DREGULATOR B Y C I N T R A W I L S O N - W R I T E U S @ T H E W AV E M A G . C O M

Coming soon: Toy subpoenas and Wii waterboarding.

E

ver since they were “outed” in Vanity Fair several years ago, furries – those unfortunate people who can only achieve their most ideal sexual satisfaction by dressing up in plush, anthropomorphic, animal mascot suits – have become so accepted, they’re almost considered mainstream. Yet devotees of infantilism – grown men and women who like to dress up as toddlers, roleplay Disney movies, sit in oversize high chairs, drink from nipple bottles and have their diapers changed – are still forced to indulge their fantasies underground. Secrecy, of course, makes perversions fester and squeeze their way out into the culture in other inappropriate and perverse ways. Infantile behavior seems to have leaked all over the place lately, from the population explosion of the Jolie/Pitt nation-state to Washington’s enduring affection for worlds within worlds of make-believe. Congress, for example, has been wearing its “angry eyes” at Attorney General Mike Mukasey, while pretending to cite him for contempt. But that’s OK: Congress isn’t actually angry, and besides, it won’t mean anything unless they start exercising so-called “inherent contempt” – i.e., sending the Sergeant at Arms over to the homes of Mukasey, Karl Rove, Harriet Miers, Alberto Gonzales and all the other kids that used “executive privilege” to ignore their subpoenas and pistol-whipping them into compliance. Washington Post political correspondent Dana Milbank wrote a droll piece about the funny way in which Congress put on a show of talking to Rove, who wore his cloak of invisibility during the ongoing flim-flam about Valerie Plame Wilson. Of course, Rove didn’t actually show up for the hearing because he’s far too important. He did, however, send along a note from White House counsel Fred Fielding which apparently said something like, “Mr. Rove is on a tropical island after eating all the FBI files and White House hard drives with fava beans and a Virginia Chianti. You’ll never catch him alive. Bwa-ha ha ha ha.” Yet Congress was such a sport about this, they actually addressed their proceedings to an empty chair with Rove’s name on it! According to Milbank, they even actually scolded Rove’s chair – which is sort of like wagging your finger at him in effigy. Ho-ho, ha ha! Congressional subpoenas are so much fun now that they no longer mean anything (much like $20 bills). Pretty soon, you’ll be able to get toy subpoenas for the kids, in pink, green or blue razzleberry. It’ll be like one of those Wild West booths in an amusement park, where you put on a black handlebar mustache and get yourself photographed behind bars with one of those guns that shoots out a

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flag that says “Bang!” But if you’re a kid from nine to 90 who really thinks the rule of law is more fun than Silly String, there’s “Mr. Kucinich’s Fraktabulous Make-Believe Impeachment Hearing,” which promises to be exactly like a real live impeachment hearing, so long as you use the power of imagination. Why, it’ll even be like a real live dog and pony show, provided you bring your own dog, a plastic Pegasus with a long, combable mane, and plenty of sippy-cups brimming with Seagram’s Gin & Juice, so that if you drink enough you’ll start to believe the dogs and ponies might actually do something. Speaker Nancy Pelosi has assured Americans that nothing will happen as a result of articles of impeachment being brought to the House Judiciary Committee. Silly Americans – the House won’t vote on impeachment, but will focus instead on “general abuses of power” (“abuses” being different from actual “crimes” in that they’re not actually impeachable offenses, at least in wacky wiggly moon-man lawyer talk). So everyone in Congress will enjoy themselves performing this bit of community theatre, then afterward they’ll go out and eat banana splits with little paper American flags and sparklers all over them. Meanwhile, Vanity Fair’s Christopher Hitchens, playacting at journalistic bravery (how very Geraldo Rivera of him), got himself “waterboarded” so he could weigh in with a definitive statement about whether or not waterboarding actually constitutes “torture.” You’ll all be relieved to know that Hitchens, who cleverly deduced earlier this year that women aren’t funny, has declared that the answer in fact is yes. He ought to know: He tried it twice, because he wimped out too fast the first time and decided that he’d better try it again – you know, to make sure it really was torture. What great news for our enemy combatants. Because if whining, overly doughy men like Hitchens can endure waterboarding, it can’t be that bad. Before long, waterboarding will be the next bungee jumping. Heck, they’ll probably have the Wii version out next year. And we’ll all stand in line for hours to buy it, won’t we, fiends. Because, after all, it’s American. TW


COLUMN: THE DREGUL ATOR

THEWAVEMAG.COM JULY 28 - AUGUST 10, 2008

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SPOTLIGHT: NOTEWORTHY NEWS

SPOTLIGHT NOTEWORTHY

NEWS

$10 OFF Class Enrollment

Mention this ad or Use online code: 2020 Offer expires 9/07/08

Fall Classes Sign-ups Available Now! t OPEN STUDIO t CLASSES t KID’S NIGHT OUT

t ART INSTRUCTION t SUMMER CAMPS t YOUTH

t PARTIES t STUDIO RENTAL t ADULTS

Movin’ On Up A luxury San Jose penthouse awaits one lucky raffle winner.

S

SPOT L IGH T

o, you’ve just woken up in your $1.2 million San Jose penthouse, and you’re fixing up a little breakfast on your slab granite countertops. As you take in a 15thstory view of the Valley through your floor-to-ceiling windows, you can’t help but smile as you reflect on the fact that you not only bought your home for just $150, but helped countless homeless people in Silicon Valley in the process. Dare to dream, right? Actually, come Oct. 3, this will be the glorious reality for one local raffle contestant. The winner of the Dream Home Raffle will not only be the lucky owner of a two-bedroom, two-bath penthouse located in San Jose’s City Heights building, but be one of 18,000 ticket buyers who helped raise a million dollars to support one of 20 programs throughout Santa Clara and San Mateo counties run by InnVision, a nonprofit service agency. “This idea ties in very nicely with our mission,” says Nancy McHenry, InnVision’s director of marketing and communications. “It’s part of our tagline, ‘InnVision: The way home.’ Our focus in all of our programs is to help 10

THEWAVEMAG.COM JULY 28 - AUGUST 10, 2008

individuals and families live independent lives and live in their own homes, and for many people – about 20,000 in Santa Clara every year – this is a challenge. We are working really hard to end chronic homelessness, and this funding will really go a long way to support that.” If the winner of the Grand Prize is already happy with their current home, they will have the option of receiving a million dollars instead. All told, more than 100 prizes will be given out to raffle winners. McHenry notes that given the limited number of tickets being sold, each participant will have a 1-in-180 chance to win a prize valued at least over $300, or a 1-in-18,000 chance to win the penthouse or a million dollars. “Those are pretty good odds!” she eclaims. For additional information about the raffle, go to www.siliconvalleyhomeraffle.com, or call (866) 5814527. To learn more about InnVision, visit www.innvision.org. For more information on the penthouse and City Heights, call (408) 286-2489 or go to www.cityheightssanjose.com.


SPOTLIGHT: NOTEWORTHY NEWS

Your Choice with purchase of a new 2008 BMW motorcycle at San Jose BMW Only.* *$750 FREE SJBMW GIFT CARD or $600 FREE GAS CARD with purchase of 2008 K1200GT, K1200LT or R1200GS Adventure; $550 FREE SJBMW GIFT CARD or $400 FREE GAS CARD with purchase of 2008 K1200S, K1200R, R1200GS or R1200RT; $350 FREE SJBMW GIFT CARD or $250 FREE GAS CARD with purchase of 2008 R1200R, F800S, F800ST or any G650X model. All HP models and others not listed are not eligible. Not Valid with any other offers.

PLEASE CALL FOR FULL OFFER DETAILS. Expires 8/31/08 THEWAVEMAG.COM JULY 28 - AUGUST 10, 2008

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SPOT L IGH T

Š 2008 BMW Motorrad USA, a division of BMW of North America L.L.C. The BMW name and logo are registered trademarks. Always wear a helmet, proper riding gear and ride responsibly.

WOW!


SPOTLIGHT: NOTEWORTHY NEWS

SPOT L IGH T

70 feet of Fun!

Browse a library of ancient tomes or tour a replica of an ancient tomb.

Taste of Santa Cruz Sail Winemaker Sails Brewmaster Sails Wednesday Night Races Ecology Brunch Cruises Sunset Cruises Aloha Island Grille Sails Sushi Sunday Sails Team Building Private Parties Weddings

(831) 423-1213 www.chardonnay.com

$49.50

plus tax per person

All Public Sails include light refreshments

View celestial phenomena from the planetarium or meditate in an 18th Dynasty Egyptian peace garden.

Rosicrucian Park has so many intriguing treasures all in one place; it’s no mystery why Rosicrucian Park is San Jose’s best-kept secret.

Chardonnay II is licensed, insured and Coast Guard inspected 12

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SPOTLIGHT NOTEWORTHY

Staying Dry

NEWS

Santa Clara Valley Water District groundbreaking event

New project will keep San Jose safe from flooding.

T

he Santa Clara Valley Water District (SCVWD) has entered the construction phase of its third and final effort to reduce flooding along San Jose’s upper Guadalupe River. This project covers a six-mile stretch of river that has flooded five times since 1982. The $256 million initiative will prevent $330 million in damages from a 1-percent flood, protecting more than 2,300 acres of land that encompass approximately 7,500 homes, businesses and schools. Completion of the project will also put an end to the mandatory flood insurance policy currently instated for floodplain residents, resulting in an annual savings of more than $7 million. Humans aren’t the only beings that will benefit from SCVWD’s efforts. The removal of nine concrete barriers from the river will clear the path for steelhead and Chinook salmon. “The project will provide long-term beneficial impacts to stream ecol-

ogy, wildlife and fisheries,” says SCVWD senior project manager Dennis Cheong, adding that it will allow the City of San Jose to construct a six-mile continuous creekside trail connecting the Almaden Valley trail to Downtown San Jose and, ultimately, San Francisco Bay. The project, whose cost is shared by SCVWD and the Army Corps of Engineers ($119 million and

$137 million, respectively), is the culmination of approximately 20 years of collaborative planning and designing by SCVWD and the Corps, as well as the City of San Jose, environmental special interest groups, regulatory agencies and the community. The task, which will be carried out in parts, is scheduled for completion in 2016. Santa Clara Valley Water District www.valleywater.org.

SPOT L IGH T

THEWAVEMAG.COM JULY 28 - AUGUST 10, 2008

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SPOTLIGHT NOTEWORTHY

NEWS

Updates on local business openings. California Wheels

LOS GATOS

CAMPBELL

SHOE FETISH

CALIFORNIA WHEELS

216 N. Santa Cruz Ave. (408) 395-2211

2250 Winchester Blvd. (408) 341-1646 www.caliwheels.com

Shoes, shoes and more shoes. This boutique in downtown Los Gatos is truly for those can’t get enough footwear. Opened in March 2008, the newer of the store’s two locations carries a variety of top-name shoe brands: Cynthia Vincent, Cole Haan and Francesco Biasia are just a few. And what goes perfectly with a new pair of Stuart Weistman stilettos? Well, a new handbag, of course – and Shoe Fetish carries a wide selection to meet the needs of the bag-obsessed. BABY COO 140 W. Main St. (408) 395-2802 www.babycoo.us

With the green movement at its strongest, this unique boutique, located in the heart of Los Gatos, is setting the standard for infant wear and baby care. If you’re a mom concerned about what your little ones are wearing, you can rest assured they’ll be safely bundled in organic clothing that is both fashion- and environmentally friendly. FUZE 15405 Los Gatos Blvd. (408) 358-7529 www.fuzefit.com

PALO ALTO RED MANGO 429 University Ave. (650) 324-1811 www.redmangousa.com

The latest frozen yogurt bar to hit downtown Palo Alto, Red Mango offers tart nonfat frozen yogurt and a healthy selection of toppings. You can even suggest new ones. The vibrant colors and chic coffeehouse atmosphere make for a festive, not to mention delicious, dessert experience. SIMPLY BE SALON & SPA 528 University Ave. (650) 323-1009 www.simplybesalon.com

Simply Be Salon & Spa mixes traditional spa and salon practices with new cutting-edge procedures. They offer all of the typical spa services with their own modern twist, such as the Simply manicure/pedicure, the mint chocolate spa and their hydro four facial, in addition to hair and makeup services and private party packages. Their amenities are perfect for those who need a break from the rush of everyday life. TW

SPOT L IGH T

A revolutionary, state-of the-art gym designed just for kids, Fuze is youth fitness made fun! Children can burn off some of their energy by using Fuze’s interactive fitness equipment such as Dance Dance Revolution, or they can test their flexibility in one of the club’s yoga or Pilates classes. Those are just a few of the many activities and programs available for children. Parents, meanwhile, can help fill those long summer days with Fuze’s Ultimate Summer camps.

The newest of two Bay Area locations, this Campbell automobile business will have your car looking swanky in no time. They offer a variety of high-end accessories for any car, from tires, wheels and rims to custom lowering and lifting services.

Let There Be Light San Jose facility gives burgeoning solar companies the tools they need to succeed.

T

he business unit of the San Jose-based semiconductor development foundry SVTC Technologies has just established the Silicon Valley Photovoltaic Development Center (SVPDC), an 87,000-square-foot facility dedicated to providing the solar industry with the infrastructure, services and support it needs to develop product. Located in South San Jose, the center offers shared access to photovoltaic equipment, as well as testing and certification resources. As SVTC solar program manager Kurt Laetz points out, there’s a lot of money in green funds at the moment, and much of it is going to all solar companies. In order to execute their development programs, all of these start-ups need the kind of equipment, facilities and resources that the Photovoltaic Center provides. “The value we offer to Silicon Valley companies that are entering the solar industry is that we can speed their time to the market and revenue for their products, and we can do that for them at a lower development cost than they would otherwise have,” Laetz states. He notes that SVPDC’s business model is to have the facility,

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the engineering resources, the equipment and the testing certification resources these companies need to support their development programs, so that customers can walk into the center, immediately start up their development program and get their projects completed. “This is the very same business model that we [use to] supply the semiconductor industry with services,” he says. SVPDC’s first key partnership is with the German solar equipment manufacturer Roth & Rau, which will be providing a five-megawatt baseline production line for the facility. The center’s first customer is JA Solar, a Chinese solar cell manufacturer that will be bringing some of its development engineers to Silicon Valley to access the center’s equipment. “We’re really launching this center as an international facility that will have the ability to bring the solar industry from a global level down to Silicon Valley,” Laetz says. TW Silicon Valley Photovoltaic Development Center www.siliconvalleypv.com; SVTC Technologies www.svtc.com


SPOTLIGHT: NOTEWORTHY NEWS

SPOT L IGH T

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» FEATURE

HitList

» FEATURE

37

C O M P I L E D B Y M I T C H E L L A L A N PA R K E R

Jawbone Bluetooth Headset us.jawbone.com Referred to (by us, of course) as “the Prada of Bluetooth technology,” the Jawbone isn’t all about looks – it’s the only headset that can “accurately separate speech from ambient noise.” And with the new California law that requires a hands-free phone when driving, this means that road calls will be crystal-clear, even if you’re driving a softtop Jeep Wrangler, vacuuming a gravel driveway, showering, or flying in a Zeppelin. Because while it’s perfectly fine for people to think you’re a nutjob talking to yourself, there’s no excuse for looking unstylish. $129 from Best Buy

Bowers & Wilkins Zeppelin iPod Speaker

HIT L IST

www.bowers-wilkins.com

Dom Pérignon Rosé Vintage 1996 Guitar Case www.domperignon.com The Dom Pérignon Rosé Vintage 1996 campaign (which was shot by enigmatic fashion icon Karl Lagerfeld and starred impossibly leggy blonde bombshell Eva Herzigova) has been revived, thanks to the release of the Dom Pérignon guitar case. That’s right – a guitar case of champagne. And not just any champagne, but 10 bottles of Dom Pérignon Rosé Vintage 1996. They also throw in three champagne flutes for the reported price of over $100,000, plus buyers are granted a private tasting at the brand’s headquarters in France. What’s so special about Dom Pérignon Rosé? Because a large enough quantity of the exceptional quality grapes required to make the vintage is so rarely attained, it is always released in limited numbers. The company’s tasting notes describe the 1996 rosé as having “the aroma of malt,” which “rapidly leads into that of well-ripened fruit, nectarine and wild strawberries, complemented by smoky, peaty accents.” 16

THEWAVEMAG.COM JULY 28 - AUGUST 10, 2008

No, this not a hydrogen-filled dirigible. These are high-end speakers for iPods and iPhones that milk big, crisp sound from your tunes. Sure, we’ve featured iPod speakers in the past, but the sleek design of the Zeppelin speakers couldn’t be overlooked. Aluminum dome tweeters act “like an acoustic black hole, swallowing superfluous sound from behind the dome,” while its three amplifiers use digital signal processing for ultimate listening quality control. So what’s the point of such an expensive sound system? We think it’s a conspiracy by Ashlee Simpson’s record company to make her music bearable once and for all. Oh, the humanity! $599.95 at Century Stereo, 450 El Paseo de Saratoga, San Jose (408) 341-1950 www.centurystereo.com

Arne Jacobsen’s Cowhide Egg Chair Design Within Reach, Santana Row, 3080 Stevens Creek Blvd., Ste. 1010, San Jose (408) 261-8875; 151 University Ave., Palo Alto (650) 328-2700 www.dwr.com The sleek design of legendary Danish designer Arne Jacobsen’s Egg chair has been around for 50 years now, and has become a ubiquitous “symbol of sophisticated urbanism.” Now, for the first time ever, the classic and comfortable Danish chair is available in cowhide upholstery. Yee-haw! The Danes are known for Vikings, pastries, a difficult language, big dogs and, of course, innovative design. The price may be a little steep, but since Copenhagen is the sixth most expensive city in the world in which to live, these chairs are actually on the cheaper side. $12,418 TW


I

t’s official – you may now cast your vote to determine Silicon Valley’s favorite businesses. Here’s the deal: Fill out at least 20 of the entries in the categories below with your favorite local businesses (national chains excluded) and mail in this ballot complete with your personal information by Aug. 8, 2008, and you’ll automatically be entered in the drawing to win a trip for two to Tahoe and other great prizes. Winners will be announced in the Sept. 8 issue of The Wave Magazine. One entry per person, please. No photocopies. Suspected ballot stuffers will be disqualified with extreme prejudice.

 FULL NAME

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17


THE NEW DOWNTOWN

The future of Downtown San Jose has never looked better. BY MITCHELL ALAN PARKER

rom his office on the 18th floor of City Hall, San Jose Mayor Chuck Reed peers out over Downtown, the sky scraped by multiple new high-rise condos, while admiring the fact that these will bring more than 1,000 residents – not to mention, their disposable incomes – into the capital of Silicon Valley. The residents will soon begin frequenting nightclubs, bars, restaurants, retail stores and art galleries, all bolstering the Downtown area.

F

Reed then notices a green cart silently floating along a Downtown street. The machine is part of the innovative, ambitious and friendly Groundwerx crew, which at any moment is on sidewalks all over the city, cleaning up streets and chatting with residents. For Reed, it all seems to be coming together. “Downtown is just a nice place to live,” he says. Thousands of people are echoing the mayor’s sentiment, about which he speaks often and emphatically. Every day, Reed sees firsthand what the future of San Jose holds. He seems genuinely proud to be at the helm as the city experiences what San Jose Downtown Association (SJDA) executive director Scott Knies calls a “comeback of Downtown.” IN THIS ISSUE: DOWNTOWN SAN JOSE FEATURES

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THEWAVEMAG.COM JULY 28 - AUGUST 10, 2008

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DOWNTOWN SAN JOSE MAP

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SAN JOSE’S CENTRAL PARK Many locals don’t know just how much Guadalupe River Park and Gardens has to offer. By Kellen Dickinson

26

THE BEAUTY OF DOWNTOWN San Jose’s Downtown district boasts all kinds of pampering options for spa devotees. By Kellen Dickinson

36

THE FUTURE OF SHOPPING Coming soon: Downtown San Jose as a retail mecca. By Jo Abbie

38

PENTHOUSE LIVING How to transform a slick new penthouse from a modern showroom to a place that feels like home. By Jo Abbie

48

DOWNTOWN DINING From down-home carne asada to the finest quality filet mignon, Downtown’s impressive restaurant scene truly spans the spectrum.

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DRINKING IT ALL IN With its vast selection of bars, clubs and pubs, Downtown San Jose has never been more vibrant.

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META POSSIBILITIES Bruno 9Li’s amazing new exhibit at Anno Domini typifies the growth and scope of Downtown’s art scene. By Jo Abbie

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A FAMILY AFFAIR There’s more to Downtown San Jose than just wining and dining. By Irene Kew


Fifty years ago, Knies says, San Jose was just shaking off its reputation as a largely agricultural-based city, a metropolis accustomed to being overshadowed by its neighbor to the north, San Francisco. “In contrast,” Knies says, “We’re still deciding what and who San Jose is. The making of cities takes centuries. We’re still very young.” Ask Reed about the perennial comparison between San Jose and San Francisco with respect to cultural identity, and he’ll tell you he finds it absurd. “I stopped worrying about [that] a long time ago,” he says with a wave of his hand. “We’re different here. We have our own identity. We’re the capital of Silicon Valley. We are the innovation center of the world, and we’re only going to get better.” Toward that end, Knies and the SJDA, in partnership with the Redevelopment Agency and other entities, are committed to constantly improving Downtown San Jose by bringing in events like Music in the Park and the San Pedro Square farmers market to embolden and strengthen community ties. “The making of a city is never complete,” Knies says. “In the next five years, there will be more of a relation of what it means to be the capital of Silicon Valley, the creative urban center of Silicon Valley.” Walkability will remain at the forefront of the city’s makeover. According to Reed, reimagining Downtown as a place where cars are left behind in exchange for a biped experience was not only part of the city’s planning from the beginning, but will continue to be the impetus for future developments. “It makes for a better experience,” he says, adding that the city is working on “bikeability” issues as well. So what exactly is in store for the future of Downtown? The sky’s the limit, really. Large investments and developments in housing, transportation, arts and culture, and the expansion of the convention center and civic auditorium are already underway. But the key to creating and maintaining a rapidly growing city is ensuring that more people reside within its boundaries – and accommodating that influx of people goes hand in hand. Few know this better than John Weiss, assistant executive director of the San Jose Redevelopment Agency. According to Weiss, 4,000 new housing units were created in Downtown in the past 10 years. Today, approximately 1,000 units (The 88, Three Sixty Residences, Axis and City Heights) are about to be made available, while another 4,000 units are on the drawing board. “We are looking at a major population increase,” he says. “A large portion of that influx will be of the so-called Millennial Generation. And the retail will follow.” For ex-photojournalist Kymberli Brady, Downtown won her over a long time ago. While covering the first Grand Prix in San Jose, she noticed what she described as a “silent growth spurt” taking place Downtown. One night, while peering through the green gate of Paseo Plaza (then a new condo development on Third Street), she thought to herself, “What a cool place to live,” likening the building to a New York brownstone. “It was an awakening for me,” Brady says, adding that she soon bought one of the condos and has lived there in Downtown ever since. “I love it,” Brady continues. “I can walk to work at the Chamber of Commerce, walk home at 10am or

“Downtown is just a nice place to live.” – Mayor Chuck Reed midnight; I go out at 2am and take pictures; people are really friendly. My 14-year-old son, Cole, loves the amenities, too. And Groundwerx, they are so nice, worth every penny of my extra tax dollars. It just adds to the friendliness of Downtown. On Saturdays, I can take my dog, Starbuck, to San Jose State for a walk and I can hear the chimes. There are lovers on the benches, people mingling at The Grill, kids playing in the water… for a photographer, it’s a great city.” And now, apparently, even Bon Jovi has recognized the appeal of Downtown San Jose. When the legendary rock band called for footage of Downtown to be featured at their recent concert at HP Pavilion, Eric Beckett answered. Over a three-week period, he spent most of his time hanging out Downtown with a video camera. His compilation of footage won the Bon Jovi contest, earning him VIP access to the concert, where he watched his video streamed behind the band as they played their hit song “I Love This Town.” “I hadn’t thought about this town very much until I started shooting the video,” Beckett says. “But I wanted to show the uniqueness of San Jose.” Throughout his scavenging, he says he soon discovered the little things in San Jose that he feels often go unnoticed, such as airport buses that run on natural gas, or a Downtown fire truck with a shark fin on it, paying homage to the San Jose Sharks. Because a city without adequate transportation support can’t keep up with the population growth, getting in and out of San Jose safely is one of the main goals for future transportation developments. “I believe Downtown will become one of the best transportation hubs in all of California,” Weiss says, pointing out the significant presence of two light rails, the Ace train, Caltrain’s commuter rail and the eventual expansion of BART into the Diridon station within the next 10 years. “People will naturally want to live in San Jose,” he predicts. Reed agrees, emphasizing how vital bringing BART to San Jose is. “It’s one of our most important goals,” he says, adding that the next step is getting a proposed eighth-of-a-cent sales tax increase on the ballot in November to fund the project. The mayor is also excited about the future of solar technology in the city (a topic he often addresses in his speeches). Currently, the Tech Museum is working on installing solar panels, and Reed says that over the next few years he is working to get other buildings fitted with panels. Next in line is most likely the Convention Center, City Hall, the Arena and various parking structures. As for the Convention Center, Dan Fenton, CEO of the San Jose Convention and Visitors Bureau and chairman of the nonprofit organization Team San Jose, is making a name for himself by bringing an innovative approach to wooing big events to San Jose. Instead of sending convention planners a bill and asking for payment, Fenton says he and his team not only get directly involved, but are an important part of the event process. “Our role and vision is different,” he says. “We are an integral part of events and want to make sure we can help.”

Fenton has certainly done that, virtually doubling revenue for the eight buildings his bureau manage (from $6 million in 2004 to well over $11 million in the last fiscal year). “It’s very clear what Team San Jose has done and what it will continue to do,” he says, adding that “Our incentive is to produce a global result on behalf of the city and bring more people here.” Some ways Fenton plans on accomplishing this is by bringing major festivals Downtown, such as the recent Zero1 Fest, the Jazz Fest and the upcoming Mariachi Fest on Sept. 25-27, which Fenton says has the future potential to reach 100,000 people and expand into a weeklong event. There is also plenty of buzz generating for the upcoming da Vinci exhibit at the Tech Museum, which when it opens in September will be the largest collection of da Vinci artifacts and replicas in the US. Fenton’s unorthodox approach has even led the visitors bureau to act as a movie production company (the bureau is financing a series of movies that will be shown as part of a planned film festival at the California Theater). It’s all part of his efforts to establish a cultural identity for San Jose. The result has been a welcome fusion of art and technology that, for Bruce Davis, couldn’t have come at a better time. “The arts in Downtown San Jose are definitely in an upswing,” says Davis, executive director of Arts Council Silicon Valley. “First Act, the city’s Redevelopment Agency, private developers, and the mayor’s office all seem to be singing the same tune, which is that the arts are vital to the Downtown economy and make the area more desirable for residents and employees. Bottom line: Where there are people, there is the arts.” With a rapidly maturing art district, an innovative convention center, the spirit of Leonardo da Vinci, thousands of new housing units, dozens of world-class restaurants, and a safe and eclectic nightlife scene – all supported by a mayor and a team of visionaries heading organizations all committed to making San Jose a cultural boomtown all its own – the future of Downtown looks bright indeed. TW FIVE THINGS YOU DIDN’T KNOW ABOUT DOWNTOWN

1. Downtown San Jose is home to the first major new City Hall of the 21st century. 2. From the parking level to the 18th floor of City Hall, there are 439 stairs. (No wonder the mayor is so slim.) 3. “San Jose Semaphore,” the art installation on top of the Adobe Systems building, has four LED discs that rotate, creating a coded message that happens to be the entire text of Thomas Pynchon’s The Crying Lot of 49. 4. Downtown’s Plaza de Cesar Chavez was once the site of California’s state capitol building in the mid-1800s. 5. The last public lynching in California took place in St. James Park in 1933. THEWAVEMAG.COM JULY 28 - AUGUST 10, 2008

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» FEATURE

Sports&Adventure

» FEATURE » EXERCISE & LIFEST YLE

Families gather along one of the park’s trails.

San Jose’s Central Park

SPOR T S & A DVEN T URE

Many locals have no idea just how much Guadalupe River Park and Gardens has to offer. BY KELLEN DICKINSON

U

nbeknownst to many locals, a world of undiscovered outdoor fun (254 acres of it, to be exact) is sitting right in their own backyard, a wonderland known as Guadalupe Park and River Gardens. Nestled between Highway 880 to the north and Highway 280 to the south, the three-mile regional park runs along the banks of the Guadalupe River. In addition to 150 acres of public parkland, the Children’s Discovery Museum, the world’s largest Monopoly board and a renowned rose garden, the park boasts 2.6 miles of trails, plus a wide variety of ongoing activities and events for adults and children alike. Visitors can volunteer for rose deheading and contribute to the bloom of more than 4,400 rose plants, take a ride on a carousel, or get their hands dirty and take a class on worm composting.

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Recently, the park hosted a free event for families called Adventures on the Green. Local children’s recording artist Andy Z arrived to play a couple of sets of songs, and booths from nonprofit organizations such as Our City Forest were there to provide families with information on the importance of Guadalupe River. “It was just another way to bring people into Downtown so they could experience the park and know it’s there,” explains Leslee Hamilton, the park’s executive director. “It really ties to our mission of promoting the development and active use of the park.” The park’s mission is evident in everything it has to offer. Apart from special events like Adventures on the Green, the park features regular activities such as day camps, fitness classes and educational programs. Flower Arranging 101, Yoga in the Park and Family Fitness are just some of the many classes offered. Tennis courts lie between Santa Clara Street and St. John Street, while the recently completed 2.6 miles of trails will soon extend south to Almaden Valley, connecting even more of the surrounding area. The park’s involvement in educating the community about the green movement is also apparent. Hamilton has seen a huge increase in interest in home gardening recently, and as a result the park not only offers composting workshops, but also sells worm and compost bins for backyard use. The water district will also give a demonstration on water efficiency later this year. “We are really hoping that by doing these projects here, there are things that can be replicated in other parks across the city and in neighborhood backyards,” says Hamilton.

UPCOMING EVENTS River Day Camp Aug. 4-8, Aug. 11-15 9am-1pm (depending on age) Ages 5 to 10 This day camp, held at the Visitor and Education Center, still has a few spots available. For three or four days per week, children learn about different topics such as fossils, fitness, the weather, animal tracking and more. Flexible days allow parents to plan the camp around their schedule. Through Science of Sports Class Aug. 4-8, Aug. 11-15 9am- Noon, 1-4pm Grades 4 – 8 A class for sports fanatics and science whizzes of all kinds. Children will learn the physics behind all their favorite sports. At the end of the four-day experience, the little Newtons will create their own sport using all they have learned. Rose Deheading Aug. 12, Sept. 9, 5-7:30pm All ages welcome For those in the mood to help out the community this summer, this is just the job. Head on over to the Heritage Rose Garden and help snip off all of the dead roses in order to promote the growth of more blooms. Free ice cream will be provided for a job well done. Tapestry Arts Festival Aug. 30 – Sept. 1 The festival is a three-day celebration of visual and performing arts in San Jose. It not only includes artists and craftspeople, but music, food booths, a home and garden show and much more. Proceeds go to arts education programs in schools and arts outreach in the community. Other Activities: Adopt-a-Rose Program, Composting Workshop, Flower Arranging 101, Summer Walking Series, Yoga in the Park, Family Fitness, My Own Marathon, Pumpkins in the Park, and more. For times and dates, go to www.grpg.org.

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SPOR T S & A DVEN T URE

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SPORTS&ADVENTURE: FEATURE

SPORTS&ADVENTURE F E AT U R E

[ C O N T. ]

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Yoga in the Park

SPOR T S & A DVEN T URE

Guadalupe River Park and Gardens has come a long way in recent years. Not only is it providing a model for others to replicate, it has become a gathering place for locals – which is one of the goals Hamilton set out for the park to achieve. Another goal she plans to achieve is to increase awareness of all the park has to offer. “I’d like more people in San Jose to know about the park and know about the amenities – whether it’s the trails, or the arena green area with the carousel and play lawns, or the beautiful gardens we have out here.”

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That goal is not far from her reach. With wait-lists for some classes, it seems the word about the park’s many offerings is spreading. With Downtown San Jose’s growing residential population, Hamilton not only has hopes for a farmers market, but sees the area as a fully functional park that in 10 or 15 years will be the hub of the city. “Great cities have great parks,” says Hamilton. “You think of Golden Gate Park or Central Park. This will be San Jose’s Central Park.” TW


SPORTS&ADVENTURE: FEATURE

SV

Enjoy the Game!

EXERCISE & LIFESTYLE

» EXERCISE & LIFEST YLE

DANCE STUDIOS

Western Ballet

Ernie Reyes West Coast Martial Arts

914 Rengstorff Ave., Unit A, Mountain View (650) 968-4455 www.westernballet.org Western Ballet provides an atmosphere of care and dedication for all levels, from absolute beginner to professional dancers. Students range in age from four to 95. FITNESS CENTERS

1830 Hillsdale Ave. Ste. 2, San Jose (408) 371-4235, 168 E. Fremont Ave., Sunnyvale www.akakickbox. com The American Kickboxing Academy offers top-level public instruction for men, women, and children. In addition, AKA provides private professional training.

AlaVie Fitness 120 W. Campbell Ave., Ste. D, Campbell www. alaviefitness.com Cutting-edge outdoor fitness boot camps for all ages and fitness levels. Ten Bay Area locations. 5K/10K training and other fitness events and services. Women’s, coed and corporate programs.

Ernie Reyes West Coast Martial Arts 668 Lincoln Ave., San Jose (408) 993-8122, 7050 Santa Teresa, San Jose (408) 629-2441 www.erniereyes.com For children and adults, martial arts teaches focus, confidence, self-discipline, fitness, flexibility, coordination and weight, as well as respect for themselves and others.

Fairtex Muay Thai Fitness 2044 Old Middlefield Way, Mountain View (650) SOUTH 938-8588 www.fairtex.com FairtexBAY Muay Thai is RUNNING an internationally recognized sportsCLUBS fitness facility specializing in authentic Muay Thai training since 1971. AIDS Marathon: Marathon training Silver Creek Sportsplex www.aidsmarathon.com/home/sf.html 800 Bay Embedded Way, San (408) 225-1843 Trail Runners: TrailJose Running www.silvercreeksportsplex.com www.baytrailrunners.com The 240,000-sq.ft. facility is the largest under one roof in North America Sanstate Jose:of-the-art Half and whole marathon — aGalloway truly unique, complex cateringtrainto ingactive www.urbansports.info today’s families and individuals. Palo Alto Run Club: www.parunclub.com Quicksilver Running Club: Fun run, marathon, and ultra marathon training (408) www.quicksilver-running.com 271 Houret Dr., Milpitas 946-0600 Spartans Club: Interval training www.southbayathleticclub.net Southwww.gospartans.org Bay Athletic Club Stevens has always beenStriders: a leader Trail withrunning innovative fitness Creek programs, and yet we always keep the old favorites www.stevenscreekstriders.org around – like racquetball and swimming! Team in Training: Half and whole marathon training www.teamintraining.org/sj

South Bay Athletic Club

FOR MORE INFORMATION, LOG ON TO WWW.THEWAVEMAG.COM

r Martial Arts r NEW! Lacrosse r Flag Football r Dodgeball r Inline Skating r Club One Fitness r Banyan Spa

r Pro Shop r High Five Restaurant r Mighty Cubs Child Development r Corporate & Private Events r Team Building r & more!

SPOR T S & A DVEN T URE

American Kickboxing Academy

C all to da Don’t m y! iss It’s ALL under one roof: the new r Soccer r LOL Parties season ! r Roller Hockey r Sports Camps

A truly unique facility with 240,000 sq.ft. of state-of-the-art amenities and expert services. We offer leagues, training, and superb facilities for an incredible array of sports and events, for all ages from toddlers to adults, beginner to elite.

You have to see it to believe it!

408.225.1843 www.SilverCreekSportsplex.com THEWAVEMAG.COM JULY 28 - AUGUST 10, 2008

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Tova Day Spa’s lobby

Tova Day Spa’s coed jacuzzi

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Tova Day Spa’s fourfunction hydrotub capsule

The Beauty of Downtown San Jose’s Downtown district boasts all kinds of pampering options for spa devotees. BY KELLEN DICKINSON

S

pa enthusiasts who live in the new apartment developments in Downtown San Jose won’t have to travel far to for their Swedish massages or seaweed wraps. Whether it’s the expansive resortstyle facilities and sophisticated service of the Tova Day Spa at the Fairmont Hotel, the warm environs and lavish treatments of First Street’s Plum Spa, or the cutting-edge treatments and customized facials at Beautiful By Design, they’ll find a selection of treatments and services that’s just for them, right at their in-need-of-a-pedicure feet.

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Tova Day Spa 170 S. Market St. (408) 292 8682 www.tovadayspa.com Since opening in March 2008, Tova Day Spa at the Fairmont Hotel has become the jewel in the crown on the Downtown spa scene. The world class facility is a popular destination for many local residents and business people, as well as hotel guests. “We have people from the hotel, people from around town and people from the whole Bay Area,” says owner Tova Yaron. With its 6,000-square-foot space, the Tova Day Spa is an impressive facility, complete with steam room,

sauna and top of the line equipment. And with all of the condo developments currently being constructed Downtown, Yaron looks forward to a boom in business from future residents. “We’re already sold many gift certificates to the high-rises – they give the gifts to the people that are buying the apartments,” she explains. (Tip to buyers at Three Sixty Residences: hold off on that facial.) Yaron also predicts that spa memberships will be popular with local residents. “People that buy memberships have free access to the facility. They can enjoy the Jacuzzi, steam room, sauna – and then when they have treatments, they get 10 percent off.” One of the spa’s most popular treatments is their hot poultice massage: Therapists first give the skin a polishing scrub, then massage the body with an poultice filled with a mixture of organic herbs and essential oils, to release tension and revitalize the mind. 28


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The men’s room at Tova Day Spa includes full private showers and saunas.

Plum Spa

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74 S. First St. (408) 971-9713 www.plumspa.com Plum Spa has been around since 2000, and has witnessed the changes Downtown over the past few years. One of the spa’s owners, Lori Batchelor, explains that moving her independent business from Campbell was difficult at first, because many of her clients were unwilling to venture Downtown. But that void was soon filled. “Because of the residential growth Downtown, we were able to build back up our clientele,” she says, adding that she hopes that growth will continue at Plum Spa with the current influx. The name of the spa is derived from the word plum – not only the fruit, but the meaning as something highly desirable. The label is certainly appropriate, given all of the lavish treatments and services the venue has to offer. These include the Jamu Indonesian spa ritual (a procedure that Plum is one of only the 10 spas in the nation to offer), plus signature treatments including the Plum crush manicure, Plum signature aromatherapy facial, and the Plum crush body buff.

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Beautiful By Design 521 S. Market St. (408) 947-8281 www.bbdskincare.com Though its Downtown location has only been open since August 2007, Beautiful By Design is something of a spa scene veteran (owner Cindy Arvayo began the business in 1997). It is not your stereotypical relaxation destination type day spa – its primary focus is Endermologie, a cutting-edge, FDA approved cellulite reduction and body contouring treatment. Specialties such as an infrared cellulite seaweed wrap and sudatonic slimming system are ideal for those keen to try innovative treatments. But Beautiful By Design also offers procedures more at home on a typical day spa menu, such as the European corrective facials and the fruit enzyme peel. The spa can even put together a combination of treatments designed specifically for each client. TW


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SPA CAMPBELL DESIGNER’S LTD. SALON & SPA $$ 2523 Winchester Blvd. (408) 378-7300

Services: Massage, hair styling, highlighting, waxing, facials, microderm, glycolic peels, reflexology, make-up, manicure and pedicures. Special Features: With over 28 years of experience, Designer’s will provide you with all your beauty needs, from your basic manicure to a cutting edge hair style. Book any service over $50 and receive a $25 gift card towards a facial or massage on your next visit. STAR SALON & SPA $

A Visionary Salon “Providing Hair Restoration & Extensions for 18 years”

(408) 979-1195 Private Studio – By Appointment Only

www.AVisionarySalon.com Female, before

Female, after (using Micro Point Link)

Instant Hair In 2 Hours Only our exclusive Micro Point Solutions is

Male, before

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Non-Damaging Invisible Lightweight

2260 S. Bascom Ave. (408) 377-2151 www.starsalonspa.com

Services: Facials (refresher, classic European, ultimate European), massages (back and neck, full body, deep tissue, foot reflexology), tanning, hair removal, nail care and full salon services. Special Features: If a regular facial just doesn’t cut it for you, go for the Ultimate at Star Salon & Spa. It’s 80 minutes of pure facial bliss, with an AHA chemical peel that smoothes fine lines, lightens hyper pigmentation and promotes cell growth, followed by hydrating, toning, a facial, and a neck and shoulder massage, and ending with a nourishing masque. Also, check out the massage packages, which are a great bargain at $240 for six half-hour sessions.

FREMONT CLARITY SPA $$ 40000 Fremont Blvd., Ste. D (510) 656-2100 www.clarityspa.com

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Services: Facials (purifying, skin resurfacing, dendrology, tri-enzyme, hydrating, vitamin C, gentlemen’s, skin balancing, lymphatic cleansing, superlifting, aromatherapy, refresher), microdermabrasion, peel (sensi, ultra peel I/II, PCA), body treatments (back, lymphatic drainage cellulite treatment, mind and body rejuvenation, French soft and silk salt glow, perfect legs), waxing and tinting. Special Features: Extra means better at Clarity Spa with $20-andbelow add-ons that will enhance your spa experience. Get an instant super lift for $20 or the special ampoule containing vitamins A, E, C, collagen, DNA and oxygen for $12. EUROPEAN DAY SPA $ 40643 Grimmer Blvd. (510) 770-1237 www.europeandayspa.com

Services: Massages (hot stone, Swedish, deep tissue, reflexology, integrated, aromatherapy, prenatal, spa hand and foot), facials (European deep pore cleansing, Dermalift nonsurgical facial lift, glycolic acid, acne, back, men’s), body treatments (salt glow body polishing with hydrotherapy bath, cellulite, seaweed body wrap, mud body wrap, slimming/detoxification, buff and bronze w/hypnotherapy), makeup, eye treatment, manicures and pedicures. Special Features: Spa packages are the way to go if you can’t decide

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how best to pamper yourself. From career women and moms-to-be to teenagers and couples, European Day Spa has you covered. LAVENDER BEAUTY SPA $$$ 47854 Warm Springs Blvd. (510) 353-1311 www.lavenderbeautyspa.com

Services: Facials (classic, Repechage four layer, Hungarian organic, hyper hydrating, teen, acne, silkpeel, anti-wrinkle firming and lifting defense, lightening, puffy-eye treatment, oxygen treatment, LumiLift, Lumifacial), body treatments (mud wrap, body contour wrap, lemon sugar body polish, spa paraffin, cellulite treatment), waxing and eyelash perming. Special Features: Rehydrate with oxygen and choose one of Lavender’s facial treatments like the ECHO2Plus Oxygen Treatment System, which uses pure medical grade oxygen packed with 87 different vitamins, minerals, enzymes and amino acids. VISUAL IMAGE SALON $ 5200 Mowry Ave., Ste. C (510) 792-5922 www.visualimagesalon.com

Services: Facials (signature, traditional European, acne, glycolic acid peel, microdermabrasion, back), eye, lip and neck treatments, eyebrow and lash tinting, waxing, hair salon and makeup. Special Features: Become a model and get your haircut or colored for free. Models are used for training future hair stylists, and qualified educators are on hand to supervise.

GILROY BEAUTY LOUNGE $$$ 1275 First St. (408) 846-5172

Services: Massages (reflexology, shiatsu, prenatal, sports, Swedish, aromatherapy, warm stone), tanning, facials (anti-aging, deep pore, acne, glycolic, enzyme peel, microdermabrasion), permanent makeup, hair treatments and waxing. Special Features: Take a dip in their hydrotherapy tub and take home something special from their boutique, which sells designer jewelry, lingerie and health products.

HALF MOON BAY PRIMROSE COUNTRY DAY SPA $ 630 Purissima St. (650) 726-1244 www.primrosespa.com

Services: Massages (Swedish, deep tissue, four hands, aromatherapy, warm stone, couples, prenatal), facials (pumpkin, resurfacing, rosacea, Jan Marini C-ESTA, teen, enzyme peel, hyper pigment treatment, acne), body wraps (herbal, mud, seaweed), scrubs, waxing, tinting, hand and feet care and electrolysis. Special Features: Facials are Primrose’s specialty, with options like Epicurean enzyme and oxygen treatment, salicylic acid, microcurrent eye treatment and frozen live cell therapy.

RITZ-CARLTON, HALF MOON BAY SPA $$$$ One Miramontes Point Rd. (650) 712-7040 www. ritzcarlton.com/en/Properties/ HalfMoonBay/Spa/Default.htm

Services: Massages and touch therapies (Half Moon Bay signature, couples, sports, reflexology, prenatal, Thai, invigorating scalp, shiatsu, healing stone, deep tissue), facials (calming lavender, the Half Moon Bay, men’s protection, renovateur, deep cleansing, Carita intense hydrating renovateur, Carita extreme softness renovateur, Carita purifying balance renovateur, Carita lift firming renovateur, Prada radiance visage), body treatments (pumpkin body peel, Prada replenishing body facial, fresh lavender wrap, aromatherapy body polish), nailcare, hair salon, hair removal, makeup, fitness center and wellness services. Special Features: This ritzy spa’s fitness center, steam room, sauna, whirlpool, and coed Roman mineral bath are complimentary for guests purchasing a treatment.

LOS ALTOS CIANA DAY SPA & SALON $$ 111 Main St. (Salon); 107 Main St. (Spa) (650) 941-1285 www.cianasalonspa.com

Services: Facials (essential, ultimate, elemental nature, outer peace acne relief, men’s, LaStone, purifying facial for acneprone skin, 55-minute express, microdermabrasion), waxing, hand and feet therapy, hair salon and makeup. Special Features: If you want the pampering to continue at home, throw a microdermabrasion party, where a certified esthetician from Ciana visits you. YELKA DAY SPA $$$ 2049 Grant Rd. (650) 9691117 www.yelkadayspa.com

Services: Facial therapies (Treatment 21TM, pumpkin pie refining peel, hydraplenishing oxygen, MoistureLock collagen, ultimate decadence, mini decadence, regenerating caviar pearl, frosty mint spirulina, intense glycol-firming, microdermabrasion, Lumi, acne), massages (deep tissue, aromatherapy, aqua-thermal trio, personalized plus, mom-to-be, Treatment 21TM deep relaxation), body treatments (Adriatic lavender salt polish, chocolate raspberry buff, cellulite reduction, slimming detox, hand brightening and retexturizing, reflexology, aromatic scalp treatment), waxing, tinting and spa packages. Special Features: Caviar used to be something you ate, but now it’s something you put on your face – well, almost. The Regenerating Caviar Pearl Facial takes the finest of caviar extracts, which compel skin cells to metabolize, leaving your face radiant.

LOS GATOS CLOUD 9 SKIN & BODY CARE $$ 501 N. Santa Cruz Ave., Ste. 2 (408) 354-0710 www.cloud9x.com 32


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SPA 30

Services: Massages (deep tissue, trigger-point, acupressure, Thai, reflexology, Swedish gentle, hot stone, Reiki, lymphatic drainage, prenatal), facials (Cloud 9), body treatments (herbal cellulite wrap with foot reflexology, fabulous bodacial with salt scrub, herbal mask, aroma steam, moisture treatment), hair removal, nail care, naturopathic medicine, chemical and metabolic rebalancing, and chiropractic services. Special Features: Feel weightless in a flotation tank filled with 800 pounds of Epsom Salt – proven to relieve stress and muscle tension. GABRIELLE SALON $$ 540 N. Santa Cruz Ave., Ste. D (408) 395-7260

Services: Massages (aromatherapy, Swedish, deep tissue, hot stone, prenatal, sports, chair, focus), facials (Aromessance, men’s, teen, sea, sensitive skin, deep pore cleansing, antioxidant, glycolic peel, back), body treatments (salt glow, moor mud, coffee scrub, airbrush tanning), waxing, nail care, hair salon and makeup. Special Features: Coffee lovers should try the Café Latte manicure, in which the hands are soaked in coffee beans and steamed milk before the rest of the treatment. LUSCIOUS SKIN $ 401 Alberto Way, Ste. D (408) 370-9121 www.lusciousskin.com

Services: Massages (therapeutic Esalen, Reiki technique), facials (fountain of youth petite, tropical, deep cleansing European, firming, deep pore cleanse, soothing “C,” paprika with AHA, Lisa’s seasonal special), brow/lash tinting and hair removal. Special Features: Try the Paprika Facial with AHA, the signature treatment which “regenerates, rejuvenates and detoxifies” the skin. THE MOMMY SPA $$ 413-A Monterey Ave., (408) 395-2009 www.themommyspa.com

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Services: Massages (specializing in pregnancy and postpartum massage, plus Swedish relaxation, deep tissue, and hot stone massage, trigger point therapy, and couples and infant massage classes). Also offers Reiki and guided meditation. Special Features: Founder Lindsay MacInnis has extensive training and experience, studying under such recognized experts as New York’s Elaine Stillerman and San Diego’s Carol Osborne-Sheets. As a result, she has advanced certification in pregnancy massage, and over 70 hours of specific prenatal training. For new mommies, newborns to three-month-olds are welcome during postpartum therapy sessions, with time for infant care and feeding as needed. RENDEZVOUS SALON & DAY SPA $$ 529 N. Santa Cruz Ave. (408) 354-3085

Services: Massages (warm stone, Swedish body, therapeutic, aromatherapy), facials (Rendezvous ultimate, detoxifying, anti-aging rejuvenation, acne controlling), skin resurfacing (microdermabrasion, exfoliation power peels), hair salon, nail care, hair removal, brow design and makeup. Special Features: Rendezvous offers 32

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special add-on services, including detoxifying arm treatment, décolleté microdermabrasion and rejuvenation treatment, balancing back facial, hydrating hand and paraffin treatment, and after facial makeup application. Makeup applications in styles such as film, photography and television are also provided. SHANGRI-LA LOTUS $$ 412-A Monterey Ave. (408) 3951139 www.jennysbeauty.com

Services: Eyelash extensions, permanent makeup, hair styling, curling and straightening, facials (Heavenly Indulgence, classic, teen facial, Dermafile, back treatment), microdermabrasion, waxing, spa pedicures, manicures and nail care, makeup for weddings and special occasions. Special Features: Owner Jenny Dinh has been doing eyelash extensions for over 15 years. During the wedding season, she’s given as many as 10 brides a month the long, lush lashes of their dreams. STUDIO JOULE $$ 130A N. Santa Cruz Ave. (408) 395-3773 www.studiojoule.com

Services: Massages (30-, 60-, 90minute; sole session foot reflexology treatment; Joule face and body duo, mother-to-be, eucalyptus escape), facials (classic Joule, petite studio, studio teen, microdermabrasion, lightening, Obagi skincare system, Joule facial packages, Jan Marini signature), hair removal, lash and brow tint and makeup. Special Features: Find out which makeup looks best on you with a complimentary consultation with Jane Iredale Mineral Cosmetics. YVETTE’S INSTITUTE DE BEAUTE $$ 248 W. Main St. (408) 395-1551

Services: Massages (aromatherapy massage, aromatic sauna wrap, tension relief neck and shoulder, renewing hand treatment), facials (deep pore cleansing, Guinot hydradermie oxygenating, hydradermie plus anti-aging, ultimate hydration, calming sensitive skin, purifying teen, regulating, aromaplasty mineral, luminizing, lift defense, collagen, oxyliance revitalizing, flash beaute vitamin C, evidence antiaging firming, refreshing mini, deep cleansing back, soothing eye contour treatment), body treatments (Swiss herbal wrap, anti-cellulite body mask, toning/ firming sculptural, mother-to-be, firming neck and décolleté mask), makeup, lash and brow tint, hair removal and nail care. Special Features: For intensive care, go for the Glycolic Acid Peel or the Beta Hydroxy Acid Peel. The Glycolic is designed to make skin healthy and glowing, and with the Beta you can choose a booster to treat a particular problem area.

MENLO PARK INSPIRATION DAY SPA $$

neck, back and shoulders, prenatal, reflexology, shiatsu, Swedish), facials (inspiration, rose quartz, age perfecting, collagen veil mask, microdermabrasion), body treatments (Hamman, green clay mud wrap, champagne, caramel chocolate sundae, journey to serenity, bronzing), waxing, hair salon, makeup and nail care. Special Features: The DNA CryoStemTM skin therapy system fuses the synergy of DermaNutraceutical technology with cryogenic bio-cell therapy to hydrate your skin. Integrate it into your day at the spa and take some home for later use. PERSONA DAY SPA $ 1166 El Camino Real (650) 328-2836 www.personadayspa-mp.com

Services: Facials (European, vitamin C, collagen, teen, men’s, glycolic), body treatments (botanical body buff, parafango firming and anti-cellulite series, back cleansing), massages (Swedish, reflexology, deep tissue), makeup, lash tinting and perming and waxing. Special Features: Marriage should not be taken lightly and neither should the wedding day. That’s why Persona Day Spa offers prewedding consultations on makeup application and, if needed, onlocation assistance on your big day. THERMAE DAY SPA $$$ 103 Gilbert Ave. (650) 8333131 www.thermaespa.com

Services: Massages (classic relaxing, deep tissue, hydrotherapy, lymphatic, maternity, warm soothing stone specialty, aromatherapy, neck, back and shoulder), facials (purifying/deep hydrating, oxygen, aromatherapy, anti-aging, vitamin C, teen, men’s, microdermabrasion), body treatments (exfoliating salt scrub, hydrating and healing mud wrap, detoxifying herbal wrap, hydrotherapy baths, nail care, waxing and makeup. Special Features: It’s not enough just to look great on the outside. Therma’s wellness center takes care of your inner being with services such as counseling, a 25-minute meditation session and personalized Ayurveda nutrition sessions (to help you understand what foods are best for you, according to your mind and body type).

MOUNTAIN VIEW AMERICAN MALE SALON $$$ 560 Showers Dr. (650) 9419994 www.americanmale.com

Services: Waxing, salon services, paraffin hand dips, foot and hand detailing, skin and back treatments, and massages (Swedish stress relief, deep tissue sports, reflexology). Special Features: American Male Salon offers a host of packages to help men look and feel great, such as the three-and-a-half-hour Ultimate American Male Combo that includes a Swedish massage, facial, hand and foot detailing plus a professional haircut.

325 Sharon Park Dr. (650) 854-5885 www.inspirationdayspa.com

Services: Massages (signature, deep tissue, heated desert stone,

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HEALTH&BEAUTY SPA

JUUT SALON SPA $$$

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PALO ALTO BEAUTY CLINICA $$$ 200 S. California Ave. (650) 326-3442 www.beautyclinica.com

Services: Massages (deep tissue, couples, aromatherapy, hot stone, maternity, lymphatic drainage. Swedish, Esalen), facials (clean and clear, European, urban defense, back, acne, aromaplasty, alpha glycolic, sensitive skin, hydrating, herbal peel, gentlemen’s, anti-aging, regulating, oxygen), hair removal, nail therapy, body treatments (de-stress aromatherapy body wrap, Dead Sea full body masque, passionfruit body salt rub and massage, anti-cellulite, aloe vera oil body wrap, sculptured firming treatment, aroma), hair salon, makeup and hair removal. Special Features: A trip to Beauty Clinica is like taking a mini vacation, without the hassle of traveling. Their wide range of full- and half-day packages, which comes with a healthy spa lunch, will leave you feeling on top of the world. Especially popular is the Half-Day Getaway, which includes a facial, massage, body treatment, manicure, pedicure and a hot spa lunch. BODY KNEADS $ 810 San Antonio Rd. (650) 852-0546 www.bodykneads-dayspa.com

Services: Massages (Swedish, aromatherapy, pregnancy, cranial sacral, hot stone, lymphatic drainage, reflexology, hot stone, shiatsu, sports), facials (European, express mini, alpha hydroxy, mini, men’s, teen, crystal peel, back, vitamin C, eye treatment), body treatments (Body Xcell, cellulite, aromatic bath), hair removal, nail care, hand and foot therapy, permanent makeup and tanning. Special Features: With Body Xcell, the use of gyratory vibration percussion stimulates and nourishes your skin and tissues to help dissolve fat and rid cellulite. DESTINO SPA $$$

HE A LT H & BE AU T Y

4335 El Camino Real (650) 947-0203 www.destinospa.net

Oxygen Bar

Purify Your Body of daily toxins with our New Detox for Life

Great Personalized Hair Cuts

Hair Treatments

Coming Soon: Therapeutic Massage Teeth Whitening

Free Shoe Shine (with any service) Lupe Fiasco visits Foxy

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Total Men's Skin Care

PROFILES

Services: Massages (Gardenia aroma Swedish, shiatsu, prenatal, healing warm stone), facials (revitalizing pumpkin, caviar, pomegranate, collagen silk, Mandarin C aromatic, purification, men’s, tropical taste, radiant caviar, deep cleansing back), resurfacing treatments (microdermabrasion, advanced exfoliation, sugar and beta peels, lactic acid and green tea), spa rituals (Bali bliss, Sanur seaweed wrap, minty earth and sea mud wrap, lava purification wrap), feet therapy, body polishes, baths and soaks, waxing and makeup. Special Features: Feed your skin and senses with one of Destino’s appetizing treats. Try the Caramel Turtle Inspiration, which starts off with a dry brush exfoliation and delicious chocolate dip wrap. For something sweeter, have a go at Chocolate Chip Devotion, which includes a yummy chocolate chip scrub and strawberries-and-cream custom massage.

240 University Ave. (650) 328-4067 www.juut.com

Services: Salon services, waxing, makeup, facials (basic, replenishing, Juut Spa, eye zone treatment), body treatments (aroma body wrap, salt glow, herbal back treatment) and nail services. Special Features: Get a cut and color at reduced prices from licensed professionals in the process of obtaining advanced training at Juut’s Roseville training location. LA BELLE DAY SPA $$$ www.labelledayspas.com 95 Town & Country Village (650) 327-6964 36 Stanford Shopping Center (650) 326-8522

Services: Massages (therapeutic, hot stone, lymphatic draining, post- and prenatal, Swedish), facials (Back on Top, Bye Bye Spots, custom peels, epicuren enzyme, five carat glow, La Belle royal touch, quick clean, quick exfoliation, sea meets stone, slim and lift), body treatments (Endermologie®, aromatic mud, wine and roses scrub), waxing, laser hair removal, Botox, salon services, nails, regular and permanent makeup. Special Features: Turn back the clock in just four hours with Timeless Radiance, the anti-aging spa package that combines a Forever Young Facial to minimize wrinkles and brighten and firm skin, and an invigorating full-body glycolic body exfoliation. Also, check out their extensive menu of services for men, which includes grooming and sports manicure and pedicure. SKINSPIRIT CLINIC & SPA $$$ 701 Emerson St. (650) 3249600 www.skinspirit.com

Services: Botox, chemical peels, dermal fillers (collagen, Hylaform, Radiesse, Restylane), intense pulsed light, laser hair removal, Thermage, vein laser therapy, acupuncture, sclerotherapy, massages (Swedish, deep tissue, lymphatic drainage, La Stone, pre- and postnatal, cellulite therapy), facials (signature, clarifying, teen, vitamin C, oxygen, paprika, microdermabrasion), waxing, lash and brow tinting. Special Features: Treatment21TM is an entirely new way to relax – combine a specially designed skincare treatment with one of five therapeutic guided visualization journeys on a CD and listened to with headphones. WATERCOURSE WAY $$ 165 Channing Ave. (650) 462-2000 www.watercourseway.com

Services: Massages (aromatherapy, deep muscle, hot stone), facials (natural scrub, deep cleansing, moor therapy treatment, Hungarian paprika, organic, honey and yogurt, vitamin C, moisturizing, anti-stress, express, royal anti-aging, custom herbal peels), spa treatments (Red Flower Sento ritual, rain dance revitalizing skin treatment, moor therapy, salt glow, thermal seaweed wrap, Essensa’s 3D spa therapy), Ayurvedic rituals and foot treatment. Special Features: This relaxing retreat boasts nine private hot tub rooms with a range of décor and amenities, including multijetted spas, wood tubs, saunas, and cold plunges with steam rooms.

SAN JOSE SANDRA M. SKINCARE $$ 6110 Camino Verde Dr., Ste. 5, San Jose (408) 224-1223 www.sandramskincare.com

Services: Facials (clarifying mask treatment, specialty and therapeutic), corrective skincare (microdermabrasion, dermaplaning, glycolic peels, acne treatment, Sensi peel, power peel, pumpkin peel, oxygenating trio, ultra peel, PCA peel, Esthetique peel, rapid exfoliation), waxing, permanent makeup, sunless body glow treatment. Product lines (Jan Marini Skin Research, Youngblood Mineral Cosmetics, Revitalash). Special Features: Owner Sandra M. had 14 years of experience as a medical assistant before undertaking four years of study in the skincare field. 1240 SALON & SPA $$$ 1240 S. Bascom Ave. (408) 295-3886

Services: Waxing, facials (back, pumpkin, red wine, glycolic, enzyme, lymphatic drainage), microdermabrasion, nail services, salon services and hair extensions. Special Features: 1240’s vascular blemish removal treatment clears skin of broken blood vessels, spider veins and skin tags, leaving it smooth and blemish free. THE ALEXANDRIA SALON & SPA $$ 1346 The Alameda, Ste. 8 (408) 971-2926 www.thealexandriasalon.com

Services: Massages (aromatherapy, deep tissue, hot stone, Swedish, sports and chair), facials (mini, full, European, thermo-plastic mask, algo mask, sea C spa treatment, botinol, hydro lifting and collagen 90 II), waxing, threading, manicure, pedicure, body treatments (parafango wrap, back parafango for men, body shaping and firming, Dead Sea salt glow and purifying back treatment) and makeup. Special Features: All skin treatments include a complimentary makeup retouch featuring Glominerals cosmetics, also sold at Alexandria’s. ANGEL FACE DAY SPA $$ 833 S. Winchester Blvd. (408) 247-3223 www.angelfacedayspa.com

Services: Facials (hydrating, revitalizing, de-stressing, angel face, alpha hydroxy, back, gentlemen’s and teen), body treatments (European herbal wrap, European ocean glow, seaweed wrap, hair and scalp treatment), massages (Swedish, aromatherapy, deep tissue, acupressure) and makeup. Special Features: Angel Face offers specialty treatments like the Epicuren Enzyme Facial Treatment (natural enzymes, proteins and botanicals free of chemical preservatives, fragrances and colors) and the Micro Derma Facial, which uses a specially formulated microcrystal cream (that removes dry or damaged cells) to achieve results similar to that of a microdermabrasion machine. TW


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» FEATURE

Style&Shopping

» FEATURE » FASHION

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that happens is more unique, regional type of retail,” she adds. “Downtown retailers are unique because they differentiate themselves from the regional mall type of retailers. I mean, it’s nice to have those, and certainly we’d welcome them as anchors, but I think our real market is going to be for the more unique boutiques and specialty type retail.” Knies couldn’t agree more. “For Downtown to be successful, it’s my opinion that we’re going to need unique stores. I don’t believe Downtown will be successful replicating what is already offered in these very successful, large and powerful malls that ring the Valley.”

The Future of Shopping Coming soon: Downtown San Jose as a hip shopping ’hood. ST Y L E & SHOPPING

BY JO ABBIE

D

owntown San Jose does boast a smattering of uniquely cool stores, but for those in need of a bout of retail therapy, chances are it’s not the first place that springs to mind. Give it a few more years, though, and our beloved, booming Downtown could just be a style and shopping destination worthy of attention.

Developers clearly have faith in the future of Downtown shopping: Many of the current high rise residential projects include significant amounts space for retail. When completed, the Three Sixty Residences complex will house 10,000 square feet of retail space, and a proposed mixed use development from Mesa Development (the folks behind Three Sixty Residences) will add a further 15,000. The 88 development in particular has a large retail component, with a 26,000-foot retail space in the current phase (which is rumored to be going to a major grocery retailer), and an additional 25,000 in its second phase. “So we’ll begin to pull in an awful lot of retail and new retail, all in one area,” notes John Weiss, assistant executive director of the San Jose Redevelopment Agency.

“I think our real market is going to be for the more unique boutiques and specialty type retail.” retail environment is overlooked because of the lack of the traditional merchandising retail. You really do need the blend to be considered a healthy scene, and that’s the path that we’re on: complementing our terrific center for dining and our strong restaurant environment with the other types of retail offerings.”

“We’ve got our retailers kind of spread out,” says Scott Knies, executive director of the San Jose Downtown Association. “You have to kind of hunt and peck for the retail. If we could take all the cool little shops that we have Downtown and put them onto the same street, it would be a very active scene.”

Others agree that the growing success of the restaurants Downtown is a good sign. “What we’re seeing right now primarily in terms of retail activity is the opening of several restaurants and food retail,” says Leslie Parks, director of Downtown management and industrial development at the San Jose Redevelopment Agency. Parks points to recent openings such as Japan’s cult cream-puff retailer Beard Papa (and the many upcoming openings, such as Love Cupcakes and frozen yogurt bar Penguin Café) as signs of that success. “We’re in a challenging economy at present, and a lot of the higher profile national retailers are not in an expansion mode. But we are pretty optimistic, because we are seeing more and more restaurants opening up.”

Knies believes that the foundation for a strong shopping presence Downtown lies in the area’s thriving dining scene. “There’s a very healthy and high quality dining scene in Downtown,” he says, “and I believe that the health of that component of Downtown’s

We all know we can feed our hunger for eats of all kinds Downtown, but what about cravings for clothing or home wares? That could come, says Parks, but don’t expect a Gap to move in any time soon. “I think the type of retail that we’re going to be seeing when

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THEWAVEMAG.COM JULY 28 - AUGUST 10, 2008

As Weiss points out, the natural pattern is for retail to follow housing. “It’s not going to happen right away, because retail typically follows residential – it’s not a leader. So we expect that in 10 to 15 years, the residential development will be the major force behind the retail function in downtown.” Knies concurs, predicting that “as the residential base grows here, the retail will follow the customer demand.” “The major change that’s occurred recently that’s gotten everyone’s attention has been the focus on the high rise projects,” says Weiss. “Right now we’ve got roughly 850 units under construction, and once those are absorbed in the marketplace, we would expect probably another 4,000 or 5,000 units in the next 10 to 15 years. So that adds up to a total of about 10,000 units – that’s roughly 25,000 people, and that’s roughly the size of Los Gatos. So you get an idea of the magnitude of the demand that can come from having that many new people concentrated in a very tight area.” The vision of an area Downtown packed with edgy boutiques, cute gourmet merchants, mod design shops and other retail may be a few more years in the making. But it’s no longer a complete fantasy. TW


ST YLE&SHOPPING: FEATURE

SV

FASHION

» FASHION

IBI Boutique

Infiniti Boutique 120 W. Main St., Los Gatos (408) 399-7071 This unique men’s and women’s boutique features contemporary brands, up-and-coming designers mixed with one-of-a-kind items from Europe and Japan. They carry urban, funky, sophisticated and modern styles from such designers as 2K, Diesel, Howe, Rex, Rojas, and Triple 5 Soul.

Kitsch Couture

BOUTIQUES

Alta 1342 Lincoln Ave., San Jose (408) 288-5940; 701 Laurel St., San Carlos (650) 596-9599; 779 Santa Cruz Ave., Menlo Park (650) 326-7390; 130 N. Santa Cruz Ave., Los Gatos (408) 354-0069 Alta has been carrying original contemporary clothing and accessories for the past 25 years. Visit any of their four locations and experience the excitement.

Amy B. Boutique Corner Stone Shopping Center, 15994 Los Gatos Blvd., Los Gatos (408) 358-8600 Exceptional men’s and women’s contemporary clothing and accessories from Ted Baker, Diane Von Furstenberg, Oliver Peoples, James Perse, Vince and Paige Denim.

20490 Saratoga-Los Gatos Rd., Saratoga (408) 8721104 www.kitschcouture.com At Kitsch Couture, they want fashion to capture your individuality. They have transformed a quaint historic church into a wonderfully distinct contemporary boutique, featuring an eclectic mix of fashion-forward pieces, unique accessories and gifts. Customers often leave saying “There truly is something for everyone.” Brands include Free People, T-Bags, Trina Turk, Kensie and Michael Stars.

Signature Lifestyle 519 E. Campbell Ave., Campbell (408) 370-3433 www.myspace.com/signaturelifestyle Features casual clothing for young guys and gals, with a large selection of accessories at very affordable prices. Complimentary gift wrapping is also available.

Ursula’s Boutique 140 W. Main St., Ste. B, Los Gatos (408) 395-1400 The wide range of clothing and styles at Ursula’s Boutique will have you dressed for any event. With an array of jewelry, handbags and accessories, Ursula’s Boutique is all you need to complete your outfit.

Bella James

LINGERIE

1165 Lincoln Ave., San Jose (408) 292-0000 350 E. Campbell Ave., Campbell (408) 866-9000 www.bellajames.com Located in the Garden Theatre in Willow Glen and now in downtown Campbell, Bella James features inspiring and affordable contemporary women’s clothing and accessories, including Michael Stars, Joe’s Jeans, Havaianas, Free People, Hudson, Citizens and more.

Dutchess Intimates Boutique

IBI Boutique

346 E. Campbell Ave., Campbell (408) 866-8006 www.dutchessboutique.com Dutchess specializes in fine lingerie, bras, panties and accessories at affordable prices. Visit their brand new boutique in downtown Campbell for something sweet or sexy. Private party hosting available.

1231 Franklin Mall, Santa Clara (408) 261-2050 www.ibiboutique.com IBI Boutique is the modern woman’s dream closet! With a large selection of women’s clothing, accessories, footwear, jewelry and handbags. Located right in Franklin Square across from the Santa Clara Post Office. TO HAVE YOUR BUSINESS LISTED IN SVGUIDE: FASHION, CALL

(408) 467-3200

ST Y L E & SHOPPING

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» FEATURE

Home&Design

» FEATURE » LISTINGS

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01

HOME & DESIGN

Penthouse Living How to transform a slick new penthouse from a modern showroom to a place that feels like home. BY JO ABBIE

DOWNTOWN’S PENTHOUSE BOOM

Penthouses prove popular amongst high-rise developers: All of the new residential buildings currently being constructed Downtown boast several penthouse properties on their upper floors. But just who is buying them? According to Charles Young, senior development director at Mesa Development (the firm behind Three Sixty Residences and another proposed development Downtown), the answer is Baby Boomers. “We continue to see significant interest in the Three Sixty Residences penthouses from an upscale clientele, comprising primarily executives and Baby Boomers who are exited about the convenience and unparalleled luxury of a penthouse condo. This type of urban living has not been available until now in San Jose, and it’s definitely resonating well with our target audiences.”

Three Sixty Residences interior

Here’s what’s on offer for those in the market for a plush Downtown penthouse:

D

owntown San Jose’s new high-rise residential developments all have one thing in common: luxurious penthouses. If you’re in a position to enjoy the seductive views from one of these spacious penthouse apartments, some serious decorating is likely in order. Penthouses typically feature a lot of large, open spaces – which can be intimidating to the home decorator, because extravagant square footage requires careful consideration and furniture placement. “We’re believers in space; it’s a luxury,” says Marta-Maria Calle, product director at CB2, Crate & Barrel’s modern furniture branch. “One of the things that we feel about space is that you shouldn’t clutter it up with too much furniture. It’s about volume and air above you 38

THEWAVEMAG.COM JULY 28 - AUGUST 10, 2008

THREE SIXTY RESIDENCES www.360residences.com The Three Sixty development features six penthouses in total, spread out over the building’s top two floors. The two largest are on the 23rd story, while the remaining four are on the 22nd. The penthouses are available in two- and three-bedroom floor plans, which range from 2,700 square feet to 3,500 square feet. Prices start in excess of $2 million.

AXIS www.axissanjose.com

CITY HEIGHTS www.cityheightssanjose.com

THE 88 www.the88sj.com

This 22-story high-rise has a total of 16 penthouses on its top two floors, ranging from two bedroom, two-and-a-half bath units to three-bedroom, two-bath-plus-den apartments. Square footage varies according to floor plans. Prices range from approximately $1.1 million to $2.5 million.

This building features a total of eight penthouses in various floor plans, including one-bedroom, one-and-a-half-bath lofts; twobed, two-bath lofts; and twobed, two-bath units. One of the two-bed, two-bath penthouses is currently being raffled off by the developers to raise $1 million for InnVision [see our story on page 10].

The 88 boasts eight penthouses, ranging from two-bed, two-bath; two-bed, two-and-a-half-bath; and three-bed, two-and-a-halfbath floor plans. Square footage ranges from 1,450 square feet to 1,500 square feet in the two-bed, two-bath units; 1,734 for the two-bed unit with the extra half bath; and upwards of 2,300 for the three-bedroom apartments. Prices range from around $1.25 40 million to $2.75 million.


HOME&DESIGN F E AT U R E

[ C O N T. ]

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and around you – more so than space as it pertains to square feet. “If you have a huge living room, there’s nothing more grand than putting two sofas – as big a sofa as you can get in – facing each other, with a very low slung table in front, and minimal accessories, and allowing the architecture of your penthouse to speak for itself,” Calle continues, adding that she also loves what she calls “the luxury of volume” provided by the soaring ceilings typical of penthouses. “The space that high ceilings give 02

you, or dramatic windows, that sort of space is really wonderful with modern furniture,” she adds. “When furnishing a penthouse, create dimension to make the space warm and livable,” advises Yen Hui of Jimyko Home Furnishings, the store that furnished the model homes at Downtown San Jose’s City Heights. Hui suggests combining different textures to add warmth. “Mix a lush velour sofa with a rattan coffee table to create unique and unexpected texture.” 03

Defining areas can also add warmth, creating cozy spaces within a large room. This effect, adds Hui, “can be achieved by using textured fabrics and materials, considering the size of furniture and taking advantage of accessories. The finishing touches of accessories, such as plush large-sized rugs, screens, and soft lighting can cozy up a spacious penthouse instantly.” Both Calle and Hui speak of creating “zones” within the large penthouse rooms, which can give dimension to an open space. Calle says rugs and artworks are an easy way to create zones within large spaces, particularly in loft apartments. “Defining an area with a rug is one of the simplest things you can do,” she says. “I think another way of defining space is where you place art – it stops your eye from going into the next space.” Dramatic windows and open spaces make penthouses appealing, but they can also present problems. “With large windows that reveal dynamic views, a penthouse is appreciated for its openness,” notes Hui. “However, if not decorated suitably, the openness can feel cold and uncomfortable.” Indeed, such feelings have led some to consider modern design to be stark and unwelcoming. “There’s a lot of people who feel modern is cold, and I couldn’t disagree more,” says Calle, noting that one can give a space a more individual touch by adding personal items. “You want to inject your own personal sense of style: What are the things that are truly important to you, and that you really love? Whether it’s a family heirloom, something you found at a flea market, or something you found in a dumpster, it is combining all these eclectic things. Especially if you have a modern aesthetic, layering on things that you truly love creates a warmer environment.”

HOME & DESIGN

04

Hui couldn’t agree more. “Most importantly, decorate the space with pieces and treasures that have meaning to you, because that’s what makes any penthouse a pent-home.” TW

05

WHERE TO BUY: CB2, The first CB2 store west of the Midwest opens Thurs., Jul. 31 at 34 Ellis St. in Union Square, San Francisco. Or find them at www.cb2.com. Design Within Reach, Santana Row, 3080 Stevens Creek Blvd. , Ste. 1010, San Jose (408) 261-8875; 151 University Ave., Palo Alto (650) 328-2700 www.dwr.com Jimyko Home Furnishings, 1919 Monterey Rd., Studio 10, San Jose (408) 993-0918 www.jimyko.com Room & Board, 685 Seventh St., San Francisco (415) 252-9280 www.roomandboard.com West Elm, If you’re in the mood for a drive, head to their store in Corte Madera, at 435 Corte Madera Town Center. Or shop online at www.westelm.com. 01 West Elm: Their Loft Live interior creates zones and warmth. 02 Jimyko Home Furnishings: Sofa placement embraces the view and creates a social area within a large room. 03 Design Within Reach: A rug as wall art adds dimension and drama. 04 CB2: A cool, gray interior features vibrant pillows to add warmth. 05 Room & Board: A mixture of colors and textures, as well as careful furniture placement, adds definition to a large space. 40

THEWAVEMAG.COM JULY 28 - AUGUST 10, 2008


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HOME&DESIGN: LISTINGS

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LOS GATOS Galleria of Los Gatos, 210 N. Santa Cruz Ave. (408) 395-3180 www.gallereiaoflosgatos.com

MENLO PARK Traditions Furniture, 850 Santa Cruz Ave. (650) 325-4849 www.traditionsforthehome.com

Grennanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Murphy Beds CAMPBELL American Mirador, Inc., 1550 Dell Ave., Ste. H (408) 370-2252 www.americanmirador.com Grennanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Murphy Beds, 166 Kennedy Ave. (888) 291-1306 www.grennans.com Peninsula Fireplace, 46 E. Campbell Ave. (408) 866-9200 www.peninsulafireplace.com Phantom Screens, 425 Salmar Ave. (408) 374-8156 Pool, Patio & More, 1870 S. Bascom Ave. (408) 377-8880 Valet Organizers, 1190 Dell Ave., Ste. J (408) 370-1041 www.valetorganizers.com Woodpeckers Wood Furniture, 877 E. Hamilton Ave. (408) 626-9000

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PALO ALTO Design Within Reach, 151 University Ave., Palo Alto (650) 328-2700 www.dwr.com The Futon Shop, 2180 El Camino Real (650) 493-2727 www.thefutonshop.com Medallion Rug Gallery, 323 University Ave. (800) 300-7847 www.medallionrug.com Palo Alto Hardware, 875 Alma St. (650) 327-7222 TW

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THEWAVEMAG.COM JULY 28 - AUGUST 10, 2008


HOME&DESIGN: LISTINGS

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MON 7/28

TUE 7/29

WED 7/30

THU 7/31

FRI 8/1

SAT 8/2

SUN 8/3

MON 8/4

TUE 8/5

WED 8/6

THU 8/7

FRI 8/8

SAT 8/9

SUN 8/10

Crüe Fest

JULY 28 - AUGUST 10, 2008

Your timely guide to the next two weeks in Silicon Valley entertainment.

Rolex Monterey Historic Automobile Races 50 WAYS TO LEAVE YOUR SOFA » EVENT LISTINGS

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DINING

» FEATURE » ONLINE MENUS

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NIGHTLIFE & MUSIC » » » » »

FEATURE WINE TASTING & MORE CD RELEASES ALBUM REVIEWS THIS TIME IN MUSIC HISTORY

64 66 66 67 69

MOVIES & TV

» » » »

INTERVIEW MOVIE REVIEWS & PREVIEWS DVD RELEASES CINEMA DIRECTORY

70 72 72 72

ARTS

» FEATURE » EVENT LISTINGS » COLUMN: HOT TICK ET

74 76 77

FAMILY & COMMUNITY

» EVENT LISTINGS » FARMERS MARK ETS » WEDDING PL ANNING

THEWAVEMAG.COM JULY 28 - AUGUST 10, 2008

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50 Ways 8. MO’NIQUE Improv Comedy Club, 62 S. Second St., San Jose (408) 2807475 www.improv.com

August 1 - 2: Attention, laughaholics: If you want to catch some real quality laughter, you won’t want to miss these two hilarity packed shows from Mo’Nique. 9. SANTA CLARA STREET DANCE Franklin Square on Jackson St., Santa Clara (408) 615-2219

August 1: Prepare to dance the night away with live music from the Joe Sharino Band, great food, beer and wine and tons of fun: 7 - 9pm 10. THE FULL MONTY

Coastal Repertory Theatre, 1167 Main St., Half Moon Bay www.coastalrep.com

Thru August 16: In this amusing play, a small group of unemployed Yorkshire steelworkers who are frustrated with their unstable employment decide there’s only one thing that can turn things around: becoming nude dancers! 11. LYLE LOVETT & HIS LARGE BAND Mountain Winery, 14831 Pierce Rd., Saratoga www.mountainwinery.com

August 1 - 2: Sit back, relax and enjoy the great sounds from Lyle Lovett while taking in the amazing view from the Mountain Winery. 12. MIDSUMMER MOZART FESTIVAL PRESENTS THE ABDUCTION FROM THE SERAGLIO

California Theatre, 345 S. First St., San Jose (415) 392-4400 www.midsummermozart.org

August 1 & 3: It’s a celebration of the genius of the mighty Mozart, with this semi-staged production of The Abduction from the Seraglio that is packed with humor, drama, betrayal and, of course, reunited love.

50 WAYS

20

7/28 MONDAY

1. SAN JOSE GIANTS vs. RANCHO CUCAMONGA Municipal Stadium, 588 E. Alma Ave., San Jose www.sjgiants.com

July 28: Head over to Municipal Stadium for great barbecue and see our SJ Giants kick the snot out of the Rancho Cucamonga Quakes!: 7pm 2. HOW TO WELD STEEL WITH A MIG WELDER Tech Shop, 120 Independence Dr., Menlo Park www.techshop. ws/take_classes.html

July 28: Okay, show of hands: Who has always wanted to learn to weld steel? Just what we thought, see you at the TechShop! 3. AMAZING CHINESE ACROBATS Santa Cruz Beach Boardwalk, 400 Beach St., Santa Cruz (831) 4235590 www.beachboardwalk.com

Thru August 21: We’ve all seen the mind-bending moves in the movie The Matrix, right? Well, the Amazing Chinese Acrobats are just like that…

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but for REAL! 4. THE PAJAMA GAME

Smithwick Theatre – Foothill College, 12345 El Monte Rd. Los Altos Hills (650) 949-7414 www.foothillmusicals.com

Thru August 17: The Foothill Music Theatre presents the hilarious musical comedy by Richard Adler and Jerry Ross set in the 1950s, in which employees at the Sleep-Tite Factory demand a 7-½ cent raise, and they won’t take no for an answer!

7/30

WEDNESDAY 5. OAKLAND A’s NINTH ANNUAL MUG ROOT BEER FLOAT DAY McAfee Coliseum, 7000 Coliseum Way, Oakland http://oakland. athletics.mlb.com/oak/ticketing/ events.jsp#MUG

July 30: Enjoy some tasty Mug Root Beer Floats, watch some great ball and help raise funds for the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation: 12:35pm

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THURSDAY 6. DJANGO FESTIVAL Yoshi’s at Jack London Square, 510 Embarcadero W., Oakland www.yoshis.com

8/2

SATURDAY 13. BONE BASH IX Shoreline Amphitheatre, One Amphitheatre Pkwy., Mountain View www.livenation.com

August 2: Hey! Is that Freedom Rock?! Well, turn it up! Get on over to the Shoreline for some major Bone Bashing and great music from Sammy Hagar and the Wabos, and the Scorpions: 5pm 14. MEL COTTON’S SPORTING GOODS FOURTH ANNUAL FALL HUNTING EXPO Mel Cotton’s Sporting Goods, 1266 W. San Carlos, San Jose (408) 287-5994 www.melcottons.com

August 2 - 3: If you fancy yourself an outdoorsmen, be sure to swing by Mel Cotton’s for their annual fall hunting expo, featuring all the latest and greatest hunting gear. 15. SAN FRANCISCO DRAGONS vs. LOS ANGELES RIPTIDE Spartan Stadium, 1275 S. Tenth St., San Jose www.sanfranciscodragons.com

August 2: Please welcome the SF Dragons lacrosse team to San Jose as they take on and destroy the LA Riptide: 7pm 16. SAN FRANCISCO 49ERS PASTA BOWL II Santa Clara Convention Center, 5001 Great America Pkwy., Santa Clara www.49ers.com/ community/pasta_bowl.php?sectio n=CO%20DonationRequests

August 2: Chow down on some fabulous food served by the entire 49ers team, along with wine tastings, live entertainment, raffles and auctions, with all funds raised benefiting the San Jose After-School All-Stars, Santa Clara Schools Foundation and City Year San Jose/ Silicon Valley: 5:30 - 9pm 17. 54TH ANNUAL SAN FRANCISCO GEM AND MINERAL SOCIETY SHOW AND SALE County Fair Building Golden Gate Park, Ninth Ave. at Lincoln Way, San Francisco www.sfgms.org

August 2 - 3: If you like to dig things out of the ground and then wear them around your neck, you’ll have to make a stop at the 54th Annual San Francisco Gem & Mineral Show. You’ll be able to purchase gems, minerals, fossils and more… and you won’t even have to get dirty.

18. YAK ATTACK Hiller Aviation Museum, 601 Skyway Rd., San Carlos (650) 654-0200 www.hiller.org

August 2: Take a trip to Hiller Aviation Museum for a one-day exhibition of some super cool commie Yaks, Nanchang and other Russian and Chinese Aircraft: 10am - 3pm 19. JOHN MELLENCAMP Greek Theatre, Gayley Rd. & Piedmont Ave., Berkeley (510) 642-9988 www.ticketmaster.com

August 2: Join the Rock ’n’ Roll Hall of Famer for a wonderful night of music at the Greek Theatre: 7:30pm

8/3

SUNDAY 20. 2008 VINTAGE VEHICLE AND FAMILY FESTIVAL Palo Alto High School, 50 Embarcadero Rd., Palo Alto (650) 321-1004 www.moah.org

August 3: Enjoy a day filled with antique cars, hot rods, bicycles and motorcycles, along with live music, food vendors and activities for kids that include LEGO displays and radio controlled model races: 10am - 4pm 21. SAN JOSE EARTHQUAKES VS. LOS ANGELES GALAXY McAfee Coliseum, 7000 Coliseum Way, Oakland www.sjearthquakes.com

August 3: Come out and show your support for your hometown Earthquakes as they take on the LA Galaxy and David Beckman… in Oakland: Noon 22. SANTA CLARA VALLEY FIDDLERS ASSOCIATION JAM IN THE PARK Municipal Rose Garden, Naglee & Dana, San Jose www.scvfa.org

August 3: Grab your fiddle and head over to the Municipal Rose Garden for the Santa Clara Valley Fiddlers Association monthly fiddle jam, featuring traditional music, country, bluegrass, and Irish music. 23. THE BEACH BOYS Mountain Winery, 14831 Pierce Rd., Saratoga www.mountainwinery.com

August 3: Can it get any more “California” than watching The Beach Boys perform in a beautiful outdoor venue surrounded by mountains?: 7:30pm

July 31 - August 3: A tribute to the Gypsy swingmaster who redefined the role of jazz guitar, featuring guitarist Dorado Schmitt: 8pm

8/5

8/1

TUESDAY

FRIDAY

24. PAT BENATAR & NEIL GIRALDO

7. BEAUTY AND THE BEAST

Mountain Winery, 14831 Pierce Rd., Saratoga www.mountainwinery.com

Oak Meadow Park, Blossom Hill Rd. & University Ave., Los Gatos (800) 838-3005 www.lgshakes.org

August 5: Pat is joined by her hubby and longtime collaborator, Neil Giraldo, for an evening of super hits such as “Hit Me With Your Best Shot,” “Fire and Ice,” “Promises in the Dark” and many, many more!

August 1 & 8: Don’t miss the Festival Theatre Ensembles production of Beauty and the Beast. Why, you ask? Cuz it’s performed in a park and it’ll be super fun, that’s why!: 8pm

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50 WAYS TO LEAVE YOUR SOFA

8/12

25. GUITAR FOUNDATION OF AMERICA CONVENTION AND COMPETITION

TUESDAY

Herbst Theatre, 401 Van Ness Ave., San Francisco www.guitarfoundation.org/ drupal/convention

40. SAN JOSE HERITAGE ROSE GARDEN DEHEADING

August 5 - 10: Some of the finest classical guitar players in the WORLD (including Thibault Cauving, Zoran Dukic, José Antonio Escobar, ShinIchi Fukuda, Boris Gaquere, Antoine Garth and Viviana Guzman) will be in San Francisco for a week’s worth of concerts.

8/6

WEDNESDAY 26. CRÜE FEST Shoreline Amphitheatre, One Amphitheatre Pkwy., Mountain View www.livenation.com

Guadalupe River Park & Gardens Visitor Center, 438 Coleman Ave., San Jose (408) 298-7657 www.grpg.org

August 12: Bring family and friends for a day deheading roses. When through, you’ll be rewarded with a free ice cream!: 5:30 – 7:30pm 41. TWELFTH NIGHT

12 PARTY Montalvo Arts Center, 15400 Montalvo Rd., Saratoga www.montalvoarts.org

August 6: Enjoy a hard-rocking evening of music from Buckcherry, Papa Roach, Sixx:AM, Trapt and, of course, Satan’s all-time favorite band, Mötley Crüe!: 5pm

August 8 - 9: Sleep under the stars on Montalvo’s front lawn and enjoy the Perseid meteor showers. Go on evening hikes, watch films and view the night sky through powerful telescopes: 8pm

8/7

31. 19TH COMCAST SAN JOSE JAZZ FESTIVAL

THURSDAY 27. BEST HIKES WITH DOGS: CENTRAL CALIFORNIA

REI Saratoga, 400 El Paseo de Saratoga, San Jose (408) 8718765 ww.rei.com

August 7: Join ultraveteran backpackers and dog owners Linda and David Mullally as they share slides and information on some of their favorite day hikes and backpacking trips featured in their new book, Best Hikes with Dogs: Central California: 7pm 28. PINOCCHIO

Montgomery Theatre, 291 S. Market St., San Jose (408) 288KIDS www.cmtsj.org

29. CALIFORNIA THEATRE SUMMER MOVIES SERIES PRESENTS TRUE GRIT

Throughout Downtown San Jose www.sanjosejazz.org

August 8 - 10: Swing down to Downtown San Jose and listen to great jazz on 10 stages, from some of the greatest jazz musicians from around the world. 32. PROOF

Triton Museum Hall Pavilion, 1505 Warburton Ave., Santa Clara www.scplayers.org

August 8 - 17: Catherine, a troubled young woman, deals with the emotions that engulf her after the death of her father, a famous mathematician. 33. CROSSING: A TRAIN STORY San Mateo County History Museum, 2200 Broadway, Redwood City (650) 299-0104 www.historysmc.org

August 8: The museum invites children under five to join them for their “Stories from the Past” program, where they’ll enjoy a story on trains, build a train to take home, then visit the exhibit Journey to Work: Pioneering Patterns of Growth: 11am & 2pm 34. US AIR GUITAR CHAMPIONSHIPS

California Theatre, 345 S. First St., San Jose (800) SAN-JOSE www.sanjose.org

Grand Ballroom at the Regency Center, San Francisco www.usairguitar.com

August 7: Don’t miss the California Theatre’s summer movie series featuring True Grit starring John Wayne on Aug. 7, and West Side Story on Aug. 14. Along with the feature presentation, you’ll enjoy classic cartoons and organ playing!: 7pm

August 8: Oh, yes, friends, you read correctly. We’ve all done it, but now it’s time to get serious about our air guitar playing. For there can only be one CHAMPION OF THE AIR GUITAR!

8/8

FRIDAY 30. STARRY, STARRY NIGHT: ART & ASTRONOMY SLUMBER

35. SAN MATEO COUNTY FAIR San Mateo County Expo, 2495 Delaware St., San Mateo www.sanmateocountyfair.com

August 8 - 17: Enjoy nine full days of carnival rides, clowns, corn dogs, cotton candy, funnel cakes, caramel apples… and stomachaches.

8/9

SATURDAY 36. SUMMER GATHERING OF MOUNTAIN MEN Roaring Camp, Graham Hill & Mt. Herman Rds., Felton www.roaringcamp.com

August 9 - 10: You’ll be transported back to the 1800s as you wander through wilderness encampments of early trappers, watch frontiersmen perfect their skills during tomahawk and knife throwing contests, then chow down on some chuck wagon barbecue.

August 8 - September 12: A unique take on one of Shakespeare’s most revered comedies, including cross-dressing twins!

8/15 FRIDAY

42. 35TH ROLEX MONTEREY HISTORIC AUTOMOBILE RACE Laguna-Seca, 1021 Monterey – Salinas Hwy., Salinas www.laguna-seca.com

37. SAN JOSE REPTILE SHOW

August 15 - 17: Visit beautiful Salinas and watch vintage racecars (including Ferraris, Jaguars, Porsches, Bugattis, Shelbys, Lotuses, Aston Martins, Maseratis and Mustangs) scream around the track at ridiculously dangerous speeds.

Santa Clara Fairgrounds 344 Tully Rd., San Jose www.sanjosereptileshow.com

43. MONTERY COUNTY FAIR

August 9 - 10: Okay, snake lovers, your dream has come true. No, we didn’t hear anything about Snakes on a Plane II. It’s called the San Jose Reptile Show, featuring thousands of slithery reptiles for sale and display.

8/10 SUNDAY

38. MUSICAL SAW FESTIVAL Roaring Camp, Graham Hill & Mt. Herman Rds., Felton www.roaringcamp.com

August 10: Show up with your Stanley and partake in workshops, open mics and performances of musical saws and folk instruments from around the world.

8/11 MONDAY

39. THE REGENERATION TOUR Mountain Winery, 14831 Pierce Rd., Saratoga www.mountainwinery.com

August 11: It’s a flashback to the ’80s featuring The Human League, Belinda Carlisle, ABC and the Flock of Seagulls. Don’t forget your parachute pants and wrestling shoes: 7pm

8

Monterey County Fairgrounds, Monterey (831) 372-5863 www.montereycountyfair.com

August 15: Unlike other county fairs, this one features rides, corn dogs, games of skill and cotton candy. What? Every other county fair has those, too? Oh, never mind. 44. AMERICAN CRAFT SHOW Fort Mason Center, Marina Blvd. & Buchanan St., San Francisco www.craftcouncil.org/sf/

August 15 – 17: Beautiful, hand crafted everything will be on hand. Do you think they’ll have those little mice made out of walnut shells? Do you?! 45. FOURTH ANNUAL COMEDY FUNDRAISER Mexican Heritage Plaza, 1700 Alum Rock Ave., San Jose (408) 251-2850

August 15: Show up and laugh along with Luke Torres, Shayla Rivera, Edwin San Juan and Darren Carter “The Party Starter” while helping to raise funds for the Alum Rock Youth Center: 7pm

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8/16

SATURDAY 46. FIESTA DE ARTES 2008 Los Gatos Town Center Grounds, Main St., Los Gatos www.lg fiesta.org

August 16 - 17: Over 150 artists will be showing their crafts, along with live music and activities for the little ones: 10am - 6pm 47. ROCK THE BELLS Shoreline Amphitheatre, One Amphitheatre Pkwy., Mountain View www.livenation.com

August 16: It’s a full day of hiphop featuring A Tribe Called Quest, NAS, Mos Def, Rakim, Method Man, Redman, Raekwon, Ghostface, Immortal and Spank Rock: 4pm 48. VIVA LAS AMERICAS Pier 39, Embarcadero & Beach St., San Francisco www.pier39.com

August 16: This celebration of everything Hispanic with live music, raffles, craft-making, dance, mariachis, face painting, wonderful food, activities for the kids and more!: Noon - 4pm 49. DOWNTOWN STREET FAIR SERIES E. Second St., Morgan Hill (408) 779-3190 www.morganhilldowntown.org

August 16: One and all are invited to visit downtown Morgan Hill and enjoy local arts and crafts vendors, musicians and a super fab local farmers market: 10am - 2pm 50. THIRD ANNUAL CELEBRATE MILPITAS S. Milpitas and Calaveras Blvds., Milpitas www.milpitaschamber. com/celebrate.html

August 16 - 17: Two days of exciting fun featuring three stages of live entertainment, great food, wine and, of course, amazing art! TW

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50 WAYS

August 7 - 10: A little wooden puppet who longs to become a real boy struggles through adventures involving donkey boys, a blue fairy, and a cricket in a suit to achieve his dream.

Sanborn County Park, 16055 Sanborn Rd., Saratoga (408) 867-9959 www.shadyshakes.org


» FEATURE

Dining

» FEATURE » HOT SPOTS » ONLINE MENUS

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NEW & COMING SOON Recent additions to the Downtown eatscape include Silk Road Bistro (87 E. San Fernando, 408-2863969), an upscale Indian and Pakistani establishment serving dishes such as lamb tandoori and chicken tika. Yelpers are raving about the naan bread and restaurant’s lovely brickwork, artwork and pleasant lighting. Another new kid on the block is Morocco’s (86 N. Market St., 408-998-1509), which is already winning favor for its lamb tajine, lentil salad and great wine flights that include offerings from California, Australia and Morocco. Also sure to be a welcome addition is Caffé Trieste (315 S. First St., 408-268-5211 www.caffetrieste.com). A North Beach SF institution, this company of Italian espresso fiends has just opened up right near Original Joe’s.

Here are some of the other eateries on our radar that will be opening soon Downtown:

Il Fornaio

Downtown Dining DINING

From down-home carne asada to the finest quality filet mignon, Downtown’s impressive restaurant scene truly spans the spectrum.

“F

rom hole-in-the-wall tacquerias to five-star restaurants, there’s a very healthy and high quality dining scene Downtown,” said Scott Knies, executive director of the San Jose Downtown Association. The man sure knows of what he speaks (and no doubt, what he eats). Whether it’s a hearty breakfast burrito, a quick bowl of noodles or a lavish fine dining experience, you can find it Downtown.

7 RESTAURANT & LOUNGE $$$ 754 The Alameda (408) 280-1644 www.7restaurant.com CUISINE: Modern American THE DEAL: Like a transported New-York-on-The-Alameda, 7’s interior is super-sleek: Long banquettes run through a loftlike space that incorporates an open kitchen. Twin brothers Curtis and Russel Valdez extend the sophistication to their seasonal menus, with specialties like black pepper-crested ahi tuna and house-made spätzle. Ask for the list of signature cocktails

48

– there are about 35 of them, including the “7,” a divine mix of Seagram’s 7, pineapple, orange juice and ginger ale. THE DISH: The steamed mussels with andouille sausage, oven roasted tomatoes, leeks, roasted garlic, herbs and white wine.

19 MARKET $ 19 N. Market St. (408) 280-6111 www.19market.com CUISINE: CaliforniaVietnamese THE DEAL: Unlike the barebones eat-and-run feel of so many Vietnamese restaurants, 19 Market shines with Zen-

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inspired earth-tone interiors and an equally agreeable menu. This bar and bistro not only dishes out familiar favorites like beef noodle soup (pho) and imperial rolls, but adds a Singaporean, Chinese, and California twist to Vietnamese fare, such as Chilean sea bass, simmered with caramel sauce in a clay pot. THE DISH: Shaking Beef “Bo Luc Lac” – cubed filet mignon wok tossed with onions, garlic and black pepper, served on a bed of fresh watercress and cherry tomatoes.

71 SAINT PETER $$ 71 N. San Pedro St. (408) 9718523 www.71saintpeter.com CUISINE: French, Modern American THE DEAL: Housed in an old brick storefront on San Pedro Square, this bistro’s Spanish floor tiles, reclaimed wood from an old French abbey, and other rustic accents make the place classy and comfortable. Complex dishes like raspberry-black-pepper demi-glace roast duck and pistachio crusted tilapia with lemon-ginger beurre blanc stimulate the CaliFrancophile’s salivary glands,

Yolicious: A Pinkberry style frozen yogurt chain. Blendz: The juice retailer (we’re hoping the Downtown location will serve wheatgrass shots with a vodka chaser). Mezcal Bistro and Bar: We’re thinking Cal-Mex cuisine and plenty of fancy margaritas. Billy Berk’s Restaurant: Family style servings of Cal-Mex, Asian fusion style eats, from slow roasted pork or mojito skirt steak with lime and jalapeño to white cheddar burgers or blackened salmon sliders. Popeye’s Chicken and Biscuits: Because Downtown is not complete without fried chicken, biscuits and gravy. Extreme Pizza: SF-based pizza franchise featuring intense (and reportedly extremely tasty) toppings. Those who have visited Extreme’s Berkeley locations will no doubt remember the Poultry Geist pizza, with ranch dressing-marinated chicken, Swiss, fontina, gorgonzola and mozzarella cheeses, broccoli, onion and fresh sage. Love’s Cupcakes: The latest link in the growing cupcake chain craze, Love’s make teeny tiny cupcakes so petite (and scrumptious), you can eat three. Penguin Café: Another frozen yogurt bar, this one hails from SoCal and features flavors such as creamy peanut butter (lowfat, too), extra strawberry and blueberry custard. Specialty Café and Bakery: The popular San Francisco bakery and sandwich store. Our thanks to the San Jose Redevelopment Agency for the list of recent and upcoming restaurant openings.

while the seasonally changing menu keeps them returning to see what’s new. Avoid a fight with your date by ordering your own crème brulee. THE DISH: Mustard grilled lamb chops with roasted potatoes, wild-berry mint marmalade and a red wine a jus.

A PERFECT FINISH $$ 55 S. First St., San Jose (408) 2886000 www.apfwinebar.com CUISINE: Small Plates, Dessert, Wine Bar THE DEAL: It may be touted as the ideal end to a night out, but this swank yet snoot-free wine and dessert bar is a good place to kick off the night, too. Set in the heart of the Historic District and within walking distance to theatres and the Shark Tank, A Perfect Finish serves up a wide selection of great wines, sumptuous small plates and delightful desserts with soft jazz and a side of refreshing service. THE DISH: Try the sautéed mushroom crostini with a

glass of BV Georges de Latour ’03 cabernet sauvignon.

A.P. STUMP’S $$$ 163 W. Santa Clara St. (408) 2929928 www.apstumps.com CUISINE: American, Steakhouse THE DEAL: The restaurant’s richly paneled interior complements the food’s classic feel. Executive chef Jim Stump’s menu features updated classics, such as double-cut pork chops and oven-roasted salmon, with specialty items like seabass wrapped with Dungeness crab. Equally impressive is the 200-label wine list. The historic Paul Masson champagne cellars, once a gathering place for the city’s politicos and financial heavyhitters, have been turned into large private dining rooms – perfect for your next executive luncheon. THE DISH: The 10-ounce dryaged New York strip.

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DINING F E AT U R E PRICE GUIDE: $[5-15]

[ C O N T. ]

$$[15-25]

$$$[25-40]

$$$$[40+]

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Spiedo Ristorante

AGENDA RESTAURANT & LOUNGE $$ 399 S. First St. (408) 287-3991 www.agendarestaurant.com CUISINE: Modern American THE DEAL: Agenda’s historic

DINING

1908 red-brick building features a restaurant on the main level, an outdoor dining area, a bar on top, and a nightclub below. Appetizers such as portobello spring rolls complement an afterwork glass of wine, while comfort meals like baked macaroni with three cheeses make you whine for mama. The word “fusion” applies both to Agenda’s menu as well as the live jazz that patrons enjoy most Friday and Saturday nights, starting at 7:30. THE DISH: Syrah braised short ribs, served with creamy spinach and mashed potatoes.

ARCADIA RESTAURANT $$$ 100 W. San Carlos St. (408) 278-4555 www.sanjosemarriott.com CUISINE: Modern American THE DEAL: This vast, 130-

seat dining space in the San Jose Marriott welcomes a motley crew of VIPs, theatre freaks and conventioneers 50

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with gracious and impeccable service – and the food, presented from an open kitchen, is sinfully lavish. Michael Mina’s rich interpretations of near-white-trash American classics include cute, bitesized lobster “corn dogs” made with lobster mousse and sweet cornmeal. Try one of the many steak dishes or lap up some perfect oysters with a glass of wine at the raw bar. THE DISH: We can never resist the lobster corn dogs.

AZUCAR $$ 73 E. San Fernando St. (408) 293-1121 www.azucarsj.com CUISINE: Latin American THE DEAL: Located between

Second and Third Streets, the owners of Azucar have transformed their space into a quaint Latin American bistro, complete with dark, cherry-colored wood, blue cobalt glasses and a menu inspired by dishes from Mexico, Peru, Nicaragua, Cuba, and other countries. If you’re in the mood for lighter fare, sit at the bar, order tapas-style and try one of their 12 infused rums. THE DISH: Tender churrasco with the chimichurri sauce (it has a bit of kick!).

BELLA MIA $$ 58 S. First St. (408) 280-1993 www.bellamia.com CUISINE: Italian, Modern American THE DEAL: Come for the oldworld charm; stay for the amazing pasta dishes. Bella Mia’s dark mahogany wood and beautiful chandeliers make the place dreamily cozy, and the house-made pastas are always pleasing. For the carb-conscious, the restaurant carries a variety of starter and main-course salads, while those in a carefree culinary mood might prefer the seafood saffron risotto or the grilled pork chops. THE DISH: Linguine and clams, steamed with garlic, white wine, parsley and cream.

THE BRITANNIA ARMS PUB & RESTAURANT $$ 173 W. Santa Clara St. (408) 278-1400 www.britanniaarmsdowntown.com CUISINE: British, American THE DEAL: You could call the

Brit “Silicon Valley’s living room,” if living rooms came with a jovial menu of steak and kidney pie, shepherd’s 52


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CHACHO’S $ pie, bangers and mash (British pork sausage with mashed potatoes, gravy and veggies), or fish ’n’ chips. Along with the food, a full-service cocktail bar, domestic and imported beers on draft and a friendly environment, Britannia Arms offers sporting events on large screen plasma TVs, and live music and entertainment. Now that’s a living room! THE DISH: Try the Cornish pastie: a traditional UK dish that sees beef, onion, carrots and potatoes folded into a rich gravy and baked inside a tasty short crust pastry.

18 S. Almaden Ave. (408) 293-1387 CUISINE: Mexican THE DEAL: The Sanchez

family puts mad love into every last detail of their homey restaurant, including colorful murals celebrating Dia de los Muertos, 120 different tequilas at the bar, and hand-selected moles and spices they fly in from Toluca, Mexico. The chile relleno alone is worth the trip. THE DISH: Regulars swear by the caldo de albondigas, a hearty beef broth with meatballs and fresh vegetables.

paintings and sculpture throughout. The Grand Marnier soufflé is a moanworthy nibbler, while the filet of beef en brochette could make even the tone-deaf yodel. Chefs can customize special-occasion tasting menus if you call a week or so ahead. THE DISH: Les Grenadines des Troi Roi – filets of beef, veal and lamb on grilled potato croutons and served with its own sauce and fresh vegetables.

EULIPIA $$ 374 S. First St. (408) 280-6161 www.eulipia.com CUISINE: Modern American THE DEAL: One of Mayor

CAFE ROSALENA $ 1077 The Alameda (408) 287-2400 CUISINE: American, Deli THE DEAL: This charming

DINING

little breakfast and lunch spot along the Alameda combines the best of homemade cooking with quick convenience. Owners Bryan and Rosalena kept the building’s old-world charm when they renovated the space, adding a scattering of tables (including a few sidewalk tables), a long order counter and a curved deli case. The potato-andchorizo breakfast burrito will fuel your morning with a side of delicious espresso; return for lunch, and you’ll find abundant sandwiches, salads, burritos and friendly service. THE DISH: You can’t go wrong with the chicken Caesar salad or a breakfast burrito.

CUCCINI $$ 72 N. Almaden Ave. (408) 287-1737 www.cuccini.com CUISINE: Italian, Mediterranean THE DEAL: Cuccini is owner Reza Shafazand’s homage to a restaurant of the same name that he used to frequent in Iran, his homeland. The place offers new Persian food, specializing in reasonably priced Middle Eastern plates like chicken or beef tikah and Sahara steak and shrimp. Adjoining the restaurant, a pumped-up nightclub offers two full bars, a hookah lounge and indoor/outdoor dancing. THE DISH: Chicken tikah – charbroiled cubes of saffron-marinated chicken breast, served with sautéed vegetables and basmati rice.

CAFÉ TOO! $

E & O TRADING COMPANY $$

110 S. Market St. (408) 2770557 www.sjmusart.org

96 S. First St. (408) 938-4100 www.eotrading.com

CUISINE: California

CUISINE: Asian Fusion

THE DEAL: At Café Too!

THE DEAL: Southeast

(located inside the San Jose Museum of Art), fresh café fare is its own work of art. Dig into a delicious, yet inexpensive range of gourmet sandwiches, healthful salads, homemade soups and ever-changing weekly specials. Or pick from what owner Greg Casella (who also runs Catered Too!) calls the Edible Art menu – beautifullyplated creations such as a stunning brushetta trio. Equally satisfying are the views: Eat indoors and enjoy a rotating display of artwork, or dine al fresco with wonderful views of greenery and Downtown’s fine architecture. THE DISH: We love the ahi tuna tartar – cubed tuna mixed with fresh ginger, spicy ponzu and sesame seeds, and topped with wasabi crème fraiche and mango.

Asian grill food, innovative cocktails in a wild but pleasant layout (suspended bamboo structures, exposed brick walls, and images of dragons) make diners feel they’re meeting Indiana Jones for a pre-adventure dinner. Reworked small plates from East India to Bali include shiitake mushroom and pork lettuce cups and Indonesian corn fritters. E&O will validate parking from any Downtown parking lot marked with a big “PV” (parking validation) logo. THE DISH: From the selection of big plates, we recommend the hardwood-grilled ahi tuna.

EMILE’S RESTAURANT $$$ 545 S. Second St. (408) 2891960 www.emilesrestaurant.com CUISINE: French THE DEAL: A textbook location

to take a date – small and personal, with elegant décor, fresh flowers and local 52

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Chuck Reed’s favorites, this Downtown San Jose eatery has been sending patrons into ecstasy since it opened as a jazz joint in 1977. Everchanging entrées include fancy mouthfuls such as sesame-encrusted seared ahi tuna. And if you’re a swiller, change your mood from blues to “Crazeology” with just one sip of the bar’s special blood orange cocktails. Eulipia is named after jazzman Rahsaan Roland Kirk’s tune “Theme for the Eulipions.” THE DISH: Go for a classic like the grilled rib-eye steak with garlic mash.

FAHRENHEIT ULTRA LOUNGE & RESTAURANT $ 99 E. San Fernando St. (408) 998-9998 www.fahrenheitultralounge.com CUISINE: Modern American, Asian Fusion THE DEAL: Fahrenheit’s exotic small plates received so much attention, the kitchen expanded their menu to include equally exceptional entrées. For starters, try the Mandalay beef with roti bread, or the ginger-poached chicken salad, and cruise to gratifying large plates such as the grilled cabernet skirt steak or pan-seared wild Alaskan salmon. Cocktails get as every bit as much attention at Fahrenheit; it’s the only South Bay joint where bottle-flipping bartenders add a shot of energetic flair to their service. THE DISH: Pan-seared salmon topped with a ginger scallion soy glaze.

GORDON BIERSCH $ 33 E. San Fernando St. (408) 294-6785 www.gordonbiersch.com CUISINE: American THE DEAL: The restaurant’s

lunch menu, peppered with burgers and sandwiches, rules only slightly less than the dinner menu’s 54


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truly golden steak, chicken and seafood entrées. If Americanesque food seems tired, diners can enjoy pasta, stir-fry, pizza, and a host of Asian-influenced entrées. Of course, wash any meal down with their fresh beer, brewed just down the street. Also, look out for their seasonal beer selections – this summer’s Sommergold is a pale, German-style ale. THE DISH: No meal is complete without their famous garlic fries.

THE GRILL ON THE ALLEY $$$ 172 S. Market St. (408) 2942244 www.thegrill.com CUISINE: American, Steakhouse THE DEAL: The Grill on the Alley in the Fairmont Hotel is your meat-and-potatoloving heaven on earth, and you’ll be hard pressed to find better service in Silicon Valley. Modeled after the classy big-city dinner clubs of the 1940s, The Grill offers up an elegant gourmet treatment of American favorites. Dress up to fit in. Try the Kobe sliders with one of the bartender’s magnificent martinis during happy hour. THE DISH: American Wagyu Kobe flat-iron steak with Santa Maria seasoning.

GUMBO JUMBO $$ 80 N. Market St. (408) 2948626 www.gumbojumbo.com CUISINE: Cajun Fusion THE DEAL: Diners get a dash

DINING

of heat at Gumbo Jumbo, where popular menu choices include crawfish and traditional jambalaya. The delicious Cajun soups are sure to complement any meal, especially the restaurant’s renowned seafood gumbo. Feel free to stop by late – the kitchen is open until midnight Thursday through Saturday. THE DISH: House special is the Gumbo Jumbo jambalaya, packed with tiger prawns, catfish, scallops, chicken, Louisiana hot sausage and veggies.

HAWGS SEAFOOD BAR $$ 150 S. Second St. (408) 2879955 www.hawgsseafoodbar.com CUISINE: Seafood THE DEAL: Hawgs is the

perfect center-of-town refuge for seafood fanatics. Pull up a stool at the stainless steel wraparound bar and gawk at the open kitchen, or make a date of it and dine at a table. Deliciously devoid of any California cuisine pandering, Hawgs has dishes that’ll appease any salty dog: clam linguine, salmon with nothing but a splash of 54

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lemon, or breaded prawns. THE DISH: Dungeness crab and prawn pasta – pieces of Dungeness crab, prawns, artichoke hearts, fresh tomatoes and broccoli over angel hair pasta with a seafood cream sauce.

HOUSE OF SIAM $ 151 S. Second St. (408) 2953397 www.houseofsiam.net CUISINE: Thai THE DEAL: Catering to both

herbivores and meat freaks, the House of Siam provides a much-needed Thai treat in Downtown San Jose. Two sisters professionally trained in Bangkok run the San Jose kitchen, and patrons are often treated to traditional Thai dancing. Pair the menu’s hands-down favorites (prawn and tofu versions of pad Thai) with one of the many spicy soups or curry dishes. THE DISH: Try the Tod Mon appetizer – a deep-fried fish cake and green beans mixed with curry paste and Thai bay leaves, and served with a sweet and sour sauce.

IL FORNAIO $$ 302 S. Market St. (408) 2713366 www.ilfornaio.com CUISINE: Italian, Modern American THE DEAL: All ingredients at this extension of the popular West Coast trattoria are fresh, simple and extremely flavorful. Comfortable for large parties or intimate dates, Il Fornaio offers up rotisserie chicken smothered in a rosemary and white wine reduction (Pollo Toscana). Warm wood, clean lines and the smell of hearth-baked bread fill the space (“il fornaio” literally means “the baker”). THE DISH: Ravioli alla Lucana – homemade ravioli stuffed with sweet sausage, ricotta, parmesan and fennel.

IMPROV $ 62 S. Second St. (408) 280-7475 www.sanjoseimprov.com CUISINE: Modern American THE DEAL: This comedy

dinner theatre is about the laughs, but the food will make your toes tingle. Make dinner reservations: not only will they allow you early entry to the show, but since seating is first-come, firstserved, they’ll guarantee you a table in the front. The menu features comfort food that dresses up all manner of chicken and beef, as well as can’t-go-wrong appetizers like nachos and fried calamari. THE DISH: Chicken tequila pasta – sauteed chicken breast pieces, fresh peppers, onions and penne pasta all tossed in a creamy cilantro lime tequila sauce.

JERSEY’S CHEESESTEAKS $ 325 S. First St. (408) 971-2898 CUISINE: American THE DEAL: Jersey’s has

relocated Downtown, where it only still serves authentic Philly cheesesteak sandwiches, but remains the official West Coast home of the Philadelphia Eagles. Their new home features a full kitchen and expanded menu, which includes salads, pastas, seafood and steaks. Not into cheesesteaks? Try their blackened chicken penne pasta, or an Oaxacan chicken burrito. THE DISH: The Philly cheesesteak sandwich. Duh.

KOJI SAKE LOUNGE $$ 48 S. First St. (408) 287-7199 www.kojisakelounge.com CUISINE: Japanese, Small

Plates THE DEAL: Touted as the

South Bay’s only sake lounge, Koji serves simple, traditional Japanese cuisine in a contemporary atmosphere, and fueled by an ever-changing selection of premium sakes. Small, tantalizing dishes include panko crusted calamari, a teriyaki chicken sandwich on grilled pita bread, and ahi tuna tartar with mango salsa. More than 20 premium sake brands don the shelves of Koji, with new sake featured every Wednesday. Mellifluous music, a Zen garden and ample lounge space equipped with suede booths and candle-lit tables make this a great hangout. THE DISH: Chicken Karaage – Japanese style fried chicken.

LA PASTAIA $$ 233 W. Santa Clara St., inside the Hotel De Anza (408) 2868686 www.lapastaia.com CUISINE: Italian THE DEAL: Cadmium-red

walls and slate-covered archways give La Pastaia a look as rich as its contemporary, rustic Italian menu. Menu favorites include the fusilli con melanzane, featuring grilled eggplant, sun-dried tomatoes, roasted garlic and smoked mozzarella. They also serve crisp pizzas from the wood-burning oven and have a brilliant selection of wines imported from Italian vintners. THE DISH: Osso buco D’Agnello – a braised lamb shank with roasted tomato, rosemary and mint, served over soft polenta.

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La Fondue, Saratoga

CAMPBELL:

Capers Eat & Drink 1710 W. Campbell Ave. (408) 374-5777 www.caperseatanddrink.com Cuisine: American, Catering Contact: Kam Razavi Private Dining: 1 Room, 125 Indoor seating CUPERTINO:

Sent Sovi

Park Place (Cypress Hotel)

14583 Big Basin Way (408) 867-3110 www.sentsovi.com, Cuisine: French Catering Contact: Josiah Slone Private Dining: 2 Rooms, 60 Indoor Seating

10030 S. De Anza Blvd. (408) 873-1000 www.parkplacecupertino.com Cuisine: Modern American Catering Contact: Greg Guerra Private Dining: 200 Indoor seating, 300 Outdoor LOS GATOS:

Three Degrees (Toll House Hotel) 140 S Santa Cruz Ave. (408) 884-1054 www.tollhousehotel.com, Cuisine: Modern American Catering Contact: Manager Private Dining: 5 Room, 120 Indoor seating, 180 Outdoor MOUNTAIN VIEW:

DINING

Plumed Horse 14555 Big Basin Way (408) 867-4711 www.plumedhorse.com Cuisine: American Catering Contact: Liz Moore Private Dining: 4 Rooms, 200 Indoor seatings

Cafe Baklava Mediterranean Grill 341 Castro St. (650) 969-3835 www.cafebaklava.com Cuisine: Mediterranean Catering Contact: Illiano Private Dining: 1 Room, 45 Indoor seating SARATOGA:

SAN JOSE: DOWNTOWN

Grill on the Alley (Fairmont Hotel) 172 S. Market St. (408) 294-2244 www.thegrill.com/SanJose Cuisine: Steakhouse American Catering Contact: John Price Private Dining: 2 Rooms, 33 Indoor seating, 30 Outdoor

Fahrenheit Ultra Lounge 99 E. San Fernando St. (408) 821-9921 www.fahrenheitultralounge.com Cuisine: Modern Asian Fusion Catering Contact: Chris Fenton Private Dining: 2 Rooms, 120 Indoor seating

Loft Bar & Bistro 90 S. Second St. (408) 291-0677 www.loftbarandbistro.com Cuisine: Modern American Catering Contact: Adrian Mullen Private Dining: 3 Rooms, 250 Indoor seating, 60 Outdoors

Bella Saratoga 14503 Big Basin Way (408) 741-5115 www.bellasaratoga.com Cuisine: Italian Catering Contact: Claudio Nicosia Private Dining: 2 Rooms, 55 Indoor seating, 80 Outdoor

La Fondue 14550 Big Basin Way (408) 867-3332 www.lafondue.com Cuisine: Fondue Catering Contact: Manager Private Dining: 4 Rooms, 140 Indoor seating, 40 Outdoor

Paragon Restaurant 211 S. First St. (408) 282-8888 www.paragonrestaurant.com Cuisine: Modern American Catering Contact: Neely Hooper Private Dining: 1 Room, 150 Indoor seating, 100 Outdoor SANTA CLARA

Mexicali Grill 3149 Mission College Blvd. (408) 588-9865 www.mexicaligrill.com Cuisine: Mexican Catering Contact: Manager Private Dining: 1 Room, 186 Indoor seating, 300+ Outdoor

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LOFT BAR & BISTRO $$ 90 S. Second St. (408) 291-0677 www.loftbarandbistro.com CUISINE: Modern American THE DEAL: After his success

"CF 1?H> 0?;>

at Campbell’s Capers Eat and Drink, Kam Razavi moved Downtown and had another hit with Loft. A historic stone-and-marble exterior belies the airy urban-chic warehouse interior, complete with upstairs loft and a secondstory patio. The menu features gourmet turns on classic comfort foods. The full bar on the second floor is a popular gathering spot on weekend nights. THE DISH: Razavi’s meatloaf, made with smoked ham and smothered in a wild mushroom sauce and served with garlic mashed potatoes.

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MCCORMICK AND SCHMICK’S $$ 170 S. Market St., Ste. 100 (408) 283-7200 www.mccormickandschmicks.com

Forget the scissors, don’t bother tearing out another coupon! Just dial the toll-free number listed from your cell phone and we’ll send you the coupon as a text message. Then just show your phone for great savings!

AZUCAR 888 - 377 - 9050 71 E. San Fernando St., San Jose (408) 293-1121

RECEIVE $10 OFF THE PURCHASE OF 2 DINNER ENTREES.

BELLA MIA 888 - 377 - 9053 58 S. First Street, San Jose (408) 280-1993

DINING

DINNER: RECEIVE $10 OFF THE PURCHASE OF TWO DINNER ENTREES OR $5 OFF TWO LUNCH ENTREES.

HABANA CUBA RESTAURANT 888 - 377 - 9055 238 Race Street, San Jose (408) 998-2822

888 - 377 - 9054 99 E. San Fernando St., San Jose (408) 998-9998

RECEIVE 10% OFF YOUR FINAL BILL FOR LUNCH OR DINNER.

RECEIVE 15% OFF YOUR BILL, UP TO $10. RESTRICTIONS:

HAWGS SEAFOOD BAR

TANDOORI OVEN

888 - 377 - 9058 150 S. Second St, San Jose (408) 287-9955

RECEIVE A FREE APPETIZER WITH PURCHASE OF 2 ENTREES & 2 BEVERAGES

NOT VALID WITH ANY OTHER OFFERS.

888 - 377 - 9063 150 S. First St. #107, San Jose (408) 292-7222

LUNCH: FREE SODA WITH PURCHASE OF ANY ENTREE OR WRAP.

THE MELTING POT $$$ 72 S. First St. (408) 293-6020 www.meltingpot.com CUISINE: Modern American

MORTON’S THE STEAKHOUSE 888 - 377 - 9060 177 Park Ave., San Jose (408) 947-7000

RECEIVE A FREE DESSERT W/ DINNER. ONE COUPON PER TABLE

Offers subject to change. Most national cell phone carriers supported. Standard text messaging rates apply.

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888 - 377 - 9061 155 W. San Fernando St., San Jose (408) 283-9400

RECEIVE 10% OFF YOUR TOTAL BILL, EXCLUDING ALCOHOL, TAX AND GRATUITY.

ONE COUPON PER TABLE EXP 9/15/07

FAHRENHEIT ULTRA LOUNGE & RESTAURANT

PIZZ’A CHICAGO IN SAN JOSE

CUISINE: Seafood, Modern American THE DEAL: Affordable, upscale seafood in a beautiful, business-friendly atmosphere. Menus change daily. In keeping with the McCormick local-food style, most of the chef’s nonfishy ingredients come from either the Central or Napa Valleys. The drink menu ranges from wine to singlemalt Scotch to draft beers, and bartenders practice “traditional mixology” – fresh-squeezed juices and hand-mixed cocktails. This is the place to take that important, big-shouldered business associate. THE DISH: Try the tilapia – it’s cashew crusted and served with a hot Jamaican rum butter sauce.

THEWAVEMAG.COM JULY 28 - AUGUST 10, 2008

THE DEAL: This popular

franchise takes the Swissborn craze of dipping stuff in hot pots way beyond standard-issue “cheese with bread,” and San Jose’s handsome location in a historic building is sophisticated, warm and simple. The four-course menu features varied entrées cooked in one of four styles, with an assortment of savory breads, vegetables and choice of salad. The regular menu includes dishes like lobster, chicken, pork tenderloin, shrimp, Florentine ravioli and, of course, chocolate fondue dessert. THE DISH: The Wisconsin trio – a cheese fondue that blends fontina, buttermilk

[ C O N T. ]

bleu and butterkase cheeses with white wine, scallions and a hint of sherry.

MORTON’S THE STEAKHOUSE $$$ 177 Park Ave. (408) 947-7000 www.mortons.com CUISINE: Steakhouse THE DEAL: A haven for lovers

of all things beef, Morton’s, The Steakhouse is reputed for their superior cuts of meat. Expect fine dining at its best in this smart, casual restaurant and bar. Paired with a glass of premium wine from their extensive wine list, you can’t go wrong with any of their steak offerings. Top off the experience with a soufflé for two. THE DISH: Double cut filet mignon topped with a classic béarnaise sauce.

MOTIF RESTAURANT & LOUNGE $$ 389 S. First St. (408) 279-1888 www.motiflounge.com

saltado, arroz con mariscos, and black ink risotto, all served in a modern and casual atmosphere. THE DISH: Peruvian-style lamb shanks.

ORIGINAL JOE’S RESTAURANT $$ 301 S. First St. (408) 292-7030 www.originaljoes.com CUISINE: American THE DEAL: The waiters

wear tuxes and the leather banquettes keep all conversations covert. Saucy, home-style Italian food dominates the menu, and these are mama-miasized portions. For light lunching, try the salads, sandwiches (the meatball sandwich is a good pick) or daily lunch specials. Some claim that Joe’s Chicken Soup cures colds, but we’re certain the full bar will cure whatever else ails. It’s the only Downtown full-service restaurant that’s open until 1am. THE DISH: Calf’s liver with bacon and onions. Just kidding, go with a steak or pasta.

CUISINE: Asian Fusion THE DEAL: This stunning

recent addition to the Downtown scene may be a club, but it’s also a venue that is serious about food. Their lounge-y dining area serves up tasty plates that fuse contemporary cuisine with Asian flavors. Think appetizers such as lobster dumplings in double broth with bean sprouts, or lemon marinated asparagus with daikon and egg. More substantial fare can include pork loin with roast peanuts, lardon, caramelized yam and sautéed greens, or griddled game hen with shoestring potatoes and hoisin jus. THE DISH: Honey-glazed teriyaki king salmon with coconut rice and sautéed Asian vegetables.

NAZCA PERUVIAN CUISINE $$ 167 W. San Fernando St. (408) 295-2828 CUISINE: Peruvian, Latin American, Fusion THE DEAL: According to Nazca owner Jose Bohorquez, Peruvian gastronomy is at its highest level in the nation’s history, with a boom of culinary schools in Lima sending Peruvian chefs to all corners of the world. And it’s no secret why. Traditional Peruvian food, Bohorquez says, is a mixture of several cuisines brought to Peru from Spain, China, Japan, Italy and Africa, which were then blended with Peruvian flavors. Nazca embodies that tradition, serving modern Peruvian and fusion cuisine rich in seafood and meat. Main dishes include Peruvian ceviche, lomo

P.F. CHANG’S $ 98 S. Second St. (408) 961-5250 www.pfchangs.com CUISINE: Chinese, Asian

Fusion THE DEAL: Harmony is what

this upscale chain achieves with fresh ingredients, balanced spices, and reliable, friendly service. Chefs armed with Mandarinstyle woks prepare with flair in “exhibition kitchens,” and servers have been known to create custom sauces tableside for your Shanghai street dumplings. Bay Areans prefer the wokseared lamb or General Chang’s chicken and, for dessert, try the banana spring rolls. There are a couple of dishes not on the menu that chefs will make for regulars; ask your server about the sesame chicken or the General Chang’s shrimp. THE DISH: Moo Goo Gai Pan, a unique take on the classic Cantonese chicken and shrimp dish.

PAGODA RESTAURANT $$$ 170 S. Market St. (408) 9983937 www.fairmont.com CUISINE: Chinese, Asian

Fusion THE DEAL: Orient Express

meets high-tech at this opulent complement to the Fairmont Hotel, where the menu is divided into yin and yang. Yin represents the restaurant’s traditional Chinese fare, while yang fuses Asian flavors with California influence. Try 60


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out their popular garlic chicken as well as one of their specialty drinks (we recommend the Pineapple Royale). At the Bamboo Lounge, down the corridor, enjoy Pagoda’s sushi and appetizers while sipping cocktails. THE DISH: Coriander dusted ahi tuna with crispy noodle cake, snow pea ginger broth and pineapple mango relish.

PAOLO’S $$$ 333 W. San Carlos St., Ste. 150 (408) 294-2558 www.paolos.com CUISINE: Italian THE DEAL: This is Italian

cuisine with a definite California edge. The braised lamb shank gives housemade egg pasta a mellow NorCal attitude, and the roasted Culver duck breast is tender but worldly with the addition of Pincholine olives, Medjool dates, a Malvasia reduction and braised local greens. Consult the sommelier for wine pairings that have earned repeat commendations from Wine Spectator. Paolo’s serves bargain “CPA Special” buffets before and after matinees and early-evening performances at San Jose’s Center for the Performing Arts. THE DISH: Fresh, hand made pasta, such as the housemade egg noodles with sheep’s milk ricotta and herb filling, served with vine-ripened tomatoes, garlic and olive oil.

PARAGON RESTAURANT $$ 211 S. First St. (408) 282-8888 www.paragonrestaurant.com CUISINE: Modern American THE DEAL: This chic lounge

DINING

and restaurant is the paragon of art-deco-gonehigh-tech décor, with cube lighting, polished-stone surfaces, and low booths that appear ready for takeoff. Tables on the heated outdoor patio are highly coveted on warm nights, so make reservations. Same goes for Friday and Saturday nights, when there’s live jazz. THE DISH: The roasted chicken with gourmet macn-cheese is a staple, but there are a few surprises, too, that change seasonally.

PEGGY SUE’S $ 29 N. San Pedro St. (408) 2986750; 183 Park Ave. (408) 2940252 www.peggysues.com CUISINE: American THE DEAL: At this classic

’50s diner with comfy red booths, walls packed with mid-century memorabilia, and generous burgers and thick shakes, the TV stars of yore are honored with eponymous sandwiches: 60

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[ C O N T. ]

The Ed Sullivan is your basic grilled cheese sandwich, Pat Boone’s a BLT on rye or wheat, and the Sid Caesar is a stand-up grilled pastrami with Swiss on rye with mustard and pickles. THE DISH: Big Bopper Burger: three quarter-pound beef patties layered with cheese, chili, and an egg.

for the Hurricanes – they might just sneak up on you. Uh, the drink, that is. THE DISH: The Poor House – ham, roast beef, “beef drippins” and topped with au jus, shredded cabbage, tomato, pickles, mayonnaise, Creole mustard on a New Orleans-style French roll. (Now that’s a mouthful!)

PICASSO’S TAPAS RESTAURANT $$

ROKKO JAPANESE CUISINE $$

62 W. Santa Clara St. (408) 298-4400 www.picassosrestaurant.com

55 S. Market St. (408) 947-7778

CUISINE: Spanish, Tapas THE DEAL: Picasso’s offers a

tapas menu so multifaceted, even a Cubist painter would be impressed. The paella is served for two or more, so bring friends to share a pitcher of sangria while you wait. On weekends, there’s often a guitarist to keep guests entertained during the inevitable wait. THE DISH: Start off with the tangy, garlic-spiked specialties, like clams in white wine garlic sauce, then switch it up with the stewed chicken and tortilla Española (a potato and onion frittata).

PIZZ’A CHICAGO $$ 155 W. San Fernando St. (408) 283-9400 www.pizzachicago.com CUISINE: Pizza THE DEAL: Every Pizz’a pie

offers a taste of the deelish deep-dish character of Chicago without the Windy City weather. Try the Al Capone’s pizza doppelganger with fresh spinach, ricotta, onions, and toasted almonds, and the Joliet Jake, a pie piled with portabella, crimini, shiitake and button mushrooms with basil, tomato, and apricots. For meatball fiends, there’s the Oprah sandwich. THE DISH: The Rush Street – pepperoni, Canadian bacon, sausage, linguica and meatballs.

POOR HOUSE BISTRO $ 91 S. Autumn St. (408) 2925837 www.poorhousebistro.com CUISINE: American, New

Orleans THE DEAL: Housed in a

cheery Victorian, Poor House Bistro brings a bit of N’awlins to Silicon Valley. The menu features Louisiana favorites like crawfish, blackened chicken, jambalaya, gumbo, fried catfish, red beans and rice, and the famous donutlike desserts, beignets. Service is Big Easy friendly, and terrace seating outside lets you lounge in the sun while enjoying a Po Boy sandwich. Sunday brunch from 10am to 2pm. Live music kicks off the party Friday and Saturday nights. Watch out

CUISINE: Japanese, Sushi THE DEAL: Delectably fresh sashimi isn’t all you’ll find at this Downtown sushi den. There’s also the roster of generously portioned daily specials, every bit as flavorful as menu staples like the teriyaki entrées (chicken, beef, salmon) and tasty assortment of sushi rolls. THE DISH: The Rokko crunch roll – an appetizing combination of lightly cooked salmon, crisp salmon skin, avocado and tempura flakes.

SAN JOSE BAR & GRILL $ 85 S. Second St. (408) 286-2397 www.sanjosebarandgrill.com CUISINE: American THE DEAL: You can’t miss

the game on the 12 TVs lining the bar, and you won’t want to miss the SJ sliders – specialty minisandwiches, including gourmet cheeseburgers, teriyaki chicken, BBQ pork and BLTs. They’re as big as your fist and much tastier, and they come in baskets of four, eight or 12. THE DISH: Black and bleu burger with Cajun spice and crumbled blue cheese.

SCOTT’S SEAFOOD GRILL & BAR $$ 185 Park Ave. (408) 971-1700 www.scottsseafoodsj.com CUISINE: Seafood, Modern American THE DEAL: This is where Silicon Valley honchos wine and dine hotshot engineers and venture capitalists. The extensive wine and beer list is sure to loosen a few ties. Finish off with the key lime pie or strawberry shortcake. THE DISH: The Dungeness crab cioppino and seared ahi tuna never fail to impress.

SMOKE TIKI LOUNGE $$ 152 Post St. (408) 292-4266 www.smoketiki.com CUISINE: Barbecue, Hawaiian THE DEAL: From the talent

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tropical small plates and smoked meats (favorites include Texas smoked spareribs and house smoked salmon) in an upscale atmosphere. Artistic stone figures adorn the huge outdoor patio, while a realistic palm tree towers over the bar. Centrally located, just blocks from the Convention Center and the HP Pavilion. THE DISH: Signature 14-hour smoked beef brisket.

SONOMA CHICKEN COOP $ 31 N. Market St. (408) 287-4098 www.sonomachickencoop.com CUISINE: American THE DEAL: At this casual,

DINING

Total Bill. Not Valid w/other coupons. Exp. 8.31.08. w/ this ad.

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self-serve spot on San Pedro Square, help yourself to a plucky selection of juicy rotisserie chicken, creamy roasted garlic chicken pasta alfredo, zesty lime-grilled chicken and a funky chicken salad gone tropical with mango, red peppers, and tangy peanut dressing. Even if you’re not a fan of fowl, don’t be chicken of this place – the inventive vegetarian salads, pizzas, and foccacia sandwiches are reliable and reasonable. Ideal for a relaxed dinner or lunch with health-conscious co-workers or friends with finicky eating habits. THE DISH: Rotisserie chicken.

[ C O N T. ]

SPIEDO RISTORANTE $$ 151 W. Santa Clara St. (408) 971-6096 www.spiedo.com CUISINE: Italian, Modern American THE DEAL: Silicon Valley’s fine-dining alternative to Prozac is Spiedo’s: hearty fare served in a welcoming, effortlessly chic dining room with large windows and soothing lighting. The homemade gnocchi and stuffed pasta are like love on a platter when paired with selections from the impressive list of local Californian and Italian wines. THE DISH: This Cal-Italian restaurant is known for its nine mesquite-rotisseriegrilled entrées, served in generous portions with sides of creamy polenta or golden mashed potatoes.

TESKE’S GERMANIA $$ 255 N. First St. (408) 292-0291 www.teskes-germania.com CUISINE: German THE DEAL: When all the

Silicon Valley office parks and malls begin to look the same, seek sanctuary in the cozy old-world charm of this family-run German restaurant. Proprietors Hans and Catherine Bauman serve up all the bratwurst and beer your inner Bavarian could possibly desire. With Spaten on tap, the walled beer garden is surely the best place in Downtown San Jose to play hooky from work on a scorching summer’s day. THE DISH: Rib-sticking schnitzel, house-made spätzle and schnapps galore.

TIED HOUSE CAFE & BREWERY $$ 65 N. San Pedro St. (408) 2952739 www.tiedhouse.com CUISINE: Modern American THE DEAL: Ravenous Sharks

fans devour platters of smoked trout, smoked salmon, ribs, and sausages with pints of Ironwood Dark, an English-style brown ale, while mall-weary shoppers gratefully chow down the blackened Louisiana catfish with Tied’s Cascade Amber. THE DISH: Pesto-parmesan calamari or the harvest quesadilla, roasted butternut squash, and red peppers with pepper jack cheese in a flour tortilla drizzled with lime-chipotle sour cream.

TRES GRINGOS BAJA CANTINA $ 83 S. Second St. (408) 278-9888 www.tresgringossj.com CUISINE: Mexican THE DEAL: The Tiki-themed

Tres Gringos keeps the party going with blended margaritas, daiquiris and other tropical drinks in crazy Big Gulp sizes. But don’t go drinking on an empty stomach: Chow the chipotle chicken flautas, margarita oysters and other CalMex appetizers. Enjoy the Sharks game in the tropical splendor of the thatched-hut bar area – San Jose Sharks defenseman Mike Rathje is an investor in this cantina, and he wouldn’t want you to miss it. THE DISH: Do not, we repeat do not, miss the Baja fish tacos. TW


DINING: FEATURE

Oceanfront Dining On-Site Brewery Fresh Seafood Fire Pits Cocktails & Wine Live Music & Dancing

HALF MOON BAY DINING

BREWING COMPANY

4 Miles North of Half Moon Bay

390 Capistrano Road Princeton-by-the-Sea 650.728.BREW www.hmbbrewingco.com

Parcel 104 at the Santa Clara Marriott 2700 Mission College Blvd., Q Santa Clara 408.970.6104 Q Parcel104.com THEWAVEMAG.COM JULY 28 - AUGUST 10, 2008

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» FEATURE

Nightlife&Music

Dive Bar

Loft Bar & Grill

GORDON BIERSCH

NIGH T L IFE & MUSIC

B

ack when San Jose was the first capital of California, rumor has it that then-state Sen. Thomas Jefferson Green would end each legislative session with “Let’s have a drink! Let’s have a thousand drinks!” The lawmakers, it is said, would then pack into a saloon on Market Street, where they reportedly drank all night (most likely whiskey) and had a bar tab totaling 1,000 drinks. Whether or not these tales are true, the first legislative session became known as “The Legislature of 1,000 Drinks” – and anyone who frequents Downtown these days knows that the spirit of that session still flows strong from beer taps and whiskey bottles throughout the city. Whether it’s a casual meeting with co-workers, a round of Jäger bombs with old friends, or an elegant tryst in need of a romantic setting, Downtown San Jose has got you covered.

THIS SWANKY LOUNGE offers a

different brand of DJ music Wednesdays thru Sundays: ’80s, salsa, reggae, you name it. The Agenda also serves as a jazz venue for live acts passing through town and plays host to a summer jazz series. SIGNATURE DRINK: Skittles (Absolut Citron, Absolut Mandarin, Midori, peach schnapps, orange, cranberry and pineapple juice).

BLANK CLUB 44 Almaden Ave. (408) 292-5265 www.theblankclub.com IF YOU LIKE ROCK, this is the place to be, with local punk bands as well as national

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acts on the bill several nights a week. The Blank also has themed musical events like ’80s New Wave Night (Thursdays) and our favorite, Union Jack-Off Karaoke (Mondays). SIGNATURE DRINK: An icy cold glass of Pabst Blue Ribbon beer.

selection of liquor. SIGNATURE DRINK: Vodka and Jäger Red Bulls (a mix of vodka or Jägermeister and Red Bull energy drink).

CARAVAN LOUNGE 98 Almaden Ave. (408) 995-6220 THE CROWD AT the Caravan is

BRITANNIA ARMS 173 W. Santa Clara St. (408) 278-1400 www.britanniaarmsdowntown.com A PUB IS more than the sum of its parts – it’s the ephemeral happiness that derives from fish and chips, darts, a perfectly poured Black and Tan and the hottie in the corner who just winked at you. Welcome to the Brit, home to DJs (Thursday through Saturday), live bands (Wednesday) and a wide

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Fahrenheit Ultralounge

With its vast selection of bars, clubs and pubs, Downtown San Jose has never been more vibrant.

399 S. First St. (408) 287-3991 www.agendalounge.com

FEATURE WINE TASTING & MORE CD RELEASES ALBUM REVIEWS THIS TIME IN MUSIC HISTORY

Paragon

Drinking It All In

AGENDA LOUNGE

» » » » »

a mix of old and young, which is probably why this is one of our favorite neighborhood dives. You can have a drink with the regulars or chat all night long with the friendly bartenders. There is a pool table, an impressive jukebox and live music a few nights a week. SIGNATURE DRINK: Anything containing alcohol.

DIVE BAR 78 E. Santa Clara St. (408) 288-5252 www.sjdivebar.com ALTHOUGH CALLED DIVE BAR,

the name is deceptive. With its beautiful mahogany bar and generous space, it is much classier than your typical watering hole. Not to worry, you can still find your favorite local dive amenities here, including a jukebox, and the daily drink specials will keep you coming back. Get your groove on with DJs Otrebor and Super Dave spinning house, old-school, ’70s, ’80s and ’90s every Friday and Saturday night. SIGNATURE DRINK: Cosmopolitan (vodka, Cointreau, cranberry and fresh lime juice).

33 E. San Fernando St. (408) 294-6785 www.gordonbiersch.com THE GERMAN-STYLE LAGERS

at Gordon Biersch are a heady experience – Dan Gordon learned to make them the authentic way at the world-class brewing school, Weihenstephan. Add San Jose GB’s outdoor dining courtyard and you’ve got it made in the shade. SIGNATURE DRINK: Seasonal Beer “Sommergold.”

THE GRILL ON THE ALLEY San Jose Fairmont Hotel, 172 S. Market St. (408) 294-2244 www.thegrill.com IF YOUR IMAGE of a hotel bar is a cramped lounge filled with tipsy, jet-lagged businessmen, then The Grill on the Alley will be a thoroughly pleasant surprise. Even without the upscale steak-and-chops restaurant that gives the place its name, the bar at The Grill defies hotel bar stereotypes. Be sure to order a martini from their list of specialty varieties like The Daily Bull (Red Bull and Ketel One Citroen). SIGNATURE DRINK: Sidecar (Courvoisier, Cointreau, fresh lime juice and one gram of sugar).

HUNTERS NIGHTCLUB 349 S. First St. (408) 947-1975 www.huntersnightclubs.com “WHERE PEOPLE MEET PEOPLE”

is the motto of this gay nightclub in Downtown San Jose – and with something new going on every day of the week, there is ample opportunity for this to happen. Regular themed events are a nightly tradition, while VJs play music videos nonstop seven nights a week. Be sure to stop by on Marathon Mondays for $1 well drinks, and part of your proceeds will go to the National AIDS Marathon & AIDS LifeCycle.

IMPROV COMEDY CLUB 62 S. Second St. (408) 280-7475 www.improv.com THE IMPROV IS to comedians

what Carnegie Hall is to singers, which is to say that only the biggest and best names in the funny biz are invited to crack wise on the Improv stage. Whether they’ve booked a former sitcom star trying to make ends meet or a rising star on the stand-up scene, the best part about the Improv is that you aren’t going to buy two drinks only to have the headliner bomb. SIGNATURE DRINK: Sex on the Stage (vodka, Midori, orange juice, cranberry juice, pineapple juice and peach schnapps). 66


NIGHTLIFE&MUSIC: FEATURE

$2 PABST

$2 PABST

$2 PABST

WII VIDEO

LADIES COUGAR NIGHT

SATURDAY NIGHT DANCE FEVER

LIVE MUSIC

DJ / LIVE MUSIC

DJ / LIVE MUSIC

THE ESCAPE BAR & GRILL, 2942 S.

$2 PABST

MULLETT MADNESS

$2 PABST WII VIDEO

$2 PABST TRIVIA

$2 PABST OPEN POOL TOURNAMENT

Bascom Ave., San Jose (408) 377-5436

R&B, FUNK, JAZZ

BAMBOO LOUNGE, 1355 N. Fourth St., San Jose (408) 392-2468 www.TheIslandGrill.com

LIVE MUSIC R&B, FUNK, JAZZ

KARAOKE / HOUR HAPPY HOUR HAPPY $1 OFF ALL DRINKS THE BANK, 14421 Big Basin Way, Saratoga (408) 867-5155

BERT’S ALIBI, 1313 W. El Camino Real Mountain View (408) 561-4339

$1 OFF ALL DRINKS 5 - 6:30PM

5 - 6:30PM

$2 PBR ON TAP

$3.50 KAMIKAZES

AFTER 10PM $1 KAMIKAZES $3.50

HAPPY HOUR HAPPY HOUR

$3.50 KAMIKAZES

BRITISTH BANKER’S CLUB, 1090 El

$2 PBR ON TAP

$2 PBR ON TAP

AFTER 10PM $1 KAMIKAZES $3.50

SOUTH BAY’S LONGEST HAPPY HOUR!

KARAOKE & DJ

KARAOKE

$1 OFF ALL DRINKS 5 - 6:30PM

HAPPY HOUR LADIES NIGHT SUNDAYS KARAOKE & DJ

COLLEGE NIGHT

BRANHAM LOUNGE, 1116 Branham Ln., San Jose (408) 265-5525

$3.50 KAMIKAZES

$1 OFF ALL DRINKS 5 - 6:30PM

CLUB NIGHT NO COVER

BAND NIGHT JAZZ MUSIC & NO COVER - FUNK, KARAOKE ROCK, DANCE

INDUSTRY NIGHT

HAPPY HOUR $1 OFF ALL DRINKS 5 - 6:30PM

$2 PBR ON TAP

AFTER 10PM $1 KAMIKAZES $3.50

AFTER 10PM $1 KAMIKAZES $3.50

$2 TUESDAYS

WEDNESDAYS

BEER BUST

CLUB NIGHT

HUMPDAY DRINK SPECIALS

Camino Real, Menlo Park (650) 327-8769 www.britishbankersclub.com

HAPPY HOUR HAPPY HOUR HAPPY HOUR CHATANOGA, 2725 El Camino Real Santa Clara (408) 241-1200 www.chatanogaonline.com

4 - 7PM

4 - 7PM

4 - 7PM

LIVE ENTERTAINMENT 8PM-MIDNIGHT

LIVE ENTERTAINMENT 9PM-MIDNIGHT

LIVE ENTERTAINMENT 9PM-MIDNIGHT

BOMBS AWAY THURSDAYS

DIVE BAR, 78 E. Santa Clara, San Jose (408) 288-5252 www.sjdivebar.com

MARTINI FRIDAYS

Fernando St., San Jose (408) 998-9998 www.fultralounge.com

9:30PM - 1:30AM

INDUSTRY NIGHT LIVE CELTIC MUSIC

Ave., Santa Clara (408) 588-1111 www.meetmeattheoak.com

7 - 10PM, HAPPY HOUR SPECIALS

HAPPY HOUR

KOJI SAKE LOUNGE, 48 S. First St., San Jose (408) 287-7199 www.kojisakelounge.com

HAPPY HOUR

TOP SECRET TUESDAYS

HAPPY HOUR 4 - 7PM

KARAOKE WEDNESDAYS

CLUB NIGHT

LIVE MUSIC

CLUB NIGHT

LIVE MUSIC

LIVE MUSIC

HAPPY HOUR

DRINK

DRINK

JAM NIGHT

KARAOKE NIGHT

JAM NIGHT

LIVE ART SHOW & HOUSE MUSIC

KARAOKE NIGHT

HOUSE MUSIC

9:30PM - 1:30AM

TOP 40’s-80’s

9:30PM - 12:30AM, HAPPY HOUR SPECIALS

HAPPY HOUR

5-7PM, 3 BEERS & SPECIALS SPECIALS $3 WELLS & ½ PRICE SPECIALTY COCKTAILS $3 BEERS, $3 WELLS, $5 SPECIALTY DRINKS, $3 JAGER, BEER PONG 30% OFF BOTTLE OF WINE ALL NIGHT

KARAOKE NIGHT

LIVE MUSIC

HAPPY HOUR 4 - 7PM HAPPY HOUR 4 - 7PM 50 CENTS OFF DOMESTIC 50 CENTS OFF DOMESTIC BEER & WELL DRINKS BEER & WELL DRINKS

#1060, San Jose (408) 247-1706 www.rosiemccanns.com

YE OLDE ROYAL OAK PUB, 1240 Coleman

MARAGARITA MONDAYS

4 - 7PM

JAM NIGHT 8PM

R&B, HOUSE

9:30PM - 12:30AM

HAPPY HOUR

6 - 9PM $5 COCKTAILS, 6 - 9PM $5 COCKTAILS, 6 - 9PM $5 COCKTAILS, $3 BEERS $3 BEERS $3 BEERS

8PM HAPPY HOUR 4 - 7PM 8PM HAPPY HOUR 4 - 7PM 50 CENTS OFF DOMESTIC 8PM HAPPY HOUR 4 - 7PM 50 CENTS OFF DOMESTIC 50 CENTS OFF DOMESTIC BEER & WELL DRINKS BEER & WELL DRINKS BEER & WELL DRINKS

1ST MON. OF THE MONTH

OPEN MIC

7PM - 1AM, SPONSORED BY GUITAR SHOWCASE

KARAOKE

9PM - 1AM, HAPPY HOUR SPECIALS

TRIVIA

7:30 - 10PM, HAPPY HOUR SPECIALS

KARAOKE

HAPPY HOUR SPECIALS

HAPPY HOUR

HAPPY HOUR $5 COCKTAILS, 6 - 9PM $5 COCKTAILS, 6 - 9PM $3 BEERS, $3 BEERS HALF OFF SAKE!

THEWAVEMAG.COM JULY 28 - AUGUST 10, 2008

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KARAOKE NIGHT

MAD MIX JAM

ROSIE MCCANN’S, 355 Santana Row

CHILL SUNDAYS

$4 DRAFT BEERS, 1/2 5-7PM: 3 BEERS & $3 5-7PM: 3 BEERS & $3 PRICED ROTATING SPECIALS, WELLS & ½ PRICE SPE- WELLS & ½ PRICE SPECOMPLIMENTARY CHAMCIALTY COCKTAILS CIALTY COCKTAILS PAGNE - 9:30-10:30PM

GOOSETOWN, 1072 Lincoln Ave., San Jose (408) 292-4835 www.goosetownlounge.com

QUARTER NOTE, 1214 Apollo Way, Sunnyvale (408) 732-2110 www.quarternote.com

4 - 7PM

$6 GREY GOOSE & KETEL ONE $3 JACK $3 JAGER FREE POOL $5 JAGER BOMBS & $5 9PM-1AM: $3 CORONA MARTINIS, $4 FINLANDIA $6 PATRON B4 10PM $2 DOMESTIC BOTTLES $3 HOUSE MARGARITAS $2 BLUE MOON BEFORE IRISH CAR BOMBS B4 11PM $3 PACIFICO COSMOS B4 9PM DJ OTRE- DJ OTREBOR & CREW ALL DAY 11PM; $1 TOP SHELF JELLO $3 LANDSHARK $4 JAGER DJ OTREBOR & CREW BOR & CREW SHOTS 11PM TO CLOSE

DRINK SPECIALS HAPPY HOUR

FAHRENHEIT ULTRA LOUNGE, 99 E. San

RHYTHM SATURDAYS

HAPPY HOUR HAPPY HOUR


» HEADLINERS

NIGHTLIFE&MUSIC F E AT U R E of the typical Downtown lounge, Koji features some of the finest sake that your palate will ever have the chance to dance to. The ambience is perfect for sipping warm sake as well, candle-lit, plush booths, Japanese Zen garden and downtempo beats spinning in the backround.

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JOHNNY V’S 31 E. Santa Clara St. (408) 947-8470 www.myspace.com/ johnnyvslivemusic JOHNNY V’S WILL make you

feel like a kid in a candy store. Entertainment includes a classic pinball machine and other videogames, two flatscreen TVs playing sports and movies, not to mention live music and DJs every night of the week. The greatest attraction, though, is the bar’s premium wine and beer selection.

music, or enjoying the stars on the patio. SIGNATURE DRINK: Mango Mojito (mango flavored rum, fresh mint, pineapple, sweet and sour, and a splash of soda).

MIAMI BEACH CLUB 417 S. First St. (408) 262-9621 www.yourmiamibeachclub.com

THE LOFT BAR & BISTRO 90 Second St. (408) 291-0677 www.loftbarandbistro.com

KOJI SAKE LOUNGE 48 S. First St. (408) 287-7199 www.kojisakelounge.com RELATIVELY AGAINST THE grain

WITH ITS EURO-NEW YORK

décor, The Loft is reminiscent of an upscale Manhattan loft with the sophistication of a Swiss penthouse, combining upscale dining with a fresh, vibrant atmosphere for a positively decadent dining experience – whether it’s down at the bar, on the second level listening to some

IF LATIN DANCING is your passion, this is the nightclub for you. Salsa, merengue, cumbia and reggaeton are only a few of the styles you’ll see on the three dance floors at Miami Beach Club. Friday is Ladies Night Out with no cover charger for women. A free salsa class from 7-9pm on Thursdays and Fridays will have you cha cha cha-ing across the floor in no time. SIGNATURE DRINK: Anything with an umbrella in it.

SV

WINE TASTING & MORE

Hahn Estates, Smith & Hook Winery 37700 Foothill Rd., Soledad (831) 678-2132 www.hahnestates.com Wine Tasting: Mon-Fri 11am4pm, Sat-Sun 11am-5pm.

Pedrizzetti Winery Hahn Estates, Smith & Hook Winery

1645 San Pedro Ave., Morgan Hill (408) 779-7389 www.pedrizzettiwinery.com Open Tue-Sun 10am-5pm (closed most holidays).

WINERIES

Rabbit’s Foot Meadery

Burrell School Vineyards & Winery

1246 Birchwood Dr.,Sunnyvale (408) 261-1603 www.rabbitsfootmeadery.com Their famous cider is available at Whole Foods Markets and Oliver’s Markets.

24060 Summit Rd., Los Gatos (408) 353-6290 www.burrellschool.com Burrell School Vineyards & Winery produces “Wines at the Head of Their Class”: wines of unmistakable mountain character. Estate grown Cabernet Franc, chardonnay, merlot, pinot noir, Cabernet Sauvignon, and Syrah. Open Thu-Sun 11am5pm, Fri-Sat 11am-6pm.

NIGH T L IFE & MUSIC

Agenda Lounge

MISSION ALE HOUSE 97 E. Santa Clara St. (408) 292-4058 www.missionalehouse.com WITH MORE THAN two dozen

» WINE TASTING & MORE

Cinnabar Winery Tasting Room 14612 Big Basin Way, Saratoga (408) 867-1010 www.cinnabarwine.com We invite you to visit our beautiful tasting room. Located in the quaint, historical village of Saratoga, flanked by the magnificent Santa Cruz Mountains. Open daily 11am - 5pm and Friday and Saturday evenings until 8pm for the summer months.

Cooper-Garrod Estate Vineyards 22645 Garrod Rd., Saratoga (408) 867-7116 www.cgv.com Wine Tasting: Mon-Fri Noon-5pm, SatSun 11am-5pm.

Roudon-Smith Winery 2364 Bean Creek Rd., Scotts Valley (831) 438-1244 www.roudonsmith.com Wine Tasting: Sat Noon-4:30pm.

Thomas Fogarty Vineyards 19501 Skyline Blvd., Woodside (650) 851-6777 www.fogartywinery.com Wine Tasting: Thu-Sun 11am-5pm. WINE SHOPS

Savvy Cellar Wines 2048 Broadway St., Redwood City (650) 363-8737 www.savvycellar.com Experience top quality wines without having to spend an arm and a leg. Savvy Cellar Wine Bar & Wine Shop features wines from all the great wine producing regions of the world – all wines rated 90 points or higher and retail for $39/bottle or less. Check website for details on: wine classes, wine clubs, private events, tasting specials, live jazz and online sales (including gift certificates).

Vino Locale

Fortino Winery 4525 Hecker Pass Hwy., Gilroy (408) 842-3305 www.fortinowinery.com Wine Tasting: Tue-Sat 10am5pm, Sun 11am-5pm.

Fleming Jenkins Vineyards & Winery 45 W. Main St., Los Gatos (408) 358-4949 www. flemingjenkins.com Wine Tasting: Tue-Sun Noon-6pm.

431 Kipling St., Palo Alto (650) 328-0450 www.vinolocale.com Vino Locale is the perfect place to host a business or social event in an elegant and private setting. Open Tue-Sat 11am-9pm, Sun Noon-5pm.

Vintage Wine Merchants 377 Santana Row #1135, San Jose (408) 260-1115 www.vintagewinemerchants.com Open Mon-Wed 10am-9pm, Thu-Sat 10am-10pm, Sun Noon-8pm.

FOR MORE INFORMATION, LOG ON TO WWW.THEWAVEMAG.COM 66

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THEWAVEMAG.COM JULY 28 - AUGUST 10, 2008

premium beers, the Mission Ale House boasts the best beer selection in Silicon Valley. Its relaxing atmosphere makes it the perfect place for professionals to hang out after a long workday (though it’s also ideal for weekend fun). The House also offers a variety of choice cigars and a Friday afternoon special: $2 tacos or $2 pizzas, to name a few. SIGNATURE DRINK: A shot of Jack and a pint of cold beer.

MOTIF RESTAURANT AND CLUB 389 S. First St. (408) 279-1888 www.motiflounge.com IF YOU DON’T NOTICE the uniquely vibrant avant-garde décor when first stepping into Motif, you’re bound to be taken aback by the huge suspended glass installation of 7,000 pieces. This is only one of the many elegant features housed inside Motif’s 8,000-square-foot building. Two bars, a restaurant, two DJ areas, flat screen plasma TVs and a lounge create an atmosphere of energy and intimacy perfect for any event. SIGNATURE DRINK: Sidecar

PARAGON RESTAURANT & BAR

SMOKE TIKI LOUNGE

211 S. First St. (408) 282-8888 www.paragonrestaurant.com PARAGON IS KNOWN and

praised for its casual yet opulent atmosphere – and if that’s not enough, how about the collection of more than 100 different vodkas, all chilled on an ice shelf and waiting for you to sample. Paragon also serves delicious food, appetizers and desserts, and when it’s time to wind down after dinner, you can stroll out to their plaza and have a go at their famous bocce ball court. SIGNATURE DRINK: Pomegranate Ginger (ginger infused vodka and pomegranate juice).

SAN JOSE BAR AND GRILL 85 S. Second St. (408) 286-2397 www.sanjosebarandgrill.com SAN JOSE BAR AND GRILL

doubles as a sports lounge with larger-than-life TV screens that show your favorite sporting events. With DJs spinning music Thursday through Saturday, you are also encouraged to dance. Plus, the SJBG has some of the best burgers you’ll find Downtown. SIGNATURE DRINK: Heartbreaker (Absolut Peach, Absolut Mandarin, passion mango Rockstar, cranberry juice and Triple Sec).

152 Post St. (408) 292-4266 www.smoketiki.com FROM THE TALENT behind Mission Alehouse, Smoke serves up tasty tropical small plates and smoked meats in an upscale atmosphere that’s Tiki without being tacky. Artistic stone figures adorn the huge outdoor patio, while a life-sized palm tree towers over the bar. SIGNATURE DRINK: Smoke Mai Thai (Rum, pineapple juice, orange juice, grenadine, 151 and a splash of dark rum).

SOUTH FIRST BILLIARDS 420 S. First St. (408) 294-7800 www.sofapool.com THIS 21-AND-OVER BILLIARDS

hall is not of the dark, dank variety. South First Street Billiards is about as upscale as a pool hall can get, with a deluxe full bar with more than 15 tasty brews on tap, and edgy local art on the walls. They also serve lunch, dinner and snacks, not to mention some of the best quesadillas around. SIGNATURE DRINK: Spanish Island (vodka, rum, tequila, gin, banana liquor, and mango syrup).

O’FLAHERTY’S IRISH PUB 25 N. San Pedro St. (408) 947-8007 www.oflahertyspub.com O’FLAHERTY’S IS THE TYPE of

place to spend an afternoon reminiscing with longtime friends about those halcyon childhood days. With its handcrafted bar featuring mostly imported beers and spirits, Singer sewing machine tables and framed black-andwhite pictures on the walls, the pub has a very homey feel. Sundays are reserved for sports and live Irish music (sometimes provided by happy barflies). SIGNATURE DRINK: Irish Car Bomb (Guinness beer, Bailey’s Irish Cream and Jameson Whiskey).

68 » CD RELEASES

CD

RELEASES

JULY 29

AUGUST 5

Alice Cooper, Along Came a Spider Rick Springfield, Venus in Overdrive Scars on Broadway, Scars on Broadway Sugarland, Love on the Inside Third Day, Revelation Various Artists, The Mummy: Tomb of the Dragon Emperor (Soundtrack)

The Airborne Toxic Event, The Airborne Toxic Event Amy Ray, Didn’t It Feel Kinder The Faint, Fasciinatiion Madonna, Give It 2 Me (Single) Mike Gordon, The Green Sparrow Peter Bradley Adams, Leavetaking Randy Newman, Harps & Angels The Real McKenzies, Off the Leash Trapt, Only Through the Pain Zebrahead, Phoenix


NIGHTLIFE&MUSIC: ALBUM REVIEWS » ALBUM REVIEWS

NIGHTLIFE&MUSIC ALBUM REVIEWS

CONOR OBERST (MERGE)

BY TOM LANHAM

Conor Oberst 

There were times – like in his overtly precious incarnation, Bright Eyes – when you wanted to push Conor Oberst down the nearest open elevator shaft. He was just too much: too much mincing melody, too much sub-Ginsberg wordplay, and way too much vibrato on that hatchling-vulture voice of his. But a weird thing occurs on this, his first de facto “solo” set in 13 years. By retreating to the Mexican desert and assembling a Flying Burrito-styled Mystic Valley Band for backup, Oberst actually manages to get in touch with his inner Gram Parsons, as well as his inner country-rock crooner. It’s a Beck-inventive experiment, and it works. Only one track here (the whiny, cloying “Eagle on a Pole”) bears any resemblance to Bright Eyes, while the rest blazes new trails straight to the heart of the songwriting matter. On the opener, “Cape Canaveral,” Oberst’s knuckles tap out the folksy rhythm on his acoustic, until his vocals boom in, sounding unusually assured and mature. By the second track, “Sausalito,” he’s pairing Byrds-retro jangle with diary-frank lyrics. Soon, he’s spiraling off into rockabilly (“I Don’t Wanna Die (In the Hospital)),” vaudeville shuffle (“Danny Callahan”), even reel-rowdy Celtic chants (“NYC – Gone, Gone”). Maybe there’s hope after all for this once self-absorbed sad sack. All it took was a little peyote.

THE VERVE (ON YOUR OWN)

Forth 

It was inevitable, really. After its untimely post-Urban Hymns breakup, ethereal UK combo The Verve was almost fated to reform. The three brilliant, deep-thinking solo sets crafted afterwards by Zen-like front man Richard Ashcroft didn’t exactly catch fire, and the rest of the band – especially temperamental guitarist Nick McCabe – seemed to disappear from the pop scene entirely. Now, the relationship seems symbiotic, as if the axe man and the crooner somehow need each other in order to survive. So the Hymns thread picks up here as if it had never broken, with a solid divide between delicate, dreamy acoustics (“Judas,” “I See Houses”) and sweeping, panoramic soundscapes (“Noise Epic,”“Sit and Wonder”) that showcase McCabe’s patented textures. And when the two mindsets collide, as on the picturesque “Valium Skies” and raucous single “Love Is Noise,” it’s pure Vervevibrant magic. So, no, it’s not Urban Hymns, nor does it boast unforgettable classics like “Bittersweet Symphony” or “The Drugs Don’t Work.” But it’s damned close and, as inevitabilities go, rather comfortable.

MURRY HAMMOND I’m On My Way 

I Don’t Know Where I’m Going, But

(HUMMINGBIRD)

CSS

CAMPBELL’S #1LATE NITE DINING UNTIL 2AM

Donkey 

(SUBPOP)

By all accounts, this sophomore outing from Brazilian punk-poppers Cansei de Ser Sexy (CSS) was a nightmare to write and record, with band members leaving, debts piling up, even a case of claustrophobia or two. But you wouldn’t know it at first listen. Front vixen Lovefoxxx and crew bounce through so many buoyant, synth-peppered numbers, they could pass for Blondie at their “Eat to the Beat” prime. On closer inspection, turmoil roils up from the froth, in the grim-themed tracks “Left Behind,” “Rat Is Dead (Rage),” and “How I Became Paranoid.” But there’s a kooky, new wave cheekiness that shines disco-ball lights on even the darkest corners of Donkey. What doesn’t kill you only makes you stronger, they say, and CSS is one of the mightiest new forces in music at the moment. TW THEWAVEMAG.COM JULY 28 - AUGUST 10, 2008

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NIGH T L IFE & MUSIC

The mighty chugging cow punk train that is the Old 97s has moved so briskly down the track over the years, it’s difficult to glimpse anyone but the brainy conductor, Rhett Miller, who’s also stoked the engine with some fiery solo sets. So it’s fitting that his brakeman, co-guitarist/vocalist Murry Hammond, finally steps off the caboose with this more backwoods-y debut. Hammond has a tinnier voice that’s perfectly suited to the dusty country covers he’s selected, like AP Carter’s “I Never Will Marry,” the Rev. Charles Tindley’s “What Are They Doing in Heaven Today?” and the Gothic Gospel traditional “Satan, Your Kingdom Must Come Down.” But while Miller comes across as warm and whimsical, Hammond projects a more cold, clinical, historical accuracy – until his softly strummed originals (“I Believe, I Believe,” “Riding the Rods”) blend seamlessly with the obscure chestnuts. Which is probably what makes the 97s work so well: The forlorn Hammond is a great foil for the frenzied Miller, and side projects like this underscore what each offers the other in a group setting. It’s not the Old 97s, of course, but that’s exactly the point.


NIGHTLIFE&MUSIC: FEATURE

NIGHTLIFE&MUSIC F E AT U R E 66

[ C O N T. ]

well balanced beer with a creamy aftertaste).

SPLASH BAR & GRILL 65 Post St. (408) 885-9283 www.splashsj.com ONLY IN THE LAND of the free

can a former brothel evolve into a gay nightclub. Club Splash is the place to dance the night away with house music, hip-hop, Top 40 and Latin. Also featuring videos, the club has two dance floors, two bars and an outdoor smoking patio.

TEMPLE BAR & LOUNGE 52 S. First St. (408) 288-8518 JAZZ ENTHUSIASTS CAN stop

by after work to wind down and listen to the music playing over the speakers Mondays thru Wednesdays, and then enjoy live jazz, samba and blues Thursdays thru Sundays. And you gotta love any place that has a 240-minute happy hour (weeknights, 4-8pm). SIGNATURE DRINK: The French Martini.

TOON’S 52 E. Santa Clara St. (408) 292-7464 www.toonsnightclub.com THERE’S BEEN A lot of turnover in the Downtown club scene over the years. New clubs have come and gone, old clubs have finally succumbed to changing fads and there’s still a gigantic hole where the 40,000-square-foot San Jose Live! once resided. Through it all, Toon’s has survived. Oh, sure, they’ve changed management a few times over the years, but their multicolored neon sign is practically a Downtown landmark. Inside the club, the music pumps seven nights a week, ensuring that virile, sweaty bodies are grinding to live music or DJs any time you stop by.

TRES GRINGOS BAJA CANTINA 83 S. Second St. (408) 278-9888 www.tresgringossj.com TRES GRINGOS BAJA CANTINA

TIED HOUSE 65 N. San Pedro St. (408) 295-2739 www.tiedhouse.com THE TIED HOUSE is “tied”

NIGH T L IFE & MUSIC

to (meaning it only serves the beer made by) the Redwood Coast Brewing Company, which began in Mountain View in the late ’80s. And what beer it is: Multiple Great American Beer Festival award-winners grace the taps here. Try the beer sampler to get the full range. The patio on San Pedro Square is a popular spot for suds-sipping and people-watching. SIGNATURE DRINK: Cascade Amber Beer (California style pale ale: a

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THEWAVEMAG.COM JULY 28 - AUGUST 10, 2008

is worth the wait in line, especially if you’re in the mood to see some dancing on the bar. Decorated like a Gilligan’s Island beach house, the bar attempts to bring the beach to you every day of the year. Twisted Taco Two’s-Day is a definite highlight of this watering hole, offering $2 well drinks, Tecates and specialty shots, as well as $1 tacos, all night long. SIGNATURE DRINK: Tres Gringos (Bacardi Limon, homemade sweet and sour mix, a squeeze of lemon, and a splash of Coke).

TRIALS PUB 265 N. First St. (408) 947-0497 www.trialspub.com HOUSED IN A historic Victorian building, this authentic pub offers 17 beers on tap and plenty of traditional fare on the menu, while proudly boasting that it’s home to not a single television set (there’s a bookshelf instead). Be sure to munch on Trials’ delicious fish and chips (or try their sausage rolls-two English bangers wrapped in puff pastry) while you down a smooth pint of ale.

VAULT ULTRA LOUNGE 81 W. Santa Clara St. (408) 298-1112 www.vaultultralounge.com THIS RENOVATED 1926 BANK

makes for not only dapper aesthetics, but excellent acoustics. Plus, with more than 9,500 square feet of dancing space, you can finally bust out your old moonwalk moves. DJs spin deep-dish house for your dancing needs. If you need something to get you into the dancing mood, The Vault boasts an extensive bottle service menu.

VOODOO LOUNGE 14 S. Second St. (408) 286-8636 www.voodooloungesj.com COMPLETE WITH AN upscale VIP room and a chic mezzanine (both ideal people-watching vantage points), the VooDoo Lounge has long been at the heart of San Jose’s buzzing nightlife. The unique layout and musical programming combine exotic drinks like the VooDoo Child or The Lava Lamp for the perfect party atmosphere. Dress code enforced. TW


NIGHTLIFE&MUSIC: HISTORY » THIS TIME IN MUSIC HISTORY

NIGHTLIFE&MUSIC THIS TIME IN MUSIC HISTORY

Beastie Boys JULY 28, 1750: JOHANN SEBASTIAN BACH DIES AFTER AN UNSUCCESSFUL EYE OPERATION. JULY 28, 1987: THE BEATLES SUE NIKE AND CAPITOL RECORDS OVER THE USE OF THEIR SONG “REVOLUTION” IN SHOE COMMERCIALS. AUGUST 1, 1981: MTV MAKES ITS DEBUT AT 12:01AM. THE FIRST VIDEO AIRED IS “VIDEO KILLED THE RADIO STAR” BY THE BUGGLES. AUGUST 1, 1994: MICHAEL JACKSON AND LISA MARIE PRESLEY ANNOUNCE THEY WERE MARRIED 11 WEEKS EARLIER IN THE DOMINICAN REPUBLIC (FREAKS!).

AUGUST 7, 1987: A LOS ANGELES JUDGE THROWS OUT A LAWSUIT AGAINST OZZY OSBOURNE. THE SUIT WAS FILED BY THE PARENTS OF A TEENAGER WHO COMMITTED SUICIDE WHILE LISTENING TO OZZY’S SONG “SUICIDE SOLUTION.” AUGUST 14, 2000: POLICE IN LOS ANGELES FIRE PEPPER SPRAY AND RUBBER BULLETS TO CLEAR A CROWD OF 9,000 PEOPLE WHEN A FREE CONCERT BY RAGE AGAINST THE MACHINE TURNS VIOLENT. TW

Rage Against the Machine

AUGUST 6, 1987: THE BEASTIE BOYS SUE JACKSONVILLE, FLA. FOR INCLUDING THE PHRASE “MATURE AUDIENCE” ON THEIR CONCERT TICKETS AND ADS. AUGUST 6, 1982: PINK FLOYD’S THE WALL HAS ITS US PREMIERE IN NEW YORK CITY.

NIGH T L IFE & MUSIC

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» INTERVIEW

Movies&TV

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INTERVIEW MOVIE REVIEWS & PREVIEWS DVD RELEASES CINEMA DIRECTORY

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a part of whatever it is that they’re doing. TW: Pineapple Express is an actionpacked comedy. Is writing action harder than writing jokes? SR: The movies that I grew up on were not comedies, for the most part. They were, but my mother’s favorite movies were Die Hard and Total Recall and Under Siege. I remember seeing them in the movie theater when I was way too young. I remember seeing Lethal Weapon 2 in the movie theater. So those are my favorite types of movies, really. It’s not hard at all to write action, it’s really fun for us. We try to be innovative with it. I see every single action movie that comes out, so we’re constantly thinking “What do we like, what do we not like, what have we just never seen before?” Pineapple obviously had budgetary restraints, but it’s really our goal to show people action that they’ve never quite seen before.

Tropical High Megastar funnyman Seth Rogen is no dope when it comes to stoner humor. BY FRED TOPEL

MOVIE: Pineapple Express

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DIRECTED BY: David Gordon Green STARRING: Seth Rogen, James Franco, Gary Cole STUDIO: Columbia Pictures

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eth Rogen has become the man of the hour. Last year he had two of the summer’s biggest hits, starring in Knocked Up and co-starring in his own script for Superbad. In his latest creation, Pineapple Express, Rogen not only co-wrote the script with friend and writing partner Evan Goldberg, but again takes on the leading role. In their take on the stoner comedy, Rogen’s character gets high and riffs on nonsense, but he also finds himself on the run after witnessing a murder with his dealer. It’s a full-on movie, only the action heroes have no idea how to fight or elude the bad guys.

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The Wave: Superbad was inspired by your experiences as a 13-yearold. Is Pineapple inspired by your experiences when you got older? Seth Rogen: Definitely. It’s definitely inspired by stretches I’ve gone through where I do nothing but smoke weed for months and months on end, and relationships I’ve had with the people that supplied me that weed, and just kind of pothead relationships in general. We take it, obviously, to a somewhat ridiculous extreme in the movie, but the core of the story is definitely based around prior experiences. TW: Your character in the movie is a process server. Why did you choose that job? SR: It was just kind of “What’s a weird job we haven’t seen a lot of, that you could fathomably smoke weed all day while doing?” I honestly have no clue what a process server does in

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real life. We could be completely off the mark. We could be 100 percent wrong, but in the writing of the movie, it seemed to make sense. It was a somewhat organic way of getting me outside Gary Cole’s house to witness the murder. Then we just thought it would be a funny joke that [co-star James] Franco never really got what I did. TW: Were you trying to get away from the self-referential Jewish humor for which you’ve become known? SR: In Pineapple, we made Franco’s character Jewish and mine isn’t, so we tried to flip it on its head a little bit. I read the internet. There’s a lot of comments that fly around saying things like “Can Seth Rogen make one f**kin’ movie without a Jew joke?” That’s my goal for this one. TW: What is the balance of you originating your own scripts and doing movies for other writer/ directors now? SR: To me, it’s just what is around and who approaches me. I’m more than happy to do stuff that I’m in, but it’s exciting to me when a director or writer that I admire wants me to be

TW: Do you work a 9-to-5 schedule as a writer with Evan Goldberg? SR: Yeah, when possible. I mean, when I’m making a movie, it makes it a little more difficult, but yeah, I’ll go over to his house and we’ll write pretty much from 9-to-5. We both love writing, but we both love sitting on our asses doing nothing more, so we do it in a way where we get as much time to do nothing as humanly possible. We also both have girlfriends, so before we would write from 10 to 3 in the morning. Now that doesn’t fly. TW: What exactly is doing nothing for you? SR: My nothing evolves based on whatever videogame has been most recently released. Right now it’s Grand Theft Auto IV. I’ve played it for like three hours total. I’m getting into it. TW: How awesome is your life now? SR: It’s been very good lately. It’s busy. I was just going through my schedule for the next few months. It’s weird. It’s a little strange being a guy who normally doesn’t know what he’s doing tomorrow to have that [much] work, but it’s a good feeling. TW Get tickets at www.cineluxtheatres.com and www.cameracinemas.com


MOVIES & TV: INTERVIEW

Stadium Seating t Cinema Club t Community Savings t Café Too t Film Festivals 10 for $60 t Rental Availability t Dolby Surround Hollywood Hits t ComedySportz t Foreign Cinema

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» MOVIE REVIEWS & PREVIEWS

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S TA R R I N G : B I L L P U L L M A N , A L A N RICKMAN, CHRIS PINE D I R E C T E D B Y: R A N D A L L M I L L E R

For anyone interested in the history of the Napa Valley wine industry and America’s first wine producer to compete against their European counterparts, Bottle Shock is a compelling expose of a true story. Jim Barrett (Pullman) has invested everything in his failing vineyard when his son Bo (Pine) enters their untested wine in Steven Spurrier’s (Rickman) blind wine tasting in Paris. The make-or-break contest tightens family tensions. This is a really educational film about a watershed moment in the history of the American wine industry, and everyone plays their parts well. The script doesn’t quite make it universally relatable, but it’s certainly not bad.

PINEAPPLE EXPRESS  S TA R R I N G : S E T H R O G E N , J A M E S FRANCO, DANNY MCBRIDE D I R E C T E D B Y: D AV I D G O R D O N GREEN » DVD RELEASES

The Mummy: Tomb of the Emperor’s Dragon

Seth Rogen continues to dominate the comedy marketplace with Pineapple Express, which takes its name from a potent strain of premium weed. Rogen stars in his own script about a process server who witnesses a crime and goes on the run with his pot dealer (Franco). There are some surely wonderful stoner references that certain critics, ahem, didn’t quite get. Clearly they’ve captured the humor of being out of one’s mind on a steady basis, plus the action elements are awesome. The frantic tone of these panicked losers in car chases, brawls and gunfights is automatically hilarious, and kind of kicks ass, too.

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THE MIDNIGHT MEAT TRAIN S TA R R I N G : B R A D L E Y C O O P E R , LESLIE BIBB, VINNIE JONES D I R E C T E D B Y: R Y U H E I K I TA M U R A

The title may sound like a joke, but it’s based on a Clive Barker story, of course. A New York photographer (Cooper) begins to find success capturing nighttime scenes of the city. Pursuing this angle leads him to a subway murderer (Jones), which gets his girlfriend (Bibb) in peril, too. While the title is a turnoff (it sounds like a pointlessly bloody gorefest), the film does have a decent

DVD RELEASES

MOVIES JULY 29 Beowulf – Blu-ray Harold and Kumar Escape from Guantanamo Bay – Unrated Two-Disc Special Edition The Lost Boys – Blu-ray Shine a Light

MOVIES AUGUST 5 The Counterfeiters Nim’s Island Starship Troopers 3: Marauder

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TV JULY 29 Centennial – The Complete Miniseries Law & Order: Special Victims Unit – Season Seven Robin of Sherwood – The Complete Collection Stargate SG-1: Continuum

TV AUGUST 5 Anthony Bourdain: No Reservations – Collection Three Get Smart – Season One Lonesome Dove – Two-Disc Collectors Edition Star Trek: The Original Series – Season Two (remastered)

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Here’s a political satire with a pretty clear point. An election between an incumbent president (Grammer) and his rival (Hopper) is so close, one vote will actually decide the election. That one vote belongs to Bud Johnson (Costner), an everyman loser who never cared about politics until it actually matters. Honestly, could we do any worse than Kevin Costner picking our president? Just the idea of Grammer or Hopper as a potential commander in chief sounds hopeful. It seems like the perfect Costner vehicle, what with the heartfelt life lessons he learns on behalf of all viewers. If it explains the Electoral College, even better. A

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S TA R R I N G : K E V I N C O S T N E R , KELSEY GRAMMER, DENNIS HOPPER D I R E C T E D B Y: J O S H U A M I C H A E L STERN

S TA R R I N G : B R E N D A N F R A S E R , J E T LI, MARIA BELLO D I R E C T E D B Y: R O B C O H E N

The first Mummy remake was great fun. The Mummy Returns was a typical sequel, but still entertaining. The Mummy: Tomb of the Emperor Dragon barely resembles a Mummy movie. The idea of a Chinese mummy is cool, but picking up Rick (Fraser) and Evie (Bello replacing Rachel Weisz) as bored aristocrats is, in fact, boring. Their little domestic antics, like falling asleep before seductions and trying to fly fish, are ridiculous, and even getting back into action doesn’t redeem the characters. The film emphasizes special effects over actual thrills, and the characters don’t even seem to know what they’re doing anymore. This is their third adventure, for crying out loud!

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pedigree. Barker has some interesting themes, though some of the Hellraiser sequels got a bit silly. The cast is solid – not quite A-list, but certainly not hacks – so they must have seen something good in the script.

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Finally, the sequel is here to answer the ultimate sci-fi question of how a single pair of jeans can fit four very different body types perfectly. Compiling the plots of three sequel novels, the sisterhood split up for college and share their unique experiences as they learn even more and strengthen their bond. The filmmakers had to rush through the books because these actresses

CAMPBELL Camera 7 Cinema, 1875 S. Bascom Ave. (408) 559-6900 CineLux Plaza Theatre, 2501 S. Winchester Blvd. (408) 378-2425

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S TA R R I N G : M I C H A E L M A D S E N , L A R R Y B I S H O P, E R I C B A L F O U R D I R E C T E D B Y: L A R R Y B I S H O P

Well, between Hell Ride and The Midnight Meat Train, they’ve pretty much covered all the evil forms of travel. Oh, wait, there’s still Death Race coming out. Pistolero (Bishop) leads his biker gang, The Victors, on a crusade for revenge against rivals the 666ers. Dissenters from his own gang may prove to be bigger rivals for Pistolero. Well, there hasn’t been a good biker movie in a while. Ghost Rider and Wild Hogs don’t even count. However, after Hell Ride, there still might not have been a good biker movie in a while. Produced by Quentin Tarantino, it could be Hostel, but it’s probably Daltry Calhoun.

Awww. A poor Little League team triumphs over adversity to win the Little League World Series. Awww. They’re from Mexico, so they’re the first non-US team to go the distance. Awww. And it’s in the ‘50s, when they had to fight racial prejudice, too. Awww. True sports stories about underdogs, racial tension and landmark social achievements tend to do well. There may not be a big studio or mega movie stars attached to Perfect Game, but maybe it can triumph over adversity. TW

DIRECTORY

M O U N TA I N V I E W Century Cinema 16 1500 N. Shoreline Blvd. (650) 960-0970

GILROY Platinum Theatres, 6851 Monterey St. (408) 84-MOVIE HOLLISTER Premiere Cinemas 5, 581A McCray St. (831) 638-1800

REDWOOD CITY Century Park 12, 557 E. Bayshore Blvd. (650) 365-9000

M E N L O PA R K Guild, 949 El Camino Real (650) 266-9260

S A N TA C L A R A AMC Mercado 20, 3111 Mission College Blvd. (408) 871-2AMC

M I L P I TA S Century 20 Great Mall, 1010 Great Mall Dr. (408) 942-5550

SAN JOSE AMC Saratoga 14 Theatre, 700 El Paseo de Saratoga (408) 871-2AMC Cinelux Almaden Cinema 2306 Almaden Rd. (408) 265-7373 Camera 12, 201 S. Second St. (408) 978-2787

MORGAN HILL CineLux Tennant Station Stadium 11 750 Tennant Way (408) 778-6500

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PA L O A LT O Aquarius, 430 Emerson St. (650) 266-9260 Stanford Theatre, 221 University Ave. (650) 324-3700 Century CineArts at Palo Alto Square, 3000 El Camino Real, Bldg. #6 (650) 493-3456

L O S G AT O S Los Gatos Cinema, 41 N. Santa Cruz Ave. (408) 395-0203

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S TA R R I N G : A M B E R TA M B LY N , ALEXIS BLEDEL, AMERICA FERRERA D I R E C T E D B Y: S A N A A H A M R I

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Century 20, Oakridge, 925 Blossom Hill Rd. (408) 225-2200 Century 21, 3161 Olsen Dr. (408) 984-5610 Century 22, 3162 Olsen Dr. (408) 984-5610 Century 23, 3164 Olsen Dr. (408) 984-5610 Century 24, 741 Winchester Blvd. (408) 984-5610 Century 25, 1694 Saratoga Ave. (408) 984-5610 Century Berryessa 10 1171 N. Capitol Ave. (408) 926-7091 Century Capitol 16 San Jose 3690 Hillcap Ave. (408) 972-9276 Century Capitol Drive-In Capitol Expwy. and Snell Ave. (408) 226-2251 CineArts@Santana Row 3088 Olsen Dr. www.cinearts.com Hackworth IMAX Dome 201 S. Market St. (408) 294-TECH India Movie Center 6 1433 The Alameda (408) 830-9999


MOVIES & TV: REVIEWS & PREVIEWS

JOIN US ON AN ADVENTURE THAT’S OUT OF THIS WORLD! Win a family four pack of passes to a special screening of FLY ME TO THE MOON in Cupertino on Saturday, August 2nd!

For your chance to win, head down to MARBLE SLAB in the West Valley Shopping Center on Thursday, July 31st between 5PM–7PM. Marble Slab is located at 5205 Prospect Road, San Jose. This film is rated G. THEATRE IS OVERBOOKED TO ENSURE A FULL HOUSE. Passes received through this promotion do not guarantee admission and must be surrendered upon demand. Seating is on a first come, first served basis. All federal, state and local regulations apply. A recipient of tickets assumes any and all risks related to use of ticket and accepts any restrictions required by ticket provider. The Wave, Summit Entertainment Pictures, LLC., Marble Slab, Terry Hines & Associates and their affiliates accept no responsibility or liability in connection with any loss or accident incurred in connection with use of a prize. Tickets cannot be exchanged, transferred or redeemed for cash, in whole or in part. We are not responsible if, for any reason, winner is unable to use his/her ticket in whole or in part. Not responsible for lost; delayed or misdirected entries. All federal and local taxes are the responsibility of the winner. Void where prohibited by law. No purchase necessary. Participating sponsors their employees and family members and their agencies are not eligible. NO PHONE CALLS! TICKETS RECEIVED THROUGH THIS PROMOTION ARE NOT FOR RESALE.

FLYING INTO THEATRES AUGUST 8!

Want you to win!

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To win your copy of the DVD, answer this question:

What is the name of the deadly virus in Doomsday that is spreading throughout the British Isles? Email your answer to

DoomsdayWave@ alliedadvpub.com to enter to win!

ON DVD AND BLU-RAY™ HI-DEF ON JULY 29 THEWAVEMAG.COM JULY 28 - AUGUST 10, 2008

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» FEATURE

Arts

Pandemonium, Theatre on San Pedro Square

» FEATURE » EVENT LISTINGS » COLUMN: HOT TICK ET

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One of 9Li’s latest incarnations , Power of Meta

Meta Possibilities Bruno 9Li’s amazing new exhibit at Anno Domini typifies the exciting growth and scope of the Downtown art scene. BY JO ABBIE

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ince they established their Anno Domini gallery in 2000, Brian Eder and partner Cherri Lakey have been pioneers of the San Jose art scene. So when they relocated the gallery in December 2005 to its current space at the old Camera One cinemas site Downtown, it signaled nothing but good things for the area. Pretty soon, Eder and Lakey made sure their new neighborhood’s local nickname, SoFA (South First Art district), become more widely known, while also enticing other galleries in the area to take part in a first Fridays art walk program. So far, SoFA First Fridays have been a huge success. “Downtown, it started in February 2006,” Eder recalls. “We started it at our old space, but as far as the actual art walk, it’s been two years, and it just keeps building momentum.... Most of the galleries say they get more [visitors] on their first Friday than typically they used to get in an entire exhibit. “We went to the city, and this was our gig. We told them we wanted to do the brochure,” Eder continues, flipping through the glossy pamphlet SoFA participants use to publicize the monthly event. “Basically it’s the galleries that promote it, which is really great. I think it’s one of the most collaborative things the art groups have done in years.” So what inspired Gallery AD to make the SoFA First Fridays event happen? “We saw a steady flow of people starting to come, but we didn’t want to count on that – we wanted other people to start knowing what was going on,” Eder recalls. “We thought if we created a brochure about this – [because at the time] there were brochures about all the restaurants Downtown and everything else except the galleries – it would be really 74

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nice, because everyone can kind of tell you in their own voice what they do as a gallery.” Once the gallery began distributing the brochures, “we started seeing a lot more people coming out,” Eder continues. “We printed 10,000 of them and we have like 100 left, and that was only six months ago!” Gazing out from the Anno Domini page of the brochure is a picture of Brazilian artist Bruno 9Li (the number nine is “nove” in Portuguese, so Bruno added the number to his family name Novelli and adopted it as his signature on his works). 9Li is a great example of the type of cutting-edge, contemporary artists Eder and Lakey have a knack for spotting and bringing to prominence. They first brought 9Li and his work to San Jose in 2007, with his Mysterium Tremendum exhibit. The gallery was then still developing its new Downtown space, and 9Li gave them a great gallery warming gift — a mural on the outside wall of the building. 9Li’s subsequent success demonstrates perfectly the keen eye Eder and Lakey have for talented artists. After making his US debut at Anno Domini in 2007, the Brazilian artist received solo exhibitions in Barcelona, and São Paulo in his native Brazil. He has since traveled to Japan, where the mystical themes and creatures of his mind-bending illustrations have popular appeal. And the artist’s otherworldly drawings have struck a chord with fine art aficionados, high-end designers and

9Li works on the mural outside the Anno Domini building

visionary publishers worldwide: His striking works have appeared on numerous magazine covers, including Amelia’s Magazine in the UK, J-People (Germany), Zupi (Brazil) and, of course, The Wave Magazine in San Jose.

9Li’s work (and quite possibly his Gael Garcia Bernal-type good looks) also captured the attention of international publishers, from art mag Juxtapoz to the European editions of GQ and Marie Claire. The fashion crowd, too, has embraced the artist’s work: During São Paulo Fashion Week in January 2008, 9Li’s illustrations featured as a graphic element of an entire winter collection of Brazilian label Ellus 2nd Floor, one of the largest and most conceptual fashion brands in the nation. In his latest exhibit, META (which opens at Anno Domini on Aug. 1), 9Li explores and questions what lies beyond the perceptible reality of our day to day lives. “Meta is a Greek word that means ‘beyond, 76

FIRST FRIDAY ART WALK Seven galleries in the three blocks from San Carlos to Reed Streets take part in SoFA First Fridays. Also be sure to head to South First Billiards (420 S. First St., 408-294-7800 www.sofapool. com), which doubles as a gallery for the work of local artists. Go to www.southfirstfridays.com to download the Art Walk map. Anno Domini, 366 S. First St., San Jose (408) 271-5155 www.galleryAD.com KALEID Gallery, 88 S. Fourth St., San Jose (408) 271-5151 www.kaleidgallery.com Movimiento de Arte y Cultura Latino Americana (MACLA), 510 S. First St., San Jose (408) 998-2783 www.maclaarte.org

San Jose Institute of Contemporary Art, 560 S. First St., San Jose (408) 2838155 www.sjica.org San Jose Museum of Quilts & Textiles, 520 S. First St. (408) 9710323 www.sjquiltmuseum.org Space 47, 47 E. William St., San Jose www.space47.org Works San Jose, 451 S. First St., San Jose (408) 286-6800 www.workssanjose.org


ARTS: FEATURE

Kiwanis Club of Los Gatos

presents

Sat 16 & Sun 17 August 2008 10am—6pm • Free Admission 110 E. Main Street Civic Center in Downtown Los Gatos

Los Gatos Food Fest featuring over 20 local restaurants, including: Tapestry Bistro, Viva Neighborhood Eatery, Restaurant James Randall Hundreds of ne art & craft booths

Live music from local bands: The Hitmen, Silicon Valley House Rockers, The Cocktail Monkeys Kids Zones – Fun children’s activities

La Canada Building by Deborah Wood

Outstanding wines and microbrews

For more information: 408.395.8016 • www.lgfiesta.org

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Take the shuttles from Campbell’s VTA Station Parking at the Los Gatos High School


» EVENT LISTINGS

ARTS EVENT The Pajama Game, Smithwick Theatre

LISTINGS adaptation of the classic children’s story: 8/1.

GARY GRAFFMAN: FOR THE LEFT HAND

TWELFTH NIGHT

St. Mark’s Episcopal Church, 600 Colorado Ave., Palo Alto (650) 331-0202 www.musicatmenlo.org

Sanborn County Park, 16055 Sanborn Rd., Saratoga (408) 867-9959 www.shadyshakes.org

A unique take on one of Shakespeare’s most revered comedies, including cross-dressing twins!: 8/7 - 9/12.

MUSIC@MENLO PRELUDE PERFORMANCE

WEST SIDE STORY

Montgomery Theater, 271 S. Market St., San Jose (800) SAN-JOSE

Two young lovers are caught between two warring New York City street gangs, the Jets and the Sharks, in this intriguing and inspiring musical drama: Thru 8/3. WISHFUL DRINKING

What could possibly be better than seeing the woman who played Princess Leia tell a hilarious true story of a Hollywood hangover? Nothing: Thru 8/2.

THEATRE ALTAR BOYZ

The Stage, 490 S. First St., San Jose (408) 283-7142

Join small-town boys Matthew, Mark, Luke, Juan and Abraham, who start a Christian boy band to “save souls one screaming fan at a time.” Featuring such songs as “Girl, You Make Me Wanna Wait” and “Jesus Called Me on My Cell Phone,” you’ll be praising the Almighty, too [For more about this show, see Hot Ticket, page 77]: 7/30 - 9/21. ALL SHOOK UP

Mountain View Center for the Performing Arts, 500 Castro St., Mountain View (650) 903-6000

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A Shakespearean plot twist fused with classic Elvis Presley tunes? No wonder NBC called it “the best retro rock show since Grease”: 8/2 - 8/10. ANYTHING GOES

Palo Alto Children’s Theatre, 1305 Middlefield Rd., Palo Alto (650) 463-4970

A classic musical comedy about romance and mistaken identity on the SS American: 8/1 - 8/8. DOUBT

Lucie Stern Theatre, 1305 Middlefield Rd., Palo Alto (650) 903-6000 www.theatreworks.org

Winner of the Pulitzer Prize for Drama in 2005, as well as a Tony Award for Best Play that same year, this play follows Sister Aloysius as she suspects a popular priest of misconduct with a student: Thru 8/10. FAITH HEALER

Pigott Theater, Stanford University Memorial Way (650) 723-2576

An influential love story that “deals with the power, belief, doubts and deception at the heart of a great performer, the faith healer Frank Hardy”: 7/31 - 8/17. THE FULL MONTY

Coastal Repertory Theatre,

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In this amusing play, a small group of unemployed Yorkshire steelworkers who are frustrated with their unstable lives decide that there is only one thing that can turn things around – becoming nude dancers!: Thru 8/16. HAIR

City Lights Theater, 529 S. Second St., San Jose (408) 295-4200 www.cltc.org

Featuring such classic songs as “Aquarius,” “Good Morning, Starshine” and, of course, “Hair,” this musical set in the Vietnam War-era counterculture movement explores the draft, racism, psychedelic drugs, free love and more: Thru 8/24. HIGH SCHOOL MUSICAL

Mission City Center for Performing Arts, 3250 Monroe St., Santa Clara (408) 423-2415

Probably the most popular musical for teenagers, this play follows two high school students – the nerd and the jock – who both audition for their school’s musical, turning their world upside down: Thru 7/31. LOS GATOS SHAKESPEARE FESTIVAL Oak Meadow Park, 333 Blossom Hill Rd., Los Gatos (408) 399-5781

Featuring three plays: The Tempest and As You Like It, both by William Shakespeare, plus an original adaptation of the classic Beauty and the Beast by Bruce W. De Les Dernier: Thru 8/9. NOT A GENUINE BLACK MAN

Historic Hoover Theater, 1635 Park Ave., San Jose (408) 535-4747

Written by and starring Brian Copeland, this one-man show features Copeland playing more than 20 characters as he depicts what it means to be black while growing up in San Leandro in 1972: 8/1 - 8/24.

THEWAVEMAG.COM JULY 28 - AUGUST 10, 2008

THE PAJAMA GAME

CLASSICAL MUSIC & OPERA THE UNFOLDING OF MUSIC II – CARTE BLANCHE CONCERT III:

Smithwick Theatre – Foothill College, 12345 El Monte Rd., Los Altos Hills (650) 949-7414 www.foothillmusicals.com

The Foothill Music Theatre presents the hilarious musical comedy by Richard Adler and Jerry Ross set in the 1950s, in which employees at the Sleep-Tite Factory demand a 7-1/2 cent raise, and they won’t take no for an answer!: Thru 8/17. PETER PAN

Milpitas Community Center, 457 E. Calaveras Blvd., Milpitas (408) 586-3210

Childhood has never been represented better than by Peter Pan. Join Peter and the Lost Boys as they find adventure in Neverland: Thru 8/2. PINOCCHIO

Montgomery Theater, 271 S. Market St., San Jose (800) SAN-JOSE

A musical adaptation of the inspiring classic story about a wood-carved puppet that wants nothing more than to become a real boy: 8/7 - 8/10. PROOF

Triton Museum Hall Pavilion, 1505 Warburton Ave., Santa Clara www.scplayers.org

Catherine, a troubled young woman, deals with the emotions that engulf her after the death of her father, a famous mathematician: 8/8 - 8/17. ROUGH CROSSING

Dragon Theatre, 535 Alma St., Palo Alto (650) 493-2006 www.dragonproductions.net

Written by Tom Stoppard and directed by Dave Sikula, this production is being billed as “Stoppard’s version of a deliriously silly 1930s shipboard farce”: Thru 8/3. RUMPELSTILTSKIN

Montalvo Arts Center, 15400 Montalvo Rd., Saratoga (408) 961-5800 www.montalvoarts.org

The Missoula Children’s Theatre puts on this original, full-scale musical

St. Mark’s Episcopal Church, 600 Colorado Ave., Palo Alto (650) 331-0202 www.musicatmenlo.org

Music at Menlo’s Chamber Music Institute performs music from Schumann and Brahms: 7/31. THE BEAUTY OF THE CLASSICAL HARMONICA

San Jose Repertory Theatre, 101 Paseo de San Antonio, San Jose (408) 367-7255 www.sjrep.com

IF YOU HAVE AN IDEA FOR A LISTING, OR KNOW OF SOMETHING HAPPENING THAT YOU'RE AFRAID WE'LL OVERLOOK, PLEASE EMAIL YOUR ARTS EVENT TO EVENTS@THEWAVEMAG.COM.

Legendary American pianist Gary Graffman returns to bring his unique recital of left-hand music to Music at Menlo. Featuring works by Bach, Chopin and Skryabin: 7/31.

Cogswell Plaza, Lytton and Ramona, Palo Alto www.princesf.com/damien

This worldy music tour of classical, operatic, American and South American melodies features performances by the Damien Masterson Ensemble: Damien Masterson himself, guitarist and film scorer Rick Heizman and concert pianist Robert Schwartz: 7/31. MIDSUMMER MOZART FESTIVAL: THE ABDUCTION OF SERGALIO I

California Theatre, 345 S. First

F E AT U R E 74

transcending everything,’” he explains. “For this series I tried to explain graphically my thoughts about life in this planet. It’s not about just routine – because when we are in a routine, we can see things, we use things, we share spaces. It’s about what is behind everything, what is beyond everything that you do.” “Meta in Portuguese is also a word that means ‘being focused,’” the artist continues. “If you have a ‘meta,’ you are trying to do something in the future. You work for it. So, for me, META is a mix of those two things: what is beyond, and also discipline to get what you want. I try to put on paper the sensation of the astral – when you are transcending what you live in your routine. I could draw cars or buildings, but it doesn’t satisfy my mind.” The artist looks forward to his upcoming return to Anno Domini. “When I got to San Jose, I didn’t have a good idea about the city,” he recalls of his first visit last year. “I knew it was Silicon Valley (it’s world famous), but I didn’t have a certain idea about the atmosphere of the city. I loved it. San Jose reminds me a lot of the city where

St., San Jose (408) 295-9600 www.midsummermozart.org

This opera tells the story of a Spanish nobleman who arrives at Pasha Selim’s Turkish harem to rescue his lover. This semi-staged production features all of the music of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart: 8/1. MIDSUMMER MOZART FESTIVAL: THE ABDUCTION OF SERGALIO II

California Theatre, 345 S. First St, San Jose (415) 392-4400 www.midsummermozart.org

Part Two of this Mozart opera at the California Theatre is sure to please any Mozart enthusiast: 8/3. MUSIC@MENLO PRELUDE PERFORMANCE St. Mark’s Episcopal Church 600 Colorado Ave., Palo Alto (650) 331-0202 www.musicatmenlo.org

Music at Menlo’s Chamber Music Institute performs music by Frazelle, Higdon and Frank: 8/7 - 8. MUSIC@MENLO: KORET YOUNG PERFORMERS CONCERT St. Mark’s Episcopal Church 600 Colorado Ave., Palo Alto (650) 331-0202 www.musicatmenlo.org

Music at Menlo’s Chamber Music Institute performs music by Gade and Dvorak: 8/8.

[CONT’D]

I used to live [Porto Alegre, Brazil]. I don’t know how to explain... it’s just about atmosphere – people, how people get involved, how people talk to you.” Eder clearly is excited not only by 9Li’s return, but by the present, not to mention the future of Downtown’s increasingly active art scene. He recalls SubZero, the gallery component of the Zero1 Festival in June of this year: “It was amazing. There were three blocks closed to traffic. We had two stages, about 50 to 100 artists on the streets. They expected a thousand people, but the numbers that kept coming back were somewhere between 8,000 and 9,000 people. It was just an amazing energy. There was a point where we were out front of the gallery and looking at all of the people, and we were standing there going, ‘God, this is an amazing city, whose city is this? Why can’t it be like this all the time?’” Judging by the rapid growth of SoFA’s art scene in recent years, it seems like Downtown San Jose could soon be that city, all the time. The artist’s reception for Bruno 9Li’s META is on Fri., Aug. 1 at 8pm at Anno Domini, 366 S. First St., San Jose (408) 271-5155 www.galleryAD.com.


» COLUMN: HOT TICK ET

ARTS

EVENT

LISTINGS

DIVIDE LIGHT

the traditional dress of the Heian period: Ongoing.

Under the musical direction of Daniel Hughes, this world-premiere opera is based on the complete works of Emily Dickinson. Lesley Dill redirects the classic opera to celebrate and investigate American Transcendentalism with large projections on the black screen and multiple scrims: 8/13.

1650 Senter Rd., San Jose (408) 287-2290 www.historysanjose.org

MUSEUMS

535 N. Fifth St., San Jose (408) 294-3138 www.jamsj.org

Montalvo Arts Center, 15400 Montalvo Rd., Saratoga (408) 961-5858

CANTOR ARTS CENTER Palm Dr. at Museum Way, Stanford University (650) 723-4177 www.museum.stanford.edu

A New 19th Century: The reinstalled Mondavi Family Gallery features newly acquisitioned works by Monet, Renoir, Sargent and more: Ongoing. Auguste Rodin Collection: The largest collection of Rodin bronzes outside of Paris: Ongoing. African Art in Context: Photography, dress and other artifacts: Ongoing. Papua New Guinea Sculpture Garden: Wood and stone carvings of people, animals and mythical beings: Ongoing. Living Traditions: Arts of the Americas: A collection of work from diverse Native American peoples and times: Ongoing. Explore Outdoor Sculpture: Enjoy beautiful weather and the works of Auguste Rodin, Maya Lin, Beverly Pepper, Richard Serra and Andy Goldsworthy: Third Sunday of each month. Andy Warhol Prints: Featuring multiples from the Mao and Flowers series and from the Electric Chair series in addition to images of Elizabeth Taylor and Mick Jagger: Thru 11/30. Spared from the Storm: Masterworks from the New Orleans Museum of Art: Eighty works, spanning five centuries, are part of an exhibition of European and American paintings saved from the Hurricane Katrina disaster. Featured artists include Jackson Pollock, Claude Monet, Georgia O’Keeffe, Pablo Picasso and PierreAuguste Renoir: Thru 10/5. Richard Diebenkorn: An exhibition of nearly 50 drawings, paintings and prints by Richard Diebenkorn, from the private collection of Carey Stanton: Thru 10/26.

Exciting interactive displays, galleries and activities for the whole family to enjoy: Ongoing. DE SAISSET MUSEUM 500 El Camino Real, Santa Clara (408) 554-4528 www.scu.edu/desaisset

Eye on the Sixties: Vision, Body & Soul: Focusing on one of the most vibrant and dynamic decades in modern history, this exhibit includes painting, sculpture, drawings and prints by artists ranging from Frank Stella to Claes Oldenberg: Ongoing. HAKONE GARDENS 21000 Big Basin Way, Saratoga (408) 741-4994 www.hakone.com

Hina Doll and Kimono Exhibition: The Upper House of Hakone Gardens, one of the oldest Japanese estates in the Western Hemisphere, is now showcasing a display of ornamental dolls representing the Emperor and other historical figures in

A Breath of Plein Air: A show featuring 54 pieces by 25 local artists, showcasing the beauty of the Santa Clara Valley: San Jose, Santa Clara and Silicon Valley: Thru 9/21. JAPANESE AMERICAN MUSEUM OF SAN JOSE Jack Matsuoka’s Cartoons: Making the Best of Poston: Documenting the incarceration of Japanese Americans during the 1940s: Ongoing. MEXICAN HERITAGE PLAZA 1700 Alum Rock Ave., San Jose (408) 928-5524 www.mhcviva.org

Mi Coche / My Culture – Livin’ the Lowrider Lifestyle: A unique, visual art experience that delves into the art and Chicano subculture of automobiles. Exploring the history of the Lowrider lifestyle, this exhibit pays homage to this cross-cultural movement through a variety of artistic genres: Thru 8/29. ROSICRUCIAN EGYPTIAN MUSEUM 1660 Park Ave., San Jose (408) 947-3636 www.egyptianmuseum.org

History of the Rosicrucian Egyptian Museum Exhibit: This exhibit shows the museum’s transformation from one artifact in an office to a museum with more than 4,000 artifacts: Ongoing. SAN JOSE INSTITUTE OF CONTEMPORARY ART 560 S. First St., San Jose (408) 283-8155 www.sjica.org

Crater Bay Area: A participatory exhibition that is a lunar drawing competition to win deeds of land on the moon: Thru 8/2. Brendon Lott: Memories I’ll Never Have: Photographs from internet sharing networks are sent to China and reproduced as oil paintings: Thru 8/2. Eureka: An exhibit featuring some of the work by the winners of the 2005-2007 Eureka fellowship, one of the most prestigious prizes for Bay Area artists: 8/1 - 9/20. SAN JOSE MUSEUM OF ART 110 S. Market St., San Jose (408) 271-6840 www.sjmusart.org

Robots: Evolution of a Cultural Icon: An optimistic, pessimistic and at times humorous exhibition that examines the development of robot iconography in fine art over the last half century: Thru 10/19. 01SJ Biennial: Superlight: Interactive, digital and other media are exhibited as part of the second Biennial Zero1 San Jose Global Festival of Art of the Edge: Thru 8/30. SAN JOSE MUSEUM OF QUILTS & TEXTILES 520 S. First St., San Jose (408) 971-0323 www.sjquiltmuseum.org

Beyond Knitting: Uncharted Stitches: An exhibition of contemporary sculptural knitting as defined by art knitting of the 21st century: Thru 8/24. Pun Intended: The Appliquéd Wit of Dorothy Vance: Fourteen

TICKET

humorous quilts featuring folk art, politics and pop culture: 8/24. TECH MUSEUM OF INNOVATION 201 S. Market St., San Jose (408) 294-TECH www.thetech.org

IDEA House: An interactive program space encourages you to formulate and synthesize like never before: Ongoing. Green by Design: Designs with a green approach, aiming to prevent environmental problems and improve lives: Ongoing. View from Space: Science made visible in an exhibit that displays weather, aircraft and daily patterns from space: Ongoing.

GALLERIES ANNO DOMINI 366 S. First St., San Jose (408) 271-5155 www.galleryad.com

Brazilian artist Bruno 9Li returns to Gallery A.D. with META, his second solo exhibit in the US. Since A.D.’s presentation of Mysterium Tremendum, 9Li’s US debut solo exhibit in 2007, Bruno has received solo exhibitions in Barcelona, Spain and São Paulo, Brazil. META sees the artist examine what lies beyond the perceptible reality of the everyday, drawing inspiration from the themes of spiritism, metaphysics, ovnis (UFOs) and exotic, aquatic plants and animals [For more on Bruno 9Li, see page 74]: 8/1 - 9/20. GALLERY HOUSE 320 California Ave., Palo Alto (650) 326-1668 www.galleryhouse2.com

Featuring works by newly juried artists Jeff Emmerichs, Dan McLean, Carolyn Shaw, Mary Stahl, Eric Steppling and Karen White as part of the “new members” show: Thru 8/2. Four Photographers: Color and black-and-white photographs by four Bay Area photographers: 7/29 - 8/23. GALLERY SARATOGA 14435A Big Basin Way, Saratoga (408) 867-0458 www.gallerysaratoga.com

Liquid Light: A Romantic Journey: Using an experimental alternative photographic process called Liquid Light, which uses liquid photographic emulsion to coat watercolor paper and turn it into photographic paper, Karen Frocks exhibits images of Europe: Thru 8/3. MODERNBOOK GALLERY 494 University Ave., Palo Alto (650) 327-6325 www.modernbook.com

Summer Group Show: A group show featuring select works from some of the gallery’s most popular artists. 8/1 - 8/31. PEABODY FINE ART GALLERY 11 N. Santa Cruz Ave., Los Gatos (408) 395-3440 www. riki-arts.com/angelatthebar.html 603 Santa Cruz Ave., Menlo Park (650) 622-2200 www.peabodygallery.com

Angel at the Bar, Jazz on the Plazz: An oil painting exhibition featuring new paintings by Riki R. Nelson: 8/5 - 9/5 (Los Gatos). Dr. Seuss for President: An exhibition featuring the release of the first-ever political print editions of Dr. Seuss: 8/6 (Menlo Park). TW

Soul Players Altar Boyz is a praiseworthy show that takes a hilarious dig at boy bands and evangelical pop. BY MICHAEL J. VAUGHN

I

n these days of over-the-top New Yorker covers, we are reminded that satire is a perilous endeavor. So what are the chances for an off-Broadway musical that pokes fun at pop evangelism and boy bands, with songs like “Girl, You Make Me Wanna Wait” and “Jesus Called Me on My Cell Phone”? Pretty good, it seems. Altar Boyz, the show about a fictitious group featuring singers Matthew, Mark, Luke and Juan (and don’t forget Abraham!), has been “raising the praise” in New York since the show’s 2005 opening. Having since been released to the regional circuit, it comes to the San Jose Stage Company for an eight-week run that begins Jul. 30. The secret of the show’s charm, says director Rick Singleton, is that you can take it any way you want it. “It’s actually a very friendly show,” he says, “in terms of whether you believe the Bible is the work of God or a piece of fiction. It’s a very gentle ride. I checked with my brother, who’s in the evangelical music industry, and he said yeah, lots of evangelicals go to it.” The bottom line, says Singleton, is in how you play it. “Let the joke play, don’t play the joke,” he says. “That’s my motto when it comes to satire. All five guys have to approach it as if they’re totally committed to this ‘Raise the Praise’ tour.” The play presents the final concert of that band’s “Raise the Praise” tour. The

TICKET INFO

Altar Boyz, Jul. 30 - Sept. 21, $25-$50, San Jose Stage, 490 S. First St. (408) 283-7142 www.sanjosestage.com. performance features a machine, the Soul Sensor DX-12, that registers the number of burdened souls in the room. The goal of the Altar Boyz is to reduce that number to zero by the end of the concert. The San Jose Stage Company had to delay the run of the show in order to get just the right cast – because, as Singleton puts it, Altar Boyz is not just about a boy band, “it’s about a boy band that’s really talented.” The cast includes C.J. Blankenship, a veteran of the acclaimed Foothill summer musicals (he recently played Barack Obama in Stage’s Monday Night Live fundraiser), and Latin/Christian singing star Manuel Romero, who will contribute a little flamenco work to the show’s Ricky Martin send-up number, “La Vida Eternal.” Singleton is a founding member of the San Jose Stage Company, and directed its greatest success, the punk-rock musical Angry Housewives, in the ,80s. The show cemented Stage’s reputation for the off-kilter musical, a category that not only has included recent shows like Urinetown and the caveman musical Ugh!. Alter Boyz and the theatre company seem like a match made in, well, heaven. TW

THEWAVEMAG.COM JULY 28 - AUGUST 10, 2008

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ARTS

CHILDREN’S DISCOVERY MUSEUM 180 Woz Way, San Jose (408) 298-5437 www.cdm.org

HISTORY SAN JOSE

HOT


» feature

Family&Community

San Jose Museum of Art

Plaza de Cesar Chavez fountains

The Tech Museum of Innovation

HP Pavilion (aka “The Shark Tank”)

» EVENT LISTINGS 80 » FARMERS MARK ETS 80 » WEDDING PLANNING 81

Circle of Palms

Guadalupe Park & River Gardens Rose Garden

A Family Affair There’s more to Downtown San Jose than wining and dining. FA MILY & COMMUNIT Y

BY IRENE KEW

F

rom becoming the largest city in Northern California to being the safest big city in the state, San Jose has plenty to crow about. Add to that a vibrant, revitalized Downtown that’s teeming with new restaurants, luxurious residential skyscrapers, an impressive arts scene and a buzzing nightlife. But while much has been said about the city’s welldeserved rep as an ever-growing dining and entertainment hot spot, few realize how family-friendly Downtown actually is. Pleasant, tree-lined streets make strolling through the area a cinch and a pleasure. A convenient lightrail system makes it affordable, even enjoyable, to get around. And with its wide range of fascinating family activities and destinations – from kid-friendly trails and circus extravaganzas to innovative museums and farm fresh produce – you’ll be surprised at how much fun Downtown San Jose packs for the entire family.

Get Cultural Ranked by Child Magazine as one of the top 10 children’s museums nationwide, the Children’s Discovery Museum (180 Woz Way, 408-298- 5437, www.cdm. org) delights adults and youngsters with its two floors of interactive and educational fun, from exploring a real fire engine and ambulance to learning about electricity, air pressure and mathematical concepts in exhibits like Secrets of Circles and Current Connections. There’s even a 3,100-square-foot space (The Wonder Cabinet) specially dedicated to kids four and under. An infant crawl space, art studio, story times and an environment rich with textures and creativity all ensure that the wee ones will have an unforgettable time. Through December 2008, check out Alice’s Wonderland: A Most Curious Adventure, the awardwinning exhibit based on Lewis Carroll’s classic tale, which highlights exciting interactive displays such as a make-believe Mad Hatter’s tea party.

Over on South Market Street, The Tech Museum of Innovation (201 S. Market St., San Jose, 408-294-8324, www.thetech.org) boasts more than 250 exhibits and Northern California’s only domed IMAX screen in its expansive 132,000-square-foot facility. Divided among themed galleries focusing on exploration, the human body and performance and innovation in the Silicon Valley, the museum’s hands-on, educational exhibits will inspire and excite even not-so scientific types. Starting Sept. 27, don’t miss Leonardo: 500 Years Into the Future, a wide-ranging and educational exhibit showcasing the innovative art, science and engineering works of Leonardo da Vinci and his contemporaries. Go from cutting-edge science at The Tech to modern masterpieces at the San Jose Museum of Art (110 S. Market St., San Jose, 408-271-6840, www.sjmusart. org). Anchoring San Jose’s lively arts scene since 1969, this well-loved Downtown fixture is free for children under six and offers a permanent collection of 1,400 artworks from the 20th and 21st centuries. Equally exceptional are special exhibits such as the current Robots: Evolution of a Cultural Icon, a collection of robot-themed art from over 20 artists. In the summer, the museum also offers a week-long full-day camp for children age six to 11, where they can learn how to look at, talk about and create their own art. 82

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THEWAVEMAG.COM JULY 28 - AUGUST 10, 2008


FAMILY & COMMUNIT Y: FEATURE

NEW! Lacrosse camps, clinics & leagues

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» EVENT LISTINGS

FAMILY&COMMUNITY EVENT

LISTINGS product giveaways and, of course, the opportunity for kids to get slimed!: Noon - 5pm

San Mateo County Fair

DOGGIE ICE CREAM SOCIAL: 8/2 Santana Row, Park Valencia, San Josewww.santanarow.com

Bring your pooch for a full day of fun with a wading pool, doggie ice cream, valuable information about training classes for your dog, clicker training and doggie day care: Noon - 4pm EDIBLE LANDSCAPING TOUR: 8/2 Common Ground Organic Garden, 559 College Ave., Palo Alto www.conexions.org/vhd/ gardentour

Take a self-guided and bicyclefriendly tour in and around Palo Alto and discover how folks weave edible plants into both garden beds and the landscape! 2008 VINTAGE VEHICLE AND FAMILY FESTIVAL: 8/3 Palo Alto High School, 50 Embarcadero Rd., Palo Alto (650) 321-1004 www.moah.org

IF YOU HAVE AN IDEA FOR A LISTING, OR KNOW OF SOMETHING HAPPENING THAT YOU'RE AFRAID WE'LL OVERLOOK, PLEASE EMAIL YOUR COMMUNIT Y EVENT TO EVENTS@THEWAVEMAG.COM.

BUSINESS ACCELERATED NETWORKING DINNER EVENT: 8/6 Villa Ragusa, 35 S. Second St., Campbell events.ewomennetwork. com/event/calendar.php?lid=74

Join fellow San Jose businesswomen to (what else?) eat, network and talk business: 5 - 8:15pm

CLUB MEETINGS

FA MILY & COMMUNIT Y

SOUTH BAY CIVIL WAR ROUND TABLE: 7/29 Holder’s Country Inn, 998 De Anza Blvd., San Jose (408) 374-1541

Come hang out with fellow Civil War buffs, have some dinner and enjoy speaker Alan Sissenwein discuss the life of George Armstrong Custer: 6:45pm

FUN TIME SINGERS: WEDNESDAYS Prince of Peace Lutheran Church, 12770 Saratoga Ave., Saratoga www.funtimesingers.org

A lively and diverse community choir invites men and women to join their group: 7:15 - 9:30pm

FESTIVALS & EXPOS SANTA CLARA STREET DANCE: 8/1 Franklin Square on Jackson St., Santa Clara (408) 615-2219

strawberry, with live music by Dave Mason and other bands, pie contests, arts and crafts, a special children’s area, a strawberry carnival and much more. FREMONT FESTIVAL OF THE ARTS: 8/2 - 3 Paseo Padre Pkwy. & Walnut Ave., Fremont www.fremontfestival.net

Join more than 700 top-notch artisans to view and purchase original paintings, clothing, jewelry, sculptures, wood objects, stoneware, wind chimes and more, plus wine, beer, food and a fun zone for the kids!

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Swing by Mel Cotton’s for their annual fall hunting expo, featuring all the latest and greatest hunting gear. FOURTH ANNUAL ULTIMATE WEDDING SHOW: 8/2 San Francisco Design Center – Concourse Exhibition Center, San Francisco www.ultimateweddingshows.com

The Fourth Annual Ultimate Wedding Show will feature fashion shows, photographers, bakers, florists – virtually everything to plan that fairy-tale wedding you’ve dreamt of: 10am - 5pm

2008 MONTEREY BEER FESTIVAL: 8/2 Monterey Fairgrounds, 2000 Fairgrounds Rd., Monterey www.montereybeerfestival.com

28TH SAN FRANCISCO JEWISH FILM FESTIVAL: 8/2 - 7

14TH ANNUAL MONTEREY BAY STRAWBERRY FESTIVAL: 8/1 - 3

This year’s Monterey Beer Festival will feature more than 50 brewers, along with live music and great food!: 12:30 - 5pm

Enjoy 34 independent films and videos from around the world.

Ramsay Park, 1302 Main St., Watsonville www.mbsf.com

FARMERS

Campbell: Sunday 9am – 1pm (year round) Campbell Ave. at Central & First Sts. (510) 745-7100 Cupertino: Friday 9am – 1pm (year round) Vallco Fashion Park Parking Lot, 10123 Wolfe Rd. (800) 949-FARM Los Gatos: Sunday 8am – 12:30pm (year round) Montebello Way & Broadway Extension (408) 353-5355 Mountain View: Sunday 9am – 1pm (year round) Hope & Evelyn (800) 806-FARM

Mel Cotton’s Sporting Goods, 1266 W. San Carlos, San Jose (408) 287-5994 www.melcottons.com

Dance the night away with live music from the Joe Sharino Band, while enjoying great food, beer and wine and tons of fun: 7 - 9pm

MARKETS

Palo Alto: Sunday 9am – 1pm (year round) California Ave. & El Camino Real (800) 806-FARM San Jose: Sunday 10am – 3pm (year round) Stevens Creek & Winchester (800) 949-FARM San Jose: Friday 10am – 2pm (year round) Kaiser Santa Teresa Parking Lot (800) 949-FARM San Jose: Sunday 8:30am – Noon (year round) Japantown, Jackson between Sixth & Seventh Sts. (408) 298-4303 San Jose: Sunday 10am – 2pm (year round) Princeton Plaza, Kooser & Meridian (800) 806-FARM

THEWAVEMAG.COM JULY 28 - AUGUST 10, 2008

CineArts – Palo Alto Square, 3000 El Camino Real, Palo Alto www.sfjff.org

19TH COMCAST SAN JOSE JAZZ FESTIVAL: 8/8 - 10

A celebration for the delectable » FARMERS MARKETS

MEL COTTON’S SPORTING GOODS FOURTH ANNUAL FALL HUNTING EXPO: 8/2 - 3

Santa Clara: Thursday 10am – 2pm (year round) Santa Clara Kaiser Parking Lot (800) 949-FARM Santa Clara: Saturday 9am – 1pm (year round) Jackson St. between Homestead & Benton (510) 745-7100 Saratoga: Saturday 9am – 1pm (year round) Saratoga West Valley College, Fruitvale & Allendale Aves. (800) 806-FARM Sunnyvale: Saturday 9am – 1pm (year round) S. Murphy Ave. at Washington and Evelyn (510) 745-7100

Throughout Downtown San Jose www.sanjosejazz.org

Listen to great jazz on 10 stages, from some of the greatest jazz musicians from around the world. SAN JOSE REPTILE SHOW: 8/9 - 10 Santa Clara Fairgrounds 344 Tully Rd., San Jose www.sanjosereptileshow.com

Okay, snake lovers, your dream has come true. No, it’s not Snakes on a Plane II – it’s the San Jose Reptile Show, featuring thousands of slithery reptiles for sale and on show. 37TH ANNUAL STANFORD JAZZ FESTIVAL: THRU 8/9 Stanford Campus – Stanford University www.stanfordjazz.org

The Stanford Jazz Festival showcases

more than 100 artists, including Terence Blanchard, Josh Redman, Kenny Burrell, Mulgrew Miller, John Scofield, Gary Bartz and many more. ART AT THE BEACH: THRU 8/17 Esplanade Park – Capitola Beach, Capitola (831) 419-7485

Head to picturesque Capitola for a full day of nothing but perusing and purchasing wonderful art!: 11am - 6pm

FAMILY ACTIVITIES SANTA CLARA FAIR: 8/1 - 3 344 Tully Ave., San Jose www.thefair.org

Enjoy a day filled with antique cars, hot rods, bicycles and motorcycles, along with live music, food vendors and activities for kids that include LEGO displays and radio controlled model races: 10am - 4pm CALIFORNIA THEATRE SUMMER MOVIES SERIES PRESENTS TRUE GRIT: 8/7

California Theatre, 345 S. First St., San Jose (800) SAN-JOSE www.sanjose.org

Don’t miss the California Theatre’s summer movie series, featuring True Grit starring John Wayne on Aug. 7, and West Side Story on Aug. 14. Along with the feature presentation, you’ll enjoy classic cartoons and organ playing!: 7pm STARRY, STARRY NIGHT: ART & ASTRONOMY SLUMBER PARTY: 8/8 - 9 Montalvo Arts Center, 15400 Montalvo Rd., Saratoga www.montalvoarts.org

DAY OUT WITH THOMAS: 8/1 - 3

Sleep under the stars on Montalvo’s front lawn and enjoy the Perseid meteor showers. Go on evening hikes, watch films and view the night sky through powerful telescopes: 8pm

Roaring Camp, Graham Hill & Mt. Herman Rds., Felton www.roaringcamp.com

CROSSING: A TRAIN STORY: 8/8

Carnival rides, live entertainment and corn dogs... Mmm, corn dogs.

Take a 25-minute ride on Thomas the Tank Engine as he chugs along the San Lorenzo River, along with face painting, puppet shows and a chance to get your photo taken with Sir Topham Hatt. YAK ATTACK: 8/2 Hiller Aviation Museum, 601 Skyway Rd., San Carlos (650) 654-0200 www.hiller.org

A one-day exhibition of some super cool commie Yaks, Nanchang and other Russian and Chinese Aircraft: 10am - 3pm NICKELODEON’S SLIME ACROSS AMERICA 2008 TOUR: 8/2 Golden Gate Park, Oak St. & Masonic Ave., San Francisco

Nickelodeon will make its fourth stop on this summer’s Slime Across America 2008 Tour at San Francisco’s Golden Gate Park. Featuring live performances from Menudo, as well as various games, Nickelodeon costume character appearances,

San Mateo County History Museum, 2200 Broadway, Redwood City (650) 299-0104 www.historysmc.org

The museum invites children under five to join them for their “Stories from the Past” program, where they’ll enjoy a story on trains, build a train to take home, then visit the exhibit Journey to Work: Pioneering Patterns of Growth: 11am & 2pm SAN MATEO COUNTY FAIR: 8/8 - 17 San Mateo County Expo, 2495 Delaware St., San Mateo www.sanmateocountyfair.com

Enjoy nine full days of carnival rides, clowns, corn dogs, cotton candy, funnel cakes, caramel apples… and stomachaches. CARTWHEEL DAY: 8/9 California Kids Sports Center, 832 Malone Rd., San Jose (408) 269-5437

As a celebration for the beginning of the summer games, California


EVENT

LISTINGS THIRD ANNUAL CELEBRATE MILPITAS: 8/16 - 17

San Jose Reptile Show

S. Milpitas & Calaveras Blvds., Milpitas www.milpitaschamber. com/celebrate.html

Two days of exciting fun featuring three stages of live entertainment, great food, wine and, of course, amazing art! DOWNTOWN CAMPBELL ART WALK Throughout Campbell www.downtowncampbell.com.

Meander around Campbell every

third Friday of the month and check out some of the fabulous art from local galleries as they extend their hours from 6 - 9pm.

more bustin’ out all your favorite Wolfgang hits.

34TH ANNUAL MIDSUMMER MOZART FESTIVAL: THRU 8/3

Mountain View Center for the Performing Arts, 500 Castro St., Mountain View (650) 903-6000

Venues throughout the Bay Area (415) 627-9141 www.midsummerfestival.org

Don’t miss North America’s only allMozart festival, featuring pianist Jon Nakamatsu, oboist Laura Griffiths, pianist Nikolai Demidenko and many

CHILDREN’S THEATRE IN THE PARK: THRU 8/17

The Peninsula Youth Theatre invites one and all to join them for their free theatre in the park, featuring presentations of The Little Mermaid, Under the Big Top, Jack and the Three Sillies and Elves and the Shoemaker. 83

SV

WEDDING PLANNING

» WEDDING PL ANNING

CHAIR COVER RENTAL/DECORATIONS

Parlour 308 Sports Center invites children ages three to 16 to drop by and get a free cartwheel lesson: 10am - Noon SUMMER GATHERING OF MOUNTAIN MEN: 8/9 - 10 Roaring Camp, Graham Hill & Mt. Herman Rds., Felton www.roaringcamp.com

You’ll be transported back to the 1800s as you wander through wilderness encampments of early trappers, watch frontiersmen perfect their skills during tomahawk and knife throwing contests, then chow down on some chuck wagon barbecue. BURLINGAME ART & JAZZ FESTIVAL: 8/9 - 10 Burlingame Ave. (650) 344-1735 www.burlingamechamber.org

Two days of amazing art, featuring ceramics, fine art, sculpture, jewelry and clothing, plus gourmet food, live music and activities for the kids. SECOND ANNUAL DAY OF REMEMBRANCE TO HONOR VETERANS AND COMMEMORATING THE END OF WWII: 8/10 History Park, 1650 Senter Rd., between Keyes and Phelan, San Jose (408) 287-2290 www.historysanjose.org

An afternoon commemorating the end of World War II as well as

honoring the legacy of America’s greatest generation, featuring period music, trolley rides, personal stories and a parade: Noon - 5pm

Mustangs) scream around the track at ridiculously dangerous speeds.

MUSICAL SAW FESTIVAL: 8/10

Monterey County Fairgrounds, Monterey (831) 372-5863 www.montereycountyfair.com

Roaring Camp, Graham Hill & Mt. Herman Rds., Felton www.roaringcamp.com

Show up with your Stanley and partake in workshops, open mics and performances of musical saws and folk instruments from around the world. SAN JOSE HERITAGE ROSE GARDEN DEHEADING: 8/12 Guadalupe River Park & Gardens Visitor Center, 438 Coleman Ave., San Jose (408) 298-7657 www.grpg.org

Bring family and friends for a day deheading roses. When through, you’ll be rewarded with a free ice cream!: 5:30 - 7:30pm 35TH ROLEX MONTEREY HISTORIC AUTOMOBILE: 8/15 - 17 Laguna-Seca, 1021 Monterey – Salinas Hwy., Salinas www.laguna-seca.com

Visit beautiful Salinas and watch vintage racecars (including Ferraris, Jaguars, Porsches, Bugattis, Shelbys, Lotuses, Aston Martins, Maseratis and

Lynn’s Wedding Services Milpitas (408) 398-2199 www.lynnweddingservices.com Full service chair cover rental and much more! Chair cover and linen rental, wedding flowers, candelabras, party rentals, hall and stage decorations, hair and makeup.

MONTEREY COUNTY FAIR: 8/15

INSURANCE

Unlike other county fairs, this one features rides, corn dogs, games of skill and cotton candy. What? Every other county fair has those, too? Oh, never mind. FIESTA DE ARTES 2008: 8/16 - 17 Los Gatos Town Center Grounds, Main St., Los Gatos www.lg fiesta.org

Over 150 artists will be showing their crafts, along with live music and activities for the little ones: 10am - 6pm DOWNTOWN STREET FAIR SERIES: 8/16 E. Second St., Morgan Hill (408) 779-3190 www.morganhilldowntown.org

One and all are invited to visit downtown Morgan Hill and enjoy local arts and crafts vendors, musicians and a super fab local farmers market: 10am - 2pm

Valerie Young Vedda ACCOMMODATIONS

181 Metro Dr., Ste. 290, San Jose (408) 930-1290 Learn about the value of your insurance coverage through a friendly review of your current policies and benefit from our multiline discounts for home, auto and life insurance. CA License 0F86939

Hotel Los Gatos & Spa

RECEPTIONS

210 E. Main St., Los Gatos (408) 335-1700 www.hotellosgatos.com Mediterranean-styled villas providing luxurious guest rooms and suites. Nestled at the base of the Santa Cruz Mountains and within walking distance of the many shops, restaurants and galleries. Home to Preston Wynne Spa & Dio Deka Restaurant. BACHELORETTE PARTIES

SALON

Jewelsexpression 1445 Foxworthy Ave., San Jose www.jewelsexpression.com Jewelsexpression offers exotic dancing classes with a softer touch. Designed for women of all shapes, sizes and ages, you’ll learn the art of the “walk,” floor performing, and faux pole and chair dancing. Great for bridal showers and bachelorette parties. BEAUTY SALON

Shangri-La Lotus Salon & Spa

Birthday Caboose

A private coach for your party takes you to Bear Mountain

One-Room School House A private one room school house for your party

Blue Ox Canopy Located on Graham Hill Rd., Felton, CA Customize your birthday party with additional entertainment options. For more information call (831) (831 831)) 335-4484 or visit roaringcamp.com

A covered outdoor area for your party on the lawn

F & C L I S TThomas I N GtheS Tank Tank Engine™ A themed party for an aspiring engineer and up to 20 guests

The Alexandria Salon & Spa 1346 The Alameda, Ste. 8, San Jose (408) 971-2926 www.thealexandriasalon.com Hair, skincare, massage, makeup and waxing services provided by a friendly and skilled staff in our relaxed spa environment. Come see our newly added clothing boutique. TANNING

413A Monterey Ave., San Jose (408) 623-3963 www.jennybeauty.com Look your very best for your day. Shangri-La provides the perfect makeup for your entire wedding party – bride, attendants and both mothers. Flawless makeup complements your dresses and location, allowing your photographer/videographer to provide you with the best memories. Whether you come to us or we come to you, everything will be done to your satisfaction. ENTERTAINMENT

Thoro-Bread Entertainment (650) 248-3803 We provide DJ services for all occasions, and offer a wide range of music, including today’s greatest hits, hip-hop, reggae, dancehall, soul, oldies, Spanish music and much more. So, next time you’re thinking about having a party, give us a call and leave the music to us! FLORIST

Abercrombie Flowers & Gifts 120 S. Sunnyvale Ave., Sunnyvale (408) 245-0130 Luscious wedding bouquets, distinctive reception and exotic centerpieces for your luxurious and lavish soiree. Corporate gifts, funerals and events are other areas of our expertise!

Parlour 308 Airbrush Tanning 308 E. Main St., Los Gatos (408) 354-9308 www.parlour308salon.com Professional, comfortable and discreet. Your tan is applied by hand, using an airbrush. The solution is customized for every client, to create a natural sun-kissed tan. TRAVEL

Cruise Planners 5669 Snell Ave., Ste. 372, San Jose (408) 715-7196 Our travel agency specializes in designing a vacation that exceeds your expectations. Our passion is to plan a seamless and exciting cruise and travel experience. Call us today to start planning your dream vacation memories. WEDDING GOWNS

Nicolette Couture Bridal Boutique 15 El Toro Ave., Morgan Hill (408) 779-6146 www.nicolettecouture.com Features four gorgeous wedding gown designers, one of which is exclusive to our boutique for all of Northern California. We offer a no pressure, memorable shopping experience for your dream wedding gown.

FOR MORE INFORMATION, LOG ON TO WWW.THEWAVEMAG.COM THEWAVEMAG.COM JULY 28 - AUGUST 10, 2008

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FA MILY & COMMUNIT Y

Roaringg Camp C Railroads il B Birthday 1/6sq .167

Hotel Los Gatos & Spa 210 E. Main St., Los Gatos (408) 335-1700 www.hotellosgatos.com Mediterranean ambience provides luxurious banquet facilities for events to accommodate up to 130 guests at various locations, including our Indoor Monte Sereno Ballroom, Outdoor Courtyard & Pool Terrace.


FAMILY & COMMUNIT Y: LISTINGS

FAMILY&COMMUNITY F E AT U R E 78

The first US library to be jointly owned and operated by a city and major university, the towering, nine-level Martin Luther Jr. King Library (150 E. San Fernando St. San Jose, 408-808-2000, www.sjlibrary.org) holds more than 1.5 million items, from books and periodicals to videos and CDs. The library is also home to the world’s largest Steinbeck archive, the Ira F. Brilliant Center for Beethoven Studies (which boasts an extensive collection of manuscripts, documents, books and materials, including a lock of Beethoven’s hair) and 30 public art installations sprinkled throughout the building. From book sales and signings to origami sessions and talks on becoming a successful eBay seller, the library also offers a host of fun family events, as well as story times (in Japanese, Hindi and Spanish, too!) for toddlers and children most days of the week. And here’s the best part: They’re free.

Embrace the Outdoors

FA MILY & COMMUNIT Y

Why are businesswomen joining eWomenNetwork? • To acquire more customers. • To market and promote what they offer. • To join our community of women helping women.

Let’s get connected. I’d love to learn more about you. Kristy Rogers Managing Director kristyrogers@eWomenNetwork.com 408-288-8484

Connecting and promoting women and their businesses

www.eWomenNetwork.com 82

THEWAVEMAG.COM JULY 28 - AUGUST 10, 2008

Take a hike along the many childand-bike-friendly trails Guadalupe River Park and Gardens (www.grpg. org) that weave through Downtown’s urban jungle. Amongst its many attractions are the Heritage Rose Garden at Spring and Taylor Streets (a one-of-a-kind collection of 3,500 varieties of roses), and the world’s largest Monopoly game board in the Discovery Meadow, where you can rent large tokens and play a game or two. The three-mile trail also features a year-round carousel and playgrounds at the Arena Green, tennis courts and numerous intriguing art installations. Throughout the year, the park also offers many educational programs for kids and adults alike, such as composting workshops, yoga in the park and walking programs [For more on the park, read our Sports & Adventure feature on page 22]. Don’t miss also another popular Downtown outdoor attraction: the fountain at Plaza de Cesar Chavez which shoots jets of water into the air for children to splash around most of the year. Every Friday, from May 2 through Dec. 12, a charming block of San Pedro Street, between Santa Clara

[ C O N T. ]

and St. John’s Streets, is transformed into a bustling Downtown Farmers Market. From 10am to 2pm, you can browse through stalls of colorful flowers, gourmet foods, and fresh fruits and vegetables from Californiacertified growers. Year round, the streets of Downtown San Jose play hosts to some of the most amazing and free street festivals such as the San Jose International Mariachi Festival (Sept. 23-28) and the upcoming Tapestry Arts Festival (Aug. 30 to Sept. 1), which draws more than 200,000 visitors each year with its booths of handmade local art, mouthwatering cuisine and superb live entertainment. In the summer, head to Music in the Park (through Sept. 9 at Plaza de Cesar Chavez), where you’ll be treated to free shows of first-rate rock, reggae, Latin, jazz and pop bands every Thursday evening. On Saturday evenings (through Aug 23), catch free movies starting at dusk in St. James Park or on Wednesday evenings in San Pedro Square (www.sjdowntown.com). But the fun doesn’t end with summer. Starting mid-November, ice-skate outdoors in the Circle of Palms rink near the historic Fairmont Hotel. From late November through early January, the Winter Wonderland lights up Downtown with carnival rides and a giant Ferris wheel. Stroll through animated displays and decorated trees at the Christmas in the Park celebration and cheer on marching bands, guest celebrities and fabulous floats at the ever popular Holiday Parade.

Have a Ball Few things bring the family together like rooting for the San Jose Sharks in a nail-biting hockey game in the “Shark Tank,” Downtown’s HP Pavilion (www.hppsj.com). Check for Sharks Family packs, which offer discounted rates for tickets, food and drinks. The Pavilion also hosts other teams like the Arena Football League’s San Jose SaberCats and the National Lacrosse League’s San Jose Stealth, as well as headliner concerts, circuses, touring shows and ice extravaganzas. In the lineup this year are the Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus (Aug. 2024), Neil Diamond, Tina Turner and Celine Dion. TW


FAMILY & COMMUNIT Y: LISTINGS

FAMILY&COMMUNITY EVENT 81

NINTH ANNUAL SUNNYVALE SUMMER SERIES: THRU 8/27 S. Murphy Ave. between Washington & Evelyn Sunnyvale www.downtownsunnyvale.com

Cruise over to Sunnyvale every Wednesday and enjoy a fine collection of arts & crafts, food booths and live music from T.Y.T., The Hitmen, Andre Thierry, Sage, Mama Pacho, Dub FX, Double Funk Crunch and many more: 5 - 8pm FREE FRIDAY NIGHT BEACH CONCERTS: THRU 8/29 Santa Cruz Beach Boardwalk, 400 Beach St., Santa Cruz (831) 423-5590 www.beachboardwalk.com

Summer again brings exciting free Friday night concerts to the Boardwalk’s Beach Bandstand. Look for classic bands from the ’60s, ’70s and ’80s: The Romantics, Rare Earth, John Waite, Blue Öyster Cult, Gin Blossoms and many more. MIDNIGHT MOVIE MADNESS: THRU 8/30 Camera 7, The Pruneyard, 1875 S. Bascom Ave., Campbell www.cameracinemas.com

Not only are cult classics (like The Thing, The Big Lebowski, Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas) shown at the stroke of midnight, but Camera Cinemas will give away concert tickets, T-shirts and other goodies to attendees. And it’s only $7.50! MUSIC ON THE SQUARE: THRU 10/3 Courthouse Square, Downtown Redwood City, 2200 Broadway www.redwoodcityevents.com

Enjoy free music on the square every Friday night: 6 - 8pm

FUNDRAISERS & DONATIONS OAKLAND A’s NINTH ANNUAL MUG ROOT BEER FLOAT DAY: 7/30

Enjoy some tasty Mug Root Beer Floats, watch some great ball and

help raise funds for the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation: 12:35pm CAROL OF LIGHTS FUNDRAISER: 7/30 Sonoma Chicken Coop, 200 E. Campbell Ave., Campbell (408) 374-9700

Stroll over to the Sonoma Chicken Coop and help raise money for The Carol of Lights, an organization that provides a free holiday event for kids in downtown Campbell: 7pm SAN FRANCISCO 49ERS PASTA BOWL II: 8/2 Santa Clara Convention Center, 5001 Great America Pkwy., Santa Clara www.49ers.com/ community/pasta_bowl.php?sect ion=CO%20DonationRequests

Chow down on some fabulous food served by the entire 49ers team, along with wine tastings, live entertainment, raffles and auctions, with all funds raised benefiting the San Jose After-School All-Stars, Santa Clara Schools Foundation and City Year San Jose/Silicon Valley: 5:30 - 9pm WOMEN WHO KICK COMEDY BUTT FUNDRAISER: 8/13 Rooster T. Feathers Comedy Club, 157 W. El Camino Real, Sunnyvale (408) 732-7781 www.roostertfeathers.com

Help raise funds for The American Lung Association of California. All you have to do is laugh: 8pm FOURTH ANNUAL COMEDY FUNDRAISER: 8/15 Mexican Heritage Plaza, 1700 Alum Rock Ave., San Jose (408) 251-2850

Show up and laugh along with Luke Torres, Shayla Rivera, Edwin San Juan and Darren Carter “The Party Starter” while helping to raise funds for the Alum Rock Youth Center: 7pm

HEALTH & WELLNESS FAMILY YOGA: 8/4, 8/11, 8/18, 8/25

10:45 - 11:15am

LECTURE BEST HIKES WITH DOGS: CENTRAL CALIFORNIA: 8/7 REI Saratoga, 400 El Paseo de Saratoga, San Jose (408) 871-8765 ww.rei.com

Join ultraveteran backpackers and dog owners Linda and David Mullally as they share slides and information on some of their favorite day hikes and backpacking trips featured in their new book, Best Hikes with Dogs: Central California: 7pm

VOLUNTEER BECOME A BIG BROTHER OR BIG SISTER (408) 876-4193 www.emp.org

Become a mentor and be a positive influence on a child’s life and it’ll only cost you two hours a week!

WORKSHOPS & CLASSES HOW TO WELD STEEL WITH A MIG WELDER: 7/28 Tech Shop, 120 Independence Dr., Menlo Park www.techshop. ws/take_classes.html

Okay, show of hands: Who has always wanted to learn to weld steel? Just what we thought, see you at the TechShop. FIRST ANNUAL DAUGHTERS OF THE ARTS, MARTIAL ARTS SEMINAR: 8/2 West Valley Middle School, 801 Hibiscus Ln., San Jose (408) 483-9483 www.dotaorg.com

The first seminar of its type in the Bay Area features all female instructors in Shinkendo, Danzan Ryu Jujitsu, Eskrima and Tae Kwon Do: 10am - 3:30pm TW

Elephant Pharmacy, 4470 El Camino Real, Los Altos (650) 472-6800

Discover how to practice yoga in a playful and creative way using breath, poses, chanting and relaxation: For all ages:

FA MILY & COMMUNIT Y

McAfee Coliseum, 7000 Coliseum Way, Oakland http:// oakland.athletics.mlb.com/oak/ ticketing/events.jsp#MUG

LISTINGS

ScrapLovers @ WorkofArt 1/8h .125 F&C THEWAVEMAG.COM JULY 28 - AUGUST 10, 2008

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SVMARKETPLACE » COLUMN: HOME WORK

HOME

IMPROVEMENT LANDSCAPING AND GARDENS

Zaira’s Gardening and Landscaping (408) 569-3389 Contact Hector for FREE ESTIMATES... Maintenance, Clean-ups, Trimmings, Pressure Wash, New Lawn and more. PATIO FURNITURE

The Complete Backyard 1600 Duane Ave., Santa Clara (408) 748-8100 www.patio101.com Come by and visit our 33,000square-foot showroom featuring all the top names in the patio business. We have over 250 sets on display from various manufacturers.

Staging by Karen Dayton www.staging-pros.com

TO ADVERTISE IN THE HOME IMPROVEMENT SVMARKETPLACE CALL: (408) 467-3201 EQUIPMENT RENTAL

A Tool Shed (Eight South Bay locations) (800)-ATOOLSHED www. atoolshed.com A Tool Shed Rentals should be your first stop for all your rental needs! We have the tools and equipment rentals to make your weekend or major project easier.

Black Sea Gallery 27 South First Street, San Jose (408) 998-8885 www.blackseagallery.com Welcome to Black Sea Gallery, where worldly furniture finds its home. Each piece is inspired by an exotic place, a past era, an antique lost but not forgotten.

FIREPLACE

At Home House Cleaning (408) 401-7755 Your home is our concern! We offer worry free insurance protection, bonded employees, window cleaning, and deep carpet cleaning. Call for a free estimate.

Beth’s House Cleaning

KITCHEN AND BATH

Arch Design Center (ADC) Peninsula Fireplace

Jimyko 1919 Monterey Road, Suite #10, San Jose (408) 993-0918 www.jimyko.com Provides fresh and unique ideas that attune to today’s casual and contemporary lifestyles. We invite you to explore our retail studio and experience the elements that define your home.

FLOORING AND CARPETS

Grand Flooring

1264 S. Bascom Ave., San Jose (408) 278-9056 ADC is a new showroom with an old-fashioned approach. A family oriented business whose main focus is bringing customer service back to the showroom.

Willow Glen Kitchen and Bath

950 S. McGliney Ln., Ste. 505, Campbell (408) 371-9495 Offering emergency leak repair, roof maintenance, annual maintenance, reroofing of all types, and roofing inspections.

Palo Alto Hardware

Can-Do Construction (831) 539-1181 All phases of construction and excavation, residential remodel and additions, structural retaining walls, decks, and hardscapes. Licensed, bonded, and insured. HOME THEATRE

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ROOFING AND GUTTERS

Franklin’s Roofing Service

875 Alma St., Palo Alto (650) 327-7222 www.paloaltohardware.com At Palo Alto Hardware, “living green” is more than just a catchphrase. We work hard to put into place systems and programs that are environmentally friendly as we run our business.

GENERAL CONTRACTOR

981 Stockton Ave, San Jose (408)292-6833 www. allworldfurniture.com All World Furniture Inc. was started over sic years ago and now has a one of the largest modern, contemporary furniture showrooms with attached warehouse in the San Francisco Bay Area.

www.mrpooltable.com Offering quality handcrafted 8-foot pool tables - custom made - factory direct to you. Also offering a wide variety of accessories from lamps to casino tables to spectator chairs.

351 Willow Glen St., San Jose (408) 293-2284 Lighting, rugs and pottery are but a few of the items we feature in our “Complete Home Furnishing” selections; enabling you to experience a “One Stop Shopping” environment.

LAWNS AND GARDENS

All World Furniture

POOL TABLES

Admiral Pool Tables

HARDWARE

894 Commercial St., San Jose (408) 441-1021 www.grandflooring.com Beautiful homes deserve beautiful floors. At GrandFlooring.com we let nature customize your floor. Our solid hardwood flooring contains both clear and character planks that reflect all the best attributes of the natural wood.

FURNITURE

55 Newell Rd., Ste. 301, Palo Alto (650) 424-1616 Professional plumber 24 Hrs. / seven days a week video Inspection / Pipe locating / Fixture repair.

HOUSE CLEANING

Business: (408) 263-7091 Cell: (408) 202-5438 I Clean Your House Like It’s My Own! I’m the Only One that Comes Into Your Home. (Licensed & Bonded)*First-Time Clean-Up to 50% OFF* Free Estimates - Call Today 10+ years experience. Specializing in modern home cleaning: Stainless steel, granite, hardwood, pergo, laminate, etc... Good referrals!

46 E. Campbell Ave., Campbell (408) 866-9200 www.peninsulafireplace.com Specializing in original designs. Offering screens and accessories, hand forged iron, wood and stone mantels, wood gas and electric fireplaces, glass and mesh doors.

PLUMBING

Smart Choice Plumbing

Modern TV 1228 S. Bascom Ave., Ste. B, San Jose (408) 2931330 www.moderntvonline.com We can provide the home theater system you dream about. Whether it’s a dedicated theater with plush seating and a big screen, or a family room with a slim plasma TV and speakers built into the walls, we have the solution for you.

THEWAVEMAG.COM JULY 28 - AUGUST 10, 2008

Garden Accents 11155 Lena Ave., Gilroy (408) 846-4555 www.garden-accents.net Our vision is a garden center to inspire the customers, not just to sell product. We provide a place where garden lovers become inspired and where gardening ideas can flourish.

STORAGE

A-1 Self Storage (Four San Jose Locations) 1415 Old Oakland Rd.; 2900 Monterey Rd.; 131 Baroni Ave.; 3260 S. Bascom Ave. (800) 210-8979 www.a1storage.com Save money with A-1 Self Storage! Affordable pricing for personal and business needs. WOODWORKING CENTER

Heavenly Greens (866) 724-8873 www.heavenlygreens.com A Heavenly Greens lawn is as close to natural grass as you can get without the need to water, mow or fertilize. Your lawn will look beautiful 365 days a year with little to no maintenance. AS SEEN ON TV!

The Sawdust Shop 452 Oakmead Pkwy., Sunnyvale (408) 992-1004 www.sawdustshop.com The Sawdust Shop is a unique woodworking center located in the heart of Silicon Valley, combining a do-it-yourself woodshop, a woodworking store, and woodworking classes all under one roof.


ADVERTISER INDEX S A L E S @ T H E W AV E M A G . C O M

19 Market. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .49 6 to 9 Dental . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .31 a.c.t. Energy. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .33 Aaron Sessions, State Farm . .42 Alliance Development Group - Park Place . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .39 Alliance Development Group - Stone Crest . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .41 American Kickboxing Academy 24 Angel Face Day Spa . . . . . . . . .29 Anise Cafe . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .61 Art Beat, The . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10 Artsopolis. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .75 A Taste of Paso Wines . . . . . . .83 Attuned Dental Care . . . . . . . .33 Australian Tanning Company 31 AVA Spa . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7 A Visionary Salon . . . . . . . . . . .30 Axis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .42 Bank, The. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .63 Basin, The. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .59 Bay Dental . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13 Beautiful by Design . . . . . . . . .33 Bella Mia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .61 Bella Saratoga. . . . . . . . . . . . . .59 Bert’s Alibi . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69 Birk’s Restaurant . . . . . . . . . . .57 Blowfish . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .61 Blue Sky . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .62 Braces For Pretty Faces . . . . . .27 Branham Lounge . . . . . . . . . . .68 Britannia Arms . . . . . . . . . . . . .67 British Banker’s Club . . . . . . . .50 California Wheels. . . . . . . . . . .23 Camera Cinemas. . . . . . . . . . . .71 Caper’s Eat & Drink. . . . . . . . . .53 Cars for Kids. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .75 Cascal Restaurant. . . . . . . . . . .61 Center for Cosmetic Dentistry 15 Century Graphics . . . . . . . . . . .85 Chardonnay II . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12 Chatanoga Persian Cuisine. . .60 Children’s Discovery Museum 79 Chrysalis Aesthetic & Reconstructive Surgery. . . . . .15 Cin-Cin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .58 Cinelux Theatres. . . . . . . . . . . .71 City Smog Check. . . . . . . . . . . .10 Cocoa Jeans / Moda Divina. . .37 Cucina Bambini. . . . . . . . . . . . .82 Day Out with Thomas . . . . . . .83 Designers Ltd. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .29 Dio Deka. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .55 Dive Bar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69 Doomsday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .73

Dr. Hoang K. Do. . . . . . . . . . . . . .8 Dr. Pauline Lu, D.D.S. . . . . . . . .34 Dr. Robert Ferguson. . . . . . . . .29 Dr. Tony Pham. . . . . . . . . . . . . .35 Dr. Youbert Karalian . . . . . . . .30 El Amigo Restaurant . . . . . . . .51 Escape Bar & Grill, The . . . . . .68 Eternal Beauty Medical Clinic 12 Everything and Hair. . . . . . . . .32 eWomen. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .82 Fahrenheit UltraLounge . . . . .53 Fish Market . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .55 Five Branches Institute . . . . . .35 Fly Me to the Moon . . . . . . . . .73 Foxy Avenue Clips . . . . . . . . . .34 GoodEye Photography . . . . . .85 Goosetown Lounge . . . . . . . . .69 Grand Century Dental . . . . . . . .9 Gumbo Jumbo Cajun Cuisine 49 Half Moon Bay Brewing Company . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .63 Hawg’s Seafood . . . . . . . . . . . .52 Home Consignment Center . .43 Hotel DeAnza . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10 House of Genji. . . . . . . . . . . . . .57 iFlySFBay . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .23 infobayarea.com . . . . . . . . . . .79 Internal Spa Rejuvenation Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .32 Island Grill . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .51 iSwing Golf . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .23 Jane Aesthetic Medicine & Surgery. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Japantown. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .25 Justina Azcueta. . . . . . . . . . . . .32 Kennedy Events . . . . . . . . . . . .75 Kim’s Auto Body . . . . . . . . . . . .14 Koji Sake Lounge . . . . . . . . . . .50 Laser Beauty Center. . . . . . . . .35 Little Lou’s BBQ. . . . . . . . . . . . .59 Livorno Square . . . . . . . . . . . . .43 LJM Legal. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .15 Loft Bar & Bistro. . . . . . . . . . . .53 Los Gatos Tire & Automotive . .9 Lupretta’s Delicatessen. . . . . .63 Magical Moments . . . . . . . . . . .9 Magic Tan. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .34 Mantra Palo Alto . . . . . . . . . . .60 Maple Tree Inn . . . . . . . . . . . . .25 Maxpro . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69 Mazda Laguna Seca. . . . . . . . .87 Melting Pot, The. . . . . . . . . . . .52 Menara Moroccan . . . . . . . . . .51 Merlion. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .57 Mix 106.5 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .73 Mustard Cafe. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .51

Nazca Peruvian Cuisine. . . . . .50 Obsession Makeup and Hair. . .9 Ocean Blue. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .55 Off Ramp, The . . . . . . . . . . . . . .24 Off the Hook . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .68 Paizley’s Salon & Spa. . . . . . . .33 Parcel 104 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .63 Pearl River . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .61 Pinn Brothers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Quarter Note . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .68 Roaring Camp Railroads Birthday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .81 Roaring Camp Railroads Moonlight . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .63 Roem Corporation Montecito Vista . . . . . . . . . . . .88 Rosicrucian Egyptian Museum . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12 Rosie McCann’s . . . . . . . . . . . . .54 Salt . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8 Sanctuary Salon . . . . . . . . . . . .29 San Jose BMW Motorcycles . .11 San Jose Box Office . . . . . . . . .44 San Jose Downtown Association - Dining . . . . . . . .49 San Jose Downtown Association - Historic. . . . . . . .44 San Jose Downtown Association - Parking . . . . . . .21 San Jose Redevelopment Agency . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 San Jose Reptile Show . . . . . .79 Santa Cruz Big Trees . . . . . . . .44 Scandalous . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .30 ScrapLovers @ WorkofArt. . . .83 Shoe Fetish . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .37 Silvercreek Sportsplex. . . . . . .25 Silvercreek Sportsplex. . . . . . .79 SINO. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .59 Slice. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .67 Sole di Paradiso . . . . . . . . . . . .33 Spencer’s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .53 Straits Restaurant . . . . . . . . . .59 Sue Durfee. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .42 Sunny Buffet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .62 Tabard Theatre Company . . . .75 Team 72 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .44 Tied House. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .51 Trailsloggers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .24 Umbrella Salon. . . . . . . . . . . . .28 Up and Running . . . . . . . . . . . .25 Valley Transportation Authority . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11 Warehouse Sale, The. . . . . . . .37 West Coast Bartending School. . . . . . . . . .67 Westpark Dental . . . . . . . . . . . .7 Wine Cellar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .62

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COLUMN: THE FINAL L AST WORD

THE FINAL LAST WORD B Y S E A N B A B Y - S E A N B A B Y @ T H E W AV E M A G . C O M

The Future of Gays in the Military

E

ver since Top Gun portrayed luscious homosexuality in the military, the gay community has struggled to bring these rights from the silver screen into reality. The closest we’ve come so far is “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell,” which sounds more like a cute game than an actual policy. But with President Bush and his gay-hating veto about to leave office, Democrats are looking forward to lifting the ban on open gays in the military. Question is, what will gay people bring to the military? First, physical training will now isolate and tone the upper and lower abs. Second, it’ll spark a debate between the current presidential candidates. Here’s how they see things:

Barack Obama Obama has an “all hands on deck” attitude: If they can help us win the war, who cares who they sleep with afterward? You like men? Fine, so long as you can shoot straight. Obama believes that people’s views have evolved, and that we shouldn’t be hindered by intolerance, like the now famous incident that saw Arab linguists prevented from serving in the military because of their open gayness. Their secret would have been safe if “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell” hadn’t confusingly meant “Shirtless Roller-skate Party” in Arabic. Pro: It seems win-win. If you’re the military, you always need more young, able-bodied men. And if you’re gay, see above. Con: Arab translators turned away? What a freakishly convenient news story for supporters of gays in the military… almost too convenient. Yes, the military is ridiculous for doing that, but these servicemen already knew the rules. How hard is it for a gay Arab linguist to shave off his moustache and play a little makebelieve to help save lives? My girlfriend pretends all the time during her sex life, for stakes much lower than international conflict.

John McCain McCain recently said that open homosexuality in the military is an intolerable risk to morale and cohesion. That may sound insensitive, but to his credit, he was already 75 years old when gayness was invented. McCain has a point, though: War isn’t the place to worry about everyone’s feelings. Basic training has to transform a bright-eyed, idealistic teenager into a killing machine fueled by anger and stupidity. That kid’s day job is about to

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become turning actual living human bodies into chunks of not that. You can’t teach him how to saw a man in half with an M4 and then order him to hug his sensitivity trainer. Look at it this way: If some loving officer tried to lead an army of free-thinking, level-headed individuals into battle, they’d be defeated before everyone could decide on a restaurant. Pro: McCain clearly has a picture in his mind of which gay military situations would lead to disaster – like how sexual tension doesn’t mix with explosive ordinance disposal. Exploring a fellow soldier’s body on an uncleared landmine may be a glorious way to die, but it makes for a very awkward letter for your commanding officer to write. Con: Between laser-guided bombs and the nature of our country’s enemies, modern warfare has little need for a charging wall of blood-crazed gay bashers, even though that’s still the best way to watch a soccer game (not to mention the only way to get a delicious new Starbucks Vivanno smoothie). So we should actually be OK with a high percentage of tolerant, intelligent soldiers. Gay people are just regular people whose reproductive instincts have been replaced with “fabulous” – and if everything else about you is normal, grab a gun. Special Behind-the-Scenes Look at Column Writing: When describing the act of killing in the context of homosexuality, it’s very difficult to resist clumsy innuendo. Through its many iterations, the previous sentence was everything from “beset that enemy’s flank” to “ram your bayonet into Fritz!” Hell, in one moment of weakness, it was just “It’s hard to kill when you’re chest waxing and have a dong in Trevor.” That doesn’t even make sense! I point this out just to show you how difficult this issue is, even when you’re only writing jokes about it. On the other hand, writing a joke about what a bowl of pudding and Howie Mandel have in common is easy: Both of them get funnier when you punch them. TW


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