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CONTENTS F E AT U R E

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2008 RED BULL U.S. GRAND PRIX

76

Everything you need to know about the MotoGP extravaganza that’ll speed into Laguna Seca Raceway July 18-20.

INTERVIEW 76

JAMES MCAVOY

The actor was relieved to ditch the period costumes and don tough-guy attire for his role as a Wanted man.

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26

40

DEPARTMENTS UPFRONT 06

LETTERS { you talk }

10

SPOTLIGHT { local news }

16

HIT LIST { editors’ picks }

78

ARTS Feature: Jim Denevan’s monumental sand drawings transform coastlines into works of art… if only temporarily.

82

FAMILY & COMMUNITY Feature: Needles and yarn have moved from grandma’s rocking chair to the local pub, as more and more young folks try their hand at knitting.

LIFESTYLE 26

30

40

42

SPORTS & ADVENTURE Feature: The British-born sport of cricket is extremely popular among Silicon Valley’s expat community. HEALTH & BEAUTY Feature: Tips on putting on some muscle, and why it might not be the healthiest decision. STYLE & SHOPPING Feature: Once the domain of brown and black, sunglasses now come in every color under the… you get the idea. HOME & DESIGN Feature: Bay Area homeowners are finally harnessing the power of the sun, as solar energy becomes more affordable than ever.

COLUMNS 08

DREGULATOR { media watchdog }

46

HOME WORK{ from house to home}

81

HOT TICKET { arts alert }

89

THE FINAL LAST WORD { local opinion }

54

SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTIONS SV GUIDES: 28 EXERCISE & LIFESTYLE 41 FASHION

14 DAYS 52

50 WAYS TO LEAVE YOUR SOFA { top events }

54

DINING Feature: Chef Josiah Slone shows us how to do the jerk… his recipe for slow-cooked Jamaican jerk pork, that is.

70

NIGHTLIFE & MUSIC Feature: Spinning records truly is an art.

60 CATERING 72 WINERIES 85 WEDDING PLANNING

SV MARKETPLACE:

16

78

88 HOME IMPROVEMENT

5VOTE NOW!

READERS’ CHOICE BALLOT ON PAGE 17

82 THEWAVEMAG.COM JUNE 30 - JULY 13, 2008

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MASTHEAD

OUR PEOPLE W R I T E U S @ T H E W AV E M A G . C O M

The Wave Magazine Silicon Valley's Finest Entertainment & Lifestyle Magazine Volume 08, Issue 14 | June 30 - July 13, 2008

THE WAVE MEDIA President/Publisher: B. Peter Brafford Associate Publisher: Chris Rhoads

Vice President, Corporate Relations: Dan Ferguson Vice President, Sales: Bill Hargreaves

EDITORIAL Events Editor: Johnny Brafford Senior Editor: Jo Abbie Assistant Editor: Mitchell Alan Parker Copy Editor: Ed Robertson

Contributing Writers: Seanbaby, Fred Topel, Cintra Wilson, Michael J. Vaughn, Tom Lanham, Damon Orion, Jenn Katz, Josiah Slone, Jon Sontag, Jennifer & Kitty O’Neil, Traci Vogel

ART / PRODUCTION Design Director & Photographer: Chris Schmauch Graphic Designer: Jon Sontag

Contributors: Lisa Ferdinandsen

[ DESIGN ]

SALES / ADVERTISING Advertising Director: Bill Hargreaves Online Sales / Marketing: Chris Rhoads Traffic Manager: Yvonne Gonzalez

Marketing / Traffic Coordinator: Rebekah Hollister District Sales Managers: Ken Sorensen, Ray Klopp, Janette Deuerling, Grayson Lumpkin, Carol Zimring

CLIENT SERVICES Account Managers: Yvonne Gonzalez, Rebekah Hollister

ONLINE IT Support: Jenny Phan Design / Code: Chris Schmauch

Online Publishing: Jon Sontag

CIRCULATION Director of Circulation: Matt Smith

Circulation Representatives: Javier Segura, Guillermo Merino, Heather Deveraux, Luis Barreto, Alberto Velarde, Rogelio Galvez, Bertha Fernandez

EMAILS Display Ads: advertising@thewavemag.com Marketplace Ads: marketplace@thewavemag.com Editorial: writeus@thewavemag.com Events: events@thewavemag.com

Design: design@thewavemag.com Employment: jobs@thewavemag.com Distribution: distribution@thewavemag.com

ADVERTISING INFORMATION Bill Hargreaves (408) 467-3260 advertising@thewavemag.com

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Send to writeus@thewavemag.com or use the mailing address below.

P UBLICAT ION INFORMAT ION

SUBSCRIPTIONS to The Wave Magazine run

The Wave Media publishes The Wave Magazine.

$9.95 for 27 issues (one year). For more informa-

All content of this issue is copyright ©2008 by The

tion, call (408) 467-3200 or visit

Wave Media, Inc., and may not be reprinted in

http://subscribe.thewavemag.com

whole or in part without the express written consent of the publisher. The Wave is available throughout

ED IT O RIA L C O N T RIBU T IO N S

the Silicon Valley; one copy of each edition of

Unsolicited manuscripts and story ideas must be

The Wave is available for free. Anyone removing

accompanied by a stamped return envelope.

magazines in bulk will be prosecuted.

The publisher assumes no responsibility for lost artwork, photographs or manuscripts. Submit all

SUBSCRIP T ION INFORMAT ION BACK ISSUES of The Wave Magazine are available for $5. Please submit your request for a back issue to: 1735 Technology Dr., Suite 575, San Jose, CA 95110.

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THEWAVEMAG.COM JUNE 30 - JULY 13, 2008

manuscripts, artwork and photographs to: The Wave Magazine, 1735 Technology Dr., Suite 575, San Jose, CA 95110

Phone: (408) 467-3200 Fax: (408) 467-3401


2008 SUMMER CONCERT SERIES Harveys Outdoor Arena

SAMMY HAGAR

EVENING WITH KISS

& THE WABOS WITH SPECIAL GUEST MONTROSE

SATURDAY, AUGUST 30

SATURDAY, AUGUST 9

Tickets on sale at all Ticketmaster locations or book online at Ticketmaster.com.

HARVEYS LAKE TAHOE CASINO & HOTEL TotalRewardsTahoe.com Must be 21 or older to gamble. Know When To Stop Before You Start.® Gambling Problem? Call 1-800-522-4700. ©2008, Harrah’s License Company, LLC. T1600-08-274

SOUTH SHORE ROOM CONCERT SERIES Tickets available at the Box Office, by calling 1-800-786-8208 or online at SouthShoreRoom.com

Get $5 off tickets* with your FREE Total Rewards® card. Not a member? Sign up today!

CHUBBY CHECKER

FLOGGING MOLLY

JULY 6

JULY 18

*Total Rewards ® ticket discount does not apply to VEX nightclub or Cabaret shows at Harveys. Offer not available on all shows. See box office for details. Must be 21 or older to gamble. Know When To Stop Before You Start.® Gambling Problem? Call 1-800-522-4700. ©2008, Harrah’s License Company, LLC. T1600-08-274


LET TERS

WRITE US@TheWaveMag.com LETTERS FROM YOU

When sending letters, please include your full name, city, state, and daytime telephone number. Letters may be edited for clarity or length and may be used in any medium owned by The Wave Media. Send snail mail to 1735 Technology Dr., Ste. 575, San Jose, CA 95110 and email to writeus@thewavemag.com. I just want to let you know how much my friends and I love the Karaoke Championship you’re putting on Friday nights at Dave & Buster’s [Hit List, Vol. 8, Iss. 11]. Most of the people suck, but there are some really good ones, too. I’ve been working on a song to perform in a couple weeks, and I plan on winning the motor scooter and any other prizes that go along with being a grand champion. I’m winning, mark my words. Oh, also when are your Readers’ Choice Awards (cuz I’m winning the free trip or whatever it is you give away, too)?

Also, why does Tom Lanham give everything at least three stars in his CD reviews? Is it because you guys get free CDs from record companies, so you figure you have to say everything is great? What’s the deal? I can’t take a reviewer seriously if every freaking review they write is just how wonderful it is. By the way, the new Offspring sucks!

Bruce Milpitas

Jeremy Campbell

Our Readers’ Choice Awards issue comes out Sept. 8. See the voting ballot on page 17 of this issue and online at www.thewavemag.com.

Our music writer, oddly enough, is a fan of music. Every now and then he can’t resist letting someone have it – see his recent dis of Scarlett Johansson’s Anywhere I Lay My Head [Vol. 8, Iss. 10], which he gave zero stars – but for the most part, he’d rather focus on the good stuff being released, instead of dwelling on the bad.

Loved your story on kettles [“On the Boil,” Vol. 8, Iss. 13]. Real exciting stuff. Ever thought of doing a piece on forks, or maybe even bowls? Wait, I got it – how about something on oven mitts! BORING.

fad that restaurants are trying to cash in on, but that they’re making a conscious effort to prepare the healthiest dishes they can while also supporting their community.

Sue Campbell

Trevese, Los Gatos

I really enjoyed your story “Ethical Dining” [Vol. 8, Iss. 13]. I found it very informative and am so glad to see that restaurants are – as much as I hate the term – “going green.” There are so many health benefits, and the fact that they are supporting local growers is fabulous. I only hope this just isn’t some

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A friend and I picked up the Aerobie Ring we saw in your mag [“Sun of a Beach,” Vol. 8, Iss. 12]. We went to a football field to throw it around. My friend looked at me and said, “How much you wanna bet I can throw this over them mountains,” and he did. Sara Los Gatos


LET TERS

THEWAVEMAG.COM JUNE 30 - JULY 13, 2008

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COLUMN: THE DREGUL ATOR

THE DREGULATOR B Y C I N T R A W I L S O N - W R I T E U S @ T H E W AV E M A G . C O M

Private eyes, they’re watching you, watching you.

S

it right down, fiends, and let your Aunt Dregula tell you a little story. Perhaps you’ve heard these things before, but probably not in this order. After 9/11, a certain Admiral John Poindexter – Ronald Reagan’s national security advisor – came to the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) with a Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC) guy named Brian Hicks, and pitched DARPA with a project that seemed like a good idea at the time. In broad strokes: Poindexter wanted funding for a program called “Total Information Awareness” (TIA) – which would develop and deploy data-mining technologies. These applications would arguably give intelligence, counterintelligence and law enforcement agencies a vital leg up in surveillance in the suddenly “asymmetric” war environment of post-9/11. DARPA got a big influx of money from a grateful Congress, Poindexter was installed as the new project manager at DARPA’s newly formed Information Awareness Office (IAO), and the future of illegal American domestic wiretapping was off to the races. The project had problems right off the bat with its image: Nobody felt terribly comfortable letting a guy like Poindexter – an Iran-Contra alumni and convicted felon – manage a department that was already coloring way outside the lines and even off the pages in terms of potential violations of privacy. Civil liberties activists went into a tailspin about the ramifications TIA might have: a mass-surveillance system used to scrutinize the private information of American citizens. (TIA’s crypto-totalitarian logo – an angry blazing eye at the top of a pyramid, staring Big Brotherly rays of scorching omniscience at certain sections of a hapless and naked globe – didn’t put any minds at rest, either.) DARPA tried to save the program in February 2003 by changing the name of TIA to the “Terrorist Information Office” – making the focus of the terrible eye in the sky more explicitly non-citizen offending – but Congress freaked out anyway, and stopped funding the IAO in 2003.

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– to encompass the broadest possible number of transactions, as opposed to focusing on individuals in whom law enforcement has specific interests. It’s less like a perpetual fishing expedition than a perpetual reef dynamiting, in terms of information gathering and wholesale privacy violations. What nobody seems to have anticipated then was that the agencies who would implement the most widespread abuses of the technologies advanced by TIA would be private corporations like Verizon and Comcast, who proved entirely willing and even patriotically eager to sell out the privacy of their customers by volunteering what they presumed to be their private data to be scrutinized with this new technology. Opa! Shortly after TIA disappeared, suddenly the phone calls and internet activities of American citizens were being trolled by the NSA, with no warrants whatsoever. Data that was previously considered “your private information” in the pre-9/11 world – bank records, hospital records, credit card data, website URLs you view in your own home – is now, ostensibly, unprotected (for your own protection), gathered, and apparently… for sale. And now we have the NebuAd scandal. According to WIRED magazine, NebuAd, an online advertising firm, “pays ISPs to let it eavesdrop on web users.” This, however, is not just passive data collection. NebuAd “doesn’t just passively record traffic, but actively injects fake packets into responses from other websites in order to deliver cookies to users.”

The project never stopped, though. It slipped into the shadows. Funding came from elsewhere… other, murkier budgets from the Dark Side, devoted to your national security. Result: The technologies were soundly developed and deployed in precisely the ways that Congress was afraid they would be.

In other words, NebuAd is, in all likelihood, just the tip of the iceberg. Data mining technology is everywhere, – and it’s not just used to fight terrorists anymore. Now it hacks into the privacy of internet users, for no reason other than bold, capitalistic impulse looting. Corporations apparently have just as much right to your private information as law enforcement communities and security agencies. Hey, they only want to read your mind so they can make you even happier than you already are! What’s wrong with that?

Data mining works by casting the widest possible net – all available data

It’s the future, fiends… just not the one you wanted. TW


COLUMN: THE DREGUL ATOR

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9


SPOTLIGHT: NOTEWORTHY NEWS

SPOTLIGHT NOTEWORTHY

NEWS

A Friendly Footprint It’s official: San Jose is one of the lowest-impact cities in the nation.

T

SPOT L IGH T

he San Jose, Sunnyvale and Santa Clara region has the seventh smallest carbon footprint of any large US city, according to data recently released by Washington, DC think tank the Brookings Institution (www.brookings.edu). Trailing just behind at No. 8 is the San Francisco, Oakland and Fremont area. The Brookings study took into account fuel from automobiles and energy used in residences, but did not include emissions from factories, commercial buildings and transportation by sea, air and rail. The institution says it will incorporate this missing data in reports scheduled for release later this year or in early 2009. Along with the region’s ecologically conscious community, researchers attributed San Jose’s high ranking to such factors as mass-transit systems, a moderate climate, and clean energy sources like natural gas and hydro-electric projects. Jeff Janssen, senior policy advisor for Mayor Chuck Reed, has several recommendations for cities looking to reduce their carbon footprints. “On an individual level,” he says, “residents should be encouraged by cities to conserve water, change their lightbulbs to CFLs [compact fluorescent

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THEWAVEMAG.COM JUNE 30 - JULY 13, 2008

lightbulbs], and recycle the majority of their waste. On a citywide scale, if municipalities replace their streetlights with energy-efficient LED lights, they will save electricity, while at the same time reduce their operating expenses. Placing solar on individual homes, commercial business, or city facilities helps to lower the area’s carbon footprint, while at the same time allowing for clean renewable energy to power the area at a lower cost.” Janssen adds that other cities could drastically reduce their carbon footprints by adopting the 10 Green Vision goals that the City of San Jose plans to carry out within the next 15 years. These goals include reducing per capita energy use by 50 percent, recycling or beneficially reusing 100 percent of the city’s wastewater, and ensuring that 100 percent of public fleet vehicles run on alternative fuels. “These goals also go a long way to reducing our dependency on oil while providing clean water, land and air for generations to come,” Janssen says. For more information on the Green Vision Goals program, go to www.sanjoseca.gov/mayor/goals/environment/GreenVision/GreenVision.asp.


SPOTLIGHT: NOTEWORTHY NEWS

SPOT L IGH T

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SPOTLIGHT NOTEWORTHY

NEWS

Team America San Jose State is the US Olympic team’s last stop before Beijing.

I

f Olympic fever hasn’t set in yet, it shouldn’t be too much longer – at least, not for San Jose residents. In case you missed it, our city is about to serve as the official processing site for the US Olympic team for the 2008 Games (held in Beijing, Aug. 8-24). The athletes chosen to represent the US this summer will gather at San Jose State University (SJSU) from late July through early August, before heading out to Beijing.

SPOT L IGH T

The majority of the team’s approximate 600 members will travel by bus from Mineta San Jose International Airport or San Francisco International Airport to SJSU, where they’ll receive medical and dental examinations, have their photos taken, attend briefings on Chinese customs and etiquette, and get measured for uniforms and sized for commemorative Olympic rings. The athletes will also participate in $1,200-to-$1,500-valued shopping sprees for Team USA apparel and luggage. Training facilities on campus and nearby will be available to the contestants during their stays at the university.

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Having had positive experiences with the San Jose Sports Authority in events such as the 2003 Titans Games (an athletic competition that featured wrestling, boxing, fencing, weightlifting, judo, karate, tae kwon do and the shot put), the United States Olympic Committee (USOC) is pleased to team up with the school again. “[The staff of SJSU] have been incredible partners to work with,” says USOC chief of

sport performance Steve Roush. “The university, from the president down to the athletic staff, has been so receptive to what’s coming. We really feel like we’ve selected an incredible site to do this with.” United States Olympic Committee www.usoc.org San Jose State University www.sjsu.edu


SPOTLIGHT: NOTEWORTHY NEWS

Starlight, Starbright see the forest lit at night! Located on Graham Hill Rd., Felton, CA For more information or reservations call (831) (831)) 335-4484 or visit (831 www.roaringcamp.com www.roaringcamp.com

Wonder Wonder at the beauty of a redwood forest lit up at night during a 2-hour, 2-hour, round-trip railway excursion from the boardwalk in Santa Cruz. Reservations recommended.

SPOT L IGH T

THEWAVEMAG.COM JUNE 30 - JULY 13, 2008

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SPOTLIGHT NOTEWORTHY

NEWS Scott Bearden receives the Audience Favorite award from Opera San Jose’s general director Irene Dalis

Good Vibrations Former local scores big at Opera San Jose vocal competition.

O SPOT L IGH T

n May 31, onetime Opera San Jose resident artist Scott Bearden beat out nine other contestants at the Second Annual Irene Dalis Vocal Competition in San Jose, nabbing both the First Place cash prize of $15,000 and the Audience Favorite prize of $5,000 for his renditions of passages from Umberto Giordano’s Andrea Chenier and Giuseppe Verdi’s Falstaff. Bearden, 41, is pleased at the thought that his success at the competition, coupled with his victory at New York’s prestigious American Verdi Competition in November 2007, will help him get auditions at bigger companies. “That’s where the money is, and ultimately, we [in the business] want to sing less and make more money, so that we’re not constantly changing a suitcase over and heading back out again,” he says.

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The easygoing baritone, who currently lives in New York, believes persistence and patience are crucial qualities for aspiring opera singers to cultivate. “Early success is not always the best success, even though it’s nice, because sometimes it doesn’t lend itself to that same person continuing to strive after what’s next,” he offers. “[Success] is not something that’s going to happen overnight. I think it’s something that has to be a lifelong endeavor, if you really, truly want it to be your life.” Opera San Jose founder Irene Dalis herself will be spending a little time in the limelight soon: On Oct. 17, the former Metropolitan Opera diva will be honored with a lifetime achievement award at the Silicon Valley Arts & Business Awards luncheon. TW Opera San Jose, 2149 Paragon Dr., San Jose www.operasj.org


SPOTLIGHT: NOTEWORTHY NEWS

SPOT L IGH T

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» FEATURE

HitList

» FEATURE

37

C O M P I L E D B Y M I T C H E L L A L A N PA R K E R

But instead of relishing in the moment, you kill it by saying, “OK, I’ll email you all a copy in about two weeks.” In this digital age, people are realizing that the instant gratification of something tangible is irreplaceable. Enter the Polaroid PoGo, a pocket-sized portable photo printer. Unlike other printers that only work with their corresponding camera, the PoGo is able to print copies from any camera, even cell phones, in under a minute. Oh, Polaroid, how we’ve missed you. Available Jul. 6 from Target.com and Best Buy. $149

DJ Desk www.metrofarm.net Many of the staff here at The Wave double as office DJs. When a record isn’t spinning, it gets eerily quiet, causing the magazine to suffer. So we are constantly getting up to flip and change records. What we need is a custom DJ desk setup like this one from Metrofarm. Then we could just rotate employee sets throughout the day without worrying about any pauses between records. And with these custom desks, made with high quality wood (sometimes concrete) and shaped into sleek designs, we’d be looking and sounding like professionals, for once. Starting at $6,200 (plus shipping).

LOFT Organic Liqueurs www.loftliqueurs.com

HIT L IST

Being the first certified organic liqueur in the US is nothing to brag about – unless it tastes good, of course. LOFT’s Lemongrass Cello is sweet, but not too sweet. The lemongrass comes from a certified organic and certified biodynamic farm in California, making it an eco-conscious way to drink yourself unconscious. After trying it chilled with ice, we immediately recognized the possibilities of this 50-proof liqueur. Lisa Averbuch, president and founder of LOFT, also has endless suggestions: add to vodka, rum or tequila cocktails, champagne, iced tea, soda, or pour it over ice cream and chocolate truffles. $29.99

The Emperor Workstation www.novelquest.com The chairs in our office smell like five-year-old pizza, and the postures we’ve developed have us all lurching around the halls like Quasimodo. If you’re feeling sorry for us, and you should be, buying us all Emperor workstations will undoubtedly get you a reservation at the finest table in Heaven. The chair is named after the Emperor scorpion because of the taillike section that arches overhead. But instead of a stinger, this Emperor packs a sharp system of three large monitors, THX Dolby surround sound, air filtering, light therapy, a webcam, a battery backup and more. They are available for purchase in July and the company is working on building a network of resellers. The price will be in the range of a “middle size car,” so we’ll be kind and only ask that you buy us 10. You could write it off as a charitable donation!

Light Emitting Wallpaper www.jonassamson.com

Polaroid PoGo www.polaroid.com Let’s say you’re on vacation. You’re with your friends and family. You all huddle together for that monumental group photo. You are excited to capture it all on camera. Afterwards, everyone gathers around the image on your digital camera, admiring your brilliant skills. They all want a copy. 16

THEWAVEMAG.COM JUNE 30 - JULY 13, 2008

Although currently just a prototype, we’re hoping enough buzz will be created to get this stuff up and running, and up on our walls, soon. The adhesive-backed wallpaper connects to any normal electric socket. What happens next is amazing: “Shapes, colors, fades and primitive animations” flicker and light up the flat surface walls, says creator Jonas Samson. “The idea of a light source as a surface enables a lot of new design possibilities, and I think the idea of light emitting wallpaper appeals to people’s sense of imagination.” Indeed. One “primitive animation” of the custom-designed paper is of a growing tree that comes to life in 30 increments, each one seamlessly fading onto the wallpaper. TW


I

t’s official – you may now cast your vote to determine Silicon Valley’s favorite businesses. Here’s the deal: Fill out at least 20 of the entries in the categories below with your favorite local businesses (national chains excluded) and mail in this ballot complete with your personal information by Aug. 8, 2008, and you’ll automatically be entered in the drawing to win a trip for two to Tahoe and other great prizes. Winners will be announced in the Sept. 8 issue of The Wave Magazine. One entry per person, please. No photocopies. Suspected ballot stuffers will be disqualified with extreme prejudice.

 FULL NAME

 DAYTIME PHONE NUMBER

DINING

 BEST JAPANESE

 BEST JAZZ/BLUES BAR

 BEST OVERALL

 BEST JUICE BAR

 BEST KARAOKE

 BEST AFTER HOURS/LATE NIGHT  BEST AMERICAN  BEST BAKERY/PATISSERIE  BEST BANQUET FACILITY  BEST BAR MENU

 BEST MEXICAN  BEST NEW RESTAURANT  BEST PATIO DINING  BEST PIZZA  BEST SANDWICH

 BEST LATIN/SALSA CLUB  BEST LIMOUSINE SERVICE  BEST LIVE ROCK CLUB  BEST LIVE CONCERT VENUE  BEST LOUNGE

 BEST BARBECUE

 BEST SEAFOOD

 BEST MARTINI

 BEST BREAKFAST SPOT

 BEST STEAKHOUSE

 BEST NEIGHBORHOOD BAR

 BEST BRITISH

 BEST SUSHI

 BEST RECORD STORE

 BEST BRUNCH

 BEST THAI

 BEST NEW CLUB/BAR

 BEST BUFFET

 BEST VEGETARIAN

 BEST PATIO/OUTDOOR

Starting Jul. 7, vote online at www.thewavemag.com or fill out this form and mail it to: The Wave Magazine Readers’ Choice Awards, 1735 Technology Dr., Ste. 575, San Jose, CA 95110.

5VOTE NOW! *We will not sell or distribute your personal information.

 EMAIL ADDRESS

SPORTS & ADVENTURE

 BEST LINGERIE  BEST MEN’S APPAREL

 BEST BICYCLE SHOP

 BEST PET BOUTIQUE

 BEST BOWLING ALLEY

 BEST SHOE STORE

 BEST CAMPING/HIKING GEAR  BEST DANCE STUDIO

 BEST VINTAGE CLOTHING

 BEST DRIVING RANGE

 BEST WOMEN’S APPAREL

 BEST EXTREME SPORTS COMPANY

HOME & DESIGN

 BEST GOLF COURSE

 BEST ANTIQUE STORE

 BEST GYM/HEALTH CLUB  BEST MARTIAL ARTS STUDIO

 BEST FURNITURE STORE (OUTDOOR)

 BEST SKI RESORT

 BEST VIETNAMESE

 BEST POOL HALL

 BEST BUSINESS LUNCH

 BEST WINE RETAILER

 BEST PUB & TAVERN

 BEST CATERING

 BEST WINERY

 BEST SPORTS BAR

HEALTH & BEAUTY

 BEST WINE BAR

 BEST BEAUTY SUPPLY STORE

 BEST COFFEE  BEST CUBAN  BEST DELI  BEST DESSERT  BEST FINE DINING  BEST FRENCH  BEST FUSION  BEST GERMAN  BEST GREEK/MEDITERRANEAN  BEST PRIVATE/GROUP DINING  BEST ICE CREAM/YOGURT PARLOR  BEST INDIAN  BEST IRISH

 BEST ITALIAN

NIGHTLIFE & MUSIC Â BEST AFTER-WORK BAR Â BEST BEER SELECTION Â BEST BREWERY Â BEST CASINO Â BEST CIGAR LOUNGE Â BEST COMEDY CLUB Â BEST COUNTRY BAR Â BEST DANCE CLUB Â BEST DATING SERVICE Â BEST DIVE BAR Â BEST GAY/LESBIAN BAR Â BEST HAPPY HOUR Â BEST HOTEL BAR

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

 BEST SPORTING GOODS STORE

 BEST GARDEN SUPPLY/NURSERY  BEST HARDWARE STORE

 BEST DAY SPA

 BEST KITCHEN STORE  BEST LUXURY APARTMENTS  BEST NEW HOME COMMUNITY

 BEST HAIR SALON

 BEST ART GALLERY

 BEST HOLISTIC HEALTH CLINIC

 BEST ART HOUSE CINEMA

 BEST MEDI SPA

 BEST ART SUPPLY

 BEST PILATES STUDIO

 BEST BOOKSTORE

 BEST PLASTIC SURGERY CLINIC

 BEST CAMERA STORE

 BEST TANNING SALON

 BEST DANCE COMPANY

 BEST THERAPEUTIC MASSAGE

 BEST HOBBY & COLLECTIBLES

 BEST YOGA STUDIO

 BEST MOVIE THEATER

 BEST ELECTRONICS STORE  BEST FURNITURE STORE (INDOOR)

 BEST SHOOTING RANGE

 BEST BURGER

 BEST CHINESE

 BEST SHOPPING MALL

FAMILY & COMMUNITY Â BEST ATTRACTION Â BEST BABY/CHILDREN’S STORE Â BEST BIRTHDAY PARTY VENUE Â BEST CANDY STORE Â BEST CHILDREN’S BOOKSTORE Â BEST DAYCARE Â BEST EDUCATIONAL ATTRACTION

STYLE & SHOPPING

 BEST MUSEUM

 BEST BOUTIQUE/DESIGNER CLOTHING

 BEST MUSICAL INSTRUMENT STORE

 BEST JEWELRY

 BEST THEATRE COMPANY

 BEST KID’S APPAREL

 BEST FAMILY FRIENDLY DINING  BEST FARMERS MARKET  BEST PRIVATE SCHOOL  BEST TOY STORE

THEWAVEMAG.COM JUNE 30 - JULY 13, 2008

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M O N T E R E Y ,

C A

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otoGP. It’s known as the “premier class” in motorcycle racing because every other league (AMA, World Superbike, AFM, etc.) regards the riders in this series as the world’s greatest. The bikes are all prototypes, the riders are the very best in the sport, and the tracks are of the highest quality. This is the sport to watch if you want to see how quickly a man can travel around a circuit on two wheels.

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Of the 18 courses on which these world-class riders compete, Mazda Laguna Seca Raceway is one of the most challenging. So frustrated was seven-time MotoGP World Champion Valentino Rossi after his first foray on the track, he seemed to struggle for words when describing the legendary raceway. But riders had better get a handle on the track’s intricacies: On Jun. 25 it was announced that MotoGP rights holders Dorna Sports inked a deal with the raceway, ensuring that Laguna Seca will continue to host the event until at least 2014. MotoGP isn’t the only thing happening during the three-day event, which expects to attract some 150,000 raving fans. Besides the premier class, the weekend offers AMA Superbike and Supersport races, as well as two Red Bull Rookies Cup competitions. In this guide, you’ll find everything you need to get the most out of the weekend, from transportation, lodging, tips, series statistics, general information and more. See you at the track.

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TRACK SCHEDULE {SUBJECT TO CHANGE}

FRIDAY JULY 18 riday features all four classes on the track (AMA Superbike, Supersport, Red Bull Rookies Cup and the badasses from MotoGP). Highlights include two one-hour MotoGP practice sessions and qualifying races for Saturday’s AMA Supersport race. The day concludes with a free Fan Party from 5-7pm at the Parts Unlimited hospitality tent in Turn 5.

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8-8:45am: Practice – AMA Pro Honda Oils Supersport presented by Shoei Helmets 9-9:30am: Practice – Red Bull Rookies Cup 10-11am: Free Practice 1 – MotoGP World Championship 11:25am-Noon: Practice – AMA Superbike Championship presented by Parts Unlimited Noon-1:30pm: Lunch 12:10-12:45pm: Track Crossing – Start/Finish and Dunlop Tire Bridge 1-1:30pm: Qualifying – Red Bull Rookies Cup 1:50-2:50pm: Free Practice 2 – MotoGP World Championship 3:30-3:55pm: Qualifying – AMA Pro Honda Oils Supersport presented by Shoei Helmets Group 2 4-4:25pm: Qualifying – AMA Pro Honda Oils Supersport presented by Shoei Helmets Group 1 4:30-5:30pm: Track Crossing – Start/Finish and Dunlop Tire Bridge 5-7pm: Free Fan Party – Parts Unlimited hospitality tent (Turn 5) SATURDAY JULY 19 aturday’s highlight is the MotoGP World Championship qualifying at 1:50pm. We’ll also see the first two races of the weekend: Race 1 of the Red Bull Rookies Cup at 3:45pm, followed by the 17-lap contest for AMA Pro Honda Oils Supersport Championship, presented by Shoei Helmets at 4:35pm. A free Saturday night concert is scheduled from 5-7pm in the Yamaha marketplace, with the band to be announced in the near future. Let’s hope it’s not James Toseland’s band, Crash.

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7:30-8:20am: Track Crossing – Start/Finish and Dunlop Tire Bridge 8:30-9:30am: Practice – AMA Superbike Championship presented by Parts Unlimited 10-11am: Free Practice 3– MotoGP World Championship 20

11:15-11:35am: Warm-up – AMA Pro Honda Oils Supersport presented by Shoei Helmets 11:45-12:15pm: Qualifying – Red Bull Rookies Cup 12:15-12:40pm: Track Crossing – Start/Finish and Dunlop Tire Bridge 12:20-1:30pm: Lunch 12:50-1:10pm: Fan Parade Lap 1:50-2:50pm: Qualifying Practice – MotoGP World Championship 2:55-3:25pm: Track Crossing – Start/Finish and Dunlop Tire Bridge 3:45-4:15pm: Race 1 – Red Bull Rookies Cup 4:35-5:05pm: Race – AMA Pro Honda Oils Supersport presented by Shoei Helmets (17 laps) 5:10-6:30pm: Track Crossing – Start/Finish and Dunlop Tire Bridge 5-7pm: Free Concert – Yamaha marketplace (Lakebed) SUNDAY JULY 20 th

unday is the big day. The 11 round of the MotoGP World Championship begins at 2pm. It’s a 32-lap race and will be one of the most electrifying events in United States motor sports this year. Race 2 of the Red Bull Rookies Cup starts at 12:45pm, then the 28-lap AMA Superbike Championship – the last race of the weekend – starts at 3:45pm.

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7:30-9:10am: Track Crossing – Start/Finish and Dunlop Tire Bridge 9:40-10:05am: Warm-Up – MotoGP World Championship 10:15-10:40am: Qualifying – AMA Superbike presented by Parts Unlimited, Group 2 10:45-11:10am: Qualifying – AMA Superbike presented by Parts Unlimited, Group 1 11:10-11:50am: Track Crossing – Start/Finish and Dunlop Tire Bridge 11:10am-12:25pm: Lunch 12:45-1:15pm: Race 2 - Red Bull Rookies Cup

2pm: Race – MotoGP World Championship (32 laps) 2:45-3:30pm: Track Crossing – Start/Finish and Dunlop Tire Bridge 3:45-4:45pm: Race – AMA Superbike presented by Parts Unlimited (28 laps) 5:00-6:30pm: Track Crossing – Start/Finish and Dunlop Tire Bridge

THEWAVEMAG.COM JUNE 30 - JULY 13, 2008

Inn at Spanish Bay

GETTING THERE his is a huge event attracting some 150,000 fans over the course of the weekend. Assuming you’re not familiar with the logistics of getting to the track, merely type “Laguna Seca” into Google Maps and you’re all set. You can take the scenic route down (Hwy. 17 to Hwy. 1) or take 101 into Monterey. Either way, driving to the track is extremely easy – there are so many Event Parking signs, you’d have to be blind not to get there. You’ll park in a massive abandoned military barrack parking lot; from there, air-conditioned shuttles will drop you off at the track. It’s pretty painless. Another alternative is to buy a parking pass to park at the track – they’re $50 and in limited supply – or if you’re Brad Pitt (he’s been there every year so far), you’ll helicopter in. For $300 per person round trip, South Bay Helicopter Services (www.sbayhelicopter.com) will pick you up at Monterey Airport and drop you off at the helipad located adjacent to the Red Bull Energy Center.

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Obviously, if you ride a motorcycle, that is your smartest option for getting into and out of the track. For those who don’t want to ride all the way down to the track, many people trailer or put their bikes in trucks and unload them at their campsite, or wherever they’re staying. This is not a bad idea, as motorcyclists have their own private entrance into the track, not to mention their own parking lot.

WHERE TO STAY f you haven’t already made reservations for a hotel in Monterey, you’ll need to stay elsewhere. If you’ve never done it, camping is a great way to save money and experience the race environment with true fans. Several camp spots near the track have showers and lots of space, if you’re into that sort of thing. It’s usually a pretty good time, as fans of this type of motorcycle racing are typically easygoing, fun-loving people. Below are some hotels and camping places you can check out. If a hotel is full, ask the reservation clerk to refer you to one that might have rooms (oftentimes, they’ll know where the vacancies are). But be warned: The hotels all know that demand is high this weekend, and rooms are priced as such. Expect to pay over $200 for a room that would normally be $60.

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HOTELS: Bay Park Hotel (831) 649-1020 www.bayparkhotel.com Best Western Beach Resort Monterey (831) 655-7650 www.montereybeachresort.com Comfort Inn Carmel Bay by the Sea (831) 622-7090 Comfort Inn Monterey Bay (831) 373-3081 www.comfortinn.com Embassy Suites Hotel Monterey Bay Seaside (831) 393-1115 www.embassysuites.com Hilton Garden Inn Monterey (831) 373-6142 www.monterey.stayhgi.com

Inn at Spanish Bay (831) 647-7500 www.pebblebeach.com Monterey Bay Inn (831) 373-6242 www.montereybayinn.com Monterey Bay Lodge (831) 372-8057 www.montereybaylodge.com Portola Plaza Hotel at Monterey Bay (831) 649-4511 www.portolahotel.com Travelodge-Monterey Bay (831) 373-3381 www.travelodge.com CAMPSITES: For current availability, go to www.lagunaseca.com and look under General Info.


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Casey Stoner

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS How fast do these MotoGP bikes go? Good question. Last year the premier class was reduced from 990cc bikes to 800cc bikes. This was intended to slow the bikes down, since they were hitting over 200mph on the straights. But with more technology and lighter bikes, their speeds haven’t changed much. In fact, lap times have actually improved.

Who should I cheer for?

Race Night on Cannery Row

TRACK-TIVITIES Racing is not the only thing happening at Laguna Seca during the Redbull MotoGP weekend. The inside of the track, for example, is a veritable motorcycle festival, complete with an array of vendors selling discounted gear and demonstrating the latest bike products.

You should cheer for whomever you want to win. MotoGP is an incredibly international and patriotic sport. That is, when the Spaniards are racing in Spain, they tend to do everything in their power to win. Same goes for the Italians, French, Australians, etc. So cheering for the Americans wouldn’t be the worst thing. Nicky Hayden, who has struggled considerably since winning the World Championship in 2006, has a new motor in his machine that’s using a relatively experimental pneumatic valve system. He debuted it just two races ago, and it seems to be working, so all eyes will be on him for this race. Also, you can’t really mention MotoGP without bringing up Fiat Yamaha rider and seven-time world champion Valentino Rossi – he’s not only the current points leader with 162, but has been riding in top form again after a difficult 2007 season. Others to watch include Ducati’s Casey Stoner (Australia) and Fiat Yamaha rookie sensation Jorge Lorenzo (Spain), who has already raced this season with two broken ankles as a result of a wicked high-side crash.

What’s a “high-side?” A “high-side” crash typically happens in a corner when the rear wheel of the machine spins out, causing the bike to slide. The actual high-siding occurs when the rear tire regains traction with the road, flinging the rider off the bike with a force 10 times that of a Brahma bull. It’s the opposite of a low-side crash, where the rider “loses the front” tire and the bike lays over on the track (hopefully, without hitting anyone else).

What is the Red Bull Rookies Cup? Both of these races feature riders from ages 13 to 16, and they’re all on the same Red Bull KTM 125cc motorcycles. The 125cc bikes don’t go as fast, but consider that these riders are racing for their lives – if they do well, they may have a future in motorcycle racing. If not, they’ll be forced to go to college and live the life of a normal person.

What’s so special about Laguna Seca? On Sept. 17, 1987, Laguna was blessed by Pope John Paul II. If that’s not enough, the current racetrack is 2.238 miles in length (3.602 kilometers), has 11 turns, including the famous “Corkscrew” at Turns 8 and 8A, which features a 300-foot change in elevation. It’s the most dramatic elevation drop in the entire MotoGP race series, and the entry is a blind apex – which means if you don’t enter it just right, you could be “screwed.” There’s also the fact that the track follows the dramatic landscape of a Northern California mountain lakebed. Calling the scenery dramatic is the understatement of the race season. To put track times into perspective, the current lap record is 1 minute, 5.880 seconds, set on Mar. 10, 2007 by Sebastien Bourdais in a Panoz DP01 Champ Car. 22

THEWAVEMAG.COM JUNE 30 - JULY 13, 2008

Fortuna Girls


Fandango Restaurant

WHERE TO EAT hile you’re at the track, there’s no shortage of food and drink – and surprisingly, not at AT&T Park prices. Beer and food prices are more like ballpark prices 10 years ago, so you won’t end up hating yourself for shelling out $100 for an afternoon of drinking beer in the sun.

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At night, if you’re staying around Monterey, there are some amazing restaurant options. Here are some of our favorites. MONTEREY RESTAURANTS: Casanova Restaurant (831) 625-0501 www.casanovarestaurant.com Crown & Anchor (831) 649-6496 www.crownandanchor.net Fandango Restaurant (831) 372-3456 www.fandangorestaurant.com Fish Hopper (831) 372-8543 www.fishhopper.com Fresh Cream Restaurant (831) 375-9798 www.freshcream.com Passion Fish (831) 655-3311 www.passionfish.net Rosine’s Restaurant (831) 375-1400 www.rosinesmonterey.com Sardine Factory (831) 373-3775 www.sardinefactory.com Stokes Restaurant & Bar (831) 373-1110 www.stokesrestaurant.com

WHAT TO BRING he Monterey Peninsula gets oppressively hot in July – last year, the track temperature for the MotoGP race was over 150 degrees – so bring sunscreen, and plenty of it. Also, be sure to have a hat you can stash or pull out if need be. Style wise, comfortable shoes and light clothing are highly recommended. If you bring a jacket, you won’t use it. And while it almost goes without saying, you will need a cool pair of sunglasses.

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WHERE TO PARTY ithout a doubt, Cannery Row on Saturday night is the best party of the weekend. Thousands of motorcycles descend on the historic district to celebrate the following day’s race. If you hate motorcycles, live music, a line of bar parties, and endless beer supplies, this may not be for you – though it’s still worth checking out. If you go down early and eat, it’s nice to take an evening stroll around the wharf.

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Valentino Rossi

POINT STANDINGS The point standings as of Stage 8 of the 2008 season: ROSSI, Valentino ITA PEDROSA, Dani SPA STONER, Casey AUS LORENZO, Jorge SPA EDWARDS, Colin USA DOVIZIOSO, Andrea ITA HAYDEN, Nicky USA

162 151 117 104 82 68 57

TOSELAND, James GBR CAPIROSSI, Loris ITA NAKANO, Shinya JPN VERMEULEN, Chris AUS HOPKINS, John USA MELANDRI, Marco ITA ELIAS, Toni SPA

53 51 49 48 32 29 29

DE ANGELIS, Alex RSM DE PUNIET, Randy FRA GUINTOLI, Sylvain FRA WEST, Anthony AUS SPIES, Ben USA OKADA, Tadayuki JPN

POINT SYSTEM CHART

Here’s how the points work in a MotoGP race: 1st = 25 2nd = 20 3rd = 16

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THEWAVEMAG.COM JUNE 30 - JULY 13, 2008

4th = 13 5th = 11 6th = 10

7th = 9 8th = 8 9th = 7

10th = 6 11th = 5 12th = 4

13th = 3 14th = 2 15th = 1

25 22 18 16 2 2


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» FEATURE

Sports&Adventure

» FEATURE » EXERCISE & LIFEST YLE

26 28

As a man born in Pakistan, Ahmad says he’s definitely in the minority: He estimates that 90 percent of the cricket players in his area are from India, mostly engineers aged 25 to 40. SCCC batsman Ashish Kaul, a 32-year-old San Carlos Nvidia engineer originally from Bombay, India, says there are also a few Australians and Englishmen in the club. “But if you asked me if the majority of people who play the game in this area are Australians or Englishmen, I would say no,” he offers. “At least in this area, it’s dominated by the South Asian community.” Whether the players are from India, Australia, England or elsewhere, the game of cricket presents a more-or-less universal set of challenges that, according to Ahmad, are as much mental as they are physical. “Especially if you’re a batsman. You have to make the decision within subseconds – because the ball is coming to you, you have to decide where to hit,” he says. “And as a bowler, you may have more time to think, but you still have to think [about] every ball, so that you can either contain the run or get the person out.” Forty-two-year-old Silicon Valley IT company employee Sanjay Murthy acts as an all-rounder for Sunnyvale 28

Here’s the Pitch The venerable sport of cricket is surprisingly popular in the Bay Area.

SPOR T S & A DV EN T URE

BY DAMON ORION

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espite its relative obscurity here in the US, the British-born game of cricket is the second most popular sport in the world, right behind the pastime we Yanks call soccer. Along with its native England, the game is huge in former Commonwealth countries such as India, Pakistan and the West Indies, as well as in Australia, where it is considered the national sport. And while the game hasn’t caught on in America to the extent that it has in these Britain-mothered nations, there’s a surprisingly large variety of cricket clubs available to local enthusiasts, including associations in Sunnyvale, San Mateo, Palo Alto, Santa Clara, Berkeley and Marin. A cricket match goes something like this: Two teams of 11 players each assemble in a field with two wickets (frameworks of three stumps) placed roughly 66 feet apart at either end of what is dubbed the “pitch,” an area that is the center of the action. A bowler (the equivalent of a pitcher in baseball) tosses a ball toward one of the wickets as a man on the opposing team swings a bat in an attempt to keep the ball from reaching the wicket. If the batsman scores a hit, there’s a group of fielders waiting to do their best to keep him 26

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from scoring a run, which he does by running toward the wicket on the opposite end of the pitch.

THE INS AND OUTS OF CRICKET

The similarities between cricket and baseball are obvious, but there are also some notable differences. For instance, unlike a pitcher in baseball, the bowler generally bounces the cricket ball off the ground on its way toward the wicket. And in cricket, each team member only gets one turn as batsman (as opposed to baseball, where players on average have three or four at-bats). Cricket bats are also significantly wider than baseball bats (around 4¼ inches). And while a baseball game generally only lasts two to three hours, cricket competitions have been known to stretch on for as long as five days (interspersed with plenty of civilized breaks for tea, drinks and lunch, mind you). Of course, very few people have time for a five-day game these days, so teams are increasingly forgoing these epic-length “Test matches” in favor of a faster, more intense one-day game format.

zThe game of cricket dates at least as far back as the 16th century. The prevailing theory is that English children invented the sport during the Middle Ages. No one’s quite sure where the name came from, but many people have speculated that it’s a variation of the Old English word crycc (meaning staff or crutch), the old French criquet (a type of club) or the Dutch krickstoel (a stool designed for kneeling in church that bears a resemblance to a wicket used in early cricket games).

Thirty-year-old IBM product manager Syed Fareed Ahmad serves as an all-rounder (a cricket player skilled at both batting and bowling) for Santa Clara Cricket Club (SCCC), which grew into one of the Northern California Cricket Association (NCCA)’s largest clubs soon after its inception in 1987. Ahmad says his team’s games typically consist of seven hours of total play time: three-and-a-half hours of batting, three-and-a-half hours of fielding. He says this isn’t quite as exhausting as it might sound. “It’s not like basketball, where you’re running every second, so as a batsman, you do have a break whenever you take a run,” he says. “You have a few seconds or even up to a minute sometimes where you can catch your breath, so you’re not necessarily pumping your heart all the time. But it does test your endurance.”

zAustralia’s Sir Donald Bradman (1908-2001) is widely considered to be the finest cricket player ever. His Test cricket batting average – 99.94 – is said to be the greatest statistical performance of all time in any major sport. zSachin Tendulkar of the Indian national cricket team is considered one of the greatest cricket players in the world today. He is the highest run scorer in the history of the World Cup, as well as the first player to score 10,000 runs in One Day International cricket, a format played in the Cricket World Cup. zIn India, cricket players are huge superstars. Team members are paid enormous amounts of money, and are frequently enlisted for celebrity product endorsements. zThough it’s considered a gentlemen’s sport, cricket has inspired some behavior that could hardly be considered sporting. In March 2007, hundreds of Indian cricket fans, enraged by India’s loss to Sri Lanka in the World Cup, burned effigies of players from the national team and staged mock funeral processions representing the death of cricket. zAlso rather impolite was the English cricket team’s use of the so-called Bodyline tactic in the early 1930s. Devised to counteract the mighty swing of the aforementioned Bradman, the technique involved deliberately aiming the ball at the batsman’s body. The practice created some bad blood not just between players, but also between Australia and the UK at large. zCricket spectators will sometimes hear a bowler or fielder shout the word “Howzat?” at the umpire. The question being asked here is “How is that,” meaning “Is the batsman out or not?”


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SPORTS&ADVENTURE: FEATURE

SPORTS&ADVENTURE F E AT U R E

[ C O N T. ]

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Sunnyvale Cricket Club members

Cricket Club, an organization established in 1893 under the name The Wanderers. For him, batting is the most difficult aspect of cricket. “You have to work night and day to really come up with a good skill set,” says Murphy, who was born in Pune, India. “It’s not like you take a bat, go out there and start swinging. It’s like golf: You have to learn it right from the beginning, and if you don’t do it the right way, you’ll never do it right.” Along with a bit of natural talent, the proper attitude is crucial to success in

cricket. Murthy stresses the importance of maintaining the mindset of a beginner: “You can be really, really good, like, for example, Sammy Sosa, and you may start believing you’re a star, but your luck can change at the drop of a hat. So it’s very important to be humble, and be a learner all your life.” TW For more information on local clubs, go to www.ncalcricket.org, www. sunnyvalecricketclub.org or www. santaclaracc.org. For news of today’s international cricket, head to ESPN’s self-dubbed online “ home of cricket,” Cricinfo www.cricinfo.com.

SV

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SPOR T S & A DVEN T URE

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American Kickboxing Academy 1830 Hillsdale Ave. Ste. 2, San Jose (408) 371-4235, 168 E. Fremont Ave., Sunnyvale www.akakickbox. com The American Kickboxing Academy offers top-level public instruction for men, women, and children. In addition, AKA provides private professional training.

AlaVie Fitness 120 W. Campbell Ave., Ste. D, Campbell www. alaviefitness.com Cutting-edge outdoor fitness boot camps for all ages and fitness levels. Ten Bay Area locations. 5K/10K training and other fitness events and services. Women’s, coed and corporate programs.

Ernie Reyes West Coast Martial Arts 668 Lincoln Ave., San Jose (408) 993-8122, 7050 Santa Teresa, San Jose (408) 629-2441 www.erniereyes.com For children and adults, martial arts teaches focus, confidence, self-discipline, fitness, flexibility, coordination and weight, as well as respect for themselves and others.

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Fairtex Muay Thai Fitness 2044 Old Middlefield Way, Mountain View (650) SOUTH 938-8588 www.fairtex.com FairtexBAY Muay Thai is RUNNING an internationally recognized sportsCLUBS fitness facility specializing in authentic Muay Thai training since 1971. AIDS Marathon: Marathon training Silver Creek Sportsplex www.aidsmarathon.com/home/sf.html 800 Bay Embedded Way, San (408) 225-1843 Trail Runners: TrailJose Running www.silvercreeksportsplex.com www.baytrailrunners.com The 240,000-sq.ft. facility is the largest under one roof in North America Sanstate Jose:of-the-art Half and whole marathon — aGalloway truly unique, complex cateringtrainto ingactive www.urbansports.info today’s families and individuals. Palo Alto Run Club: www.parunclub.com Quicksilver Running Club: Fun run, marathon, and ultra marathon training (408) www.quicksilver-running.com 271 Houret Dr., Milpitas 946-0600 Spartans Club: Interval training www.southbayathleticclub.net Southwww.gospartans.org Bay Athletic Club Stevens has always beenStriders: a leader Trail withrunning innovative fitness Creek programs, and yet we always keep the old favorites www.stevenscreekstriders.org around – like racquetball and swimming! Team in Training: Half and whole marathon training www.teamintraining.org/sj

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» FEATURE

Health&Beauty of their old “fat” pants to show how much weight they’ve lost. And while trim is certainly in, what about those who are tired of shopping in the kids section to find jeans that fit? What about those who are actually trying to gain weight in order to reach an aesthetic physique described as something other than “lanky,” “sticklike” or “string bean”?

HE A LT H & BE AU T Y

Whether it’s to tone muscle, increase flexibility, build strength and size, or to simply prevent physical injuries, training intelligently is the only way to maximize your body’s potential. Pete D’Epiro, a personal trainer at Evolution Trainers in Mountain View who has trained numerous Silicon Valley professionals (including vice presidents and CFOs of Intel and HP/ Agilent), was kind enough to offer some advice on how to pack on some muscle, and to school us on why it’s not always recommended.

The Skinny on (Not Being) Skinny Why some of us could stand to pack on a few pounds. BY MITCHELL ALAN PARKER

O

ver the years, the fitness industry seems to have developed an incessant focus on

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losing weight. TV is awash with commercials featuring the ubiquitous skinny person tugging at the waist

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Putting on weight is more difficult than shedding pounds, D’Epiro says, and people wanting to add muscle often end up just adding fat. D’Epiro sometimes advises against putting on weight, particularly the amount of weight associated with bodybuilders. That trend, he warns, is highly unhealthy and extremely taxing on the body. The overeating, overload of protein and chemical enhancements can lead to kidney problems and other medical issues. “The reality is, someone who is slender, who has been slender their entire life, that’s the way their body and muscles were designed,” D’Epiro says. “So trying to change that may not be the best idea. The other thing is that sooner or later, everyone wants to lose weight. As you age, if you’ve been skinny your whole life, you may get ragged on when you’re younger, but once you get older, say when you’re 80, you suddenly become a phenomenon and healthier than the average Joe.” The waif look is undeniably out of style. But so is the ridiculous bodybuilder look. A happy medium is ideal. Nowadays, women are sporting toned muscles, especially arms (Madonna, Michelle Obama), while men prefer a trim physique with chiseled pectorals and abdominals (Mathew McConaughey, Brad Pitt). Just be sure not to overdo it (Helga on

» FEATURE » SPA PROFILES

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American Gladiators, Hugh Jackman in the new Wolverine film). It’s advisable to consult a personal trainer, but here are a few tips from D’Epiro: Time under tension formula: Basically, you want to find out how much weight you can lift eight to 12 times in at least 45 seconds. This will optimize your workout. If you blast through a workout, you won’t see adequate results. Do some trial and error lifts to find out what weight you are comfortable with that adheres to the time under tension formula. Duration: Only work out for an hour per day, three times a week, with a day of rest in between. After an hour, D’Epiro says, the body doesn’t have any more energy to support the workout. Diet: Typically, adding more protein is suggested, but D’Epiro says that Americans eat too much protein to begin with, so this may not be needed. Adding anywhere from 250 to 500 more calories a day is a good way to put on some size. Stick with it: Who hasn’t started a workout routine, only to have it disappear entirely after skipping just one day? Before you know it, you’re covered in potato chip crumbs and wondering how you got so flabby again, promising to start working out the following morning. Don’t get frustrated if you don’t see results right away. Just focus on making it a regular part of your weekly routine. Stay away from analyzing your body in the mirror every day. If you still can’t stick with it, get a personal trainer. Most people, D’Epiro says, recognize the importance of a trainer and often see results in a couple of months, causing them to realize that they need to stick with a personal trainer to keep up their routine. A good personal trainer in Silicon Valley will run you about $65 - $100 an hour. TW WHERE TO WORK OUT Bally Total Fitness, Multiple locations www.ballyfitness.com Club One, Multiple locations www.clubone.com Evolution Trainers, 1235 Pear Ave., Ste. 101, Mountain View (650) 965-8991 www.evolutiontrainers.com Gold’s Gym, Multiple locations www.goldsgym.com US Fitness Pros, 5353 Almaden Expwy., San Jose (408) 265-1600 www.usfitnesspros.com


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HEALTH&BEAUT Y: SPA PROFILES

HEALTH&BEAUTY » SPA PROFILES

SPA CAMPBELL DESIGNER’S LTD. SALON & SPA $$ 2523 Winchester Blvd. (408) 378-7300

Services: Massage, hair styling, highlighting, waxing, facials, microderm, glycolic peels, reflexology, make-up, manicure, pedicures. Special Features: With over 28 years of experience, Designer’s will provide you with all your beauty needs, from your basic manicure to a cutting edge hair style. Book any service over $50 and receive a $25 gift card towards a facial or massage on your next visit. STAR SALON & SPA $ 2260 S. Bascom Ave. (408) 377-2151 www.starsalonspa.com

Services: Facials (refresher, classic European, ultimate European), massages (back and neck, full body, deep tissue, foot reflexology), tanning, hair removal, nail care and full salon services. Special Features: If a regular facial just doesn’t cut it for you, go for the Ultimate at Star Salon & Spa. It’s 80 minutes of pure facial bliss, with an AHA chemical peel that smoothes fine lines, lightens hyper pigmentation and promotes cell growth, followed by hydrating, toning, a facial, and a neck and shoulder massage, and ending with a nourishing masque. Also, check out the massage packages, which are a great bargain at $240 for six half-hour sessions.

FREMONT CLARITY SPA $$ 40000 Fremont Blvd., Ste. D (510) 656-2100 www.clarityspa.com

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Services: Facials (purifying, skin resurfacing, dendrology, tri-enzyme, hydrating, vitamin C, gentlemen’s, skin balancing, lymphatic cleansing, superlifting, aromatherapy, refresher), microdermabrasion, peel (sensi, ultra peel I/II, PCA), body treatments (back, lymphatic drainage cellulite treatment, mind and body rejuvenation, French soft and silk salt glow, perfect legs), waxing and tinting. Special Features: Extra means better at Clarity Spa with $20-andbelow add-ons that will enhance your spa experience. Get an instant super lift for $20 or the special ampoule containing vitamins A, E, C, collagen, DNA and oxygen for $12. EUROPEAN DAY SPA $ 40643 Grimmer Blvd. (510) 770-1237 www.europeandayspa.com

Services: Massages (hot stone, Swedish, deep tissue, reflexology, integrated, aromatherapy, prenatal, spa hand and foot), facials (European deep pore cleansing, Dermalift nonsurgical facial lift, glycolic acid, acne, back, men’s), body treatments (salt glow body polishing with hydrotherapy bath, cellulite, seaweed body wrap, mud body wrap, slimming/detoxification, buff and bronze w/hypnotherapy), makeup, eye treatment, manicures and pedicures. Special Features: Spa packages are the way to go if you can’t decide

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how best to pamper yourself. From career women and moms-to-be to teenagers and couples, European Day Spa has you covered. LAVENDER BEAUTY SPA $$$ 47854 Warm Springs Blvd. (510) 353-1311 www.lavenderbeautyspa.com

Services: Facials (classic, Repechage four layer, Hungarian organic, hyper hydrating, teen, acne, silkpeel, anti-wrinkle firming and lifting defense, lightening, puffy-eye treatment, oxygen treatment, LumiLift, Lumifacial), body treatments (mud wrap, body contour wrap, lemon sugar body polish, spa paraffin, cellulite treatment), waxing and eyelash perming. Special Features: Rehydrate with oxygen and choose one of Lavender’s facial treatments like the ECHO2Plus Oxygen Treatment System, which uses pure medical grade oxygen packed with 87 different vitamins, minerals, enzymes and amino acids. VISUAL IMAGE SALON $ 5200 Mowry Ave., Ste. C (510) 792-5922 www.visualimagesalon.com

Services: Facials (signature, traditional European, acne, glycolic acid peel, microdermabrasion, back), eye, lip and neck treatments, eyebrow and lash tinting, waxing, hair salon and makeup. Special Features: Become a model and get your haircut or colored for free. Models are used for training future hair stylists, and qualified educators are on hand to supervise.

GILROY BEAUTY LOUNGE $$$ 1275 First St. (408) 846-5172

Services: Massages (reflexology, shiatsu, prenatal, sports, Swedish, aromatherapy, warm stone), tanning, facials (anti-aging, deep pore, acne, glycolic, enzyme peel, microdermabrasion), permanent makeup, hair treatments and waxing. Special Features: Take a dip in their hydrotherapy tub and take home something special from their boutique, which sells designer jewelry, lingerie and health products.

HALF MOON BAY PRIMROSE COUNTRY DAY SPA $ 630 Purissima St. (650) 726-1244 www.primrosespa.com

Services: Massages (Swedish, deep tissue, four hands, aromatherapy, warm stone, couples, prenatal), facials (pumpkin, resurfacing, rosacea, Jan Marini C-ESTA, teen, enzyme peel, hyper pigment treatment, acne), body wraps (herbal, mud, seaweed), scrubs, waxing, tinting, hand and feet care and electrolysis. Special Features: Facials are Primrose’s specialty, with options like Epicurean enzyme and oxygen treatment, salicylic acid, microcurrent eye treatment and frozen live cell therapy.

RITZ-CARLTON, HALF MOON BAY SPA $$$$ One Miramontes Point Rd. (650) 712-7040 www. ritzcarlton.com/en/Properties/ HalfMoonBay/Spa/Default.htm

Services: Massages and touch therapies (Half Moon Bay signature, couples, sports, reflexology, prenatal, Thai, invigorating scalp, shiatsu, healing stone, deep tissue), facials (calming lavender, the Half Moon Bay, men’s protection, renovateur, deep cleansing, Carita intense hydrating renovateur, Carita extreme softness renovateur, Carita purifying balance renovateur, Carita lift firming renovateur, Prada radiance visage), body treatments (pumpkin body peel, Prada replenishing body facial, fresh lavender wrap, aromatherapy body polish), nailcare, hair salon, hair removal, makeup, fitness center and wellness services. Special Features: This ritzy spa’s fitness center, steam room, sauna, whirlpool, and coed Roman mineral bath are complimentary for guests purchasing a treatment.

LOS ALTOS CIANA DAY SPA AND SALON $$ 111 Main St. (Salon); 107 Main St. (Spa) (650) 941-1285 www.cianasalonspa.com

Services: Facials (essential, ultimate, elemental nature, outer peace acne relief, men’s, LaStone, purifying facial for acneprone skin, 55-minute express, microdermabrasion), waxing, hand and feet therapy, hair salon and makeup. Special Features: If you want the pampering to continue at home, throw a microdermabrasion party, where a certified esthetician from Ciana visits you. YELKA DAY SPA $$$ 2049 Grant Rd. (650) 9691117 www.yelkadayspa.com

Services: Facial therapies (Treatment 21TM, pumpkin pie refining peel, hydraplenishing oxygen, MoistureLock collagen, ultimate decadence, mini decadence, regenerating caviar pearl, frosty mint spirulina, intense glycol-firming, microdermabrasion, Lumi, acne), massages (deep tissue, aromatherapy, aqua-thermal trio, personalized plus, mom-to-be, Treatment 21TM deep relaxation), body treatments (Adriatic lavender salt polish, chocolate raspberry buff, cellulite reduction, slimming detox, hand brightening and retexturizing, reflexology, aromatic scalp treatment), waxing, tinting and spa packages. Special Features: Caviar used to be something you ate, but now it’s something you put on your face – well, almost. The Regenerating Caviar Pearl Facial takes the finest of caviar extracts, which compel skin cells to metabolize, leaving your face radiant.

LOS GATOS CLOUD 9 SKIN & BODY CARE $$ 501 N. Santa Cruz Ave., Ste. 2 (408) 354-0710 www.cloud9x.com 34


HEALTH&BEAUT Y: SPA PROFILES

A Visionary Salon “Providing Hair Restoration & Extensions for 18 years”

(408) 979-1195 Private Studio – By Appointment Only

www.AVisionarySalon.com Female, before

Female, after (using Micro Point Link)

Instant Hair In 2 Hours Only our exclusive Micro Point Solutions is

Male, before

Male, after (using Micro Point Link)

Non-Damaging Invisible Lightweight

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Services: Massages (deep tissue, trigger-point, acupressure, Thai, reflexology, Swedish gentle, hot stone, Reiki, lymphatic drainage, prenatal), facials (Cloud 9), body treatments (herbal cellulite wrap with foot reflexology, fabulous bodacial with salt scrub, herbal mask, aroma steam, moisture treatment), hair removal, nail care, naturopathic medicine, chemical and metabolic rebalancing, and chiropractic services. Special Features: Feel weightless in a flotation tank filled with 800 pounds of Epsom Salts – proven to relieve stress and muscle tension. GABRIELLE SALON $$ 540 N. Santa Cruz Ave., Ste. D (408) 395-7260

Services: Massages (aromatherapy, Swedish, deep tissue, hot stone, prenatal, sports, chair, focus), facials (Aromessance, men’s, teen, sea, sensitive skin, deep pore cleansing, antioxidant, glycolic peel, back), body treatments (salt glow, moor mud, coffee scrub, airbrush tanning), waxing, nail care, hair salon and makeup. Special Features: Coffee lovers should try the Café Latte manicure, in which the hands are soaked in coffee beans and steamed milk before the rest of the treatment. LUSCIOUS SKIN $ 401 Alberto Way, Ste. D (408) 370-9121 www.lusciousskin.com

Services: Massages (therapeutic Esalen, Reiki technique), facials (fountain of youth petite, tropical, deep cleansing European, firming, deep pore cleanse, soothing “C,” paprika with AHA, Lisa’s seasonal special), brow/lash tinting and hair removal. Special Features: Try the Paprika Facial with AHA, the signature treatment which “regenerates, rejuvenates and detoxifies” the skin. THE MOMMY SPA $$ 413-A Monterey Ave., (408) 395-2009 www.themommyspa.com

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Services: Massages (specializing in pregnancy and postpartum massage, plus Swedish relaxation, deep tissue, and hot stone massage, trigger point therapy, and couples and infant massage classes). Also offers Reiki and guided meditation. Special Features: Founder Lindsay MacInnis has extensive training and experience, studying under such recognized experts as New York’s Elaine Stillerman and San Diego’s Carol Osborne-Sheets. As a result, she has advanced certification in pregnancy massage, and over 70 hours of specific prenatal training. For new mommies, newborns to three-month-olds are welcome during postpartum therapy sessions, with time for infant care and feeding as needed. RENDEZVOUS SALON & DAY SPA $$ 529 N. Santa Cruz Ave. (408) 354-3085

Services: Massages (warm stone, Swedish body, therapeutic, aromatherapy), facials (Rendezvous ultimate, detoxifying, anti-aging rejuvenation, acne controlling), skin resurfacing (microdermabrasion, exfoliation power peels), hair salon, nail care, hair removal, brow design and makeup. Special Features: Rendezvous offers 34

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special add-on services, including detoxifying arm treatment, décolleté microdermabrasion and rejuvenation treatment, balancing back facial, hydrating hand and paraffin treatment, and after facial makeup application. Makeup applications in styles such as film, photography and television are also provided. SHANGRI-LA LOTUS $$ 412-A Monterey Ave. (408) 3951139 www.jennysbeauty.com

Services: Eyelash extensions, permanent makeup, hair styling, curling and straightening, facials (Heavenly Indulgence, classic, teen facial, Dermafile, back treatment), microdermabrasion, waxing, spa pedicures, manicures and nail care, makeup for weddings and special occasions. Special Features: Owner Jenny Dinh has been doing eyelash extensions for over 15 years. During the wedding season, she’s given as many as 10 brides a month the long, lush lashes of their dreams. STUDIO JOULE $$ 130A N. Santa Cruz Ave. (408) 395-3773 www.studiojoule.com

Services: Massages (30-, 60-, 90minute; sole session foot reflexology treatment; Joule face and body duo, mother-to-be, eucalyptus escape), facials (classic Joule, petite studio, studio teen, microdermabrasion, lightening, Obagi skincare system, Joule facial packages, Jan Marini signature), hair removal, lash and brow tint and makeup. Special Features: Find out which makeup looks best on you with a complimentary consultation with Jane Iredale Mineral Cosmetics. YVETTE’S INSTITUTE DE BEAUTE $$ 248 W. Main St. (408) 395-1551

Services: Massages (aromatherapy massage, aromatic sauna wrap, tension relief neck and shoulder, renewing hand treatment), facials (deep pore cleansing, Guinot hydradermie oxygenating, hydradermie plus anti-aging, ultimate hydration, calming sensitive skin, purifying teen, regulating, aromaplasty mineral, luminizing, lift defense, collagen, oxyliance revitalizing, flash beaute vitamin C, evidence antiaging firming, refreshing mini, deep cleansing back, soothing eye contour treatment), body treatments (Swiss herbal wrap, anti-cellulite body mask, toning/ firming sculptural, mother-to-be, firming neck and décolleté mask), makeup, lash and brow tint, hair removal and nail care. Special Features: For intensive care, go for the Glycolic Acid Peel or the Beta Hydroxy Acid Peel. The Glycolic is designed to make skin healthy and glowing, and with the Beta you can choose a booster to treat a particular problem area.

MENLO PARK INSPIRATION DAY SPA $$

neck, back and shoulders, prenatal, reflexology, shiatsu, Swedish), facials (inspiration, rose quartz, age perfecting, collagen veil mask, microdermabrasion), body treatments (Hamman, green clay mud wrap, champagne, caramel chocolate sundae, journey to serenity, bronzing), waxing, hair salon, makeup and nail care. Special Features: The DNA CryoStemTM skin therapy system fuses the synergy of DermaNutraceutical technology with cryogenic bio-cell therapy to hydrate your skin. Integrate it into your day at the spa and take some home for later use. PERSONA DAY SPA $ 1166 El Camino Real (650) 328-2836 www.personadayspa-mp.com

Services: Facials (European, vitamin C, collagen, teen, men’s, glycolic), body treatments (botanical body buff, parafango firming and anti-cellulite series, back cleansing), massages (Swedish, reflexology, deep tissue), makeup, lash tinting and perming and waxing. Special Features: Marriage should not be taken lightly and neither should the wedding day. That’s why Persona Day Spa offers prewedding consultations on makeup application and, if needed, onlocation assistance on your big day. THERMAE DAY SPA $$$ 103 Gilbert Ave. (650) 8333131 www.thermaespa.com

Services: Massages (classic relaxing, deep tissue, hydrotherapy, lymphatic, maternity, warm soothing stone specialty, aromatherapy, neck, back and shoulder), facials (purifying/deep hydrating, oxygen, aromatherapy, anti-aging, vitamin C, teen, men’s, microdermabrasion), body treatments (exfoliating salt scrub, hydrating and healing mud wrap, detoxifying herbal wrap, hydrotherapy baths, nail care, waxing and makeup. Special Features: It’s not enough just to look great on the outside. Therma’s wellness center takes care of your inner being with services such as counseling, a 25-minute meditation session and personalized Ayurveda nutrition sessions (to help you understand what foods are best for you, according to your mind and body type).

MOUNTAIN VIEW AMERICAN MALE SALON $$$ 560 Showers Dr. (650) 9419994 www.americanmale.com

Services: Waxing, salon services, paraffin hand dips, foot and hand detailing, skin and back treatments, and massages (Swedish stress relief, deep tissue sports, reflexology). Special Features: American Male Salon offers a host of packages to help men look and feel great, such as the three-and-a-half-hour Ultimate American Male Combo that includes a Swedish massage, facial, hand and foot detailing plus a professional haircut.

325 Sharon Park Dr. (650) 854-5885 www.inspirationdayspa.com

Services: Massages (signature, deep tissue, heated desert stone,

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SPA

JUUT SALON SPA $$$

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PALO ALTO BEAUTY CLINICA $$$ 200 S. California Ave. (650) 326-3442 www.beautyclinica.com

Services: Massages (deep tissue, couples, aromatherapy, hot stone, maternity, lymphatic drainage. Swedish, Esalen), facials (clean and clear, European, urban defense, back, acne, aromaplasty, alpha glycolic, sensitive skin, hydrating, herbal peel, gentlemen’s, anti-aging, regulating, oxygen), hair removal, nail therapy, body treatments (de-stress aromatherapy body wrap, Dead Sea full body masque, passionfruit body salt rub and massage, anti-cellulite, aloe vera oil body wrap, sculptured firming treatment, aroma), hair salon, makeup and hair removal. Special Features: A trip to Beauty Clinica is like taking a mini vacation, without the hassle of traveling. Their wide range of full- and half-day packages, which comes with a healthy spa lunch, will leave you feeling on top of the world. Especially popular is the Half-Day Getaway, which includes a facial, massage, body treatment, manicure, pedicure and a hot spa lunch. BODY KNEADS $ 810 San Antonio Rd. (650) 852-0546 www.bodykneads-dayspa.com

Services: Massages (Swedish, aromatherapy, pregnancy, cranial sacral, hot stone, lymphatic drainage, reflexology, hot stone, shiatsu, sports), facials (European, express mini, alpha hydroxy, mini, men’s, teen, crystal peel, back, vitamin C, eye treatment), body treatments (Body Xcell, cellulite, aromatic bath), hair removal, nail care, hand and foot therapy, permanent makeup and tanning. Special Features: With Body Xcell, the use of gyratory vibration percussion stimulates and nourishes your skin and tissues to help dissolve fat and rid cellulite. DESTINO SPA $$$ 4335 El Camino Real (650) 947-0203 www.destinospa.net

Services: Massages (Gardenia aroma Swedish, shiatsu, prenatal, healing warm stone), facials (revitalizing pumpkin, caviar, pomegranate, collagen silk, Mandarin C aromatic, purification, men’s, tropical taste, radiant caviar, deep cleansing back), resurfacing treatments (microdermabrasion, advanced exfoliation, sugar and beta peels, lactic acid and green tea), spa rituals (Bali bliss, Sanur seaweed wrap, minty earth and sea mud wrap, lava purification wrap), feet therapy, body polishes, baths and soaks, waxing and makeup. Special Features: Feed your skin and senses with one of Destino’s appetizing treats. Try the Caramel Turtle Inspiration, which starts off with a dry brush exfoliation and delicious chocolate dip wrap. For something sweeter, have a go at Chocolate Chip Devotion, which includes a yummy chocolate chip scrub and strawberries-and-cream custom massage.

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240 University Ave. (650) 328-4067 www.juut.com

Services: Salon services, waxing, makeup, facials (basic, replenishing, Juut Spa, eye zone treatment), body treatments (aroma body wrap, salt glow, herbal back treatment) and nail services. Special Features: Get a cut and color at reduced prices from licensed professionals in the process of obtaining advanced training at Juut’s Roseville training location. LA BELLE DAY SPA $$$ www.labelledayspas.com 95 Town & Country Village (650) 327-6964 36 Stanford Shopping Center (650) 326-8522

Services: Massages (therapeutic, hot stone, lymphatic draining, post- and prenatal, Swedish), facials (Back on Top, Bye Bye Spots, custom peels, epicuren enzyme, five carat glow, La Belle royal touch, quick clean, quick exfoliation, sea meets stone, slim and lift), body treatments (Endermologie®, aromatic mud, wine and roses scrub), waxing, laser hair removal, Botox, salon services, nails, regular and permanent makeup. Special Features: Turn back the clock in just four hours with Timeless Radiance, the anti-aging spa package that combines a Forever Young Facial to minimize wrinkles and brighten and firm skin, and an invigorating full-body glycolic body exfoliation. Also, check out their extensive menu of services for men, which includes grooming and sports manicure and pedicure. SKINSPIRIT CLINIC AND SPA $$$ 701 Emerson St. (650) 3249600 www.skinspirit.com

Services: Botox, chemical peels, dermal fillers (collagen, Hylaform, Radiesse, Restylane), intense pulsed light, laser hair removal, Thermage, vein laser therapy, acupuncture, sclerotherapy, massages (Swedish, deep tissue, lymphatic drainage, La Stone, pre- and postnatal, cellulite therapy), facials (signature, clarifying, teen, vitamin C, oxygen, paprika, microdermabrasion), waxing, lash and brow tinting. Special Features: Treatment21TM is an entirely new way to relax – combine a specially designed skincare treatment with one of five therapeutic guided visualization journeys on a CD and listened to with headphones. WATERCOURSE WAY $$ 165 Channing Ave. (650) 462-2000 www.watercourseway.com

Services: Massages (aromatherapy, deep muscle, hot stone), facials (natural scrub, deep cleansing, moor therapy treatment, Hungarian paprika, organic, honey and yogurt, vitamin C, moisturizing, anti-stress, express, royal anti-aging, custom herbal peels), spa treatments (Red Flower Sento ritual, rain dance revitalizing skin treatment, moor therapy, salt glow, thermal seaweed wrap, Essensa’s 3D spa therapy), Ayurvedic rituals and foot treatment. Special Features: This relaxing retreat boasts nine private hot tub rooms with a range of décor and amenities, including multijetted spas, wood tubs, saunas, and cold plunges with steam rooms.

SAN JOSE SANDRA M. SKINCARE $$ 6110 Camino Verde Dr., Ste. 5, San Jose (408) 224-1223 www.sandramskincare.com

Services: Facials (clarifying mask treatment, specialty and therapeutic), corrective skincare (microdermabrasion, dermaplaning, glycolic peels, acne treatment, Sensi peel, power peel, pumpkin peel, oxygenating trio, ultra peel, PCA peel, Esthetique peel, rapid exfoliation), waxing, permanent makeup, sunless body glow treatment. Product lines (Jan Marini Skin Research, Youngblood Mineral Cosmetics, Revitalash). Special Features: Owner Sandra M. had 14 years of experience as a medical assistant before undertaking four years of study in the skincare field. 1240 SALON & SPA $$$ 1240 S. Bascom Ave. (408) 295-3886

Services: Waxing, facials (back, pumpkin, red wine, glycolic, enzyme, lymphatic drainage), microdermabrasion, nail services, salon services and hair extensions. Special Features: 1240’s vascular blemish removal treatment clears skin of broken blood vessels, spider veins and skin tags, leaving it smooth and blemish free. THE ALEXANDRIA SALON & SPA $$ 1346 The Alameda, Ste. 8 (408) 971-2926 www.thealexandriasalon.com

Services: Massages (aromatherapy, deep tissue, hot stone, Swedish, sports and chair), facials (mini, full, European, thermo-plastic mask, algo mask, sea C spa treatment, botinol, hydro lifting and collagen 90 II), waxing, threading, manicure, pedicure, body treatments (parafango wrap, back parafango for men, body shaping and firming, Dead Sea salt glow and purifying back treatment) and makeup. Special Features: All skin treatments include a complimentary makeup retouch featuring Glominerals cosmetics, also sold at Alexandria’s. ANGEL FACE DAY SPA $$ 833 S. Winchester Blvd. (408) 247-3223 www.angelfacedayspa.com

Services: Facials (hydrating, revitalizing, de-stressing, angel face, alpha hydroxy, back, gentlemen’s and teen), body treatments (European herbal wrap, European ocean glow, seaweed wrap, hair and scalp treatment), massages (Swedish, aromatherapy, deep tissue, acupressure) and makeup. Special Features: Angel Face offers specialty treatments like the Epicuren Enzyme Facial Treatment (natural enzymes, proteins and botanicals free of chemical preservatives, fragrances and colors) and the Micro Derma Facial, which uses a specially formulated microcrystal cream (that removes dry or damaged cells) to achieve results similar to that of a microdermabrasion machine.

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HEALTH&BEAUT Y: SPA PROFILES

Oxygen Bar

Purify Your Body of daily toxins with our New Detox for Life

Great Personalized Hair Cuts

Hair Treatments

Coming Soon: Therapeutic Massage Teeth Whitening

Free Shoe Shine (with any service) Lupe Fiasco visits Foxy

Total Men's Skin Care

Call 408.371.CLIPS or Walk-ins are available

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ATELIER AVEDA LIFESTYLE SALON AND SPA $$ 378 Santana Row, Ste. 1120 (408) 244-4222 www.atelieraveda.com

Services: Facials (botanical skin resurfacing, men’s, self renewal), body treatments (Caribbean therapy, back), treatment enhancers, waxing, tinting, hair salon and makeup. Special Features: All hair services begin with a consultation to determine what procedures are best for you, based on your lifestyle, face shape, hair texture and length. Hair color consultations are based on hair color wheels that are used as calculation tools to find the best shade for your natural color from Aveda’s exclusive products. AYOMA LIFESPA $$$ 355 Santana Row, Fifth Floor (408) 423-5424 www.ayomalifespa.com

Services: Massages (traditional Kerala sports massage, four-handed Ayuverdic massage, aromatic herbal oil, traditional Indian), waxing, hand and feet therapy, facials (Soundarya deep cleansing, Mukhralepa Ayurvedic herbal), body treatments and wellness plans. Special Features: This restful haven in Hotel Valencia is the only Ayurvedic (a 5,000-year-old healing system from India) wellness spa in the Bay Area, and offers consultations and custom spa packages. BELLA BELLA SALON $$ 2688 Union Ave. (408) 559-4247

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Services: Massages (one hour full body, Swedish and deep tissue), nail treatments, permanent makeup, hair treatments, waxing, and facials (European, time saver, paraffin wax and dermalyse). Special Features: This familyowned business boasts its own Vidal Sassoon stylist and beautician who studied in New York and Europe.

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PROFILES

BURKE WILLIAMS SPA $$$ 355 Santana Row, Ste. 2010 (408) 241-0071 www.burkewilliamsspa.com

Services: Massages (pure relaxation, deep tissue/sports, pregnancy, traditional Japanese shiatsu, Swedish/shiatsu combo, reflexology, Thai, Reiki, lymphatic, cranial sacral), facials (spa style, nourishing, oxygen, organic enzymes, microdermabrasion, back), signature treatments (Hunter’s retreat, Savannah’s surrender, salt glo, body wash, parafango), waxing, body wraps (thermal seaweed, detox/ calming, Calistoga getaway), handand-foot therapy and hair salon. Special Features: If you’re looking to host a business meeting or office party with a twist, Burke Williams has conference room and party facilities. After that, wash away work stress in one of their luxurious spa baths (herbal, seaweed, milk and mud). DOLCE VITA DAY SPA & SALON $$ 630 N. First St. (408) 287-0200 www.dolcevitaspa.com

Services: Massages (Swedish, aromatherapy, pre- and postnatal, Shiatsu, deep tissue, reflexology, foot, hot stone), facials (express, deep cleansing, oxy-vital, hydrating, botanical Botox, glycolic acid peel), body treatments (micro-buff body polish, sea salt, aromatherapy, moor mud, detoxifying seaweed, cellulite body wrap), manicures, pedicures, hair salon, makeup and waxing. Special Features: Detoxify and hydrate their skin with water therapies, like the purifying steam sauna and the balneotherapy aroma bath. FACE FORWARD SKINCARE $$ 1610 Blossom Hill Rd., Ste. 3 (408) 206-2426 www.faceforwarskincare.com

Services: Massages (Swedish, structural/deep tissue, side lying), body treatments (bust and décolleté, salt glow, seaweed body wrap, desert heat body wrap), chemical peels, postsurgical treatments (Silico-Lipid mask, CCH mask),

facials (European, deep pore, express, luminous C and sea, plantomer, antifree radical, rosacea), waxing and microdermabrasion. Special Features: Personalized service, value pricing, flexible hours, and results-oriented products and services, along with the revolutionary illumiMed® LED system that rejuvenates the skin and reduces the appearance of cellulite, make Face Forward a great find. JASKIRAN $ 2833 Riedel Rd. (408) 309-1090

Services: Massages (hands and feet, feet only, traditional Indian head), facials (refreshing and hydrating, deep pore cleansing, acne, anti-aging peptide resurfacing peel, enzyme, back), body wraps (salt glow, enzymatic sea mud), spa packages (Renewal, Restoration, Promenade the Spa, Maternity Spa Day), hair removal, threading, lash and brow tint and makeup. Special Features: If you’re looking for more pampering to go with a facial, ask for one of these add ons: foot remedy, hand and wrist massage, glycolic hand peel or paraffin treatment for hands and feet. Jaskiran also offers henna tattoo applications. LA CONCHA SPA $$$ 1042 Lincoln Ave. (408) 286-8612 www.laconchaspa.com

Services: Massages (Swedish, shiatsu, deep tissue, carpal tunnel syndrome, foot reflexology, prenatal, sports, chair, Reiki, lymphatic drainage), facials (Fruitopia, hydrating, deep cleansing, regenerating, acne, glycolic, back), mineral and herbal oil baths, body scrubs and wraps, tanning, cellulite treatments, manicures, pedicures, hand and foot therapy, hair salon and makeup. Special Features: Heaven has a name and it’s the Grand Escape Spa Package. For $760, a couple gets seven hours of aromatherapy sauna, body scrub, choice of baths, full facial, one-hour massage, lunch, manicure, pedicure. TW


HEALTH&BEAUT Y: SPA PROFILES

HERBOLOGY • DIETETICS • ACUPUNCTURE • ENERGETICS • MASSAGE

F How Acupuncture Heals

For a quarter century Five Branches University Medical Centers have provided safe, effective medical care for over 80% of your healthcare needs.

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Since 1984, Five Branches University Medical Centers have offered quality healthcare you can trust

Five BraNches university medical centers Quarter Century of Excellence in Healthcare & Education Santana Row Medical Clinic 3031 Tisch Way, San Jose ■ (408) 260-8868

Beach Harbor Medical Clinic 200 7th Avenue, Santa Cruz ■ (831) 476-8211

Health Insurance • Medi-Cal • Personal Injur y • Visa/MC

Infertility

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FREE T R E AT M E N T For New Patients Some restrictions apply. Expires August 25, 2008.

HE A LT H & BE AU T Y

THEWAVEMAG.COM JUNE 30 - JULY 13, 2008

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» FEATURE

ST YL E & SHOPPING

Style&Shopping

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Shading with Color These frames are so bright, you gotta wear shades. BY JO ABBIE

T

hings are getting bright this season – and we’re not talking about the sun. The iconic fashion accessory we use to shield our eyes from the sun’s glare (and of course, to look cool) has become bigger, bolder and brighter than ever before. Sunglasses that have emerged as the most popular styles in recent years – namely, Ray-Ban’s classic Wayfarer and the timeless aviator frame – not only remain at the top of this season’s hot list, but are available in more than just the traditional shades of black and brown, silver and gold. Think aviators in cool white or hot pink, perhaps with a stripe of color, or any and every color of the rainbow – often paired with

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correspondingly colored lenses in a gradual tint. As for the Wayfarer, the iconic style was reintroduced by Ray-Ban in 2007 due to popular demand, which began when trendsetters including Chloë Sevigny and Kate Moss began sporting the vintage frames. While Wayfarers have been hip before – they were first made famous in the ’60s when worn by such luminaries as Audrey Hepburn, Bob Dylan and Andy Warhol, and again in the ’80s in Risky Business – they have never been this colorful. Ray-Ban recently released the Colorize Wayfarer range, with the original frames now available in a multitude of colors (aqua, cobalt blue, camo green, two-tone, clear and more). If you’re not into the bold colors, fear not – you can go bold with size. The oversized sunglasses that have become ubiquitous of late are still around and as big as ever, with exaggerated, Jackie O-inspired frames, ’70s-style flourishes or the large lenses of shieldlike styles that protect you from the sun’s rays (or the onslaught of the paparazzi). This season, many of the gigantic, movie-star style shades are also seeing the addition of crystals for extra glamour.

» FEATURE » FASHION

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Whether you choose clear, white or brightly colored frames, classic Wayfarers in crayon colors, darkly tinted oversized shades or glittering accents – all it takes is a pair of frames to look dazzling this summer. TW WHERE TO BUY Bloomingdales, 1 Stanford Shopping Center, Palo Alto (650) 463-2000 www.bloomingdales.com H&M, 334 Santana Row, Ste. 1095, San Jose (408) 246-7682; Great Mall, 447 Great Mall Dr., Milpitas www.hm.com Ray-Ban, go to www.ray-ban.com or buy at www.sunglasshut.com Sunglass Hut, Westfield Valley Fair, 2855 Stevens Creek Blvd., Santa Clara (408) 244-0788; for other locations, go to www.sunglasshut.com Urban Outfitters, 355 Santana Row, Ste. 1050, San Jose (408) 244-3329 www.urbanoutfitters.com 01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09

Ray-Ban Wayfarer in aqua, $139 from Bloomingdales Urban Outfitters Striped aviator in hot pink/white, $18 Ray-Ban Wayfarer 2140 in color 958, $139 Ray-Ban Wayfarer 2140 in color 966, $139 Gucci Women’s fashion shield with crystal logo, $375 from Bloomingdales Ray-Ban Wayfarer 2140 in color 967 3F, $139 H&M Women’s ’70s-style, $9.90 H&M Men’s white, $6.90 Gucci Men’s black with flex steel temples, $290 from Bloomingdales


ST YLE&SHOPPING: FEATURE

SV

FASHION

» FASHION

Bella James

BOUTIQUES

Alta 1342 Lincoln Ave., San Jose (408) 288-5940; 701 Laurel St., San Carlos (650) 596-9599; 779 Santa Cruz Ave., Menlo Park (650) 326-7390; 130 N. Santa Cruz Ave., Los Gatos (408) 354-0069 Alta has been carrying original contemporary clothing and accessories for the past 25 years. Visit any of their four locations and experience the excitement.

Amy B. Boutique Corner Stone Shopping Center, 15994 Los Gatos Blvd., Los Gatos (408) 358-8600 Exceptional men’s and women’s contemporary clothing and accessories from Ted Baker, Diane Von Furstenberg, Oliver Peoples, James Perse, Vince and Paige Denim.

Bella James 1165 Lincoln Ave., San Jose (408) 292-0000 350 E. Campbell Ave., Campbell (408) 866-9000 www.bellajames.com Located in the Garden Theatre in Willow Glen and now in downtown Campbell, Bella James features inspiring and affordable contemporary women’s clothing and accessories, including Michael Stars, Joe’s Jeans, Havaianas, Free People, Hudson, Citizens and more.

IBI Boutique 1231 Franklin Mall, Santa Clara (408) 261-2050 www.ibiboutique.com IBI Boutique is the modern woman’s dream closet! They have a large selection of women’s clothing, accessories, footwear, jewelry and handbags. Located right in Franklin Square across from the Santa Clara Post Office.

Kitsch Couture 20490 Saratoga-Los Gatos Rd., Saratoga (408) 8721104 www.kitschcouture.com At Kitsch Couture, they want fashion to capture your individuality. They have transformed a quaint historic church into a wonderfully distinct contemporary boutique, featuring an eclectic mix of fashion-forward pieces, unique accessories and gifts. Customers often leave saying “There truly is something for everyone.” Brands include Free People, T-Bags, Trina Turk, Kensie and Michael Stars.

Signature Lifestyle 519 E. Campbell Ave., Campbell (408) 370-3433 www.myspace.com/signaturelifestyle Features casual clothing for young guys and gals, with a large selection of accessories at very affordable prices. Complimentary gift wrapping is also available.

Ursula’s Boutique 140 W. Main St., Ste. B, Los Gatos (408) 395-1400 The wide range of clothing and styles at Ursula’s Boutique will have you dressed for any event. With an array of jewelry, handbags and accessories, Ursula’s Boutique is all you need to complete your outfit. LINGERIE

Dutchess Intimates Boutique 346 E. Campbell Ave., Campbell (408) 866-8006 www.dutchessboutique.com Dutchess specializes in fine lingerie, bras, panties and accessories at affordable prices. Visit their brand new boutique in downtown Campbell for something sweet or sexy. Private party hosting available.

TO HAVE YOUR BUSINESS LISTED IN SVGUIDE: FASHION, CALL

(408) 467-3200

July 4th Celebration! Friday, July 4th Milpitas Sports Center 1325 E. Calaveras Blvd.

ST Y L E & SHOPPING

Milpitas celebrates our country’s Independence Day with a day of water fun in the pools and an evening of music & ground fireworks on the football field.

Pool Party 1:00-5:00 pm Concert & Ground Fireworks 8:00 pm (gates open at 7:30 pm) Fireworks at 9:30 pm Please Note: No alcohol, glass containers or dogs/animals are allowed. No BBQing/tailgating. Personal fireworks are illegal in Milpitas.

(408) 586-3210 THEWAVEMAG.COM JUNE 30 - JULY 13, 2008

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» FEATURE

Home&Design

» FEATURE » COLUMN: HOME WORK

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that’s the right thing, but maybe it’s not that right.’ So, with our solar lease program, we’ve made it possible for homeowners and businesses to save money from day one.” Rive adds that the zero-down deal is a promotional offer that ends at the end of July. After that, SolarCity will probably ask for $1,000 or $2,000 up front. And what of homeowners who would prefer to forgo the leasing program and simply pay for their solar system up front? According to Blunden, such customers can expect to spend between $15,000 and $35,000, after incentives. These incentives, which include a $2,000 federal tax credit and a 20-percent to 25-percent rebate via the California Solar Initiative, will often cover somewhere between a quarter and a third of the cost of the system. SunPower also offers financing through its dealers, so customers have the option of paying for the system over the course of its life. “What that means is that the amount of electricity that you’re saving per month can often be more than the cost of financing your system each month, so you become cash-flow positive,” Blunden explains.

The Falling Cost of Solar It’s never been easier, or cheaper, to go solar. BY DAMON ORION

HOME & DESIGN

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ith the cost of electricity currently rising into uncharted realms, interest in domestic use of solar power is at an all-time high. At present, more than 20,000 Northern California homes in PG&E’s territory are equipped with solar electrical systems, and that number is growing at an increasingly rapid rate. To give you an idea of just how high the demand for home solar electrical systems has become, the folks at SunPower, a San Jose-based solar provider that claims to have the highest-efficiency solar panels in the world, are actually finding their manufacturing held back due to the limited total amount of silicon in the world (the majority of solar cells are made using semiconductorgrade silicon). Last year, the company manufactured 100 megawatts of solar cells; this year, they’re making more than 250 megawatts to meet the growing public demand. According to Julie Blunden, SunPower’s vice president of public policy and corporate communications, in the year 2010, the company will be making six and a half times the amount of solar cells they made last year. While lower electricity bills aren’t the sole catalyst for the current solar power boom, they definitely make solar conversion all the more appealing. SunPower customer Sueling Cho says that before she equipped her Los Gatos

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home with solar technology, her summertime bill soared as high as $300 per month. Now it’s closer to $40. “And, I mean, I am a Sierra Club member, so it’s always, you know, hug those little green bunnies,” she jokes. According to Mari Gruner of Cobalt Power Systems Inc., a Mountain View company that mainly services residential units in Santa Clara and San Mateo counties, a customer with a four-kilowatt solar electric system (an average-sized system here in California) who currently pays $165 per month for electricity can lower their bill to $30 a month – a savings of 82 percent. That customer will save $1,620 annually, which amounts to $105,000 over the course of 25 years. Sweetening the deal for some solar homeowners is PG&E’s residential E-6 rate, which allows customers to “sell back” their unused energy for credit during peak hours. This system works best for residents who are out of the house all day, as opposed to those who have active lifestyles at home during the daylight hours. Of course, talk of saving money is great, but not everyone has the cash required to install a solar electrical system. Thankfully, a slew of local businesses have risen to the 60-Day Solar Challenge issued by San Jose Mayor Chuck Reed on Apr. 9, which called on local solar companies to come up with ways for San Jose homeowners to go solar without paying any money down. Companies that responded to the callout include SunPower/REgrid, SolarCity, Power Solutions, StablSolar, Horizon Energy Systems, BEohana Solar and REC Solar. “Historically, the biggest barrier to adoption [of solar power] has been people looking to do the right thing, and then realizing that the right thing is going to cost them $20,000,” offers Lyndon Rive, CEO of Foster Citybased SolarCity. “All of a sudden, you go, ‘You know,

Money aside, how much environmental degradation can the owner of a solar home hope to prevent? According to Christopher Masys, Northern California sales manager for REC Solar, Inc. – the San Luis Obispo company that bills itself as a “full-service, turnkey designer and installer of solar electric systems” – over the course of 30 years, a single six-kilowatt system can spare the planet 376,000 pounds of CO2 emissions, 950 pounds of smog emissions, nearly 2,000 pounds of acid-rain-causing emissions, and the approximate equivalent of 538 barrels of oil being burned. By comparison, the average American car would emit about the same amount of fumes by driving 470,000 miles over the same period of time. Blunden says she had a home solar electrical system installed about two months ago. “I just happened to be looking at my inverter over the weekend, because I’m a solar aficionado,” she chuckles. “It told me that I’d avoided a full ton of carbon.” Masys notes that the effects of domestic solar power extend beyond both the financial and the environmental. “In the future – the near future, I might add – we’re looking at plug-in hybrids and full electric vehicles,” he states. “So if we can produce all of our own electricity and run our vehicles off that, not only are we having a positive environmental effect in terms of reducing greenhouse gases and pollution, but we’re also increasing our own energy independence in this country.” TW LOCAL SOLAR COMPANIES Akeena Solar (888) 253-3628 www.akeena.net BEohana Solar (408) 245-2280 www.beohanasolar.com Cobalt Power Systems Inc. (650) 938-9574 www.cobaltpower.com Horizon Energy Systems (408) 978-0111 www.gosolarnow.com Power Solutions (408) 998-7400 www.solutionsforpower.com REC Solar (888) OK-SOLAR www.recsolar.com REgrid Power (888) 2-REGRID www.regrid.com SolarCity (888) SOL-CITY www.solarcity.com StablSolar, LLC (408) 778-4567 www.stablsolar.com SunPower (877) SUN-0123 www.sunpowercorp.com Sun Run (877) SUN-MOJO www.sunrunhome.com


City living made easy with up to $60,000 assistance on a new home!* With prices and interest rates so low in this terrific buyers market, now is YOUR time to buy! For a limited time, City Heights and The Works have special programs available to help you fulfill your dream of home ownership.*

The Works is the ultimate in city living. You'll feel at home the moment you walk through the door. From the tree-lined exterior to the modern sophistication within, the Works combines style and function to bring you Silicon Valley’s value-packed home ownership opportunity. Close to San Jose State University.

City Heights is attainable urban living at its finest. Relax in the comfort of your home with the dramatic views or take advantage of the conveniences of City life. With modern interiors and a location in the heart of Downtown San Jose, City Heights is designed to make urban living civilized.

WIN A PENTHOUSE! Ask us how!

125 Patterson St., San Jose, Open weekdays by appointment, Sat-Sun 12-5 408.288.8826 • TheWorksSanJose.com

175 W. St. James Place, San Jose, Open daily: 10am-5pm 408.286.2489 • CityHeightsSanJose.com

*Down payment supplied by the City of San Jose down payment assistance program. Income restrictions apply. Call sales agent for details. Different programs apply. Prices, term and availability subject to change without notice. Exclusively represented by Pacific Marketing Associates.


HOME&DESIGN: HOME WORK

HOME&DESIGN » COLUMN: HOME WORK

HOME

WORK

Check your breaks. Discounts up to 35%. Switch to State Farm® and you could save big with one of our many discounts. Hurry in (but don’t speed).

HOME & DESIGN

Yvonne Kendall, Agent Insurance Lic. #: 0E18170 281 East Hamilton Avenue Campbell, CA 95008-0232 Bus: 408-371-8181 Fax: 408-371-8195 www.yvonnekendall.com

Star-Spangled Setting statefarm.com

P060393 12/06 P0XXXXX 1/06

State Farm Mutual Automobile Insurance Company, State Farm Indemnity Company – Bloomington, IL

®

This Fourth of July, set a stellar table with star-stamped placemats. BY JENNIFER & KITTY O’NEIL WHAT YOU’LL NEED ( MAKES FOUR PLACEMATS )

4 bamboo placemats 2 cork wall tiles, 12 inches by 12 inches (available at office supply stores) ¼-inch thick plywood square, 10 inches by 10 inches ¼-inch thick plywood square, 6 inches by 6 inches 46

THEWAVEMAG.COM JUNE 30 - JULY 13, 2008

Wood glue White chalk X-Acto knife Masking tape FolkArt craft paint, Cardinal Red, 2 fluid ounces Small foam paintbrush Paper plate Newspaper

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hether it’s your annual July Fourth celebration or just a night of food and friends under the stars, these bamboo placemats are a simple way to add a touch of star quality to your backyard barbecue. Just cut large stars out of cork wall tiles, mount them on scraps of plywood and start stamping. Whether you need four or 40, these placemats are fast and fabulous.

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HOME&DESIGN: HOME WORK

Is this the new coffee table?

Own Cool Furniture That Makes You Feel Proud For Less Than You’ll Pay For Furniture-In-A-Box.

Really? New Stock Every Day All at Consignment Prices SAN MATEO

MOUNTAIN VIEW

SARATOGA

650-577-8979

650-964-7212

408-871-8890

1888 South Norfork

141 E. El Camino Real

600 El Paseo De Saratoga

SAN RAFAEL 415-456-2765 863 E. FRANCISCO

DANVILLE 925-866-6164 1901 CAMINO RAMON (behind Marshall’s)

Additional Locations in Roseville, Folsom, Laguna Niguel, Yorba Linda, Foothill Ranch, Newport Beach, CA. Austin,TX. Las Vegas, NV.

HOME & DESIGN

THEWAVEMAG.COM JUNE 30 - JULY 13, 2008

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HOME&DESIGN: HOME WORK

HOME&DESIGN HOME 46

WORK masking tape. Protect your work surface with newspaper and squeeze the red craft paint onto a paper plate. Use the foam brush to dab the paint onto the surface of the large star stamp.

Step One To make the large star stamp, draw a 9-inch star on a cork tile with chalk. For the small star stamp, draw a 5inch star on a cork tile with chalk. Carefully cut out the stars with the XActo knife. Glue each cork star rough side down onto the corresponding plywood square with the wood glue. Weigh down the stamps with books and let set for 30 minutes.

Step Three Immediately stamp the bamboo placemat with the large star stamp over the lower right-hand corner so that part of the design runs off the edge. Repeat with the small and large stamps to create the three-star design. Use the same technique to stamp all four placemats, alternating the stars for an artsy look. TW TIPS

Step Two

HOME & DESIGN

If the bamboo placemats have fabric trim on the edges, cover the fabric with

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Land of the Free: For small pieces of plywood, find the scrap pile at your local improvement store. Be sure to ask, but usually the little pieces are free. Love American Style: Pledge your allegiance to the flag by making striped placemats to accompany the stars. Make a “stripe� stamp by cutting a strip of cork and mounting it on a piece of wood, then stamp some placemats with blue stripes.


HOME&DESIGN: HOME WORK

ALL WORLD F U R N ITU R E

MODERN FURNITURE & MORE ! 981 Stockton Ave. San Jose, CA 95110 Showroom Hours: 11am - 8pm 7 days a week 408-292-6833 www.allworldfurniture.com

also SHOP ONLINE ! allworldfurniture@yahoo.com

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July 4, 5 & 6

Pack up the Family for Old-Fashioned Fun! • Classic Motorcycle Show Sunday, July 6 only! • Sack Races • Water Balloon Toss • Hula Hoop Contests • Volleyball, Softball and more • Frog Flume Race • Chuckwagon Barbeque • Steam Trains to Bear Mountain • Beach Trains to Santa Cruz

831-335-4484 • www.roaringcamp.com Felton, Santa Cruz County, CA Six miles north of Santa Cruz on Graham Hill Road

St rol l . Brows e . E njoy.

David D. Bohannon Organization

www.menloparkchamber.com

Nirvana for the Festival Lover Les R. Koonce

July 19-20, 10am-6pm Santa Cruz Avenue, Menlo Park s#ONTEMPORARY!RT&INE#RAFTS s&ABULOUS&OOD7INE s2EFRESHING-ARGARITAS -ICROBREWS s$RAEGERS7ORLD #LASS#OOKING $EMOS s/RGANIC!LLEY3AMPLES4REATS s"URTS"EESh"EE UTIFY9OUR7ORLDv &REE(AND-ASSAGESAND3AMPLES

s,IVE2OCKN2OLL "LUES *AZZ 0ARTY-USIC s3ATURDAY!FTER (OURS#ONCERT 7ITH$OUBLE&UNK#RUNCH TOPMIN&REMONT0ARK

s#APTIVATING+IDS&UN:ONE s#OOL#ITY %CO &RIENDLY&ESTIVAL s!MPLE"ICYCLE0ARKING s!DMISSIONIS&REE

I n f o - l i n e : 6 5 0 - 3 2 5 - 2 8 1 8 | w w w. m i r a m a r e v e n t s . c o m

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MON 6/30

TUE 7/1

WED 7/2

THU 7/3

FRI 7/4

SAT 7/5

SUN 7/6

MON 7/7

TUE 7/8

WED 7/9

THU 7/10

FRI 7/11

SAT 7/12

SUN 7/13

Red Bull US Grand Prix

J U N E 3 0 - J U LY 1 3 , 2 0 0 8

Your timely guide to the next two weeks in Silicon Valley entertainment.

Coldplay 50 WAYS TO LEAVE YOUR SOFA » EVENT LISTINGS

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DINING

» FEATURE » HOT SPOTS » CATERING

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NIGHTLIFE & MUSIC

» » » » »

FEATURE HEADLINERS WINE TASTING & MORE CD RELEASES ALBUM REVIEWS

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MOVIES & TV » INTERVIEW

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ARTS

» FEATURE » EVENT LISTINGS » COLUMN: HOT TICK ET

78 80 81

FAMILY & COMMUNITY » » » »

FEATURE EVENT LISTINGS FARMERS MARK ETS WEDDING PL ANNING

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50 Ways Bang Beat and Tainted Love, followed by an amazing pyrotechnics display: 1 - 9:30pm 8. INDEPENDENCE DAY ON THE USS HORNET Pier 3, Alameda www.uss-hornet.org

July 4: Spend the day aboard the carrier USS Hornet, enjoying ongoing tours, live music from The Unauthorized Rolling Stones, The Cocktail Monkeys, The Replay Band, Romano Marchetti Orchestra and Starboard Watch, along with games, beer and wine, great food and a wonderful view of fireworks. 9. FOURTH OF JULY ALL CITY PICNIC AND FIREWORKS EXTRAVAGANZA Central Park, 969 Kiely Blvd., Santa Clara (408) 615-3140 santaclara.ca.gov/events/fourthof-july.html

July 4: Bring the whole family for a day filled with carnival rides, a petting zoo, face painting, live music, great food, activities for the kids, patriotic music and fireworks. 10. MIDNIGHT MOVIE MADNESS

50 WAYS

TUESDAY

THURSDAY

FRIDAY

1. SAN FRANCISCO GIANTS vs. CHICAGO CUBS

3. 17TH ANNUAL TAHITI FETE OF SAN JOSE

5. SAN JOSE AMERICA FESTIVAL

AT&T Park, 24 Willie Mays Plaza, San Francisco www.sfgiants.com

San Jose State University Event Center, 290 S. Seventh St. San Jose www.tahitifete.com

San Carlos St. & Woz Way, San Jose www.americafestival.com

July 1 - 3: Before you make any Cubs jokes, remember that the Giants have a worse record than the team from Wrigley Field. Okay, now go back to making Cubs jokes.

July 3 - 6: Tahitian dance companies from Hawaii, California, Mexico, Japan, Canada and, of course, Tahiti, descend on San Jose for the annual French Polynesian celebration of Bastille Day.

7/2

WEDNESDAY 2. ALL THE GREAT BOOKS (ABRIDGED) San Jose Repertory Theatre, 101 Paseo de San Antonio, San Jose www.sjrep.com

July 2 - 20: It’s a laughable romp as you take a 90-minute whirlwind ride through some of the world’s greatest literature. 52

4. MOVIES ON THE SQUARE: INDEPENDENCE DAY

Courthouse Sqaure, 2200 Broadway St., Redwood City www.redwoodcity.org/events/ movieschedule.html

July 3: Pack up the whole family and head to Courthouse Square to enjoy a free outdoor showing of Independence Day on a 25-foot inflatable screen: 8:45pm

THEWAVEMAG.COM JUNE 30 - JULY 13, 2008

July 7 - 8: Enjoy a wonderful dinner at the scenic Mountain Winery, followed by some rockin’ tunes from Boston: 5:30pm

7/9

WEDNESDAY 14. AMERICAN IDOLS LIVE HP Pavilion, 525 W. Santa Clara St., San Jose www.hppsj.com

15. CINEMA SAN PEDRO SQUARE

7/5

July 9 - August 27: Bring your blanket and beanbag and enjoy great movies in the great outdoors! Screenings begin at dusk. July 9 feature is American Graffiti.

July 5: What could be better than seeing Stevie Wonder live in concert? NOTHING!

7/4

Mountain Winery, Saratoga www.mountainwinery.com

July 4 - 5: You better take a nap during the day, so you can stay up all night watching Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas, TWICE!: Midnight

Shoreline Amphitheatre, One Amphitheatre Pkwy., Mountain View www.livenation.com

7/3

13. BOSTON

July 9: Join the country’s greatest manufactured stars as they bring their live show – minus Simon Cowell – to the HP Pavilion!: 7pm

SATURDAY

7/1

7/7

MONDAY

Camera 7, 1875 S. Bascom Ave. Campbell; Camera 12, 201 S. Second St., San Jose www.cameracinemas.com

11. AN EVENING WITH STEVIE WONDER

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something for you. Head over to the Edison Theater in Fremont and enjoy an evening of silent films featuring The Busher (1919), Alkali Ike’s Auto (1911) and Saturday’s Lesson (1929), with Bruce Loeb on piano: 7:30pm

12. SATURDAY NIGHT SILENT MOVIES Edison Theater – Niles Essanay Silent Film Museum, 37417 Niles Blvd., Fremont www.nilesfilmmuseum.org

July 5: Are your Saturday nights becoming mundane? Well, we’ve got

July 4 - 6: Enjoy two stages of live music featuring Night Ranger, Greg Kihn and Starship, with cultural entertainment, arts & crafts from around the world, great food, activities for the kids and more!

San Pedro Square, S. San Pedro & W. Santa Clara Sts., San Jose www.sjdowntown.com

16. 32ND ANNUAL FOOTHILL COLLEGE WRITERS’ CONFERENCE Foothill College, 12345 El Monte Rd., Los Altos Hills www.foothill.edu/la/conference

July 9 - 13: If you’re a writer, or wannabe writer, this event is a must. The conference provides Foothill students and emerging writers in the Bay Area with the unique opportunity to work with established writers such as Kathleen de Azevedo, Dan Bellm, Denny Berthiaume, Bonnie Bonner, Andrea Hollander Budy and many more.

7/10

THURSDAY 17. THOROUGHLY MODERN MILLIE

San Mateo Performing Arts Center, 600 N. Delaware, San Mateo (650) 579-5565 www.broadwaybythebay.org

July 10 - 27: This Tony Awardwinning musical follows young country girl Millie to the Big Apple, where she embraces the fast and carefree world of the roaring ‘20s.

7/11 FRIDAY

18. LUCKY DUCK, THE MUSICAL

Bus Barn Theater, 97 Hillview Ave., Los Altos (650) 941-0551 www.busbarn.org

July11 - 26: The Los Altos Youth Theatre performs this Jillian Tobydirected musical about Serena, who goes from an ugly duckling to a beautiful swan. 19. EDDIE MONEY Santa Cruz Beach Boardwalk, 400 Beach St., Santa Cruz www.beachboardwalk.com

July 11: Eddie Money rocks the Boardwalk not once, but TWICE, with a show at 6:30pm and another at 8:30pm. 20. ROUGH CROSSING Dragon Theatre, 535 Alma St., Palo Alto www.dragonproductions.net

July 11 - August 3: Written by Tom Stoppard and directed by Dave Sikula, this production is being billed as “Stoppard’s version of a deliriously silly 1930s shipboard farce. “ [See Hot Ticket, page 81] 21. RALPHIE MAY Improv, 62 S. Second St., San Jose (408) 280-747

July 11 - 13: He’s big, fat and funny – what more could you want? 22. CHARLOTTE’S WEB

Clubberley Community Center Theatre, 4000 Middlefield Rd., Palo Alto (650) 329-2418

July 11 - 20: Journey to Zuckerman’s Farm as a spider’s skillful web weaving saves a charismatic pig from his almost certain demise. Featuring songs by the composer of Annie. 23. BABES IN ARMS

Montgomery Theatre, 271 S. Market St., San Jose (800) SAN-JOSE

July 11 - 20: The Children’s Musical Theatre San Jose puts on this production of a virtuous 1930s comedy about a group of teenagers that are left alone for two weeks so that they can stage their own production.

6. SAN JOSE GIANTS FIREWORKS EXTRAVAGANZA Municipal Stadium, 588 E. Alma Ave., San Jose www.sjgiants.com

July 4 - 5: Bring the whole family and watch some great baseball, and on the Fourth, enjoy a fabulous pyrotechnics display: 6:30pm 7. PIER 39 JULY FOURTH CELEBRATION Pier 39, Beach St. & The Embarcadero, San Francisco www.pier39.com

July 4: Listen to live music from Big

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50 WAYS TO LEAVE YOUR SOFA

7/12

39. CHEFS WHO CARE Aldo Los Altos, 388 Main St., Los Altos (650) 961-3584 www.csacares. org/html/chefs_who_care.html

SATURDAY

July 14 - 15: Enjoy a fantastic prixfixe dinner at Aldo and help raise needed funds, with 50 percent of all proceeds benefiting the Community Services Agency Food & Nutrition Center: 5:30 - 7:30pm

24. FIRST ANNUAL BIG BANDS & BBQ FESTIVAL Campbell Ave., near Third & Railway Sts., Campbell (408) 866-5888 www.downtowncampbell.com

7/15

July 12: Enjoy big dance bands, dancing, artisan booths, DJs, four stages of live music from Papa Hugs, Marcus Shelby’s Big Band, Lavay Smith and the Red Hot Skillet Lickers, House Rockers and, of course, fantastic barbecue: 2 - 9pm

MONDAY

40. HEALTH & HAPPINESS 2008

25. 29TH ANNUAL LOS ALTOS ARTS & WINE FESTIVAL

Hyatt Regency, 5001 Great America Pkwy., Santa Clara www.events.artofliving.org/ hh2008

Downtown Los Altos Main & State Sts. www.losaltos-downtown.org

July 12 - 13: Live music, children’s activities, fine wine, gourmet food and don’t forget the wonderful art!: 10am - 6pm 26. OBON FESTIVAL Mountain View Buddhist Temple, Mountain View (650) 964-9426 www.jtown.org

July 12 - 13: Tour the temple and take part in games and activities, a cultural bazaar, exhibits, dancing, music, raffles and, of course, great food. 27. FLOWER ARRANGING 101 Guadalupe River Park & Gardens Visitor & Education Center, 438 Coleman Ave., San Jose (408) 298-7657 www.grpg.org

July 12: Okay, it’s summer and you have a backyard full of beautiful flowers, so now what? We’ll tell you. Join master gardeners Milli Wright and Bette Lloyd as they show you how to create the most wonderful flower arrangements: 1:30 - 3:30pm 28. TEDDY BEAR FESTIVAL San Francisco Zoo, One Zoo Rd., San Francisco www.sfzoo.org

29. 28TH ANNUAL SAN JOSE BODYBUILDING, FITNESS & FIGURE CHAMPIONSHIPS South Hall (408) 238-7413 www.paullovesvproductions.com

July 12: World-class bodybuilders take to the stage in Downtown San Jose competing for the coveted title of Mr. San Jose, with the winner being invited to the United States Bodybuilding Championships. The championship features men, women and teenage competitors, along with IFBB Mr. Olympia Ronnie Coleman and IFBB Iron Man Tony Freeman: 10:30am 30. SEVENTH ANNUAL BREAK DANCING FUNDRAISER Alum Rock Youth Center, 137 N. White Rd., San Jose (408) 2515757 www.myspace.com/miavie

July 12: Hey, all you B-Girls and

30 Boys, it’s time to see what you got! Take part in this 3 vs. 3 break dancing competition, with all proceeds going towards the Alum Rock Youth Center: 7 - 11pm 31. CIRQUE DE LA BASTILLE: UNDER THE BIG TOP! Santana Row, Winchester & Stevens Creek Blvds., San Jose (408) 551-4611 www.santanarow.com

July 12 - 13: Everyone is invited to come and celebrate Bastille Day with an exciting three-ring circus, French poodle parade, wine tastings, fashion shows and more! 32. SAN JOSE EARTHQUAKES vs. COLORADO RAPIDS Buck Shaw Stadium, 500 El Camino Real, Santa Clara www.sjearthquakes.com

July 12: Silicon Valley would like to welcome the Colorado Rapids to the Bay Area – along with their destruction at the hands of our mighty QUAKES: 1pm 33. RADIO CONTROLLED MODEL AIRSHOW Santa Clara County Model Aircraft Skypark, 10250 Monterey Rd., Morgan Hill airshow.sccmas.org

7/13 SUNDAY

35. NINTH ANNUAL STRANGERS BBQ & CAR SHOW Kelly Park, 1650 Senter Rd.,San Jose www.strangerscarclub.com

July 13: Check out some of the coolest pre-1965 hot rods and customs around, enjoy great music, browse art vendors, and if you bring meat, they’ll even barbecue it for you: 10am - 4pm 36. OAKLAND ATHLETICS vs. LOS ANGELES ANGELS McAfee Coliseum, 7000 Coliseum Way, Oakland www.oaklandathletics.com

July 13: How could going to an Oakland A’s game get better? Being one of the first 10,000 fans who will receive a Dave Stewart ‘80s replica jersey, that’s how!

7/14 MONDAY

July 12 - 13: The ultimate radio controlled model air show features miniature WWII fighters with real turbine jets, plus remotely operated race planes and helicopters, and a flying Snoopy’s doghouse: 9am -3pm

37. AIMEE MANN / MARC COHN

34. 16TH ANNUAL PALO ALTO CLAY & GLASS FESTIVAL

July 14: Visit Mountain Winery, where you’ll enjoy a fabulous meal, fabulous view and fabulous music from Aimee Mann and Marc Cohn: 5:30pm

The Palo Alto Art Center, 1313 Newell Rd., Palo Alto (650) 329-2366 www.acga.net

July 12 - 13: Join more than 180 artists for carving and wheelthrowing demonstrations, plus thousands of beautiful clay and glass pieces on display for your viewing pleasure and/or purchase: 10am - 5pm

Mountain Winery, 14831 Pierce Rd., Saratoga www.mountainwinery.com

38. BANK OF THE WEST CLASSIC TENNIS Taube Family Tennis Stadium, Campus Dr. & Sam McDonald Rd., Stanford www.bankofthewestclassic.com

July 14 - 20: Six days of exciting, hard-hitting women’s professional tennis, featuring Lindsey Davenport, Serena Williams, Sybille Bammer, Elena Dementieva and many others.

7/17

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THURSDAY 41. HAIR

City Lights Theater, 529 S. Second St., San Jose www.cltc.org

July 17 - August 24: Featuring such classic songs as “Aquarius,” “Good Morning, Starshine” and, of course, “Hair,” this musical set in the Vietnam War-era counterculture movement explores the draft, racism, psychedelic drugs, free love and more. 42. INTEL MUSEUM SERIOUS SUMMER FUN: SCHEMATICS, SWITCHES AND CIRCUITS The Intel Museum, 2200 College Blvd., Santa Clara (408) 7650503 www.intel.com/museum

July 17: Children ages nine and up will learn to decode schematics and understand basic circuitry as they work with wires, batteries and switches – kids even get to build a doorbell chime or a burglar alarm!

7/18 FRIDAY

43. 2008 RED BULL US GRAND PRIX Laguna-Seca, 1021 Monterey – Salinas Hwy., Salinas www.laguna-seca.com

July 18 - 20: Three days of the most intense motorcycle racing you’ll ever see, as world class riders tear around the Laguna road course at “ludicrous speeds.” You heard right: LUDICROUS! [See our Fan Guide, page TK] 44. BOY GEORGE The Grand at The Regency Center, Van Ness & Sutter, San Francisco www.ticketmaster.com

July 18: “Do You Really Want to Hurt Me,” “Karma Chameleon,” “Time” … enough said, see you there! 45. MUSIC@MENLO Various locations www.musicatmenlo.org

50 July 18 - August 8: Spend the WHOLE summer pampering yourself with performances of works by some of your favorite classical composers, such as Bach, Schubert, Bartok and many more! See website for additional dates and times.

7/19

SATURDAY 46. MOONLIGHT DINNER TRAIN Roaring Camp, Graham Hill Rd. & Mt. Hermon Rd., Felton www.roaringcamp.com

July 19, August 16, September 13, October 11: Moonlight dinner, dancing, and a train ride through a redwood forest lit by flashlight. Cowboy sing-along and marshmallow roasting at Bear Mountain. 47. 2007 CONNOISSEURS’ MARKETPLACE Santa Cruz Ave. at El Camino Real, Menlo Park www.pacificfinearts.com

July 19 - 20: A vibrant extravaganza of art, music, food, wine and allaround family fun: 10am - 6pm

48. THIRD ANNUAL REDWOOD CITY PAL BLUES & ART SQUARE FESTIVAL Washington Square, 2200 Broadway, Redwood City (650) 285-7719 www.palbluesfestival.com

July 19: Enjoy great blues music from Frank Bey, Craig Horton, Ron Thompson, Jan Fanucchi & Steve Freund, and many more, along with 40 art booths, food and tons of activities for kids: Noon - 8pm 49. CALIFORNIA EXTREME Parkside Hall, San Jose Convention Center, 180 Park Ave., San Jose www.caextreme.org

July 19 - 20: Spend two days dedicated to classic arcade games, along with tournaments, speakers and vendors, with the best part being ALL the games are set on FREE PLAY! 50. DOWNLOAD FESTIVAL Shoreline Theatre, One Amphitheatre Pkwy., Mountain View www.livenation.com

July 19: Upload hours of great music into your brainpod with a spectacular lineup that includes Brand New, Mates of State, M83, Cut Copy, Louis XIV, Rjd2, The Whigs, Tapes ‘n Tapes and many more!: 2pm TW

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50 WAYS

July 12 - 13: Every child 11 and under who brings a teddy bear to the zoo receives FREE admission and a full day of bear activities, including visiting grizzly bears and polar bears, making crafts and having fun!: 11am - 3pm

July 15 - 17: Join his holiness Sri Sri Ravi Shankar as he instructs you on the life changing (both physically and mentally)art of practicing yoga: 6 - 8pm


» FEATURE

Dining

» FEATURE » HOT SPOTS » CATERING

54 58 60

Jerk pork

JERK SAUCE

4 cups ketchup 1 tablespoon onion powder 1 tablespoon garlic powder 1 tablespoon ground allspice ½ cup soy sauce ½ cup brown sugar ½ cup cane vinegar ¼ - ½ minced habanero pepper (optional) Combine in small saucepan and simmer over low heat, stirring frequently until it is back to the original consistency of ketchup.

Grillin’ Low and Slow From seductively spicy to searingly hot, Jamaican jerk pork is a perfect dish for languid summer days. DINING

BY JOSIAH SLONE

W

hen I was a chef working in the Caribbean island of Jamaica, I spent my spare time traveling the countryside in search of great food. Jamaica has a long culinary tradition that has been passed down through generations, combining some of the indigenous flavors with those brought over by the African slaves, and later the Indian and Chinese indentured servants. Undeniably, the best known export of Jamaican cuisine is jerk cooking. Jerk is a moderately spiced to fiery marinade paste (or sometimes dry rub) applied to meat or fish (pork, chicken and small fish being the most common) and grill-smoked to perfection. I traveled to Port Antonio, “the home of jerk,” to taste some of the most traditional jerk pork. Half a pig is rubbed with, in this case, a super fiery marinade and then grilled very slowly over a huge pit sitting atop green allspice branches. The smoke and slow cooking yield a result that is succulent, smoky and searingly hot. (Thankfully, they also sold ice cold Red Stripe beer, of which I drank several.)

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It’s not always convenient to dig a pit and cook half a pig, so modernists often use a 55-gallon oil drum that is cut in half to form a “jerk pan” or covered barbecue. Often mounted on a cart, enterprising roadside vendors sell jerk pork, chicken and fish by the pound, accompanied by slices of dense and sweet bread known as hardo. There are almost as many jerk recipes as there are cooks in Jamaica, but they all share certain ingredients: allspice, scallions, thyme and scotch bonnet (same family as habanero) peppers. Other possible ingredients include ginger, garlic, cinnamon, cloves and soy sauce. While some jerk recipes can be mouthnumbingly hot, others tend to be more spiced, with the allspice and thyme taking center stage, punctuated by a spike of heat from the scotch bonnet pepper. Jerk chicken and fish are great, but in my opinion, jerk is all about the pork. For jerk, I like to use the cheap cuts: Tenderloins and loin chops are too lean for this

cooking method, and will end up dry. For me, the ultimate cut to use for jerk is a 1½-inch thick bone-in “shoulder chop.” You may have to go to a butcher who can cut it for you, but you won’t be disappointed. I would love to have a jerk pan for my backyard, but until then, a round Weber type barbecue works quite well, with a few minor modifications. The key is to ensure you can control the heat inside the barbecue. In my mind, good jerk pork can’t be rushed – low and slow is the best way. So grab a 12-pack of Red Stripe beer, listen to some Bob Marley and relax as the barbecue works its magic. To grill “low and slow,” you need to build a fire on only one side of the grill, and use the indirect heat on the other side of the grill to cook and smoke the pork. (Unless you want pork drippings on your patio, remember to place a drip pan under the half of the grill that doesn’t have the fire.) It’s best to use big chunks of natural mesquite charcoal, not the briquettes. They will burn slowly and be able to last for the entire three hours of cooking. Either way, you may need to “feed” the fire with some fresh coals after an hour or two. In total, the cooking time over indirect heat should be about three hours. The result will be succulent and juicy jerk pork. I can feel the island breeze already. 56


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DINING: FEATURE

DINING F E AT U R E 54

[ C O N T. ]

RECIPE: JERK PORK

Meat: 8 pounds of 1½-inch thick pork butt chops (4 big pieces, around 2 pounds each) Marinade: 1 bunch thyme

INGREDIENTS 1 thumb ginger 2 bunches scallions 15 cloves garlic ½ cup whole allspice berries 1 cup canola oil ½ cup soy sauce

1 to 5 habanero peppers (1 is fairly mild, 5 is really hot – any more and you’re on your own!) 4 tablespoons sugar 1 tablespoon salt

METHOD

1. Combine all the ingredients for the marinade in a blender and blend until it forms a smooth paste.

4. Build a medium-size fire on one side of the grill and put a drip pan on the other side.

DINING

2. Puncture meat at ½-inch intervals with a metal skewer or a Jaccard tenderizing tool.

5. Allow the flames to subside and place the meat on the grill above the drip pan. Cover the grill and adjust the vents so that a thin and constant stream of smoke comes out of the top. 3. Marinate meat with paste, cover and refrigerate overnight or longer. 56

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DINING F E AT U R E

[ C O N T. ]

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6. After about an hour, turn the meat and, if necessary, adjust the positioning of the coals to avoid hot spots. Continue checking and turning every half hour. “Feed” the grill with a couple of new coals if needed.

8. Chop into chunks and serve with jerk sauce (see page 54), plus bread or rice and what’s left of the 12-pack of Red Stripe you’ve been working on. TW 7. After about three hours, when the meat is tender, uncover and move over the direct heat to finish browning if needed.

Josiah Slone is the chef/owner of Sent Sovi, 14583 Big Basin Way, Saratoga (408) 867-3110 www.sentsovi.com.

Parcel 104 at the Santa Clara Marriott 2700 Mission College Blvd., Q Santa Clara 408.970.6104 Q Parcel104.com

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» HOT SPOTS

HOT

PRICE GUIDE: $[5-15]

SPOTS

$$[15-25]

$$$[25-40]

$$$$[40+]

Cin-Cin Wine Bar

DINING

CAMPBELL

CUPERTINO

CAPERS EAT & DRINK $$

ARYA $$

[American] 1710 W. Campbell Ave. (408) 374-5777 www.caperseatanddrink.com

[Global] 19930 Stevens Creek Blvd, (408) 996 9606 www. aryarestaurant.com

Capers – which could mean either the delicious Mediterranean condiment or a playful escapade – seems a particularly appropriate name for this popular spot. You’ll find more than just perfect pasta and juicy steaks here. Fire-roasted marinated artichokes, flash-fried calamari with jalapeños, a killer chicken marsala, and a meatloaf entrée with a wholesome reputation are just some of the enticing menu items. Main-course salads are also popular, particularly for lunching customers – the Chinese Chicken Salad being No. 1 on the lunch charts for some time now. Capers offers a selection of more than 30 wines by the glass from the full bar.

Visitors can enjoy a distinctive dining experience in a restaurant that exudes relaxed elegance. The menu here is a unique mix of Persian, Italian and classic American cuisines, with dishes including shish kebab, cioppino, chicken marsala and flavorful Persian soups, stews and meats. Before your meal, allow time to enjoy a glass of wine from their extensive list in the cozy, fireside lounge.

HAWGS SEAFOOD BAR $$ [Seafood] 1700 W. Campbell Ave. (408) 379-9555 www.hawgsseafoodbar.com

Those who love seafood, but hate dealing with the sand, crowds, seagulls and hairstylesavaging salty winds of beachside establishments, will love Hawgs for its marinalike feel and selection of fresh fish. From the depths of the ocean there are oysters, mussels and clams, succulent fish and shellfish. Landlubbers can nosh on favorites such as New York steak and Australian lamb.

MERLION RESTAURANT AND WINE BAR $$ [Asian Fusion] 19628 Stevens Creek Blvd. (408) 777-8228 www.merlion.us

Though named for Singapore’s wellknown tourist icon, the Merlion (a lion head with the body of a fish), this cozy restaurant goes beyond Singaporean cuisine, blending Thai, Malaysian, Indian and Chinese influences into its pocket-friendly menu. A transparent wine cellar adds to the sophisticated interior ambience and offers an extensive selection to complement every meal.

HALF MOON BAY HALF MOON BAY BREWING COMPANY $

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LOS GATOS CIN-CIN WINE BAR $$$$ [California, Modern American] 368 Village Ln. (408) 354-8006 www.cincinwinebar.com

With the food and wine produced by sustainable, organic and biodynamic methods, and a diligent effort to use recycled products for the building’s construction, Cin-Cin is on the cutting edge of eco-conscious restaurants. Co-proprietor and wine director Lisa Rhorer describes the food and wine as “an adventurous, diverse variety that combines global flavors – Korean, French, California, Spain – with global wines.” This is demonstrated by dishes such as the “Bacon and Eggs” salad, with frisee lettuce, bacon lardons, fried shiitake mushrooms, Yukon Gold potatoes and a crispy poached egg. Pair Cin-Cin’s eclectic menu with popular wine flights, such as the Fresh, Flirty and Fabulous: three 2 ½-ounce pours of aromatic white wines sure to please the palate.

[American] 390 Capistrano Rd. (650) 728-2739 www.hmbbrewingco.com

A tasty array of eight different home-brewed beers takes center

58

stage, but the HMB Brewing Company has definitely raised the bar for “bar food.” Steamed clams, seared ahi tuna, prawn cocktails and the smoked fish are all top rate… and those are just the appetizers. Be sure to try the Mavericks Amber Ale – it has unseated Corona as the perfect oceanside sunset beer.

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DINING HOT 58

LITTLE LOU’S BBQ $ [Barbecue] 15466 Los Gatos Blvd., Ste. 111 (408) 356-5768 www.littlelousbbq.com

A tiny little place with no more than a dozen tables inside and out, Little Lou’s nevertheless manages to fill the air with the smell of summer barbecue in all its basted glory. House specialties include the Louisiana burger, Texas-style brisket and the pulled pork meal. Meatballs and buffalo wings, combo dinners, burgers, dogs and sandwiches round out the menu, with traditional sides of coleslaw, corn bread, corn on the cob, potato salad and BBQ beans. WILLOW STREET PIZZA $ [Italian, Pizza] 20 S. Santa Cruz Ave. (408) 354-5566 www.willowstreet.com

This family-oriented restaurant rotates around a social dining experience, as tables of locals devour baskets of Willow Street’s bread, which is made piping hot inhouse daily. In addition to gourmet wood-fired pizzas like the Thin Crust Mediterranean (tomato sauce, mozzarella, roasted red peppers, kalamata olives, caramelized onions, fresh thyme, and goat cheese), the menu features sandwiches, grilled meats and a number of savory pasta dishes. The fettuccini chicken tequila pasta is particularly popular. WINE CELLAR $$$ [Modern American] 50 University Ave. (408) 354-4808 www.winecellarlosgatos.com

On some nights, live music from nearby Borders Books lends a pleasant sense of occasion to dining on the Wine Cellar’s casual upstairs patio. Descend down the curving stone staircase, though, and be transported into an elegant restaurant removed from the

SPOTS

street noise. Try one of the unusual appetizers, such as the honeyapricot BBQ glazed ribs or sauteed abalone, to start. Entrées include duck confit and pan-seared chicken breast, grilled Australian lamb chops, soy-glazed wild Alaskan king salmon, and last, but never least, filet mignon.

fusion.” Their menu features an already popular filet mignon in peppercorn sauce, with lobster, ahi tuna, and other savory specialties. 3ta is a semi-formal restaurant with a relaxed atmosphere, a full bar serving up old favorites, and some new dessert-inspired cocktails. CASCAL $$

MORGAN HILL / GILROY EL AMIGO RESTAURANT $ [Mexican] 8800 San Ysidro Ave., Gilroy (408) 846-0040; 7090 Santa Teresa Blvd., San Jose (408) 365-9500 www.elamigorestaurant.com

Established in 1987 by Mexicanborn Huberto Acevedo and his wife Margarita, this authentic Mexican restaurant features all of the accoutrements that the festive Mexican culture creates. Mariachi players, a fiestalike atmosphere and colorful and delectable food propel El Amigo to new strata far above small taquerias common throughout the valley. Take time to sample the fajitas de camaron, plato de carne asada, enchiladas in traditional Mexican mole sauce, or its signature dish, the Molcajete, a fajita-style sizzling combination of shrimp and special salsa.

MOUNTAIN VIEW 3TA RESTAURANT AND BAR $$ [Asian Fusion] 156 Castro St. (650) 988-1382

This restaurant and bar combines the best of Asian cuisine. Serving everything from Pad Thai to Japanese sushi concoctions, 3ta truly lives up the phrase “Asian

[Pan-Latin] 400 Castro St. (650) 940-9500 www.cascalrestaurant.com

Vibrant interior colors create a lively setting for Cascal’s huge, Latin-influenced tapas menu. If you don’t feel like sharing, feel free to fall back on the full menu, which has a trio of ceviche dishes, plus several varieties of seafood paella. Weekdays from 3:30-6:30pm, you can enjoy your tapas with half-price mojitos, sangria or caipirinhas. SPICE ISLANDS CAFÉ $ [Malaysian] 210 Hope St. (650) 961-0628

Dishes like mango chicken and prawns, black pepper crab and spicy spareribs (plus a host of vegetarian options) may sound familiar, but they defy traditional preparations. All go perfectly with the pan-fried roti bread, a hard-to-find side dish at even the most authentic Singaporean restaurants. The bar at Spice Islands knows how to make a perfect Singapore Sling, using the recipe taken from the famous Raffles Hotel in, where else, Singapore.

PALO ALTO FISH MARKET RESTAURANT $$ [Seafood] 3150 El Camino Real (650) 493-9188 www.thefishmarket.com

Every Fish Market location (the first opened in 1976) houses a retail market, oyster bar and restaurant. 62

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CATERING

» CATERING

INDIAN/CHINESE

Habana Cuba

Temptations DINING

288 Castro St., Mountain View (650) 625-1234 www.temptationsca.com Contact: Neela Shukla MALAYSIAN

Spice Islands Cafe 210 Hope St., Mountain View (650) 961-3500 Contact: Elizabeth Chen MEDITERRANEAN

Cafe Baklava 341 Castro St., Mountain View (650) 969-3835 Contact: Illiano Yuksel MEXICAN CALIFORNIA

Crimson 15466 Los Gatos Blvd., Los Gatos (408) 358-0175 www.crimsonrestaurant.com Contact: Chef Diane Rose

Taqueria La Bamba 2058 Old Middlefield Way, Mountain View (650) 965-2755 Contact: Leo Munoz VIETNAMESE

CUBAN

Habana Cuba 238 Race St., San Jose (408) 998-2822 www.998cuba.com Contact: Jennifer Cannella

19 Market 19 N. Market St., San Jose (408) 280-6111 www.19market.com Contact: Hanna Pham

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Menara Moroccan

Dinner, Dinner, dancing and a forest train ride lit by moonlight! Located on Graham Hill Rd., Felton, CA For information call (831) (831)) 335-4484 (831 or visit www.roaringcamp.com www.roaringcamp.com Reservations required

Begin with our Chuckwagon BBQ, board vintage railway cars to Bear Mountain and explore the darkness by flashlight. Return to Roaring Camp and find the forest echoing with country music.

The menu changes daily, but no matter what day it is, there’s a dish for nearly every hankering: seafood cocktails, raw oysters and clams, baked shellfish, steamed shellfish, smoked fish, sashimi and sushi, oyster bar specialties and a deep list of mesquite charbroiled entrées. Ask for the cheesy bread with crabmeat, and always choose the au gratin as one of your sides. Trust us.

with some salad and soup, sipped Japanese-style, and then watch as your chef plays with your food, threshing your choice of meats and vegetables into bite-sized pieces with circus-worthy flair on his teppan (Japanese for “iron”).

MANTRA RESTAURANT & LOUNGE $$

The Island Grill in the resort-style Clarion Hotel cooks up the food equivalents of sun, sand and long walks on the beach: blackened chicken salad with mango citrus vinaigrette; plenty of pasta and seafood dishes, like pineapple and chipotle and fried plantains with chili pepper jelly; and jerk sauce, jerk sauce everywhere. Dig the dish appellations: Jerk Caesar, Volcano Salad, and Da Plane, Da Plane Burger.

[Contemporary Indian, California] 632 Emerson St., (650) 322-3500 www.mantrapaloalto.com

DINING

The gold wallpaper, cherry wood veneers and occasional live jazz hint that this isn’t your typical Indian restaurant. Executive chef Sachin Chopra has created a winning menu that juxtaposes the Indian and California tastes, ranging from appetizers like golden cumin cauliflower soup to entrées like mustard and roasted Kashmiri cayenne pepper-marinated sea bass filet on a bed of leeks and fresh vegetables. Equally pleasing are the elegant 78-seat dining room and Dual Happy Hour ($3 beer, $5 cocktails and half off bar food) at the sleek Daru Lounge.

SAN JOSE AIRPORT

HOUSE OF GENJI $$$ [Japanese, Steakhouse] 1335 N. First St. (408) 453-8120 www.houseofgenji.com

If you’re craving teppanyaki, or even if you just have a knife fetish, House of Genji is the place in the South Bay to watch some tableside juggling and chopping. Start 62

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ISLAND GRILL $$ [Steakhouse, Seafood, Modern American] 1355 N. Fourth St. (408) 392-2468 www.theislandgrill.com

MENARA MOROCCAN RESTAURANT $$ [Moroccan] 41 E. Gish Rd. (408) 453-1983 www.menara41.com

Recline on a pillowed couch with a Moroccan Magic cocktail in hand. Six different five-course prix fixe dinners include Casablancan delectables like lamb with honey, hare with paprika, and orange roughy with shermoula sauce. Meals are finished with mint tea. Moroccan arches, gilt accents, low-to-the-ground dining tables, and belly dancers might catch you hoping Master won’t rub the lamp just yet. SPENCER’S FOR STEAKS AND CHOPS $$$ [American, Steakhouse] 2050 Gateway Pl. (408) 437-2170

www.spencersforsteaksandchops.com

This is a steakhouse-away-fromhome for grilling fanatics, located in the San Jose DoubleTree Hotel. George Foreman wannabes will appreciate the variety of premium grade cuts on the menu and envy the state-of-the-art infrared broiler that sears each one to an unholy 1,700 degrees. Any of the full-bodied reds on the menu will help wash down those eight-to-12 ounces of grilled-to-order meat, and the 16-to-18-ounce prime rib calls for a shot of serious single malt Scotch.

SAN JOSE

ALMADEN VALLEY

BANGKOK TASTE THAI $ [Thai] 1769 Blossom Hill Rd. (408) 358-2525 www.bangkoktaste.com

Owner Chutima Thongpreecha and her father opened Bangkok Taste in San Jose in 1993, serving slightly Americanized Thai food in their comfortable small dining room. The prawn curry is a favorite served as spicy as you like it. Many of the dishes come with Nok’s Plum Sauce, which is available in jars to take home. Use the printable coupon on Bangkok Taste’s website that gives half off any entrée with the purchase of another. FISH MARKET RESTAURANT $$ [Seafood, American] 1007 Blossom Hill Rd. (408) 2693474 www.thefishmarket.com

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because they operate their own fishing vessels, fishery, and oyster farm. The dazzling menu includes line-caught Pacific swordfish, Hawaiian hebi, Pacific Miyagi oysters and live Maine lobster tail, plus a choice of having your fish cooked over a mesquite wood fire, baked, steamed, smoked or fried. Make sure to check out the weekly specialty fish and the sushi bar.

5IF#FTU8PPE'JSFE 1J[[BBOE.PSF -VODIÂ…%JOOFSÂ…'VMM#BS

PEARL RIVER RESTAURANT $ [Chinese] 414 Blossom Hill Rd. (408) 225-5060; 2281 Lincoln Ave. (408) 265-7066 www.pearlriverchinese.com

Pearl River has been serving Chinese food for more than 30 years. And with new menus and remodeled dining areas at both locations, they have made a good thing even better. In addition to the Pearl River classics – pot stickers, walnut shrimp – they’ve added new delicacies such as Singapore shrimp wraps: shrimp, lettuce, carrots and rice noodle cold wraps with Thai chili and peanut dipping sauce; and the ginger, green onions and braised tofu: stir-fried shredded ginger and onions with chicken, beef or shrimp. Open seven days a week, 365 days a year, Pearl River is always offering unique lunch and dinner specials, in addition to exotic cocktails, and home delivery service after 4pm.

SAN JOSE DOWNTOWN

ANISE CAFÉ $$ [Vietnamese, Asian Fusion] 1663 W. San Carlos St. (408) 298-8178 www.anisecafe.com

DINING

Small plates make a big impact with fresh local produce and seafood laced with tangy FrenchVietnamese sauces. Try the escargot and a slow-cooked stew for continental flair, and top it all off with some California wine. Anise CafÊ’s tawny walls, lush greenery and earthy brown accents will have you believe you’re dining in tropical luxury. “Small platesâ€? is a nice way of saying “small portions,â€? so plan to order three to four for two people. BELLA MIA $$ [Italian, Modern American] 58 S. First St. (408) 280-1993 www.bellamia.com

Come for the old-world charm; stay for amazing pasta dishes. Bella Mia’s dark mahogany wood and beautiful chandeliers make the place dreamily cozy, and the house-made pastas are always pleasing. For the carb-conscious, the restaurant carries a variety of starter and main-course salads; other splurgers might prefer the seafood saffron risotto or the grilled pork chops. FAHRENHEIT ULTRA LOUNGE & RESTAURANT $ [Modern American, Asian Fusion] 99 E. San Fernando St. (408) 998-9998 www.fahrenheitultralounge.com

Fahrenheit’s exotic small plates have gotten so much attention, they’ve expanded their menu to include equally exceptional entrÊes. For starters, try the Mandalay

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SPOTS

beef with roti bread, or gingerpoached chicken salad, and cruise to gratifying large plates such as the grilled cabernet skirt steak or pan seared wild Alaskan salmon. Cocktails get as every bit as much attention here; it’s the only South Bay joint where bottle-flipping bartenders add a shot of energetic flair to their service. KOJI SAKE LOUNGE $$ [Japanese] 48 S. First St. (408) 287-7199 www.kojisakelounge.com

Touted as the South Bay’s only sake lounge, Koji serves simple, traditional Japanese cuisine in a contemporary atmosphere fueled by an ever-changing selection of premium sakes. Small, tantalizing dishes include Panko Crusted Calamari, a Teriyaki chicken sandwich on grilled pita bread, and Ahi Tuna Tartar with mango salsa. More than 20 premium sake brands don the shelves of Koji, with new sake featured every Wednesday. Mellifluous music, a Zen garden and ample lounge space equipped with suede booths and candle-lit tables make this a great hangout for any night of the week. LOFT BAR & BISTRO $$ [Modern American] 90 S. Second St. (408) 291-0677 www.loftbarandbistro.com

Capers Eat and Drink impresario Kam Razavi has a Downtown hit with Loft. A historic stone-and-marble exterior belies the airy urban-chic warehouse interior, complete with upstairs loft and a second-story patio. The menu features gourmet turns on classic comfort foods, as exemplified by Razavi’s meatloaf, made with smoked ham and smothered in a wild mushroom sauce that migrates to the garlic mashed potatoes. The full bar on the second floor is a popular gathering spot on weekend nights. THE MELTING POT $$$ [Modern American] 72 S. First St. (408) 293-6020 www.meltingpot.com

This popular franchise takes the Swiss-born craze of dipping stuff in hot pots way beyond standardissue “cheese with bread,â€? and San Jose’s handsome location in a historic building is sophisticated, warm and simple. The four-course menu features varied entrĂŠes cooked in one of four styles, with an assortment of savory breads, vegetables and choice of salad. The regular menu includes dishes like lobster, chicken, pork tenderloin, shrimp and Florentine ravioli – and, of course, chocolate fondue dessert. MUSTARD CAFE $$ [American] 975 The Alameda (408) 295-9000 www.mustardcafe.com

Bringing the famous New York deli taste to the West Coast, Mustard CafÊ has an almost endless array of sandwiches on offer with its create-your-own sandwich menu. Choose from six artisan breads, six gourmet mustards, and pile your creation high with a selection of fine Boar’s Head meats, nine different cheeses and more. If the options are overwhelming, try one of their signature creations, such as the popular Cranturberry sandwich, which boasts turkey, mesclun greens, red onion, mayonnaise and a house-made cranberry sauce, served on whole grain bread.

NAZCA PERUVIAN CUISINE $$ [Peruvian, Latin American, Fusion] 167 W. San Fernando St. (408) 295-2828

According to Nazca owner Jose Bohorquez, Peruvian gastronomy is at its highest level in the nation’s history, with a boom of culinary schools in Lima sending Peruvian chefs to all corners of the world. And it’s no secret why. Traditional Peruvian food, Bohorquez says, is a mixture of several cuisines brought to Peru from Spain, China, Japan, Italy and Africa, which were then blended with Peruvian flavors. Nazca embodies that tradition, serving modern Peruvian and fusion cuisine rich in seafood and meat. Main dishes include Peruvian ceviche, lomo saltado, arroz con mariscos, black ink risotto and Peruvian-style lamb shanks, all served in a modern and casual atmosphere. TIED HOUSE CAFE & BREWERY $$ [American upscale pub food] 65 N. San Pedro St. (408) 2952739 www.tiedhouse.com

Ravenous Sharks fans devour platters of smoked trout, smoked salmon, ribs, and sausages with a pint of Ironwood Dark, an Englishstyle brown ale, while mall-weary shoppers gratefully chow down the blackened Louisiana catfish with Tied’s Cascade Amber. For bar snacks, it’s hard to beat the pesto-parmesan calamari or the Harvest Quesadilla, roasted butternut squash and red peppers with pepper jack cheese in a flour tortilla drizzled with lime-chipotle sour cream.

SAN JOSE SANTANA ROW & WEST

BLOWFISH SUSHI $$ [Japanese, Sushi, Asian Fusion] 355 Santana Row, Ste. 1010 (408) 345-3848 www.blowfishsushi.com

If you like your sushi trendysophisticated, with a little DJ music and anime thrown in, you’ll be hooked. A menu of Sakizuke (Japanese fusion appetizers) mixes up sea bass and miso, salmon roe and quail egg. Try special sushi rolls like the Special Dragon or the Super Dynamite Roll, and fill up on their extensive list of imported, hard-to-find sakes. Try the Peach Nympho, the Mango Mojito or the Kiwi Appletini. ROSIE MCCANN’S IRISH PUB AND RESTAURANT $$ [Irish, American] 355 Santana Row, Ste. 1060 San Jose (408) 247-1706 www.rosiemccanns.com

Rosie McCann’s reinvents traditional pub fare. Quaff a pint or two at the elegant curved bar, and you, too, will be singing praises to Rosie’s Irish Nachos, a mountain of guacamole, salsa and all the fixings atop (of course) potatoes. The Irish sausage bangers with garlic mashed potatoes and Guinness gravy, and Alaskan cod fish ‘n’ chips are delectable. Try the filet mignon medallion appetizer and order a couple of items from the kid’s menu. It’s cheaper, and you still get tons of food. 66


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Roux Louisiana Kitchen ROUX LOUISIANA KITCHEN $$ [Cajun] 3055 Olin Ave., Ste. 1005 (408) 249-8000 www.rouxkitchen.com

DINING

No other restaurant evokes the spirit of New Orleans quite like Roux. Combining Cajun, Creole and soul cuisine with live jazz music, it feels like Mardi Gras here every day. Start with appetizers such as baconwrapped oysters, sautéed crab cakes with roasted pepper aioli, seafood gumbo or Cajun crawfish, then move on to main dishes such as jambalaya with andouille sausage, chicken and shrimp, or blackened redfish with a classic side of red beans and rice. Wash all that down with a famous New Orleans Hurricane cocktail and take in the French Quarter-inspired décor and atmosphere. SINO RESTAURANT AND LOUNGE $$$ [Chinese] 377 Santana Row (408) 247-8880 www.sinorestaurant.com

Ultramodern Asian chic ambience sets the stage for this upscale Chinese/dim sum hot spot. Owner Chris Yeo (of Straits fame) packs the menu with everything from General Yeo free-range chicken to char siu smoked sea bass, and packs SINO’s five large rooms full of Santana Row’s genetically privileged diners. Try the Peking barbecued baby back ribs. Delicious. 66

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STRAITS RESTAURANT $$ [Asian Fusion] 333 Santana Row, Ste. 1100 (408) 246-6320 www.straitsrestaurants.com

Pan-oceanic Singaporean small plates and noodle dishes are like romance on the high seas: unexpected, spicy, and utterly seductive once you begin to roll with it. A meal at Straits will take your taste buds on a whirlwind tour of Asia, starting with the buttery Indian-style roti prata flatbread and the Fuji apple and prawn salad in a mint vinaigrette, all the way to the Origami sea bass with ginger, shiitake mushrooms, and rice wine baked in parchment.

WILLOW STREET PIZZA $ [Italian, Pizza] 1554 Saratoga Ave. (408) 871-0400; 1072 Willow St. (408) 971-7080 www.willowstreet.com

Friendly service, a convivial, neighborhood atmosphere, and fresh ingredients have made Willow Street Pizza a longtime local favorite. Their wonderful, wood-fired pizzas have a crispier edge than regular oven-baked pies, and their scrumptious pasta combinations (fettuccini with chicken, red bell peppers, red onions and cilantro in a tequila-lime cream sauce) are creative palatepleasers.

SAN JOSE WILLOW GLEN

CREEKSIDE INN $$ [Classic American] 544 W. Alma Ave. (408) 289-9781

The kind of place where quality comfort food and karaoke cohabitate, the Creekside recalls the big-shouldered days at the height of classic American cuisine. A meatand-potatoes menu pleases with favorites like lobster, sole, meatloaf and rack of lamb, and while the décor can’t be called cutting-edge, it wins points for coziness. Nick, the owner, promises the best steak in town. Karaoke (Wednesdays) comes with a free buffet – get there early.

SANTA CLARA BIRK’S RESTAURANT $$$ [Modern American, Steak] 3955 Freedom Cir. (408) 9806400 www.birksrestaurant.com

Almond wood and mesquite charcoal fuel the tender flavors emanating from this upscale American grill designed by Pat Kuleto. The open kitchen features superb steaks cut from tender, dry-aged, free-range beef and 68


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Oceanfront Dining On-Site Brewery Fresh Seafood Fire Pits Cocktails & Wine Live Music & Dancing

DINING HOT 66

organic, local produce, including the popular creamed spinach side. A business-casual hot spot for local white collars who like the kitchen energy at the grill and the succulent seafood at the oyster bar. Couples should request the lighter, Ushaped “Snoopy room” (shaped like Snoopy’s nose) for more intimacy. PARCEL 104 $$$$ [Modern American] 2700 Mission College Blvd. (408) 970-6104 www.parcel104.com

Celebrity chef Bradley Ogden and executive chef Robert Sapirman transform farm-fresh, local ingredients into works of seasonal art at this crown jewel of Santa Clara fine dining. The result: An ever-evolving, palate-provoking and inventive menu that pairs well with the extensive list of wines from Parcel 104’s award-winning cellar. The restaurant does not serve weekend lunches or Sunday dinners, but offers a full breakfast menu for an inspiring weekday jump-start.

HALF MOON BAY BREWING COMPANY

FISH MARKET RESTAURANT $$ [Seafood, American] 3775 El Camino Real (408) 246-3474 www.thefishmarket.com

4 Miles North of Half Moon Bay

390 Capistrano Road Princeton-by-the-Sea 650.728.BREW

DINING

www.hmbbrewingco.com

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Rarely does a seafood restaurant operate its own certified processing, distribution, and wholesale company, but that’s Fish Market’s commitment to freshness. With 25 fresh fish dishes and a variety of shellfish on a daily changing menu, Fish Market satisfies any oceanic urge. If you can’t eat in, pick up some fish at their adjoining retail market. Catch the action at the oldschool oyster bar – and know that chefs here will cater readily to your special dietary needs or not-on-themenu cravings.

SPOTS

SARATOGA

SUNNYVALE

BAI TONG THAI BISTRO $

NICOLINO’S ITALIAN $$$

[Thai] 14515 Big Basin Way (408) 872-1319

[Italian] 1228 Reamwood Ave. (408) 734-5323 www.nicolinosgardencafe.com

Bai Tong is creating quite a buzz with a menu that offers a medley of different colored curries – Kang Dang (red), Kang Keow Warn (green) and Kang Karee (yellow). For the more daring, there is the Evil Jungle Curry, a choice of meat or tofu mixed with a bunch of veggies. Pink walls and funky-looking statues may have you wondering if you’ve stumbled onto Disneyland’s Indiana Jones ride. But, hey, what could be better than eating at “The Happiest Place on Earth?” Bai Tong boasts hard-to-find wines from some of the smallest local vineyards around. THE BASIN $$ [American] 14572 Big Basin Way (408) 867-1906 www.thebasin.com

Regulars call The Basin the place “where everybody knows your name” – just with much better grub. The fare is American by way of Spain and Italy, including the wild mushroom rigatoni. With cozy wood tables and red drapes, The Basin caters to large groups and has a private room that can hold 30. Ask the bartender to shake you up a Caipirinha, the unofficial national drink of Brazil distilled from sugar cane rum and is oh-so-good. BELLA SARATOGA $$ [Italian] 14503 Big Basin Way (408) 741-5115 www.bellasaratoga.com

Comfortable family dining is served up daily at this elegant Victorian home turned restaurant in the heart of Saratoga. Bella Saratoga’s extensive Italian menu features award-winning pasta, flat bread pizzas and a comprehensive wine list to complement any meal. Portions are generous, but if your stomach still has room postdinner, delicious desserts such as tiramisu and pecan turtle pie await.

Arched doorways and old-world light fixtures set the mood at this family-oriented Sunnyvale favorite, where the waiters wear tuxes and the food speaks Italian. Try veal scaloppini, fettuccine carbonara or the famous “New York Style” sausage burger (the sausage is homemade). Try the extravagant flambé menu (lit up tableside) for a memorable dining experience. OCEAN BLUE RESTAURANT $$ [Japanese, Asian Fusion] 1010 E. El Camino Real (408) 720-8840

This elegant sushi restaurant features fresh, top quality sushi and sashimi, a full bar stocked with premium sake and stylish music, ranging from classic Japanese to current hip-hop. Try their signature Kabuki Roll: salmon, yellowtail tuna and radish sprouts wrapped in cucumber; or the more classic Firecracker Roll, topped with sliced jalapeños and hot sauce. SUNNY BUFFET $ [Chinese] 502 Ross Dr. (408) 747-1888

Sunny Buffet is a traditional buffetstyle Chinese restaurant with tons of options, including sushi, salads, fried chicken, crab legs, coconut shrimp, short ribs, orange chicken, chow mein, pizza, seafood, an extensive fruit bar, desserts and more. The combinations are almost endless. With a sky-blue painted ceiling and other welcoming décor, Sunny Buffet is a perfect place for lunch or dinner, and the service is always fast and friendly. TW


DINING: HOT SPOTS

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#

Forget the scissors, don’t bother tearing out another coupon! Just dial the toll-free number listed from your cell phone and we’ll send you the coupon as a text message. Then just show your phone for great savings!

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LUNCH: FREE SODA WITH PURCHASE OF ANY ENTREE OR WRAP.

DINING

DINNER: RECEIVE $10 OFF THE PURCHASE OF TWO DINNER ENTREES OR $5 OFF TWO LUNCH ENTREES.

HABANA CUBA RESTAURANT

ONE COUPON PER TABLE EXP 9/15/07

FAHRENHEIT ULTRA LOUNGE & RESTAURANT 888 - 377 - 9054 99 E. San Fernando St., San Jose (408) 998-9998

RECEIVE 10% OFF YOUR FINAL BILL FOR LUNCH OR DINNER.

MORTON’S THE STEAKHOUSE 888 - 377 - 9060 177 Park Ave., San Jose (408) 947-7000

RECEIVE A FREE DESSERT W/ DINNER. ONE COUPON PER TABLE

Offers subject to change. Most national cell phone carriers supported. Standard text messaging rates apply.

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» FEATURE

Nightlife&Music

» » » » »

FEATURE HEADLINERS WINE TASTING & MORE CD RELEASES ALBUM REVIEWS

70 72 72 72 73

THE LAPTOP DJ

German-based software company algoriddim recently released djay 2.1. This third-party application is a groundbreaking digital audio player and music mixing software for Mac OS X. It seamlessly integrates with your iTunes library, allowing you to mix your digital music collection with its multitouch-enabled realistic dual-turntable interface. In djay’s Automix mode, music can be automatically mixed using DJstyle transitions. Users can perform live, record their mixes, and even send them over the internet to other connected DJs in real time. It’s a fascinating and affordable way for anyone to give himself or herself a glimpse into the world of DJing. $49.99 at www.djay-software.com

DJ Dif

The Art of the DJ There’s a lot more to spinning records than two turntables and a microphone.

NIGH T L IFE & MUSIC

BY JON SONTAG (AKA DJ SUNDAY)

S

an Francisco’s Beauty Bar sets the scene with glamorous décor and neon lights as Thaddeus Cortez (aka DJ Dif) spins song after song and beat after beat. He successfully controls a smooth flow of rhythm on the dance floor with the help of Yelle, Night Facilities, Bloody Beetroots, M83, and Surkin – often extending his playlist to classic hits from the likes of Aphex Twin, Ellen Allien, Daft Punk, and Trentemøller. Throughout the night, with subtle bends in tempo, each song rides on the coattails of the next, weaving in and out of house, electronica and soul. Following the set, Cortez explains, “I can draw from all walks of music. Where else can you explore that?” After almost 100 years in the making, disc jockeys (DJs) have truly proven their trade to be an incredibly expressive art form. Interestingly enough, according to the Bay Area Radio Museum, one of the first DJs in radio history started out in San Jose. Ray Newby – with the help of his teacher, Charles D. “Doc” Herrold – began tinkering with small spark transmitters at Herrold College of Engineering and Wireless in 1909, paving the way for the future of broadcasting. Eventually, radio stations began popping up all over 70

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the country, offering listeners a wide variety of music and radio programs. It wasn’t long until playing the right song at the right time in the right rotation became a desirable skill. Soon enough, the appeal of a well thought-out playlist made its way through the doors of dance halls across the world. With two turntables and a microphone, DJs spun their abilities into a new circle of creativity. In 1947, English-born Jimmy Savile pioneered this phenomenon. With World War II forcing countries to draft a number of musicians off the stage and onto the front lines, live entertainment was at an all-time low. Ballrooms only drew small crowds for the occasional traveling band, and without a band (or any iPod adapters), enticing restless feet to the dance floor became an almost impossible task. Recognizing this void of musical expression, Savile hosted small dance parties with the help of a single wind-up phonograph. In a 2004 interview with DJHistory.com, Savile explained, “There was this amazing effect – what I was doing was causing 12 people to do something. And I thought, ‘I can make them dance quick. Or slow. Or stop. Or start.’ And all this was very heady

stuff – that one person was doing something to all these people. And that’s really the thing that triggered me off and sustained me for the rest of me days.” Despite Savile’s newfound excitement, the minimal attendance began to shadow his endeavors, so he decided to add a second record player to the arsenal, which was a huge success. Not only did he bring music back to the stage, but he gave people a mix of songs from around the world, without missing a beat. Seamlessly flowing from one song to the next, he went on to run 52 dance halls, employing 400 other DJs. Saville, only 20 years old at the time, stumbled onto what soon became the foundation of DJing today. With the development of tempo and pitch control, in addition to a vast array of other technological achievements in recent years, the art of DJing has become extremely accessible and increasingly explorative. Local DJ Jimmy B of Green Gorilla Lounge (www.greengorillalounge.com) says, “What can be done on two or sometimes three or more turntables and a mixer to express oneself… is limitless.” Still, there are a few key elements that technology will never be able to emulate:

The Song Without the right song, no one cares; no one will be listening or dancing. A true DJ needs to read the crowd, the mood and the movement, and reflect that in their playlist.

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NIGHTLIFE&MUSIC: INTERVIEW

$2 PABST

$2 PABST

$2 PABST

WII VIDEO

LADIES COUGAR NIGHT

SATURDAY NIGHT DANCE FEVER

LIVE MUSIC

DJ / LIVE MUSIC

DJ / LIVE MUSIC

THE ESCAPE BAR & GRILL, 2942 S.

$2 PABST

MULLETT MADNESS

$2 PABST WII VIDEO

$2 PABST TRIVIA

$2 PABST OPEN POOL TOURNAMENT

Bascom Ave., San Jose (408) 377-5436

R&B, FUNK, JAZZ

BAMBOO LOUNGE, 1355 N. Fourth St., San Jose (408) 392-2468 www.TheIslandGrill.com

LIVE MUSIC R&B, FUNK, JAZZ

HAPPY HOUR HAPPY HOUR THE BANK, 14421 Big Basin Way,

$1 OFF ALL DRINKS 5 - 6:30PM

$1 OFF ALL DRINKS 5 - 6:30PM

$2 PBR ON TAP

$3.50 KAMIKAZES

HAPPY HOUR HAPPY HOUR $1 OFF ALL DRINKS 5 - 6:30PM

$1 OFF ALL DRINKS 5 - 6:30PM

$2 PBR ON TAP

$2 PBR ON TAP

HAPPY HOUR $1 OFF ALL DRINKS 5 - 6:30PM

Saratoga (408) 867-5155

BERT’S ALIBI, 1313 W. El Camino Real Mountain View (408) 561-4339

AFTER 10PM $1 KAMIKAZES $3.50

$3.50 KAMIKAZES

BUDDHA LOUNGE, 251 Castro St., Mountain View (650) 965-7665 www.myspace.com/buddhalounge

SOUTH BAY’S LONGEST HAPPY HOUR!

KARAOKE & DJ

THE ULTIMATE HAPPY HOUR

THE ULTIMATE HAPPY HOUR

$1 BEER, $2 WINE, $3 $1 BEER, $2 WINE, $3 MIXED DRINKS 7-10PM MIXED DRINKS 7-10PM

Santa Clara (408) 241-1200 www.chatanogaonline.com

4 - 7PM

4 - 7PM

4 - 7PM

LIVE ENTERTAINMENT 8PM-MIDNIGHT

LIVE ENTERTAINMENT 9PM-MIDNIGHT

LIVE ENTERTAINMENT 9PM-MIDNIGHT

MARTINI FRIDAYS

RHYTHM

BOMBS AWAY THURSDAYS

DIVE BAR, 78 E. Santa Clara, San Jose (408) 288-5252 www.sjdivebar.com

Fernando St., San Jose (408) 998-9998 www.fultralounge.com

9:30PM - 1:30AM

INDUSTRY NIGHT LIVE CELTIC MUSIC

Ave., Santa Clara (408) 588-1111 www.meetmeattheoak.com

TEMPLE BAR & LOUNGE, 52 S. First St.,

CHILL SUNDAYS

HAPPY HOUR

WEDNESDAYS

THE ULTIMATE HAPPY HOUR

THE ULTIMATE HAPPY HOUR

HUMPDAY DRINK SPECIALS

HAPPY HOUR

4 - 7PM

4 - 7PM

4 - 7PM

MARAGARITA MONDAYS

TOP SECRET TUESDAYS

KARAOKE WEDNESDAYS

HAPPY HOUR

DRINK

DRINK

JAM NIGHT

KARAOKE NIGHT

JAM NIGHT

LIVE ART SHOW & HOUSE MUSIC

KARAOKE NIGHT

HOUSE MUSIC

5-7PM, 3 BEERS & SPECIALS SPECIALS $3 WELLS & ½ PRICE SPECIALTY COCKTAILS $3 BEERS, $3 WELLS, $5 SPECIALTY DRINKS, $3 JAGER, BEER PONG 30% OFF BOTTLE OF WINE ALL NIGHT

7 - 10PM, HAPPY HOUR SPECIALS

$2 WELL DRINKS, $5 TOKYO, AMF, LONG ISLANDS

KARAOKE NIGHT

9:30PM - 1:30AM

LIVE MUSIC

HAPPY HOUR 4 - 7PM HAPPY HOUR 4 - 7PM 50 CENTS OFF DOMESTIC 50 CENTS OFF DOMESTIC BEER & WELL DRINKS BEER & WELL DRINKS

CLUB NIGHT

LIVE MUSIC

TOP 40’s-80’s

CLUB NIGHT

LIVE MUSIC

LIVE MUSIC

#1060, San Jose (408) 247-1706 www.rosiemccanns.com

YE OLDE ROYAL OAK PUB, 1240 Coleman

$2 TUESDAYS

9:30PM - 12:30AM, HAPPY HOUR SPECIALS

2 FOR 1 ANY SHOTS 9 - 10PM

JAM NIGHT 8PM

R&B, HOUSE

9:30PM - 12:30AM

8PM HAPPY HOUR 4 - 7PM 8PM HAPPY HOUR 4 - 7PM 50 CENTS OFF DOMESTIC 8PM HAPPY HOUR 4 - 7PM 50 CENTS OFF DOMESTIC 50 CENTS OFF DOMESTIC BEER & WELL DRINKS BEER & WELL DRINKS BEER & WELL DRINKS

1ST MON. OF THE MONTH

OPEN MIC

7PM - 1AM, SPONSORED BY GUITAR SHOWCASE

KARAOKE

9PM - 1AM, HAPPY HOUR SPECIALS

TRIVIA

7:30 - 10PM, HAPPY HOUR SPECIALS

KARAOKE

HAPPY HOUR SPECIALS

$3 WELL DRINKS & BEER

San Jose (408) 288-8518

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NIGH T L IFE & MUSIC

KARAOKE NIGHT

MAD MIX JAM

ROSIE MCCANN’S, 355 Santana Row

AFTER 10PM $1 KAMIKAZES $3.50

HAPPY HOUR HAPPY HOUR

$4 DRAFT BEERS, 1/2 5-7PM: 3 BEERS & $3 5-7PM: 3 BEERS & $3 PRICED ROTATING SPECIALS, WELLS & ½ PRICE SPE- WELLS & ½ PRICE SPECOMPLIMENTARY CHAMCIALTY COCKTAILS CIALTY COCKTAILS PAGNE - 9:30-10:30PM

GOOSETOWN, 1072 Lincoln Ave., San Jose (408) 292-4835 www.goosetownlounge.com

QUARTER NOTE, 1214 Apollo Way, Sunnyvale (408) 732-2110 www.quarternote.com

AFTER 10PM $1 KAMIKAZES $3.50

SATURDAYS $6 GREY GOOSE & KETEL ONE FREE POOL $5 JAGER BOMBS & $5 HOUSE MARGARITAS $3 JACK $3 JAGER 9PM-1AM: $3 CORONA MARTINIS, $4 FINLANDIA $6 PATRON B4 10PM $2 DOMESTIC BOTTLES $3 & PALOMAS, $4 TOP $2 BLUE MOON IRISH CAR BOMBS B4 11PM $3 PACIFICO COSMOS B4 9PM ROTATING DJ OTREBOR & CREW SHELF MARGARITAS $1 TOP SHELF JELLO SHOTS $3 LANDSHARK $4 JAGER DJ OTREBOR & CREW LOCAL DJS DRINK SPECIALS HAPPY HOUR

FAHRENHEIT ULTRA LOUNGE, 99 E. San

$2 PBR ON TAP

$1 BEER, $2 WINE, $3 $1 BEER, $2 WINE, $3 MIXED DRINKS 7-10PM MIXED DRINKS 7-10PM

HAPPY HOUR HAPPY HOUR HAPPY HOUR CHATANOGA, 2725 El Camino Real

AFTER 10PM $1 KAMIKAZES $3.50

HAPPY HOUR LADIES NIGHT SUNDAYS KARAOKE & DJ

COLLEGE NIGHT

BRANHAM LOUNGE, 1116 Branham Ln., San Jose (408) 265-5525

$3.50 KAMIKAZES


» HEADLINERS

NIGHTLIFE&MUSIC HEADLINERS Coldplay

LYNYRD SKYNYRD

July 16, Mountain Winery, Saratoga www.mountainwinery.com

JONAS BROTHERS

July 17, Sleep Train Pavilion, Concord www.livenation.com

MELVINS

July 18, Slim’s, San Francisco www.slims-sf.com

BOY GEORGE

July 18, The Grand Ballroom at the Regency Center, San Francisco www.ticketmaster.com

JIMMY EAT WORLD July 18, The Fillmore, San Francisco www.livenation.com

COLDPLAY

July 18, HP Pavilion, San Jose www.hppsj.com

AGENT ORANGE MIKE NESS & HIS BAND

SV

WINE TASTING & MORE

» WINE TASTING & MORE

Hahn Estates, Smith & Hook Winery 37700 Foothill Rd., Soledad (831) 678-2132 www.hahnestates.com Wine Tasting: Mon-Fri 11am4pm, Sat-Sun 11am-5pm.

Pedrizzetti Winery Pedrizzetti Winery WINERIES

Rabbit’s Foot Meadery

Burrell School Vineyards & Winery

1246 Birchwood Dr.,Sunnyvale (408) 261-1603 www.rabbitsfootmeadery.com Their famous cider is available at Whole Foods Markets and Oliver’s Markets.

24060 Summit Rd., Los Gatos (408) 353-6290 www.burrellschool.com Burrell School Vineyards & Winery produces “Wines at the Head of Their Class”: wines of unmistakable mountain character. Estate grown Cabernet Franc, chardonnay, merlot, pinot noir, Cabernet Sauvignon, and Syrah. Open Thu-Sun 11am5pm, Fri-Sat 11am-6pm.

NIGH T L IFE & MUSIC

1645 San Pedro Ave., Morgan Hill (408) 779-7389 www.pedrizzettiwinery.com Open Tue-Sun 10am-5pm (closed most holidays).

Cinnabar Winery Tasting Room 14612 Big Basin Way, Saratoga (408) 867-1010 www.cinnabarwine.com We invite you to visit our beautiful tasting room. Located in the quaint, historical village of Saratoga, flanked by the magnificent Santa Cruz Mountains. Open daily 11am - 5pm and Friday and Saturday evenings until 8pm for the summer months.

Cooper-Garrod Estate Vineyards 22645 Garrod Rd., Saratoga (408) 867-7116 www.cgv.com Wine Tasting: Mon-Fri Noon-5pm, SatSun 11am-5pm.

Roudon-Smith Winery 2364 Bean Creek Rd., Scotts Valley (831) 438-1244 www.roudonsmith.com Wine Tasting: Sat Noon-4:30pm.

Thomas Fogarty Vineyards 19501 Skyline Blvd., Woodside (650) 851-6777 www.fogartywinery.com Wine Tasting: Thu-Sun 11am-5pm. WINE SHOPS

Savvy Cellar Wines 2048 Broadway St., Redwood City (650) 363-8737 www.savvycellar.com Experience top quality wines without having to spend an arm and a leg. Savvy Cellar Wine Bar & Wine Shop features wines from all the great wine producing regions of the world – all wines rated 90 points or higher and retail for $39/bottle or less. Check website for details on: wine classes, wine clubs, private events, tasting specials, live jazz and online sales (including gift certificates).

Vino Locale

Fortino Winery 4525 Hecker Pass Hwy., Gilroy (408) 842-3305 www.fortinowinery.com Wine Tasting: Tue-Sat 10am5pm, Sun 11am-5pm.

Fleming Jenkins Vineyards & Winery 45 W. Main St., Los Gatos (408) 358-4949 www. flemingjenkins.com Wine Tasting: Tue-Sun Noon-6pm.

431 Kipling St., Palo Alto (650) 328-0450 www.vinolocale.com Vino Locale is the perfect place to host a business or social event in an elegant and private setting. Open Tue-Sat 11am-9pm, Sun Noon-5pm.

Vintage Wine Merchants 377 Santana Row #1135, San Jose (408) 260-1115 www.vintagewinemerchants.com Open Mon-Wed 10am-9pm, Thu-Sat 10am-10pm, Sun Noon-8pm.

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THEWAVEMAG.COM JUNE 30 - JULY 13, 2008

July 2, The Fillmore, San Francisco www.livenation.com July 6, The Catalyst Club, Santa Cruz www.catalystclub.com

STYX

July 2, Mountain Winery, Saratoga www.mountainwinery.com

July 18, The Blank Club, San Francisco www.theblankclub.com

SLIPKNOT / DISTURBED

July 12, Shoreline Amphitheatre, Mountain View www.livenation.com

ONEREPUBLIC / PHANTOM PLANET, CAROLINE LIAR

July 13, The Fillmore, San Francisco www.livenation.com

REVEREND HORTON HEAT / SUPERSUCKER / NASHVILLE PUSSY

THE POLICE / ELVIS COSTELLO & THE IMPOSTERS

RADIO DISNEY PRESENTS FOURTH OF JULY FIREWORKS SHOW WITH THE SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY

AIMEE MANN / MARC COHN

July 3, The Catalyst Club, Santa Cruz www.catalystclub.com

July 14, Shoreline Amphitheatre, Mountain View www.livenation.com July 16, Sleep Train Pavilion, Concord www.livenation.com

July 14, Mountain Winery, Saratoga www.mountainwinery.com

July 4, Shoreline Amphitheatre, Mountain View www.livenation.com

ALAN JACKSON

STEVIE WONDER

THE SUMMER SLAUGHTER TOUR WITH THE BLACK DAHLIA MURDER, KATAKLYSM, VADER AND MANY MORE

July 5, Shoreline Amphitheatre, Mountain View www.livenation.com

BOSTON

July 7 – 8, Mountain Winery, Saratoga www.mountainwinery.com

AMERICAN IDOLS LIVE

July 8, HP Pavilion, San Jose www.hppsj.com

July 14, HP Pavilion, San Jose www.hppsj.com

July 15, The Fillmore, San Francisco www.livenation.com

CHRIS ISAAK

July 18 – 20, Mountain Winery, Saratoga www.mountainwinery.com

FEIST

July 19, The Greek Theatre, UC Berkeley www.ticketmaster.com

DOWNLOAD 2008 WITH THE JESUS AND MARY CHAIN, GANG OF FOUR, BRAND NEW, MUTE MATH, CUT COPY AND MANY MORE July 19, Shoreline Amphitheatre, Mountain View www.livenation.com

COMING SOON Blue Oyster Cult, Toby Keith, Stone Temple Pilots, Pat Benatar, Lyle Lovett, Alkaline Trio, English Beat, The Alarm, Mötley Crüe, Ryan Adams, Sammy Hagar, Tina Turner, Scorpions, Linkin Park, Lucinda Williams, X, Motorhead, Cheap Trick, Spoon, Calexico, Flogging Molly, and many more… TW

PETER FRAMPTON

July 15, Mountain Winery, Saratoga www.mountainwinery.com

STEVIE WONDER

July 8, Sleep Train Pavilion, Concord www.livenation.com

THE NEW MASTERSOUNDS

July 11 – 12, The Independent, San Francisco www.theindependentsf.com

EDDIE MONEY

July 11, Santa Cruz Beach Boardwalk www.beachboardwalk.com

» CD RELEASES

CD

RELEASES

JULY 1

JULY 8

Alkaline Trio, Agony & Irony My Chemical Romance, The Black Parade Is Dead John Mayer, Where The Light Is: John Mayer Live in Los Angeles Los Lonely Boys, Forgiven Weezer, Pork and Beans (Single)

Beck, Modern Guilt Billy Joel, The Stranger: 30th Anniversary Legacy Edition Gaelic Storm, What’s The Rumpus Great Big Sea, Fortune’s Favour Kerli, Love Is Dead Melvins, Nude With Boots Willie Nelson/Wynton Marsalis, Two Men With The Blues


NIGHTLIFE&MUSIC: ALBUM REVIEWS » ALBUM REVIEWS

NIGHTLIFE&MUSIC ALBUM REVIEWS

SAM SPARRO

BY TOM LANHAM

Sam Sparro 

(UNIVERSAL REPUBLIC)

Talk about cosmopolitan. Sam Sparro is only 25, but he was born in Australia, raised in Hollywood, and currently calls London home. And the kid’s eponymous debut reflects that seasoned worldliness – it’s bold, brassy and simply swaggering with well-traveled confidence, from its slap ‘n’ pluck basslines to its ‘80sretro synthesizer throb, over which the dark-timbred crooner rides herd like a young Pete Burns (Dead or Alive). As the fable goes, Chaka Khan heard him warbling gospel as a teen and proclaimed, “Damn, that white boy can sing!” And it’s true – Sparro (née Falson) tears it up like a Motown pro on 13 funky originals, flitting effortlessly from Southern-fried soul (“Cottonmouth”) to jazz (“Waiting for Time”) to Prince-peppered pop (“Hot Mess”). And he really hits his dance floor stride when he melds campy Eurodisco beats with his surprisingly adult, morality-tale lyrics, a la “Sick,”“Pocket” and “Too Many Questions.” His is a voice you won’t soon forget.

GREAT BIG SEA

Fortune’s Favour 

(RED EYE)

To understand the subtle allure of Great Big Sea (GBS), you have to look to their homeland, the rugged Canadian province of Newfoundland, where Celtic traditions still burn brightly and harsh winters are regularly warmed with music-fueled get-togethers. It’s no surprise, then, that front man Alan Doyle and his merry crew have tapped into traditional jigs for their rocky material, creating a wonderfully unique sound in the process. The band employs folk instruments like pipes, the Celtic bodhran and banjos alongside rollicking electric guitars, as this ninth effort reveals. Juxtaposed with more modern cuts (“Love Me Tonight,”“Walk on the Moon”) are history-hued oceanic odes like “England,”“Company of Fools” and “Banks of Newfoundland.” And when both styles dovetail perfectly, as on the Doyle showcase “Dance Dance,” GBS is truly one of the greatest rock combos working today – albeit a still relatively unknown one, but perhaps this slaphappy set will change all that.

BLACK KIDS

Partie Traumatic 

(COLUMBIA)

DEBORAH BONHAM

NIGH T L IFE & MUSIC

There are a few obvious reference points for Florida’s oddly dubbed Black Kids – most notably, Robert Smith circa his “Love Cats” yelpiest – echoing through front man Reggie Youngblood. But that’s where comparisons end: These alt-pop pundits playfully pillage everything from doo-wop to new wave, Beach Boys surf, even wahoo-ed Phil Spector on this delightful bow. And while The Cure could have penned a curiously quirky ditty like “I’m Not Going to Teach Your Boyfriend How to Dance” (easily one of the most addictive singles of the year), there’s a sunny streak beaming through that’s all the band’s own. They turn a tale of sexual perversity into a ‘50s sock-hop sing-along with “I’ve Underestimated My Charm (Again),” and a goofy sentiment like “I Wanna Be Your Limousine” into a suggestive Sly and the Family Stone stomp, all held together by Youngblood and the chirrupy backing chorus of his sister, Ali, and Dawn Watley (who anchor the cheeky rhythms on twin keyboards). Once you get past their pointedly controversial moniker, it’s tough to find any fault with these whimsical whippersnappers, another of ’08’s bright new hopes.

Duchess 

( AT C O )

All the ingredients look right – this soul-stirred songbird just happens to be the sister of late Led Zeppelin drummer John Bonham, the aunt of Jason, and a purported proponent of vintage blues. She even has Humble Pie’s Jerry Shirley slapping skins for her on this, her stateside debut (and third effort overall), and a groovy ’60s-psychedelic logo promising the spirit of a bygone era. But looks can be deceiving. The apple seems to have dropped pretty far from the family tree – her originals never really catch fire, her phraseology is tepid at best, and the whole performance feels like one of those small-town bar bands that never quite outgrow its dinky stage. You know the kind: They were playing local pubs when you were a kid, and they’re still booked at the same sad venues when you fly back to visit your folks 20 years later. Is there a place on the jukebox for moderately talented artists like this? Maybe, but you’re better off punching up an old Ann Peebles A-side instead. TW THEWAVEMAG.COM JUNE 30 - JULY 13, 2008

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join us for an event that’s been brewing since 1988. When: Saturday, July 12th noon to 7PM Gordon Biersch Brewery and Bottling Facility 357 East taylor Street, San Jose, CA Tickets: $40 Gordon Biersch is turning 20, but you must be 21 to party

Spectacular live music featuring: The Carlos Reyes band from 1:30pm-3:30pm The Gregg Rolie Band from 4:15pm-6:15pm Sports radio personalities Rod Brooks and Bob Fitzgerald of the famed KNBR Fitz and Brooks radio show will also be appearing.

Admission includes:

NIGH T L IFE & MUSIC

-Gordon Biersch Authentic German style beers, -Saag’s sausage sandwiches -Gordon Biersch’s trademarked Garlic Fries -soft drinks Tours will be given during the event

tickets can be purchased in advance through our website at: www.gordonbiersch.com/brewery or at Gordon Biersch brwery restaurants in San Jose, Palo alto, or San Francisco. our event is benefitting

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NIGHTLIFE&MUSIC: FEATURE

NIGHTLIFE&MUSIC F E AT U R E 70

The Playlist Just as painters need to obtain an extensive palette of colors, DJs need to collect an extensive catalog of songs.

The Next Song Transitioning is the most effective tool. Keeping the beat going or changing it dramatically with creativity and ease is a telltale sign of a great DJ.

The Equipment Reliable and loud. Depending upon the crowd and setting, volume will obviously vary. People need to hear the music at an exciting and enticing level, and any form of malfunction can be an absolute nightmare.

The Effect DJs hope and pray for an unforgettable set. Jimmy B comments, “Creating

[ C O N T. ]

a memorable atmosphere, whether it’s in a grimy underground, late-night loft… or somewhere in club land,” is what motivates and drives the artistic passion of a DJ. Of course, there are many other factors that come into play when executing a solid DJ set. But without the ingredients listed above, the mix will fall short. Other essential niceties deal with technique and style, most of which flow from experience and influence, the old and the new, and the ability to bring it all together into one single spectacular moment. Pablo Picasso once said, “There are painters who transform the sun to a yellow spot, but there are others who with the help of their art and their intelligence, transform a yellow spot into the sun.” A DJ takes the art of others and turns it into the art of their own: a collaborative effort spun into play by one’s sheer joy for and love of music. TW

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» INTERVIEW

Movies&TV JM: There were a couple of words that I found hard. “Girlfriend,” I found quite hard. Other than that, it was fine. I’ve got a voice coach that I use when I do American accents. She worked with everybody on Band of Brothers, but she also did Penelope with me. She wasn’t available for this, but she’s so good, I just couldn’t imagine working with anybody else, so I just thought I’d wing it. It worked out all right in the end – but the one word that I had to fix in looping was “girlfriend.” TW: Did you want to do all your own stunts? JM: I wanted to, but they wouldn’t let me. [But] I did a lot… probably 50 or 60 percent of my own stunts. TW: Did you get hurt? JM: I was really lucky, man. I never broke a single thing. I had a couple of sprains and a couple of twisted knees and ankles and stuff, but nothing more than I’d get playing football.

A Hit as a Hit Man Wanted star James McAvoy can do no wrong these days – except, perhaps, say “girlfriend.” BY FRED TOPEL

MOVIE: Wanted DIRECTED BY: Timur Bekmambetov STARRING: James McAvoy, Angelina Jolie, Morgan Freeman

MOVIES & T V

STUDIO: Universal Pictures

J

ames McAvoy may not be a target of the paparazzi, but after Wanted, he could soon hit the gossip magazines. The Last King of Scotland may have won the Glasgow-born actor awards and respect, but shooting guns with Angelina Jolie could make him a bona fide Hollywood star. McAvoy, a classically trained actor (at the Royal Scottish Academy of Music and Drama), plays Wesley Gibson, an average guy who is transformed from office geek to cool assassin after being taken in by a hit squad that trains him so well, he can make bullets curve through the air. The actor won endless praise for his role in the WWII-era film Atonement, but the rising star is clearly embracing his current contemporary role. The Wave: So, you’ve got your badass hit man look going on with the black leather jacket and jeans. James McAvoy: Hey, man. I have worn leather jackets in the past. I’m just so pleased to be publicizing a film

that doesn’t require me to wear a suit 24 hours a day, seven days a week. Because, generally, the films that I’ve been publicizing over the last two years have been very serious – and that’s great and I love them, but I hate wearing suits. So that’s the reason I did this film – so I could stop wearing suits. TW: Was working on Wanted different from your recent roles in other ways? JM: Kind of, yeah, because I’d never done a film that took four and a half months to shoot. Well, Narnia took five months or something like that, but I was hardly in it. When you spread it out over four months, there’s more opportunity for it to become disparate and disjointed. So you really have to be on top of your continuity and your script. You have to really ride the directors and the producers and kind of go, “Wait, wait, wait. While you’re making that decision, what happens before, can I do that actually?” Sometimes you make an ass of yourself, because you question them on everything, but sometimes you save stuff that could have gone really badly and really screw up your character’s arc. TW: Are you able to switch back and forth between your regular and your American accent?

TW: How hard was it balancing the drama with the outrageous humor in the film? JM: That was totally fun. I mean, I’m guilty of trying to find the humor in even the most serious of films that I’ve done, and it always gets edited out. So it was kind of a joy to be in an environment where the director and producers were saying, “No, no, no, try. You have an idea? Go for it. You want to fall down? Great, cool. There’s a rubber chicken over there if you want to get it in the frame. Here’s a banana skin.” TW: Did you ever have a mundane job you hated? JM: I had a very mundane job. I don’t know if I hated it, but, yeah, I worked as a baker for two years. It was very banal. TW: So you could identify with Wesley? JM: Yeah, I totally can identify. I loved where this character started. It’s a silly adventure, action piece of entertainment, but the character starts in a very truthful, sad place. I think he’s a proper sufferer of postmodern depression and apathy. I think that’s a condition, man, that’s all too evident amongst young men and women who’ve got fine lives, not bad, that can’t bring themselves to smile or feel better about their horrible existence. I thought that was quite an interesting place for your everyman to start from. TW: Was there one movie that changed your life as a kid and made you want to be an actor? JM: No, not really. I loved films when I was a kid – I watched a lot of films, but I never really considered acting a possibility. It was something that happened to other people, really. It wasn’t until someone gave me a job in a film that I kind of went, “Wow, this is an option? All right, okay.” TW Wanted is now showing in theaters everywhere. Get tickets at www.cineluxtheatres.com and www.cameracinemas.com NOTE: FOR MOVIE REVIEWS & PREVIEWS THIS ISSUE, HEAD TO WWW.THEWAVEMAG.COM

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MOVIES & TV: INTERVIEW

Did you know... the Camera Cinema Club has sneak previewed over 100 new films and that guests have included John Malkovich and Oliver Stone?

howing S w o N Encounters at the En Wanted C a me r a 1 2

Los Gatos

C a me r a 7

Camera 3

Downtown San Jose

Downtown Los Gatos

Pruneyard in Campbell

Downtown San Jose

408.998.3300

408.395.0203

408.559.6900

408. 998-3300

Cafe Too at Camera 3 MEAL DEAL 2nd Meal 50% OFF Buy One Meal at Cafe Too (Entree, Side Order and Drink) and receive a second one for 50% off. Lesser priced meal is the discounted one . Good thru July 9. Photocopies or duplicates not accepted.

Hancock

Avoid the lines. Online tickets now available

FREE validated parking

cameracinemas.com

MOVIES & T V

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» FEATURE

ARTS

Arts

Temporal Masterpieces Jim Denevan’s drawings take the earth as their canvas, if only for a limited time. BY TRACI VOGEL

I

n February 1995, Jim Denevan was walking along the beach by his house in Santa Cruz. “It was near evening,” he recalls, “the time of day where if you make a mark in the sand, it really stands out.”

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Pandemonium, Theatre on San Pedro Square

Denevan found himself idly drawing a line in the hard-packed sand with his finger. The line became a 15-foot-long drawing of a fish. The rest of the shoreline beckoned. “I proceeded to draw all over the entire beach, an area about half the size of a football field,” he says. “All shapes and figures: animals and waves and trees.” Denevan had found his canvas. In the years since, the 46-year-old chef and surfer has become a renowned land artist, acclaimed for his monumental sand drawings. Photographs of his work have been shown at Yerba Buena Center for the Arts in San Francisco and PS1/MOMA in New York, and he’s been featured on KQED’s arts program Spark. He recently completed what he thinks may be the world’s largest freehand drawing in a desert in Southern California. That’s right: freehand. Unlike most land artists, Denevan works without maps or diagrams, an approach

» FEATURE » EVENT LISTINGS » COLUMN: HOT TICK ET

78 80 81

that seems impossible considering the scale and precision of his work. Meticulously inscribed spirals, perfect circles, and impeccable rectangles all flow from the end of his driftwood stick, along with beautifully rendered organic forms of animals and people. The son of a math professor, Denevan appears to grasp intuitively how the shape he’s creating will exist in space, even taking into account the position from which it will be viewed. “I’m considering things like forced perspective – what happens when you see a piece from above,” he explains. “You’re not seeing it from directly above, you’re seeing it at an angle.” This viewing angle distorts the natural shape of the object, so the artist has to compensate. “Something may look like an equiangular triangle from the viewing spot, but if you flew an airplane over, you’d see that the triangle is much longer than it appears to be. 81


ARTS: FEATURE

$30 per child $55 for 2 Offer expires 7/13/08

t OPEN STUDIO t CLASSES t PRE-SCHOOL

Kid’s Night! Kid’s Night! t ART INSTRUCTION t SUMMER CAMPS t YOUTH

t PARTIES t STUDIO RENTAL t ADULTS ARTS

THEWAVEMAG.COM JUNE 30 - JULY 13, 2008

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» EVENT LISTINGS

ARTS EVENT All the Great Books (Abridged) San Jose Repertory Theatre

LISTINGS Sunnyvale (408) 720-0873

This classic farce, which spawned the hit musical Hello, Dolly!, follows a wealthy 1880s New Yorker who hires a matchmaker to find him a wife. Only the matchmaker is trying to find love herself: Thru 7/27. PICASSO AT THE LAPIN AGILE

Black Box Theatre, 848 E. William St., San Jose (408) 2887820 www.northsidetheatre.com

Billed as a “21st-century Alice in Wonderland,” this Steve Martinpenned comedy sees Albert Einstein and Pablo Picasso talking in a Parisian café in 1904, pre-Theory of Relativity and Cubism: Thru 7/13. ROUGH CROSSING

Dragon Theatre, 535 Alma St., Palo Alto (650) 493-2006 www.dragonproductions.net

Written by Tom Stoppard and directed by Dave Sikula, this production is being billed as “Stoppard’s version of a deliriously silly 1930s shipboard farce”: 7/11 – 8/3 [See Hot Ticket, page 81]. SNAPSHOTS

Mountain View Center for the Performing Arts, 500 Castro St., Mountain View (650) 903-6000 www.theatreworks.org

The latest musical by renowned Broadway and Hollywood composer Stephen Schwartz is a “musical scrapbook” of sorts that follows a struggling marriage: Thru 7/13.

MUSEUMS CANTOR ARTS CENTER Palm Dr. at Museum Way, Stanford University (650) 7234177 www.museum.stanford.edu

IF YOU HAVE AN IDEA FOR A LISTING, OR KNOW OF SOMETHING HAPPENING THAT YOU'RE AFRAID WE'LL OVERLOOK, PLEASE EMAIL YOUR ARTS EVENT TO EVENTS@THEWAVEMAG.COM.

ARTS

THEATRE BABES IN ARMS

Montgomery Theater, 271 S. Market St., San Jose (800) SAN-JOSE

The Children’s Musical Theater of San Jose puts on this production of a virtuous 1930s comedy about a group of teenagers that are left alone for two weeks so that they can stage their own production: 7/11 – 7/20. ALL THE GREAT BOOKS (ABRIDGED)

San Jose Repertory Theatre, 101 Paseo de San Antonio, San Jose (408) 367-7255 www.sjrep.com

The Bad Boys of Abridgement descend upon San Jose for the raucous comedy troupe’s first appearance in the South Bay. The London group performs, in rapid succession, snippets from all the great books, including hilarious takes on Proust, Longfellow, Dickens, Confucius, Thoreau, Swift and Tennyson: Thru 7/20. CHARLOTTE’S WEB

Clubberley Community Center Theatre, 4000 Middlefield Rd., Palo Alto (650) 329-2418

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Journey to Zuckerman’s Farm as a spider’s skillful web weaving saves a charismatic pig from his almost certain demise. Featuring songs by the composer of Annie: 7/11 – 7/20. GREASE

Saratoga Civic Theater, 13777 Fruitvale Ave., Saratoga (408) 268-3777 www.saratogadramagroup.com

If you don’t know who the Thunderbirds or Pink Ladies are, check your pulse, then go see this classic musical with all the classic tunes: Thru 7/19. HOMELAND PRAYER

The Pear Avenue Theatre, 1220 Pear Ave., Mountain View (650) 254-1148 www.thepear.org

A modern-day American family is “turned upside down” after the return of a young soldier wounded from battle: Thru 7/13. LIBERTY INN

Sunnyvale Community Center Theatre, 550 E. Remington Dr., Sunnyvale (408) 720-0873

Part of the California Theatre Center’s Summer Rep series, this witty comedy by the Bay Area’s Dakin Matthews follows Mirandolina as

THEWAVEMAG.COM JUNE 30 - JULY 13, 2008

she shrewdly runs the Liberty Inn during the American Revolution and encounters numerous eligible suitors: Thru 7/6. LUCKY DUCK, THE MUSICAL

Bus Barn Theater, 97 Hillview Ave., Los Altos (650) 941-0551 www.busbarn.org

The Los Altos Youth Theatre performs this Jillian Toby-directed musical about Serena, who goes from an ugly duck to a beautiful swan: 7/11 – 7/26. MARY’S WEDDING AND THE DOCK BRIEF

Sunnyvale Community Center Theatre, 550 E. Remington Dr., Sunnyvale (408) 720-0873

California Theatre Center’s Summer Rep series kicks off with a double bill of two short plays. Mary’s Wedding is Stephen Massicotte’s love story that “examines the enduring, painful cost of war,” while The Dock Brief is John Mortimer’s dark comedy about an “aging barrister asked to represent an alleged wife murderer”: Thru 7/20. THE MATCHMAKER

Sunnyvale Community Center Theatre, 550 E. Remington Dr.,

A New 19th Century: The reinstalled Mondavi Family Gallery features newly acquisitioned works by Monet, Renoir, Sargent and more: Ongoing. Auguste Rodin Collection: The largest collection of Rodin bronzes outside of Paris: Ongoing. African Art in Context: Photography, dress and other artifacts: Ongoing. Papua New Guinea Sculpture Garden: Wood and stone carvings of people, animals and mythical beings: Ongoing. Living Traditions: Arts of the Americas: A collection of work from diverse Native American peoples and times: Ongoing. Explore Outdoor Sculpture: Enjoy beautiful weather and the works of Auguste Rodin, Maya Lin, Beverly Pepper, Richard Serra and Andy Goldsworthy: Third Sunday of each month. Andy Warhol Prints: Featuring multiples from the Mao and Flowers series and from the Electric Chair series in addition to images of Elizabeth Taylor and Mick Jagger: Thru 11/30. Experiments in Navigation: The Art of Charles Hobson: An exhibit of Hobson’s artists books, a medium he has worked with for two decades: Thru 7/6. Spared from the Storm: Masterworks from the New Orleans Museum of Art: Eighty works, spanning five centuries, are part of an exhibition of European and American paintings saved from the Katrina disaster. Featured artists include Jackson Pollock, Claude Monet, Georgia O’Keeffe, Pablo Picasso and Pierre-Auguste Renoir: Thru 10/5. CHILDREN’S DISCOVERY MUSEUM 180 Woz Way, San Jose (408) 298-5437 www.cdm.org

Exciting interactive displays, galleries and activities for the whole family to enjoy: Ongoing.

DE SAISSET MUSEUM 500 El Camino Real, Santa Clara (408) 554-4528 www.scu.edu/desaisset

Eye on the Sixties: Vision, Body & Soul: Focusing on one of the most vibrant and dynamic decades in modern history, this exhibit includes painting, sculpture, drawings and prints by artists ranging from Frank Stella to Claes Oldenberg: Ongoing. HAKONE GARDENS 21000 Big Basin Way, Saratoga (408) 741-4994 www.hakone.com

Hina Doll and Kimono Exhibition: The Upper House of Hakone Gardens, one of the oldest Japanese estates in the Western Hemisphere, is now showcasing a display of ornamental dolls representing the Emperor and other historical figures in the traditional dress of the Heian period: Ongoing. HISTORY SAN JOSE 1650 Senter Rd., San Jose (408) 287-2290 www.historysanjose.org

A Breath of Plein Air: A show featuring 54 pieces by 25 local artists, showcasing the beauty of the Santa Clara Valley: San Jose, Santa Clara and Silicon Valley: Thru 9/21. JAPANESE AMERICAN MUSEUM OF SAN JOSE 535 N. Fifth St., San Jose (408) 294-3138 www.jamsj.org

Jack Matsuoka’s Cartoons: Making the Best of Poston: Documenting the incarceration of Japanese Americans during the 1940s: Ongoing. MEXICAN HERITAGE PLAZA

Space: Often categorized as ‘60sborne minimalism, vibrant colors and never-ending spaces encapsulate this exhibit: Thru 7/6. 01SJ Biennial: Superlight: Interactive, digital and other media are exhibited as part of the second Biennial Zero1 San Jose Global Festival of Art of the Edge. Thru 8/30. SAN JOSE MUSEUM OF QUILTS & TEXTILES 520 S. First St., San Jose (408) 971-0323 www.sjquiltmuseum.org

Beyond Knitting: Uncharted Stitches: An exhibition of contemporary sculptural knitting as defined by art knitting of the 21st century: Thru 8/24. Pun Intended: The Appliquéd Wit of Dorothy Vance: Fourteen humorous quilts featuring folk art, politics and pop culture: 8/24. TECH MUSEUM OF INNOVATION 201 S. Market St., San Jose (408) 294-TECH www.thetech.org

IDEA House: An interactive program space encourages you to formulate and synthesize like never before: Ongoing. Green by Design: Designs with a green approach, aiming to prevent environmental problems and improve lives: Ongoing. View from Space: Science made visible in an exhibit that displays weather, aircraft and daily patterns from space: Ongoing.

GALLERIES AICON GALLERY

1700 Alum Rock Ave., San Jose (408) 928-5524 www.mhcviva.org

535 Bryant St., Palo Alto (650) 321-4900

Mi Coche / My Culture – Livin’ the Lowrider Lifestyle: A unique, visual art experience that delves into the art and Chicano subculture of automobiles. Exploring the history of the Lowrider lifestyle, this exhibit pays homage to this cross-cultural movement through a variety of artistic genres: Thru 8/29.

150 San Fernando St., San Jose (408) 808-2000 www.sbawca.org

ROSICRUCIAN EGYPTIAN MUSEUM 1660 Park Ave., San Jose (408) 947-3636 www.egyptianmuseum.org

History of the Rosicrucian Egyptian Museum Exhibit: This exhibit shows the museum’s transformation from one artifact in an office to a museum with more than 4,000 artifacts: Ongoing. SAN JOSE INSTITUTE OF CONTEMPORARY ART 560 S. First St., San Jose (408) 283-8155 www.sjica.org

Monotype Marathon 2008: More than 100 artists feature an exhibition of monotypes as part of an educational fundraiser, culminating with a silent auction at the ICA: 7/1 – 7/19. Crater Bay Area: A participatory exhibition that is a lunar drawing competition to win deeds of land on the moon: Thru 8/2. Brendon Lott: Memories I’ll Never Have: Photographs from internet sharing networks are sent to China and reproduced as oil paintings: Thru 8/2. SAN JOSE MUSEUM OF ART 110 S. Market St., San Jose (408) 271-6840 www.sjmusart.org

Robots: Evolution of a Cultural Icon: An optimistic, pessimistic and at times humorous exhibition examining the development of robot iconography in fine art over the last half century: Thru 10/19. Fred Spratt: Color and

A solo exhibit of intricate heads and totemic sculptures by India native Mayyur Kailash Gupta, this will be his first exhibit in the US: Thru 7/12. DR. MARTIN LUTHER KING JR. LIBRARY

Inner Landscapes: An exhibit of realistic and abstract works “emphasizing the sublime beauty of imagination” as only the South Bay Area Women’s Caucus for the Arts can present: 7/3 – 7/30. GALLERY HOUSE 320 California Ave., Palo Alto (650) 326-1668 www.galleryhouse2.com

Featuring works by newly juried artists Jeff Emmerichs, Dan McLean, Carolyn Shaw, Mary Stahl, Eric Steppling and Karen White as part of the “new members” show: Thru 8/2. GREGORY KATE GALLERY 925 The Alameda, Ste. 101, San Jose (408) 271-2661 www.gregorykategallery.com

Water-themed, multiartist exhibition: More than 20 artists interpret the theme of “water”: 7/5 – 7/27. GALLERY SARATOGA 14435A Big Basin Way, Saratoga (408) 867-0458 www.gallerysaratoga.com

Liquid Light: A Romantic Journey: Using an experimental alternative photographic process called Liquid Light, which uses liquid photographic emulsion to coat watercolor paper and turn it into photographic paper, Karen Frocks exhibits images of Europe: 7/7 – 8/3. TW


» COLUMN: HOT TICK ET

ARTS

F E AT U R E

HOT

[CONT’D]

TICKET

A Relatively Straight Crossing

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Dragon Theatre stages one of Tom Stoppard’s less complicated, but no less entertaining, vehicles. BY MICHAEL J. VAUGHN

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The lines closer are skinnier, the lines farther away are fatter. It’s a bit of an illusion.”

Plenty of earth art, or landscape art, involves such major and permanent manipulation of the environment that it’s earned the name “monumental art.” Some, such as Robert Smithson’s famous Spiral Jetty, can even be seen via Google’s satellite imagery. Denevan takes the opposite approach. “I think it’s more fun, interesting, meaningful, if it disappears,” he says. “It’s more true to the way the world is. A lot of public art doesn’t come off so well because, for one thing, not everybody voted for it to be there. But everyone has to live with it – and sometimes people don’t want to.”

Success has drawn a line in the sand for Denevan. His creations have become a little less on-the-fly, more event-driven. Maybe that’s why he retreated to the desert for his last work, a three-mile-long freehand drawing. “I walked about 100 miles in the desert,” he explains. “I lived on the drawing while I was doing it. It’s on a dry lake bed, and dry lake beds are self-erasing surfaces.” The world’s largest freehand drawing may also have been one of its most short-lived, he adds. “There was a big rainstorm about three weeks after I finished, so it’s all disappeared now.” TW For more of Jim Denevan’s art, visit www.jimdenevan.com.

It’s easy to forgive such an antilogous explanation, because describing a Stoppard play is like trying to catch a beam of light in your hands. Sikula refers to Jumpers, which is about a professor’s marriage and also the nature of knowledge; and Arcadia, a story of two historians that also comments on chaos theory. By comparison, Crossing is pretty straightforward. “A playwright is threatened with his upcoming production falling apart and is forced to devise a way to save it,” explains Sikula. “That makes [the play] sound totally dull, but combine that with the romantic triangle, the musical numbers, the tipsy steward, the misunderstandings and all the other complications, and it builds on itself and takes off.” Some of the running gags in Crossing sound deliciously goofy. The lovers Natasha and Ivor can’t keep their real-life affair separated from their scripted one. The steward is unable to gain his sea legs until a turbulent storm provides the perfect complement to his perpetual drunkenness, while the composer has so much trouble beginning his sentences that he keeps talking incessantly for fear he’ll never start one again. The show includes 1930s-style songs (the original script also included

TICKET INFO

Rough Crossing, $13-$25, Jul. 11-Aug. 3, Dragon Theatre, 535 Alma St., Palo Alto (650) 493-2006 www.dragonproductions.net production numbers and six chorus girls). At first glance, says Sikula, “it was suddenly far more of a musical than I’d bargained for.” Fortunately, he found a tape of a 1995 production that proved otherwise. “Stoppard had extensively revised the script, cutting the chorus girls, moving huge chunks of text around, cutting some of the numbers and generally improving things.” An LA actor who made the switch to directing while at the University of Oregon, Sikula stresses the collaborative process, asking his actors to try new things. “One of the actors had a particular idea for an exit the other night, and I told him, ‘Well, if you’re going to do that, you have to do this as you exit to top it,’” the director continues. “Working together, we created a bit that’s totally in character, and also has two good gags. That’s what I always look for in actors.” TW

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ARTS

Denevan has also inscribed the beach with seemingly three-dimensional images: crosses and blocks that appear to pop up when seen from their intended viewing spot. The illusion appeals to him, but so does the elusive quality of the line in the sand. With the next high tide, or the next big wind, his work vanishes – and that’s OK with him. “I think, to do a very large drawing in the environment, it’s preferable that it disappears like magic,” he says. “For the simple fact that if it was constantly present in the environment, you’d have to respond to people’s reactions to it. It’s a little bombastic to do something so gigantic.”

Judging by their reactions, people are happy to live with Denevan’s drawings, even temporarily. When he inscribes a spiral, he says, couples will often walk to the center of it, pause, and kiss. Children jump over the lines and use the shapes to play tag. “For the first five or six years I did it, I didn’t want any press or attention,” he says. “I thought it was so wonderful that people would have no idea there would be anything at the beach that day. The work would be a surprise, and they could just walk up to it and do anything they wanted to it.”

om Stoppard may have based Rough Crossing on a 1924 farce by Hungarian playwright Ferenc Molnar, but it’s a good bet the master mind-bender didn’t stop at simple shenanigans. As soon as Dragon Productions director Dave Sikula tries to describe the 1985 shipboard play, the contradictions become apparent. “Where it becomes Stoppardian,” he says, “is that it’s very character-driven, rather than plot-driven. Though, of course, being a farce, the plot does drive it.”


» feature

Family&Community Crocheted bear, owl and cardinal by Tracy Katz. Made with crochet hook, yarn dyed with Kool-Aid and buttons for eyes and nose.

» » » »

FEATURE EVENT LISTINGS FARMERS MARK ETS WEDDING PLANNING

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frustration is making mistakes and not knowing how to get out of it.” Taking classes with instructors on hand can remedy the frustration. Although there are books and websites that can teach you to knit, it is much easier to learn in a social setting. “Most people are kinesthetic or visual learners, so if they can see and feel and be told what to do, it works out better than looking at pictures that don’t tell you what to do when you get stuck,” explains Faris. At Commuknity, a variety of classes cater to everyone from knitting novices to highly experienced yarn handlers. Workshops are separated into beginner, intermediate and advanced levels, and classes range from those addressing how to correct mistakes to lessons focusing on specific items, such as scarves or socks, or other fiber arts, including crochet. Participating in classes is more than just a learning experience – it introduces participants to others who share ideas. “It’s nice to meet others who have a similar hobby and enthusiasm,” says Faris. For some, the camaraderie found in classes is reason enough to continue knitting. “People have fun together while learning and sharing in classes. And sometimes, people will just show up to knit and hang out. It becomes a big social outlet,” adds Faris. In addition to opening the door to social networks, knitting can be therapeutic. “Once you catch on, and you’re creating a product, knitting becomes a healing and stress reducing activity,” Faris notes. The repetitive motion of knitting is said to be relaxing, while focusing on creating a product can also be considered therapeutic. The end result is more than rewarding – you not only have reduced stress levels, but have a cute hat or sweater to show off, give as a gift, or donate to charity.

Hooked on Knitting

FA MILY & COMMUNIT Y

Why the younger generation is casting a “Yes” vote for this vintage pastime.

Project Linus (www.projectlinus.org) is just one of the outreach programs Commuknity works with, providing charitable reasons to pick up the knitting

BY JENN KATZ

K

nitting – once thought of as the domain of grandmothers in rocking chairs – has somehow become a trendy activity among the younger set. Knitters can be spotted in coffee shops, on buses and trains, and even at bars during happy hour. So many twenty- and thirtysomethings have become social knitters, enjoying pints of Guinness as they transform balls of yarn into fashionable, wearable pieces, that some are dubbing knitting “the new book club.” So just how did the hobby’s image jump from the hip-replacement set to the just plain hip? “I think it’s a combination of the fashionable do-it-yourself movement spearheaded by young people in their 20s and 30s, and the yarn companies responding by having different kinds of fibers and technologies to work with,” says Gail Faris, owner of Commuknity, a San

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KNITTING 101

Jose yarn shop that is also something of a hub for the local social knitting scene. Faris adds, “The internet is so incredibly powerful in the knitting world… social chat rooms drive trends – everyone is connected.” Why spend time knitting when you can buy something premade? Being able to tailor pieces to fit perfectly is one reason. “Let’s say you’re long-waisted; you can make the sweater pattern longer. Let’s say you have large hips; you can make a crop sweater. You can individualize anything you make,” says Faris. But learning to knit takes time and patience. “It depends on the person and temperament,” Faris says. “It took me maybe six months [to learn]. The main

Ready to get your knit on? Here are some of the basic terms you’ll need to know: Casting on: The first step in knitting, this is a way of securing the yarn to the needle. Knit stitch: Knitting consists of loops that are pulled through each other, called stitches. The knit stitch is set up so that the next stitch can pass through the previous loop from below (pulling it through the yarn from the back). Once done, it will look like a V. Purl stitch: This is the opposite of a knit stitch, and is set up so that the next stitch can pass through the previous loop from above (pulling it through the yarn from the front). Once done, it will look like a wavy rainbow. Binding off: The method with which to make a finished edge and remove the stitches from the needle.


FAMILY & COMMUNIT Y: FEATURE

Summer Sports Camps start June 16!

Beat the heat and be active this summer with Camps & Classes at Silver Creek Sportsplex

SOCCER

Outstanding indoor and outdoor programs for 7-14 year olds. SOCCER ACADEMY: Build skills with professional coaching. Sign up for training and weekly games; or training alone. SOCCER LEAGUE: Outdoor league in partnership with PAL SOCCER CAMP: Full day and Half day camps

y! Call toda 74 7 .8 4 408.22

MIGHTY CUBS

more There’s l Arts

!

Martia ckey o Roller H ing Swimm Yoga s too rogram for p lt u d A b site See we ils deta

Soccer-based child development program We use sports themes to help focus on physical development. Fun, non-competitive games promote physical fitness, motor skills development, and self confidence. CLASSES: For ages 18 mos. - 6 yrs. Flexible monthly plans. CAMP: Half day camp for 5 & 6 year olds.

www.silvercreeksportsplex.com/kids Birthday Caboose A private coach for your party takes you to Bear Mountain

One-Room School House A private one room school house for your party

Blue Ox Canopy

Children’s Discovery Museum of San Jose 7OZ7AYs3AN*OSEs#!ss  sWWWCDMORG

Located on Graham Hill Rd., Felton, CA Customize your birthday party with additional entertainment options. For more information call (831) (831 831)) 335-4484 or visit roaringcamp.com

A covered outdoor area for your party on the lawn

Thomas the Tank Tank Engine™ A themed party for an aspiring engineer and up to 20 guests

FA MILY & COMMUNIT Y

EXHIBIT NOW OPEN! Discover a fascinating world that inspires curiosity and helps make the unknown more familiar, maybe even logical, and certainly fun!

Š2008 Children’s Discovery Museum of San Jose. All Rights Reserved. Alice’s Wonderland exhibit is created and circulated by Children’s Discovery Museum of San Jose with major funding from the National Science Foundation and the MetLife Foundation.

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» EVENT LISTINGS

FAMILY&COMMUNITY EVENT

LISTINGS FIRST ANNUAL BIG BANDS & BBQ FESTIVAL: 7/12

Obon Festival: 7/12 - 13, Mountain View Buddhist Temple

Campbell Ave., near Third & Railway Sts., Campbell (408) 866-5888 www.downtowncampbell.com

Washington Square, 2200 Broadway, Redwood City (650) 285-7719 www.palbluesfestival.com

Enjoy big dance bands, dancing, artisan booths, DJs, four stages of live music from Papa Hugs, Marcus Shelby’s Big Band, Lavay Smith and the Red Hot Skillet Lickers, House Rockers and, of course, fantastic barbecue: 2 - 9pm

Enjoy great blues music from Frank Bey, Craig Horton, Ron Thompson, Jan Fanucchi & Steve Freund and many more, along with 40 art booths, food and tons of activities for kids: Noon - 8pm

29TH ANNUAL LOS ALTOS ARTS & WINE FESTIVAL: 7/12 - 13

37TH ANNUAL STANFORD JAZZ FESTIVAL: THRU 8/9

Downtown Los Altos Main & State Sts. www.losaltos-downtown.org

Stanford Campus – Stanford University www.stanfordjazz.org

Live music, children’s activities, fine wine, gourmet food and don’t forget the wonderful art!: 10am - 6pm OBON FESTIVAL: 7/12 - 13 Mountain View Buddhist Temple, Mountain View www.jtown.org

Tour the temple and take part in games and activities, a cultural bazaar, exhibits, dancing, music, raffles and, of course, great food.

BUSINESS ACCELERATED NETWORKING DINNER: 7/2 Villa Ragusa, 35 S. Second St., Campbell (408) 288-8484 www.ewomennetwork.com

Enjoy a great dinner followed by a presentation from Michelle Stone, “Overcoming the Terror Barrier”: 5 - 8:15pm SAN JOSE SILICON VALLEY CHAMBER OF COMMERCE NETWORKING MIXER: 7/9

FA MILY & COMMUNIT Y

Double Tree Hotel, 2050 Gateway Pl., San Jose (408) 291-5286 www.sjchamber.com

Come out for the chamber’s monthly mixer and make some top-notch business contacts: 5:30 - 7:30pm

» FARMERS MARKETS

CLUB MEETINGS FUN TIME SINGERS: WEDNESDAYS Prince of Peace Lutheran Church, 12770 Saratoga Ave., Saratoga www.funtimesingers.org

A lively and diverse community choir invites men and women to join their group: 7:15 - 9:30pm

FESTIVALS & EXPOS 17TH ANNUAL TAHITI FETE OF SAN JOSE: 7/3 - 6 San Jose State University Event Center, 290 S. Seventh St., San Jose www.tahitifete.com

Tahitian dance companies from Hawaii, California, Mexico, Japan, Canada and, of course, Tahiti descend on San Jose for the annual French Polynesian celebration of Bastille Day.

FARMERS

Campbell: Sunday 9am – 1pm (year round) Campbell Ave. at Central & First Sts. (510) 745-7100 Cupertino: Friday 9am – 1pm (year round) Vallco Fashion Park Parking Lot, 10123 Wolfe Rd. (800) 949-FARM Los Gatos: Sunday 8am – 12:30pm (year round) Montebello Way & Broadway Extension (408) 353-5355 Mountain View: Sunday 9am – 1pm (year round) Hope & Evelyn (800) 806-FARM

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27 ANNUAL SUMMER FESTIVAL & CHILI COOKOFF: 7/4 Mitchell Park, 600 E. Meadow Dr., Palo Alto www.cityofpaloalto.org

Teams of amateur and professional chili chefs will bring their “A” game in this battle for cash and prizes, along with live music, activities for the kids and more: Noon - 5pm

If you’re a writer, or wannabe writer, this event is a must. The conference provides Foothill students and emerging writers in the Bay Area with the unique opportunity to work with established writers such as Kathleen de Azevedo, Dan Bellm, Denny Berthiaume, Bonnie Bonner, Andrea Hollander Budy and many more.

MARKETS

Palo Alto: Sunday 9am – 1pm (year round) California Ave. & El Camino Real (800) 806-FARM San Jose: Sunday 10am – 3pm (year round) Stevens Creek & Winchester (800) 949-FARM San Jose: Friday 10am – 2pm (year round) Kaiser Santa Teresa Parking Lot (800) 949-FARM San Jose: Sunday 8:30am – Noon (year round) Japantown, Jackson between Sixth & Seventh Sts. (408) 298-4303 San Jose: Sunday 10am – 2pm (year round) Princeton Plaza, Kooser & Meridian (800) 806-FARM

THEWAVEMAG.COM JUNE 30 - JULY 13, 2008

Santa Clara: Thursday 10am – 2pm (year round) Santa Clara Kaiser Parking Lot (800) 949-FARM Santa Clara: Saturday 9am – 1pm (year round) Jackson St. between Homestead & Benton (510) 745-7100 Saratoga: Saturday 9am – 1pm (year round) Saratoga West Valley College, Fruitvale & Allendale Aves. (800) 806-FARM Sunnyvale: Saturday 9am – 1pm (year round) S. Murphy Ave. at Washington and Evelyn (510) 745-7100

ART AT THE BEACH: THRU 8/17 Esplanade Park – Capitola Beach, Capitola (831) 419-7485

FAMILY ACTIVITIES

The Palo Alto Art Center, 1313 Newell Rd., Palo Alto (650) 329-2366 www.acga.net

Join more than 180 artists for carving and wheel-throwing demonstrations, plus thousands of beautiful clay and glass pieces on display for your viewing pleasure and/or purchase: 10am - 5pm 2008 CONNOISSEURS’ MARKETPLACE: 7/19 - 20 Santa Cruz Ave. at El Camino Real, Menlo Park www.pacificfinearts.com

SAN JOSE AMERICA FESTIVAL: 7/4 - 6 San Carlos St. & Woz Way, San Jose www.americafestival.com

Enjoy two stages of live music featuring Night Ranger, Greg Kihn and Starship, cultural entertainment, arts & crafts from around the world, great food, activities for the kids and more!

A vibrant extravaganza of art, music, food, wine and all-around family fun: 10am - 6pm

32ND ANNUAL FOOTHILL COLLEGE WRITERS’ CONFERENCE: 7/9 - 13 Foothill College, 12345 El Monte Rd., Los Altos Hills www.foothill.edu/la/conference

The Stanford Jazz Festival showcases more than 100 artists, including Terence Blanchard, Josh Redman, Kenny Burrell, Mulgrew Miller, John Scofield, Gary Bartz and many more.

Head to picturesque Capitola for a full day of nothing but perusing and purchasing wonderful art!: 11am – 6pm

16TH ANNUAL PALO ALTO CLAY & GLASS FESTIVAL: 7/12 - 13 IF YOU HAVE AN IDEA FOR A LISTING, OR KNOW OF SOMETHING HAPPENING THAT YOU'RE AFRAID WE'LL OVERLOOK, PLEASE EMAIL YOUR COMMUNIT Y EVENT TO EVENTS@THEWAVEMAG.COM.

THIRD ANNUAL REDWOOD CITY PAL BLUES & ART SQUARE FESTIVAL: 7/19

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needles. The project focuses on making blankets and clothing for children in need. Commuknity has also partnered with the Helping Hands Foundation (www.helpinghandsgroup. org), a nonprofit organization that teaches children various needle arts. “Children learn to overcome difficulties when learning how to knit,” Faris says. “Knitting helps with motor skills and even corresponds with math skills. More and more afterschool programs are encouraging kids to knit.” In addition to classes, social activities, and connections to outreach programs, local shops feature the essential supplies and accessories for avid knitters: patterns, books, needles, and endless yards of yarn in an array of colors and types, from cotton and wool to llama and cashmere.

FIREWORKS SPECTACULAR: 7/4 Downtown Redwood City, Broadway & Jefferson www.parade.org

You’ll keep busy at this year’s festival, with arts & crafts, clowns, food, kids area, an awesome parade and fireworks. FAMILY PAST TIMES PROGRAM: 7/4 San Mateo County History Museum, 2200 Broadway St., Redwood City (650) 299-0104 www.historysmc.org

Celebrate Independence Day by making whirligigs, parachutes to fly, American flags and hand-cranking homemade ice cream: 10am - 4pm SAN JOSE GIANTS FIREWORKS EXTRAVAGANZA: 7/4 - 5 Municipal Stadium, 588 E. Alma Ave., San Jose www.sjgiants.com

Bring the whole family and watch some great baseball, and on the Fourth, enjoy a fabulous pyrotechnics display: 6:30pm INDEPENDENCE DAY CELEBRATION: 7/4 Ardenwood Historic Farm, 34600 Ardenwood Blvd., Fremont (510) 796-0663

Celebrate the Fourth 1900s-style, with patriotic music by a brass band on the lawn, fiddle music in the farmyard, and games and contests for everyone! Don’t forget to bring your picnicking gear. FOURTH OF JULY ALL CITY PICNIC AND FIREWORKS EXTRAVAGANZA: 7/4 Central Park, 969 Kiely Blvd., Santa Clara (408) 615-3140 santaclara.ca.gov/events/fourthof-july.html

Bring the whole family for a day filled with carnival rides, petting zoo, face painting, live music, great food, activities for the kids, patriotic music and fireworks.

[CONT’D]

Knitting enthusiasts could easily become giddy in specialty yarn shops, thinking of all the project possibilities. But it’s important to keep in mind that with people’s overlyscheduled lives, knitting should never become just another chore. Though some may get excited by the prospect of creating their own cashmere sweater while also multitasking in a night with the girls, knitting is actually supposed to calm you down. “Having yarn in your hand is just a very comforting, rewarding, kinesthetic event you can’t really get by buying something,” says Faris. “You end up with something you created and you like and feel good about. It’s not a job, and it’s not some race – knitting is a lifestyle.” TW Commuknity, 1345 The Alameda, San Jose (408) 293-9333 www.commuknity.com


EVENT 16th Annual Palo Alto Clay & Glass Festival: 7/12 - 13, The Palo Alto Art Center

and Saturday’s Lesson (1929), with Bruce Loeb on piano: 7:30pm RED, WHITE & COOL: 7/6 Gilroy Gardens, 3050 Hecker Pass Hwy, Gilroy www.gilroygardens.org

Gilroy Gardens invites you to enjoy the annual all-you-can-eat barbecue with the whole family.

LISTINGS SIXTH VASONA VIBRATIONS FREE CONCERT SERIES: THRU 7/26 Vasona Lake County Park, 333 Blossom Hill Rd., Los Gatos (408) 354-2608 www. southbayfolks.org

Mountain View (650) 903-6000

NINTH ANNUAL SUNNYVALE SUMMER SERIES: THRU 8/27

San Francisco Zoo, One Zoo Rd., San Francisco www.sfzoo.org

CHILDREN’S THEATRE IN THE PARK: THRU 8/17

Every child 11 and under who brings a teddy bear to the zoo receives FREE admission and a full day of bear activities, including visiting grizzly bears and polar bears, making crafts and having fun!: 11am - 3pm

Mountain View Center for the Performing Arts, 500 Castro St.,

S. Murphy Ave. between Washington & Evelyn, Sunnyvale www.downtownsunnyvale.com

CIRQUE DE LA BASTILLE: UNDER THE BIG TOP!: 7/12 - 13 Santana Row, Winchester & Stevens Creek Blvds., San Jose (408) 551-4611 www.santanarow.com

Cruise over to Sunnyvale every Wednesday and enjoy a fine

Shoreline Amphitheatre, One Amphitheatre Pkwy., Mountain View www.shorelineamp.com

When we say this is a full-day event, we mean it’s literally FULL of events, with a three-hour preconcert Radio Disney Family Festival Zone with interactive games, prizes, giveaways, live music, followed by a performance from the San Francisco Symphony and ending with an enormous fireworks display!: 5 - 10pm LOS GATOS CELEBRATES THE FOURTH OF JULY: 7/4 110 E. Main St., Los Gatos

WEDDING PLANNING

» WEDDING PL ANNING

CHAIR COVER RENTAL/DECORATIONS

Nicolette Couture Bridal Boutique

Lynn’s Wedding Services Milpitas (408) 398-2199 www.lynnweddingservices.com Full service chair cover rental and much more! Chair cover and linen rental, wedding flowers, candelabras, party rentals, hall and stage decorations, hair and makeup. INSURANCE

Valerie Young Vedda

MORGAN HILL JULY FOURTH CELEBRATION: 7/4 Downtown Morgan Hill www.mhidi.com

Morgan Hill’s patriotic celebration features a parade, 5K race, and a family festival with live music, great food and a dazzling fireworks celebration: 7:45am FOURTH OF JULY CELEBRATION: 7/4 Roaring Camp, Graham Hill Rd. & Mt. Hermon Rd., Felton www.roaringcamp.com

Pack up the family and head to Roaring Camp for a day of family fun, with sack races, balloon tosses, hulahoop contests, music and more.

Spend the Fourth enjoying free sailboat rides and dragon boat rides, live entertainment, arts & crafts and, of course, a fireworks display! PIER 39 JULY FOURTH CELEBRATION: 7/4 Pier 39, Beach St. & The Embarcadero, San Francisco www.pier39.com

Listen to live music from Big Bang Beat and Tainted Love, followed by an amazing pyrotechnics display: 1- 9:30pm INDEPENDENCE DAY ON THE USS HORNET: 7/4

Pier 3, Alameda www.uss-hornet.org

Spend the day aboard the carrier USS Hornet, enjoying ongoing tours, live music from The Unauthorized Rolling Stones, The Cocktail Monkeys, The Replay Band, Romano Marchetti Orchestra, and Starboard Watch, along with games, beer and wine, great food and a wonderful view of fireworks. NOTE: AS OF PRESS TIME, THERE REMAINED A POSSIBILITY THAT FIREWORKS DISPLAYS AT SOME EVENTS MAY BE CANCELED IN LIGHT OF THE RECENT FIRES IN THE BAY AREA. PLEASE CHECK EVENT WEBSITES OR CONTACT THE ORGANIZERS FOR UPDATES.

SATURDAY NIGHT SILENT MOVIES: 7/5 Edison Theater – Niles Essanay Silent Film Museum, 37417 Niles Blvd., Fremont www.nilesfilmmuseum.org

Are your Saturday nights becoming mundane? Well, we’ve got something for you. Head over to the Edison Theater in Fremont and enjoy an evening of silent films featuring The Busher (1919), Alkali Ike’s Auto (1911)

NINTH ANNUAL STRANGERS BBQ & CAR SHOW: 7/13 Kelly Park, 1650 Senter Rd., San Jose www.strangerscarclub.com

Check out some of the coolest pre-1965 hot rods and customs around, enjoy great music, browse art vendors, and if you bring meat, they’ll even barbecue it for you: 10am - 4pm INTEL MUSEUM SERIOUS SUMMER FUN: SCHEMATICS, SWITCHES AND CIRCUITS: 7/17 The Intel Museum, 2200 College Blvd., Santa Clara (408) 7650503 www.intel.com/museum

Children ages nine and up will learn to decode schematics and understand basic circuitry as they work with wires, batteries and switches – kids even get to build a doorbell chime or a burglar alarm! CALIFORNIA EXTREME: 7/19 - 20 Parkside Hall, San Jose Convention Center, 180 Park Ave., San Jose www.caextreme.org

Spend two days dedicated to classic arcade games, along with tournaments, speakers and vendors, with the best part being ALL the games are set on FREE PLAY! SONGWRITERS UNDER THE STARS: THURSDAYS THRU 7/24 In the Concierge Lounge at Santana Row, Olin Ave. (408) 551-4611 www.santanarow.com

Head on over to Santana Row and listen to some great bands such as Randy Maher, Eric Bolvin, Ray Soto, Miena Yoo and Steve Krizer: 6 - 9pm

ACCOMMODATIONS

181 Metro Dr., Ste. 290, San Jose (408) 930-1290 Learn about the value of your insurance coverage through a friendly review of your current policies and benefit from our multiline discounts for home, auto and life insurance. CA License 0F86939

Hotel Los Gatos & Spa

RECEPTIONS

210 E. Main St., Los Gatos (408) 335-1700 www.hotellosgatos.com Mediterranean-styled villas providing luxurious guest rooms and suites. Nestled at the base of the Santa Cruz Mountains and within walking distance of the many shops, restaurants and galleries. Home to Preston Wynne Spa & Dio Deka Restaurant.

Hotel Los Gatos & Spa 210 E. Main St., Los Gatos (408) 335-1700 www.hotellosgatos.com Mediterranean ambience provides luxurious banquet facilities for events to accommodate up to 130 guests at various locations, including our Indoor Monte Sereno Ballroom, Outdoor Courtyard & Pool Terrace.

BACHELORETTE PARTIES

SALON

Jewelsexpression 1445 Foxworthy Ave., San Jose www.jewelsexpression.com Jewelsexpression offers exotic dancing classes with a softer touch. Designed for women of all shapes, sizes and ages, you’ll learn the art of the “walk,” floor performing, and faux pole and chair dancing. Great for bridal showers and bachelorette parties. BEAUTY SALON

Shangri-La Lotus Salon & Spa

The Alexandria Salon & Spa 1346 The Alameda, Ste. 8, San Jose (408) 971-2926 www.thealexandriasalon.com Hair, skincare, massage, makeup and waxing services provided by a friendly and skilled staff in our relaxed spa environment. Come see our newly added clothing boutique. TANNING

413A Monterey Ave., San Jose (408) 623-3963 www.jennybeauty.com Look your very best for your day. We provide the perfect makeup for your entire wedding party – bride, attendants and both mothers. Flawless makeup complements your dresses and location, allowing your photographer/videographer to provide you with the best memories. Whether you come to us or we come to you, everything will be done to your satisfaction. ENTERTAINMENT

Thoro-Bread Entertainment (650) 248-3803 We provide DJ services for all occasions, and offer a wide range of music, including today’s greatest hits, hip-hop, reggae, dancehall, soul, oldies, Spanish music and much more. So, next time you’re thinking about having a party, give us a call and leave the music to us! FLORIST

Abercrombie Flowers & Gifts 120 S. Sunnyvale Ave., Sunnyvale (408) 245-0130 Luscious wedding bouquets, distinctive reception and exotic centerpieces for your luxurious and lavish soiree. Corporate gifts, funerals and events are other areas of our expertise!

Parlour 308 Airbrush Tanning 308 E. Main St., Los Gatos (408) 354-9308 www.parlour308salon.com Professional, comfortable and discreet. Your tan is applied by hand, using an airbrush. The solution is customized for every client, to create a natural sun-kissed tan. TRAVEL

Cruise Planners 5669 Snell Ave., Ste. 372, San Jose (408) 715-7196 Our travel agency specializes in designing a vacation that exceeds your expectations. Our passion is to plan a seamless and exciting cruise and travel experience. Call us today to start planning your dream vacation memories. WEDDING GOWNS

Nicolette Couture Bridal Boutique 15 El Toro Ave., Morgan Hill (408) 779-6146 www.nicolettecouture.com Features four gorgeous wedding gown designers, one of which is exclusive to our boutique for all of Northern California. We offer a no pressure, memorable shopping experience for your dream wedding gown.

FOR MORE INFORMATION, LOG ON TO WWW.THEWAVEMAG.COM THEWAVEMAG.COM JUNE 30 - JULY 13, 2008

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FA MILY & COMMUNIT Y

Los Gatos says “Happy Birthday, America” in a good old-fashioned way. The town gets all decked out in red, white and blue and holds an All-American Picnic & Games with a traditional band concert on the high school lawn. After the concert, there’s a free cake and ice cream social. The daylong activities end with a twilight dance with music for every generation.

201 University Ave., Berkeley www.cityofberkeley.info/marina/ events.html

The ultimate radio controlled model air show features miniature WWII fighters with real turbine jets, plus remotely operated race planes and helicopters and a flying Snoopy’s doghouse: 9am -3pm

Grab your friends, a blanket and a lawn chair and enjoy free outdoor movies every Thursday: Sundown 86

RADIO CONTROLLED MODEL AIRSHOW: 7/12 - 13 Santa Clara County Model Aircraft Skypark, 10250 Monterey Rd., Morgan Hill airshow.sccmas.org

Courthouse Square, Downtown Redwood City, 2200 Broadway www.redwoodcityevents.com

SV

Everyone is invited to come and celebrate Bastille Day with an exciting three-ring circus, French poodle parade, wine tastings, fashion shows and more!

FOURTH OF JULY AT THE BERKELEY MARINA: 7/4

MOVIES ON THE SQUARE: THRU 8/28

What could be better than lounging by a lovely lakeside and listening to free music? NOTHING!

TEDDY BEAR FESTIVAL: 7/12 - 13

RADIO DISNEY’S EVENING OF MAGIC & MUSIC: A FOURTH OF JULY FIREWORKS SPECTACULAR: 7/4

collection of arts & crafts, food booths and live music from T.Y.T., The Hitmen, Andre Thierry, Sage, Mama Pacho, Dub FX, Double Funk Crunch and many more: 5 - 8pm

The Peninsula Youth Theatre invites one and all to join them for their free theatre in the park, featuring presentations of The Little Mermaid, Under the Big Top, Jack and the Three Sillies, and Elves and the Shoemaker.


FAMILY & COMMUNIT Y: LISTINGS

FAMILY&COMMUNITY F E AT U R E 85

FREE FRIDAY NIGHT BEACH CONCERTS: THRU 8/29 Santa Cruz Beach Boardwalk, 400 Beach St., Santa Cruz (831) 423-5590 www.beachboardwalk.com

Summer again brings exciting free Friday night concerts to the Boardwalk’s Beach Bandstand. Look for classic bands from the ’60s, ’70s and ’80s. The Romantics, Rare Earth, John Waite, Blue Oyster Cult, Gin Blossoms and many more. MIDNIGHT MOVIE MADNESS: THRU 8/30 Camera 7, The Pruneyard, 1875 S. Bascom Ave., Campbell www.cameracinemas.com

Not only are cult classics (like The Thing, The Big Lebowski, Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas) shown at the stroke of midnight, but Camera Cinemas will be giving away concert tickets, T-shirts and other goodies to attendees. And it’s only $7.50! MUSIC ON THE SQUARE: THRU 10/3 Courthouse Square, Downtown Redwood City, 2200 Broadway www.redwoodcityevents.com

Enjoy free music on the square every Friday night: 6 - 8pm

FUNDRAISERS SEVENTH ANNUAL BREAK DANCING FUNDRAISER: 7/12 Alum Rock Youth Center, 137 N. White Rd., San Jose (408) 2515757 www.myspace.com/miavie

Hey, all you B-Girls and Boys, it’s time to see what you got! Take part in this 3 vs. 3 break dancing competition, with all proceeds going towards the Alum Rock Youth Center: 7 - 11pm SUPPORT OUR TROOPS DINNER: 7/12 Bella Mia Restaurant, 58 S. First St., San Jose (408) 280-

FA MILY & COMMUNIT Y

Why are businesswomen joining eWomenNetwork? • To acquire more customers. • To market and promote what they offer. • To join our community of women helping women.

Let’s get connected. I’d love to learn more about you. Kristy Rogers Managing Director kristyrogers@eWomenNetwork.com 408-288-8484

Connecting and promoting women and their businesses

www.eWomenNetwork.com 86

THEWAVEMAG.COM JUNE 30 - JULY 13, 2008

[ C O N T. ]

1993 www.bellamia.com

Support our troops while enjoying a delicious meal and live entertainment with 10 percent of your bill going towards our troops: 6 - 9pm SAN JOSE LIVESTRONG CHALLENGE: 7/13 Festival Area at S. Almaden Blvd. & Park Ave., San Jose www.livestrongchallenge.org

Cyclists, runners, walkers, cancer survivors and spectators of all ages will unite to fight cancer at the San Jose LIVESTRONG Challenge: 7:30am – 5:30pm CHEFS WHO CARE: 7/14 - 15 Aldo Los Altos, 388 Main St., Los Altos (650) 961-3584 www.csacares.org/html/chefs_ who_care.html

Enjoy a fantastic prix-fixe dinner at Aldo and help raise needed funds, with 50 percent of all proceeds benefiting the Community Services Agency Food & Nutrition Center: 5:30 - 7:30pm TAUPOU BINGO: THURSDAYS San Jose Moose Lodge #401, 1825 Mt. Pleasant Rd., San Jose

Come out and play bingo and help raise funds for The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society: 6:45pm

HEALTH & WELLNESS MS SOCIAL: AN ACCELERATED CURE EVENT: 7/9 Gordon Biersch Brewery, 640 Emerson St., Palo Alto (415) 392-0100 www.acceleratedcure.org

Come meet people with MS (multiple sclerosis), their families and significant others in a fun social setting: 6:30 - 9pm KICK START EAT SMART: 7/12 - 13 Children’s Discovery Museum, Woz Way & Auzerais St., San Jose www.cdm.org

Join the Children’s Discovery Museum for a weekend of healthy fun, including family yoga, folklorico dancing, family jazzercise and more! HEALTH & HAPPINESS 2008: 7/15 - 16 Hyatt Regency, -Santa Clara www.events.artofliving. org/hh2008

Join his holiness Sri Sri Ravi Shankar as he shows you the life changing discipline of practicing yoga: 6 - 8pm

VOLUNTEER BECOME A BIG BROTHER OR BIG SISTER (408) 876-4193 www.emp.org

Become a mentor and be a positive influence on a child’s life and it’ll only cost you two hours a week!

WORKSHOPS & CLASSES SCIENCE UNDER THE BIG TOP: 7/11 Guadalupe River Park & Gardens Visitor & Education Center, 438 Coleman Ave., San Jose (408) 298-7657 www.grpg.org

Explore the science of the circus in this fun workshop where you’ll learn magic tricks and even try your hand at juggling: 3:30 - 5pm FLOWER ARRANGING 101: 7/12 Guadalupe River Park & Gardens Visitor & Education Center, 438 Coleman Ave., San Jose (408) 298-7657 www.grpg.org

Okay, it’s summer and you have a backyard full of beautiful flowers. So now what? We’ll tell you. Join master gardeners Milli Wright and Bette Lloyd as they show you how to create the most wonderful flower arrangements: 1:30 - 3:30pm TW


FAMILY & COMMUNIT Y: LISTINGS

WANTS YOU TO CELEBRATE! For your chance to win a prize pack from

including tickets to see the film, email your name, date of birth and complete address to: MammaMiaSF @alliedadvpub.com THIS FILM IS RATED PG-13 (Parents Strongly Cautioned Some Material May Be Inappropriate for Children Under 13) for some sex-related comments. NO PURCHASE NECESSARY. Passes received through this promotion do not guarantee admission and must be surrendered upon demand. Theatre is overbooked to ensure a full house. Seating is on a first-come, first-served basis. No one will be admitted without a ticket or after the screening begins. All federal, state and local regulations apply. A recipient of tickets assumes any and all risks related to use of ticket, and accepts any restrictions required by ticket provider. Universal Pictures, The Wave Newspapers and their affiliates accept no responsibility or liability in connection with any loss or accident incurred in connection with use of a prize. Tickets cannot be exchanged, transferred or redeemed for cash, in whole or in part. We are not responsible if, for any reason, winner is unable to use his/her ticket in whole or in part. Not responsible for lost, delayed or misdirected entries. All federal and local taxes are the responsibility of the winner. Void where prohibited by law. Participating sponsors, their employees & family members and their agencies are not eligible. NO PHONE CALLS!

IN THEATRES FRIDAY, JULY 18

FA MILY & COMMUNIT Y

THEWAVEMAG.COM JUNE 30 - JULY 13, 2008

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SVMARKETPLACE » COLUMN: HOME WORK

HOME

IMPROVEMENT LANDSCAPING AND GARDENS

Zaira’s Gardening and Landscaping (408) 569-3389 Contact Hector for FREE ESTIMATES... Maintenance, Clean-ups, Trimmings, Pressure Wash, New Lawn and more. PATIO FURNITURE

The Complete Backyard 1600 Duane Ave., Santa Clara (408) 748-8100 www.patio101.com Come by and visit our 33,000square-foot showroom featuring all the top names in the patio business. We have over 250 sets on display from various manufacturers.

Staging by Karen Dayton www.staging-pros.com

TO ADVERTISE IN THE HOME IMPROVEMENT SVMARKETPLACE CALL: (408) 467-3201 EQUIPMENT RENTAL

A Tool Shed (Eight South Bay locations) (800)-ATOOLSHED www. atoolshed.com A Tool Shed Rentals should be your first stop for all your rental needs! We have the tools and equipment rentals to make your weekend or major project easier.

Black Sea Gallery 27 South First Street, San Jose (408) 998-8885 www.blackseagallery.com Welcome to Black Sea Gallery, where worldly furniture finds its home. Each piece is inspired by an exotic place, a past era, an antique lost but not forgotten.

FIREPLACE

At Home House Cleaning (408) 401-7755 Your home is our concern! We offer worry free insurance protection, bonded employees, window cleaning, and deep carpet cleaning. Call for a free estimate.

Beth’s House Cleaning

KITCHEN AND BATH

Arch Design Center (ADC) Peninsula Fireplace

Jimyko 1919 Monterey Road, Suite #10, San Jose (408) 993-0918 www.jimyko.com Provides fresh and unique ideas that attune to today’s casual and contemporary lifestyles. We invite you to explore our retail studio and experience the elements that define your home.

FLOORING AND CARPETS

Grand Flooring

1264 S. Bascom Ave., San Jose (408) 278-9056 ADC is a new showroom with an old-fashioned approach. A family oriented business whose main focus is bringing customer service back to the showroom.

Willow Glen Kitchen and Bath

Can-Do Construction

HOME THEATRE

THEWAVEMAG.COM JUNE 30 - JULY 13, 2008

950 S. McGliney Ln., Ste. 505, Campbell (408) 371-9495 Offering emergency leak repair, roof maintenance, annual maintenance, reroofing of all types, and roofing inspections.

Palo Alto Hardware

(831) 539-1181 All phases of construction and excavation, residential remodel and additions, structural retaining walls, decks, and hardscapes. Licensed, bonded, and insured.

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ROOFING AND GUTTERS

Franklin’s Roofing Service

875 Alma St., Palo Alto (650) 327-7222 www.paloaltohardware.com At Palo Alto Hardware, “living green” is more than just a catchphrase. We work hard to put into place systems and programs that are environmentally friendly as we run our business.

GENERAL CONTRACTOR

981 Stockton Ave, San Jose (408)292-6833 www. allworldfurniture.com All World Furniture Inc. was started over sic years ago and now has a one of the largest modern, contemporary furniture showrooms with attached warehouse in the San Francisco Bay Area.

www.mrpooltable.com Offering quality handcrafted 8-foot pool tables - custom made - factory direct to you. Also offering a wide variety of accessories from lamps to casino tables to spectator chairs.

351 Willow Glen St., San Jose (408) 293-2284 Lighting, rugs and pottery are but a few of the items we feature in our “Complete Home Furnishing” selections; enabling you to experience a “One Stop Shopping” environment.

LAWNS AND GARDENS

All World Furniture

POOL TABLES

Admiral Pool Tables

HARDWARE

894 Commercial St., San Jose (408) 441-1021 www.grandflooring.com Beautiful homes deserve beautiful floors. At GrandFlooring.com we let nature customize your floor. Our solid hardwood flooring contains both clear and character planks that reflect all the best attributes of the natural wood.

FURNITURE

55 Newell Rd., Ste. 301, Palo Alto (650) 424-1616 Professional plumber 24 Hrs. / seven days a week video Inspection / Pipe locating / Fixture repair.

HOUSE CLEANING

Business: (408) 263-7091 Cell: (408) 202-5438 I Clean Your House Like It’s My Own! I’m the Only One that Comes Into Your Home. (Licensed & Bonded)*First-Time Clean-Up to 50% OFF* Free Estimates - Call Today 10+ years experience. Specializing in modern home cleaning: Stainless steel, granite, hardwood, pergo, laminate, etc... Good referrals!

46 E. Campbell Ave., Campbell (408) 866-9200 www.peninsulafireplace.com Specializing in original designs. Offering screens and accessories, hand forged iron, wood and stone mantels, wood gas and electric fireplaces, glass and mesh doors.

PLUMBING

Smart Choice Plumbing

Modern TV 1228 S. Bascom Ave., Ste. B, San Jose (408) 2931330 www.moderntvonline.com We can provide the home theater system you dream about. Whether it’s a dedicated theater with plush seating and a big screen, or a family room with a slim plasma TV and speakers built into the walls, we have the solution for you.

Garden Accents 11155 Lena Ave., Gilroy (408) 846-4555 www.garden-accents.net Our vision is a garden center to inspire the customers, not just to sell product. We provide a place where garden lovers become inspired and where gardening ideas can flourish.

STORAGE

A-1 Self Storage (Four San Jose Locations) 1415 Old Oakland Rd.; 2900 Monterey Rd.; 131 Baroni Ave.; 3260 S. Bascom Ave. (800) 210-8979 www.a1storage.com Save money with A-1 Self Storage! Affordable pricing for personal and business needs. WOODWORKING CENTER

Heavenly Greens (866) 724-8873 www.heavenlygreens.com A Heavenly Greens lawn is as close to natural grass as you can get without the need to water, mow or fertilize. Your lawn will look beautiful 365 days a year with little to no maintenance. AS SEEN ON TV!

The Sawdust Shop 452 Oakmead Pkwy., Sunnyvale (408) 992-1004 www.sawdustshop.com The Sawdust Shop is a unique woodworking center located in the heart of Silicon Valley, combining a do-it-yourself woodshop, a woodworking store, and woodworking classes all under one roof.


THE FINAL LAST WORD B Y S E A N B A B Y - S E A N B A B Y @ T H E W AV E M A G . C O M

Who Still Approves of Our President?

M

ocking President Bush has always been easy, but it’s even easier when he truly sucks at his job. His approval ratings are so low they break new records every day. But what still shocks me is that they aren’t at zero yet. After everything he and his administration have failed at, exactly who are the people who still say nice things about him? I looked at three of the main concerns Americans have with our president and discovered, through scientific means, just who still approves of him:

Issue 1: Gas Prices A gallon of gasoline costs so much, my girlfriend asked for a gasolineplated necklace for her birthday, and now her head explodes every time she goes near a candle. She looks like a screaming dried cranberry, but that necklace has every woman in her office jealous. What’s worse for me specifically is that the hairs on my neck stand up whenever someone says “at the pump.” I hate that. It’s like someone responding to a question with “whatev’s” or affecting a British accent for no reason. And newspaper and media copy writers are apparently required by law to only refer to gas stations as “at the pump.” At the risk of sounding paranoid, that’s so ridiculous, it’s hard to think they’re doing it for any reason other than to destroy me. Who Still Approves? No one, no matter what their job or hobby, is happy “at the pump” seeing gas at over $4 a gallon. Except the guy who sells giant plastic No. 4 signs. Years went by with him filling his warehouse with stacks and stacks of unsold giant 4s... they said he was crazy, that he’d never amount to anything. Well, who’s laughing now!?

Issue 2: The War in Iraq For many years now, the Marines have produced commercials featuring awesome fights against dragons and lava monsters. Who wouldn’t want to defend our nation’s interests in the Forbidden Caverns of Gramlarh? They must have worked pretty well, because we had so many recruits, Bush had to invent an entire war for them, which is great news for lava

monsters – but very bad news for national morale and world diplomacy. And it only gets worse, as we start to learn that the stupidest administration a 230-year-old country has ever produced can’t solve the problems of a civilization that has been fighting since humans were invented. Who Still Approves? Lava monsters, of course. But it doesn’t make sense that some poll taker would stick around if a lava monster answered the doorbell – it must have been a phone poll. But that doesn’t make any sense, either, because every answer would be, “WHO DARES QUESTION MAGMAR!?” I guess I have a lot of thinking to do about who must still support the war.

Issue 3: Social Security Bush’s Social Security plan is a unique one. I’ve done some reading on it, and to my understanding, it boils down to this: Bush wants Americans to invest their retirement into small piles of money to be shoveled into a moneyburning tank, to wage future wars after the oil is gone. No one likes this plan or trusts our president with money. America feels that when someone’s idea to fix your home’s equity is mailing you a $600 check, you ignore him when he has a second idea. A recent CBS News/ New York Times poll shows that people who are familiar with Bush’s proposal give it a 12 percent approval rating (which is roughly the same approval rating for raising babies and wolves together). Who Still Approves? As you probably know, one of the hardest things to find is an elderly prostitute. It’s just too hard on the streets to make it into retirement. But when the next generation’s old people find all their money replaced with apology notes from President Robojeb Bush XR4D, some are bound to sell themselves into sex slavery. Not many, but enough. Oh, yeah, more than enough. TW

ADVERTISER INDEX S A L E S @ T H E W AV E M A G . C O M

3TA Restaurant & Bar . . . . . . . . .67 a.c.t. Energy. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .38 Admiral Pool Tables. . . . . . . . . . .49 Alliance Development Group - Park Place . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .45 Alliance Development Group - Stone Crest . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .44 All World Furniture . . . . . . . . . . .49 American Kickboxing Academy 29 Angel Face Day Spa . . . . . . . . . . .33 Anise Cafe . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .63 Art Beat, The . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .79 Art of Living. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .87 Artsopolis. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .79 Arya. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .55 Attuned Dental Care . . . . . . . . . .35 Australian Tanning Co. . . . . . . . .35 AVA Spa . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13 A Visionary Salon . . . . . . . . . . . . .33 Back Road Motorcycle Adventures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .24 Bai Tong . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .67 Bangkok Taste Restaurant. . . . .55 Bank, The. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .59 Basin, The . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .56 Bay Dental . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11 Beautiful by Design. . . . . . . . . . .38 Bella Mia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .65 Bella Saratoga. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .66 Bert’s Alibi . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .74 Birk’s Restaurant . . . . . . . . . . . . .61 Blowfish. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .61 Blue Sky Restaurant . . . . . . . . . .69 Bottomley Distributing Company . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .75 Braces For Pretty Faces. . . . . . . .31 Branham Lounge . . . . . . . . . . . . .74 Cafe Hair Salon & Spa . . . . . . . . .34 California Wheels. . . . . . . . . . . . . .9 Camera Cinemas. . . . . . . . . . . . . .77 Cantor Arts Center, Stanford . . .79 Caper’s Eat & Drink . . . . . . . . . . .67 Cars for Kids. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .79 Cascal Restaurant . . . . . . . . . . . .57 Century Graphics . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7 Chardonnay II Santa Cruz. . . . . .29 Children’s Discovery Museum . .83 Chrysalis Aesthetic & Reconstructive Surgery . . . . . . . .7 Cin-Cin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .63 Cinelux Theatres. . . . . . . . . . . . . .77 City Heights. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .43 City of Milpitas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .41 City Smog Check. . . . . . . . . . . . . .14 Cocoa Jeans . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .41 Coldwell Banker - V. Brasil. . . . .48 Creekside Inn . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .59 Cucina Bambini. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .86 Day Out with Thomas . . . . . . . . .86 Designers Ltd.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .33 Dive Bar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .73 Dr. Hoang K. Do. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8 Dr. Robert Ferguson . . . . . . . . . .36 Dr. Tony Pham. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .38

Dr. Youbert Karalian . . . . . . . . . .32 El Amigo Restaurant . . . . . . . . . .63 EMF Motor Sports . . . . . . . . . . . .24 Everything and Hair. . . . . . . . . . .37 eWomen. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .86 Fahrenheit UltraLounge. . . . . . .67 Fireplace Elements . . . . . . . . . . .49 Fish Market, The. . . . . . . . . . . . . .60 Five Branches Institute. . . . . . . .39 Foxy Avenue Clips . . . . . . . . . . . .37 Galleria of Los Gatos . . . . . . . . . .46 Goosetown Lounge . . . . . . . . . . .73 Gordon Biersch. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .74 Grand Century Dental . . . . . . . . . .9 Gulliver USA. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10 Half Moon Bay Brewing Company . . . . . . . . . . . .68 Harrah’s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 Hawg’s Seafood . . . . . . . . . . . . . .61 Hollister Honda. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .25 Home Consignment Center . . . .47 House of Genji. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .61 iFlySFBay . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .28 infobayarea.com . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9 Island Grill . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .56 Jane Aesthetic Medicine & Surgery. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Japantown. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .87 Japantown. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .14 JFK University . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .90 Jigsaw Java . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .83 Justina Azcueta . . . . . . . . . . . . . .36 Kawczynski & Associates . . . . . .87 Kim’s Auto Body . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8 Koji Sake Lounge . . . . . . . . . . . . .63 Laser Beauty Center . . . . . . . . . .34 Little Lou’s BBQ. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .66 Livorno Square . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .47 LJM Legal. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13 Loft Bar & Bistro. . . . . . . . . . . . . .67 Los Gatos Tire & Automotive. . .14 Lynn Kelley . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .33 Magic Tan. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .38 Mamma Mia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .87 Mantra Palo Alto . . . . . . . . . . . . .59 Maple Tree Inn . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .14 Marketplace - Home Services . .88 Massage Envy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .39 Mazda Laguna Seca. . . . . . . . . . .18 Melting Pot, The. . . . . . . . . . . . . .65 Menara Moroccan . . . . . . . . . . . .56 Merlion. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .55 Miramar Events . . . . . . . . . . . . . .50 Mix 106.5 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .50 Mommy Spa, The . . . . . . . . . . . . .37 Mustard Cafe. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .65 Nazca Peruvian Cuisine. . . . . . . .65 Neo’s Nail Spa . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .37 Nicolino’s Italian Restaurant . . .66 Ocean Blue. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .60 Off Ramp, The . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .29 Off the Hook . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .75 Olive Bar, The . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .59 Paizley’s Salon & Spa. . . . . . . . . .39

Parcel 104 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .57 Paul Love’s Silicon Valley Productions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .27 Pearl River . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .65 Pinn Bros.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Pleasures from the Heart . . . . . .41 Quarter Note . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .75 RC Cycles. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .23 RDC Builders . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .46 Rejuve Medical . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11 Roaring Camp Railroads Birthday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .83 Roaring Camp Railroads Fourth of July . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .50 Roaring Camp Railroads Moonlight . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .62 Roem Corporation Montecito Vista . . . . . . . . . . . . . .92 Rosie McCann’s. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .55 Roux Louisiana Kitchen . . . . . . .63 Rozenhart Family Chiropractic. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .32 Salt . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13 Salvation Army. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .48 Sanctuary Salon . . . . . . . . . . . . . .33 San Jose BMW Motorcycles . . . .21 San Jose Downtown Association - Historic Downtown. . . . . . . . . .15 San Jose Harley Davidson. . . . . .24 San Jose Rock ‘n’ Roll Half Marathon. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .91 Santa Cruz Big Trees . . . . . . . . . .13 Scandalous . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .32 Scruff y Murphy’s . . . . . . . . . . . . .74 Shangri-La Lotus . . . . . . . . . . . . .37 Siers Construction . . . . . . . . . . . .23 Silvercreek Sportsplex . . . . . . . .27 Silvercreek Sportsplex . . . . . . . .83 SINO. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .58 Sole di Paradiso . . . . . . . . . . . . . .33 Spencer’s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .59 Straits Restaurant . . . . . . . . . . . .58 Sue Durfee. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .46 Sunny Buffet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .68 Sunnyvale Chamber . . . . . . . . . .83 SuperSlow Zone . . . . . . . . . . . . . .35 Team 72 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .48 Temple Bar & Lounge, The. . . . .75 Thunder Road Motorcycles . . . .23 Tied House. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .57 Top Dog Performance Cycles . . .23 Trailsloggers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .29 Trevese . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .62 Up and Running . . . . . . . . . . . . . .27 Ursula’s Boutique. . . . . . . . . . . . .41 Valley Transportation Authority . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12 Vision Innovations Optometry. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .37 West Coast Bartending School. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .73 Westpark Dental . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7 Willow Glen Ace Hardware . . . .49 Willow Street Pizza . . . . . . . . . . .64 Wine Cellar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .62 Yvonne Kendall, State Farm. . . .46

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WANT THREE FOR THE PRICE OF TWO? Come to our sales center to learn more about our Summer Savings Deal!

GET MORE FOR LESS AT MONTECITO VISTA! Montecito Vista will buy down the interest rate on your new three bedroom townhome so it is the same monthly payment as a two bedroom. No teaser rates, 30 year fixed loan.

TOWNHOMES STARTING FROM THE MID $400,000s Master Planned Community | Future 18,000 sq. ft. Retail | 2 Acre Park | Spacious Floorplans | 2 Car Garages | Luxurious Upgraded Standards | Stainless Steel Appliances Gourmet Kitchens | 2 to 3 Bedrooms + 2.5 Bath www.montecitovista.com | 2723 Monterey Road | San Jose, CA 95111 | 408.226.8881 Open 11 am — 6 pm daily 3% Broker Cooperation


The Wave Magazine - Volume 08, Issue 14: July 2 - 15, 2008