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CONTENTS F E AT U R E

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FOURTH OF JULY FESTIVITIES

A guide to the all of the picnics, pyrotechnics, cruises, carnivals, and events that celebrate Independence Day.

INTERVIEWS 62 68

DEATH CAB FOR CUTIE

Front man Ben Gibbard channeled his inner Kerouac for the band’s latest album, Narrow Stairs.

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12

76

STEVE CARELL AND ANNE HATHAWAY

Would you believe the fun they had recreating Get Smart’s much-loved duo, Maxwell Smart and Agent 99?

DEPARTMENTS UPFRONT 08

LETTERS { you talk }

12

SPOTLIGHT { local news }

22

HIT LIST { editors’ picks } LIFESTYLE

26

SPORTS & ADVENTURE Feature: Roller derby is smashing all preconceived notions about a woman’s role in full-contact sports.

30

HEALTH & BEAUTY Feature: Ten reasons why tea makes you feel so good.

38

40

STYLE & SHOPPING Feature: The art of tailoring isn’t a lost one, if you know how to go about having a suit made from scratch. HOME & DESIGN Feature: A teakettle is the perfect way to spruce up a kitchen… and break into the design biz.

70

MOVIES Reviews: Wanted, Get Smart, The Love Guru and more.

72

ARTS Feature: Stephen Schwartz, one of the most successful composers in Broadway history, is proving there are indeed second acts in life.

76

FAMILY & COMMUNITY Feature: Want fresh fruit? Nothing’s fresher, or more fun with the family, than picking it yourself. COLUMNS

10

DREGULATOR { media watchdog }

75

HOT TICKET { arts alert }

82

THE FINAL LAST WORD { local opinion } SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTIONS

SV GUIDES: 14 DAYS

26

40

22

28 EXERCISE & LIFESTYLE 39 FASHION

48

50 WAYS TO LEAVE YOUR SOFA { top events }

50

DINING Feature: Eating with a conscience was never so delicious.

64

NIGHTLIFE & MUSIC

56 CATERING 64 WINERIES 66 SPORTS BARS 79 WEDDING PLANNING

SV MARKETPLACE: 80 HOME IMPROVEMENT

62 THEWAVEMAG.COM JUNE 16-29, 2008

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MASTHEAD

OUR PEOPLE W R I T E U S @ T H E W AV E M A G . C O M

The Wave Magazine Silicon Valley's Finest Entertainment & Lifestyle Magazine Volume 08, Issue 13 | June 16-29, 2008

THE WAVE MEDIA President/Publisher: B. Peter Brafford Associate Publisher: Chris Rhoads

Vice President, Corporate Relations: Dan Ferguson Vice President, Sales: Bill Hargreaves

EDITORIAL Events Editor: Johnny Brafford Senior Editor: Jo Abbie Assistant Editor: Mitchell Alan Parker Copy Editor: Ed Robertson

Contributing Writers: Seanbaby, Fred Topel, Cintra Wilson, Michael J. Vaughn, Tom Lanham, Damon Orion, Kathy Chin Leong, Alastair Bland, Julie Engelhardt

ART / PRODUCTION Design Director & Photographer: Chris Schmauch Graphic Designer: Jon Sontag

Contributors: Lisa Ferdinandsen

[ DESIGN ]

SALES / ADVERTISING Advertising Director: Bill Hargreaves Online Sales / Marketing: Chris Rhoads Traffic Manager: Yvonne Gonzalez

Marketing / Traffic Coordinator: Rebekah Hollister District Sales Managers: Ken Sorensen, Ray Klopp, Janette Deuerling, Grayson Lumpkin, Carol Zimring

CLIENT SERVICES Account Managers: Yvonne Gonzalez, Rebekah Hollister

ONLINE IT Support: Jenny Phan Design / Code: Chris Schmauch

Online Publishing: Jon Sontag

CIRCULATION Director of Circulation: Matt Smith

Circulation Representatives: Javier Segura, Guillermo Merino, Heather Deveraux, Luis Barreto, Alberto Velarde, Rogelio Galvez, Bertha Fernandez

EMAILS Display Ads: advertising@thewavemag.com Marketplace Ads: marketplace@thewavemag.com Editorial: writeus@thewavemag.com Events: events@thewavemag.com

Design: design@thewavemag.com Employment: jobs@thewavemag.com Distribution: distribution@thewavemag.com

ADVERTISING INFORMATION Bill Hargreaves (408) 467-3260 advertising@thewavemag.com

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Send to writeus@thewavemag.com or use the mailing address below.

P UBLICAT ION INFORMAT ION

SUBSCRIPTIONS to The Wave Magazine run

The Wave Media publishes The Wave Magazine.

$9.95 for 27 issues (one year). For more informa-

All content of this issue is copyright Š2008 by The

tion, call (408) 467-3200 or visit

Wave Media, Inc., and may not be reprinted in

http://subscribe.thewavemag.com

whole or in part without the express written consent of the publisher. The Wave is available throughout

ED IT O RIA L C O N T RIBU T IO N S

the Silicon Valley; one copy of each edition of

Unsolicited manuscripts and story ideas must be

The Wave is available for free. Anyone removing

accompanied by a stamped return envelope.

magazines in bulk will be prosecuted.

The publisher assumes no responsibility for lost artwork, photographs or manuscripts. Submit all

SUBSCRIP T ION INFORMAT ION BACK ISSUES of The Wave Magazine are available for $5. Please submit your request for a back issue to: 1735 Technology Dr., Suite 575, San Jose, CA 95110.

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manuscripts, artwork and photographs to: The Wave Magazine, 1735 Technology Dr., Suite 575, San Jose, CA 95110

Phone: (408) 467-3200 Fax: (408) 467-3401


2008 SUMMER CONCERT SERIES Harveys Outdoor Arena

SAMMY HAGAR AND THE WABOS WITH SPECIAL GUEST MONTROSE SATURDAY, AUGUST 9

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Tickets on sale at all Ticketmaster locations or book online at Ticketmaster.com.

HARVEYS LAKE TAHOE CASINO & HOTEL | TotalRewardsTahoe.com

Must be 21 or older to gamble. Know When To Stop Before You Start.® Gambling Problem? Call 1-800-522-4700. ©2008, Harrah’s License Company, LLC.

T1600-08-256


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THEWAVEMAG.COM JUNE 16-29, 2008

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LET TERS

WRITE US@TheWaveMag.com LETTERS FROM YOU

When sending letters, please include your full name, city, state, and daytime telephone number. Letters may be edited for clarity or length and may be used in any medium owned by The Wave Media. Send snail mail to 1735 Technology Dr., Ste. 575, San Jose, CA 95110 and email to writeus@thewavemag.com. say it hasn’t helped my game at all – I [still] suck. My buddies love it, however, and say it’s highly accurate, but the most use I get out of it is finding out how close I am to the clubhouse.

Tell Cintra that I’m a professor at Santa Clara, and what takes me 30 pages to say, she said in one. Great article, “Big Media Duped Yet Again” [Vol. 8, Iss. 11]. Many thanks for a creative and well-written piece.

Ken San Jose

Jerry Kroth Santa Clara Thank you for the very positive story about San Jose’s efforts to improve bicycle facilities, both with on-street bikeways and the offstreet Trail Network [“A Path to Enlightenment,” Vol. 8, Iss. 12]. Please note that the Trail Network is currently 47.95 miles in length. Your readers may wish to visit the program’s award-winning website at www.sjparks.org/trails. At the site, they will find maps of all open trails, reports about the growing network, and other helpful resources. Thank you again for sharing news about the city’s efforts related to bicycling. Yves Zsutty Program Manager, Trail Network City of San Jose I recently started to play golf with some buddies of mine who have been playing all their lives, and I’m terrible. I was f lipping through your magazine and came across your golf guide [“Fore! Play,” Vol. 8, Iss. 11] and was intrigued with the Calloway range finder. I thought this would be the perfect thing to help with my game, considering I am a horrible judge of distance and never know which club to go with. So, I decided what the hell, I’m going for it. I’m proud to 8

THEWAVEMAG.COM JUNE 16-29, 2008

I was reading a story on your website about the art of tattooing and really enjoyed it [“Arttoo,” Vol. 8, Iss. 10]. I’ve always thought they never got enough props on their art, but the coolest thing was how you included a slideshow and the audio from the actual interview. Is this something you guys are going to start to do all the time? Sarah Milpitas We do indeed plan on featuring these slideshows more often. Keep an eye out for them, particularly in the Arts section. Why in God’s name do you have an interview with David Hasselhoff [“Hasslin’ The Hoff,” Vol. 8, Iss. 12]? Excuse me, I mean “The Hoff.” The guy is a straight-up no talent lunatic. Have you ever seen any of his music videos? Or better yet, his infamous drunken fast food binge? With the talent in Hollywood, this is who you guys choose to feature in your magazine – you guys can do better. Susan Campbell Lighten up, Susan. The man gave us Baywatch – who wouldn’t want to talk to him?


LET TERS

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THEWAVEMAG.COM JUNE 16-29, 2008

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COLUMN: THE DREGUL ATOR

THE DREGULATOR B Y C I N T R A W I L S O N - W R I T E U S @ T H E W AV E M A G . C O M

Hillary (finally) concedes defeat in her fight to get back inside the White House.

T

he Clinton bunker has finally been busted; the poison pellets have been eaten. America has spoken: the Clintons, for all their Democratic voodoo, got too good at the game not to end up looking like the same robot-lizards they were supposed to be fighting against. Bill, the angrier and more apoplectic he got, began to look more and more like a David Mamet version of Barney the Dinosaur – American Brontosaurus: a gritty drama of personal downfall for kids from ages seven to 70. Avalanches of small lies, four martini lunches, ethical compromise, and domestic strife, all played in a warm sing-song voice by Alec Baldwin. Besides, it just would have been too unnerving to have big, purple Bill as First Lady, lurching around the White House with not enough to do, poking his head into the James S. Brady press briefing room and disrupting press conferences in his track suit while eating a Danish pastry. Even just four seconds of deep thought on the subject reveal the abject impossibility of Hillary ever having had a shot on the ticket as Obama’s VP. Even without taking Hillary’s dangerously irresponsible and desperately ugly RFK-assassination quip into consideration, and without considering the reports that Bill could never have survived the legal vetting process, it’s just too hard to imagine Obama wanting Hillary around in Dick Cheney’s old job, trying to tell him what to do. Hillary as Cheney would be a grudge-trip at best: a high-speed romp into meddling in all the affairs she didn’t get to fuss with the last time she was in the White House, compounded by all the fuzzy personal boundaries she would no doubt have with the presidency, having once had unrestricted access to the president who was also her husband. It’s hard to imagine Hillary and Michelle Obama comfortably sharing the same bathroom, let alone the same White House, or the same presidential husbandtype male power figure. Given too much proximity, Michelle and Hillary would probably require a whole new fingernailproof line of St. John knitwear. But it’s over. The Clinton dynasty must return to their lawn chairs and wait for Chelsea to grow up and avenge them. Obama, meanwhile, is proving to be the most organically powerful and charismatic leader America has had since the Kennedy brothers or Martin Luther King, which makes Hillary’s RFK comments all the more bone-chilling, particularly while Senator Obama is standing in large crowds declaring that the DNC has stopped accepting money from federal lobbyists and political action committees.

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THEWAVEMAG.COM JUNE 16-29, 2008

While this in itself is more of a gesture than an actual cash sacrifice, many besotted Obama supporters are extremely nervous about his heroic declarations of intent to dismantle the culture of corrupt influence when he isn’t encased in something like an armored Popemobile. It is hard not to worry about a man offering that much hope. We can only pray that the ghost of Benazir Bhutto is haunting Senator Obama enough to be sufficiently paranoid – like somewhere around Howard Hughes-level paranoid. In the meantime, though, Obama’s harnessing of the invisible power of the gruntlevel, greater American public and their $10 and $20 bills is inspiring forays into other uses of mob power. A chain letter circulating this week urged all recipients to boycott $4/gallon gasoline, and all gasoline from Exxon Mobil, with some rather compelling ochlocratic logic: “Look at the example of Subway’s $5 subs and how it forced Quizno’s to change their prices. Quizno’s now has $5 subs. Airlines are now competing with online sites (such as Expedia) to beat their prices… we can get gas back down to $1.30 per gallon!” insists the chainletter, which claims to have originated from the keyboards of a retired Coca-Cola executive and an exHalliburton employee. “We CAN have an impact on gas prices if we all act together to force a price war,” the letter asserts. “Here’s the idea: For the rest of this year, DON’T purchase ANY gasoline from the two biggest companies (which now are one) EXXON and MOBIL. If they are not selling any gas, they will be inclined to reduce their prices. If they reduce their prices, the other companies will have to follow suit…. I suggest that we not buy from EXXON MOBIL UNTIL THEY LOWER THEIR PRICES TO THE $2 RANGE AND KEEP THEM DOWN.” While this chain letter may not have hit the “30 million people in eight days” it aspired to reach, it does seem like an interesting experiment. There is, at the very least, great appeal in doing absolutely anything that might exact any type of revenge on Vice President Cheney and his energy sector friends, no matter how lamely symbolic. Power of the people, my fiends – I guess it’s been buried in the closet for so long, along with the old striped bell-bottoms, we forgot we owned it. TW


COLUMN: THE DREGUL ATOR

THEWAVEMAG.COM JUNE 16-29, 2008

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SPOTLIGHT: NOTEWORTHY NEWS

SPOTLIGHT NOTEWORTHY

NEWS

Stayin’ Alive Good news, Silicon Valley residents: You’ll probably outlive most people in the nation.

M SPOT L IGH T

aybe it’s something in the water we drink, but it turns out that Silicon Valley residents have one of the highest collective life expectancies in the nation. According to a recent study in PLoS Medicine, an open-access medical journal published by the Public Library of Science, the average life span for Valley dwellers has leapt from 72 to 80 since 1961, which means that the life of the average Silicon Valley resident born in 1999 will be about eight years longer than that of his or her grandparents. Marin, San Mateo and Santa Clara counties scored especially high in this study, with life expectancies averaging 80.84 years, 80.29 years and 80.26 years, respectively. The average life span for residents of San Francisco, Contra Costa and Alameda counties came in at around 78 years. This is especially good news for Silicon Valley, considering that at this point in history, life expectancy in hundreds of counties across the US is either

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THEWAVEMAG.COM JUNE 16-29, 2008

dropping or staying the same. The PLoS Medicine study also states that between 1961 and 1999, life expectancy for almost one-fifth of American women dropped or did not change, which makes this the first time since the Spanish influenza of 1918 that life expectancy has decreased for a substantial percentage of women in America. Smoking and obesity may be largely responsible for this, since diseases such as emphysema, lung cancer and diabetes seem to be playing an important role in the drop. Thankfully, women in Silicon Valley appear to be exempt from this widespread trend toward life span decline. No one can point to a specific reason for Silicon Valley’s superior staying power, but likely reasons include good nutrition, quality health care and other factors that could be linked to the area’s high-income level. Live long and prosper, indeed. PLoS Medicine http://journals.plos. org/plosmedicine


SPOTLIGHT: NOTEWORTHY NEWS

Fall Semester 2008 Classes starting on September 2 Many degree and certicate programs to choose from

y l n O l l i t S t i n U / 0 2 $ Enroll early to

Earn fully transferable credit to California State University and University of California campuses Take a class for fun, growth or enrichment Quick access off HWY 85, easy parking Go to: www.westvalley.edu and click “Apply Now” to apply and register for Fall classes today

t! get the classes you want, when you wan

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SPOT L IGH T

THEWAVEMAG.COM JUNE 16-29, 2008

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SPOTLIGHT NOTEWORTHY

Price, HP’s environmental program manager. “We actually spent years and years – engineers, chemists – working on making sure that we get the recycled plastics to the standards and level of quality, reliability and health and safety standards so customers have a really good experience.” Other Eco Highlights technologies include an energy-saving auto on/auto off function for printers, and a carbon footprint calculator that will be available on HP’s website at the end of June, enabling companies to find out what their carbon footprint is and how they can reduce their environmental impact by incorporating various HP technologies.

Nature of the Business Hewlett-Packard unveils the latest in green office equipment.

P

alo Alto’s Hewlett-Packard, a company long known for its environmentally friendly practices, has just added an Eco Highlights label to several of its products, including an HP Deskjet D2545 Go Green printer made from 83-percent recycled plastic. Selling for a highly affordable $44.99 at Wal-Mart and through www.hpshopping.com, the Go Green printer consumes 40-percent less energy than comparable units, comes in 100-percent recyclable packaging and uses ink cartridges made from plastic resins taken from recycled cartridges collected through the HP Planet Partner Return and Recycling program. “With both the cartridges and the recycled content in the printer, it’s not just something that you can go out and say, ‘OK, I’m going to just put recycled content in this product’ and be done with it,” explains Michelle

Since its inception in the 1930s, Hewlett-Packard has launched a number of earth-friendly efforts, including the Global Corporate Citizenship Objective program (instituted in 1957), a recycling program introduced in 1991 and a Design for Environment program established the following year, which saw to it that environmental product stewards were included in every design team. As of last year, the company had also recycled more than a billion pounds of ink cartridges and IT equipment as part of its Planet Partners program. “We’re really beginning to put some effort behind actively communicating our environmental story to our customer,” Price notes. “We’ve had a history of having environmental offerings, but customers are [now] receptive to hearing those kinds of messages.” Ground PET plastic, recycled ink catridge material

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SPOT L IGH T

Aaron Sessions, Agent Insurance Lic. #: 0F89400 3001 Winchester Blvd Campbell, CA 95008-6500 Bus: 408-866-7766 www.aaronsessions.com

statefarm.com® P060393 12/06 P0XXXXX 1/06 State Farm Mutual Automobile Insurance Company, State Farm Indemnity Company – Bloomington, IL

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THEWAVEMAG.COM JUNE 16-29, 2008

NEWS

Hewlett-Packard (877) 801-5561 www.hp.com


SPOTLIGHT: NOTEWORTHY NEWS

SPOT L IGH T

THEWAVEMAG.COM JUNE 16-29, 2008

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SPOTLIGHT NOTEWORTHY

NEWS

Updates on local business openings. PALO ALTO LIQUIDO LOUNGE, FOUR SEASONS SILICON VALLEY

2050 University Ave., East Palo Alto (650) 566-1200 www.fourseasons.com/siliconvalley

There’s a new innovation at the Four Seasons Silicon Valley, in the form of summertime poolside luxury. Liquido is the hotel’s sophisticated new poolside café and lounge, where hotel guests (nonsleepover visitors are also welcome) can enjoy libations, mini spa treatments, light daytime dining and, after sunset, fresh sushi, music and artisan cocktails. The rooftop lounge will be open through Labor Day, so polish your white shoes and head there while you can. STANFORD SHOPPING CENTER

180 El Camino Real, Palo Alto (650) 289-0470 www.stanfordshop.com

Keep an eye out for some new stores joining the flowerladen grounds of this outdoor mall in Palo Alto: In mid July, Project Runway aficionados will gladly welcome the new store from “famed American designer” Michael Kors, while Bare Escentuals fans will be keen to check out their new store and stock up on items from the company’s pioneering mineral makeup range. Also in mid July, the center will become home to Sprinkles, purveyors of pintsized cupcakes made with quality ingredients, including bittersweet Belgian chocolate and pure Madagascar bourbon vanilla.

SAN JOSE DOWNTOWN

GODZILLA EXPRESS JAPANESE CUISINE

We’re not surprised to see a Japanese restaurant named after the gigantic, iconic, Tokyo-skyline terrorizing lizard – we’re just surprised it took this long. Godzilla Express opened its doors Downtown (between Third and Fourth Streets) just a few weeks ago. The menu features an extensive selection of Japanese cuisine, including a variety of sushi rolls (such as the dragon roll of tempura shrimp, unagi and avocado), tempura and teriyaki entrées and soba and udon dishes. SABOR TAPAS BAR & LOUNGE

72 N. Almaden Ave. www.saborlounge.net

No word yet on the menu of tasty tapas treats, but we do know that the latest addition to the Downtown nightlife scene will offer an extensive bottle service menu of premium spirits: Think Grey Goose and Ketel One vodka, Don Julio 1942 and Patron Gran Platinum tequila, Bombay Sapphire and Tanqueray 10 gin – or for those celebrating, Dom Pérignon champagne.

SAN JOSE WILLOW GLEN

WILLOW GLEN ACE HARDWARE

2253 Lincoln Ave. (408) 267-0223 willowglenace.com

DIY-inclined homeowners living amidst the leafy streets of San Jose’s Willow Glen will be happy to welcome a new local hardware store to the neighborhood. The owners, a longtime hardware store family also behind Palo Alto’s Ace outpost, aim to provide a store that is “friendly, helpful and easy to navigate.” The store also has an active green philosophy, offering some recycling services and selling many eco-friendly products, including heavily discounted compact fluorescent light bulbs.

SANTA CLARA PETER ALEXANDER

Shop B401, Westfield Valley Fair, 2855 Stevens Creek Blvd. (408) 244-2867 www.peteralexanderusa.com

Opening under the cheeky tagline “20 years of sleeping around,” Australian designer and king of nightwear Peter Alexander opened his first stateside store a couple of months ago at Valley Fair. The designer is acclaimed in his native land for his fun take on pajamas, sleep and lounge wear, and his success led to stores in the UK, and now the US. Expect everything from slinky slips and comfy PJs for ladies, plus some items for men and infants. TW

SPOT L IGH T

130 E. Santa Clara St. (408) 297-0568 www.godzillaexpress.com (site under construction)

July 4, 5 & 6

Pack up the Family for Old-Fashioned Fun! • Classic Motorcycle Show Sunday, July 6 only! • Sack Races • Water Balloon Toss • Hula Hoop Contests • Volleyball, Softball and more • Frog Flume Race • Chuckwagon Barbeque • Steam Trains to Bear Mountain • Beach Trains to Santa Cruz

831-335-4484 • www.roaringcamp.com Felton, Santa Cruz County, CA Six miles north of Santa Cruz on Graham Hill Road 18

THEWAVEMAG.COM JUNE 16-29, 2008

Seasonal Farmers Markets

I

n addition to the Silicon Valley farmers markets that run year round [See page 78], the local seasonal markets are now well and truly open for business for the summer, which means we really are spoiled for choice when it comes to choosing fresh fruits, vegetables and other fare from local farmers, growers and artisans.

LOS ALTOS: MAY 1 – SEPT.

Thursday 4–8pm, State at Second Sts. (510) 745-7100 This downtown Los Altos market offers a large selection of items to take home for dinner, including rotisserie chicken, barbecued tri-tip sandwiches, homemade hummus and flat breads, tamales and roasted corn on the cob. Visitors will also find craft items and handmade jewelry.

PALO ALTO:

MAY 10 – DEC. 13

Saturday 8am–Noon, corner of Hamilton Ave. & Gilman St. (behind the post office) (650) 328-2827 Featuring some of California’s premier organic growers, this Palo Alto farmers market is not to be missed. With venders such as Sherman Bakery and Saratoga Chocolates, visitors are also able to purchase fresh-baked bread and sweet treats.

SAN JOSE / THE ALAMEDA: MAY 26 – SEPT.

Saturday 8:30am–12:30pm, corner of The Alameda & Hanchett Ave. A favorite spot for authentic breakfast burritos, this market is full of vendors selling baked bread, fresh cut flowers and, of course, garden fresh fruits and vegetables.

SAN JOSE, CAMBRIAN PARK: MAY 2 – OCT.

Wednesday 4–8pm, Camden Ave. & Union Ave. (510) 745-7100

SAN JOSE / SAN PEDRO SQUARE: MAY 2 – DEC. 12

Friday 10am–2pm, San Pedro Square between St. John and Santa Clara (800) 949-FARM Music from local artists and the sweet smell of kettle corn float through the San Pedro farmers market. With patio dining, market goers can enjoy a meal from the featured Chef of the Market, or choose from other restaurant vendors. Buy strawberries fresh from Watsonville, still-warm artisan bread, seafood and organic produce.

SARATOGA: APR. – DEC.

Saturday 9am–1pm, corner of Saratoga Rd. & Big Basin Way (408) 353-4293

WILLOW GLEN: MAY 3 – NOV. 22

Saturday 8:30am–12:30pm, Lincoln Ave. & Minnesota St. (408) 353-4293 Not only does the Willow Glen Farmers Market have an extensive array of fresh produce from Happy Boy Organic Produce and Allard Farms, it offers a fresh fish vendor and features work from talented local artists. Find beautiful bouquets at the flower booths, and let your pooch hang out at the shaded, doggy rest area while you shop. For updates and more market listings, go to www.urbanvillageonline.com; www. pcfma.com; www.cafarmersmarkets. com or www.cafarmersmkts.com


SPOTLIGHT: NOTEWORTHY NEWS

For your chance to receive two ‘admit one’ passes to an advance screening of

head down to the Tech Museum of Innovation

SPOT L IGH T

(201 South Market St., San Jose)

on Thursday, June 19, starting at noon. Passes will be distributed at the Membership Desk. Passes are in limited supply and will be distributed on a first come, first served basis. Limit two passes per person.

W A L L - E . C O M ©Disney/Pixar

This film is rated G. Theatre is overbooked to ensure a full house. Passes received through this promotion do not guarantee admission and must be surrendered upon demand. Seating is on a first come, first served basis. EXCEPT FOR MEMBERS OF THE REVIEWING PRESS. No one will be admitted without a ticket or after the screening begins. All federal, state and local regulations apply. A recipient of tickets assumes any and all risks related to use of ticket and accepts any restrictions required by ticket provider. Walt Disney Pictures, Pixar Animation Studios, The Wave, Tech Museum of Innovation, KMKY-AM, Terry Hines & Associates and their affiliates accept no responsibility or liability in connection with any loss or accident incurred in connection with use of a prize. Tickets cannot be exchanged, transferred or redeemed for cash, in whole or in part. We are not responsible if, for any reason, winner is unable to use his/her ticket in whole or in part. Not responsible for lost; delayed or misdirected entries. All federal and local taxes are the responsibility of the winner. Void where prohibited by law. No purchase necessary. Participating sponsors their employees and family members and their agencies are not eligible. NO PHONE CALLS!

Join

at

The Tech Museum of Innovation on Sunday, June 22 between 1:00–3:00PM for ROBOT DAY. Enter to win PRIZES, including a family 4-pack of tickets to the museum.

OPENS IN THEATRES FRIDAY, JUNE 27 Te x t

WALLE

to

DISNEY

(347639).

THEWAVEMAG.COM JUNE 16-29, 2008

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SPOTLIGHT: NOTEWORTHY NEWS

SPOTLIGHT NOTEWORTHY

NEWS

Top Five Silicon Valley Rock Bands And you thought this region only produced computer geeks. 5) Trapt Before they became panty-droppingly famous and moved to Canada, the members of this modern rock/altmetal unit used to call Los Gatos home. Pray for these boys – smalltown life can’t possibly have prepared them for the depravity they’ll witness next month when they head out on tour as a support band for Mötley Crüe on Crüe Fest.

4) dredg

Birthday Caboose A private coach for your party takes you to Bear Mountain

One-Room School House A private one room school house for your party

Blue Ox Canopy

SPOT L IGH T

Located on Graham Hill Rd., Felton, CA Customize your birthday party with additional entertainment options. For more information call (831) (831 831)) 335-4484 or visit roaringcamp.com

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THEWAVEMAG.COM JUNE 16-29, 2008

A covered outdoor area for your party on the lawn

Thomas the Tank Tank Engine™ A themed party for an aspiring engineer and up to 20 guests

As dredg and Trapt have shown us, there are two things a Los Gatos band needs to make it big: 1) An edgy alternative rock sound, and 2) A name that consists of a five-letter misspelling of a bland word. Los Gatos musicians, take note: As far as we know, the names Krumb, Chokk, Drunc, Snoar and Foark are all still up for grabs.

3) The Donnas There’s an eerie ring of destiny to the tale of The Donnas: Four different girls named Donna are born in Palo Alto in 1979. Fourteen years later, they form a hard-rock band that goes on to rock stages around the world and play on shows like The

Late Show with David Letterman and The Tonight Show. (Well, OK, they all gave themselves the name Donna as a band gimmick, but it’s still sort of uncanny.)

2) Smash Mouth In the late ’90s, it was damned near impossible to go a full day without hearing peppy Smash Mouth poprock anthems like “Walkin’ on the Sun” and “All Star.” A decade later, we still can’t get ’em out of our heads.

1) The Grateful Dead Yep, this hirsute outfit got its start in Menlo Park, playing its first gigs under the name of The Warlocks at Kepler’s Books. At first glance, the Dead’s hippie ethos might seem like the polar opposite of Silicon Valley’s industrial spirit, but when you consider that the band was known to rake in as much as $95 million per year by way of a self-created business model, they ought to be the idols of bread-heads everywhere. TW


SPOTLIGHT: NOTEWORTHY NEWS

SPOT L IGH T

M O N T E R E Y ,

C A

GET YOUR TICKETS TODAY! WWW.LAGUNA-SECA.COM // WWW.TICKETMASTER.COM WWW.REDBULLUSGRANDPRIX.COM // 800-327-SECA THEWAVEMAG.COM JUNE 16-29, 2008

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» FEATURE

HitList

» FEATURE

37

C O M P I L E D B Y M I T C H E L L A L A N PA R K E R

and clubs, just in time for the reintroduction of same-sex marriage licenses here in California on Jun. 17.

iPhone 3G www.apple.com

SIGMA DP1 Camera www.sigma-dp1.com Boasting a full spec compact digital camera with all the power of a DSLR, it’s hard to believe the Sigma DP1 is “exactly like an SLR. Just in a smaller body.” Well, if you take out a TTL optical viewfinder, an interchangeable lens and the “advanced continuous-shooting function you find in some high-end DSLRs,” then, yeah, it’s exactly the same. Although the DP1 claims a 14 megapixel resolution, that’s not entirely accurate. It’s actually a 4.6 megapixel camera that uses a Foveon sensor, which contains three stacked light layers (red, blue, green) — rather than a different color at single pixel locations — to produce an exponential increase in spatial resolution. This makes the Sigma far superior to regular compact digital cameras by creating less noise (pixels that are misinterpreted) in low light places, such as indoors. And it fits in a pocket. From $799 at Wolf Camera, www.wolfcamera.com

We want one. We all want one. And with its considerably reduced purchase price, a lot more of us will soon have one. We’re talking, of course, of the new iPhone 3G. Unlike the popular first generation iPhone, the latest model boasts a 3G cellular network speed, which means it’s faster than its older sibling (twice as fast, according to Apple). The 3G also features an impressive battery life: five hours of 3G talk time, seven of video, 24 of audio and 300 standby. The shiny new phone, which will hit stores Jul. 11, also features a GPS map application, plus a host of additional applications (some free, some available for a fee). The 8GB version is available in black only, while the 16GB comes in black or the ubiquitous glossy white of Apple past. 8GB $199, 16GB $299

on springing out of a real jack-in-the-box at the Democratic Convention in August. $29.95 from www.popartcreations.com

Hillary-In-The-Box www.hillary-in-the-box.com

Absolut Colors

HIT L IST

www.absolut.com About 30 years ago, San Franciscan Gilbert Baker designed a six-color flag symbolizing gay and lesbian pride. The LGBT community has since made an icon out of the “rainbow” flag, a tangible spectrum of light representing a remarkable, uplifting tale of overcoming adversity. And with the anniversary of the flag’s inception, Absolut vodka is introducing a limited-edition bottle called Absolut Colors, featuring Baker’s rainbow colors along with a message on the bottle about embracing diversity. A cocktail book is also being sold with the vodka, with funds raised benefiting various LGBT organizations and campaigns. We’ll Absolut-ly drink to that. Absolut Colors should now be available locally at many San Francisco area bars 22

THEWAVEMAG.COM JUNE 16-29, 2008

This is a perfect representation of the hair-helmeted Hillary Clinton. Try to shut her out and put her in a dark, confined space and she’ll always pop back out at you with a deranged grin on her face. San Jose-based artist Heather Courtney can barely crank out the exquisitely manufactured novelties fast enough. After selling out in less than an hour at a Democratic National Party gathering in Washington, DC last month, and then having the quirky Jeanne Moos feature one on CNN, Courtney is seeing sales go through the roof. She says she gave the now-former presidential hopeful a handmade Hillary Clinton pop-up box at a fundraiser in San Francisco, but the gift was returned by Clinton’s staff because the value of the box “exceeds the amount on gifts that Senate staff are allowed to accept.” That may be true, though we suspect the real reason is that Clinton is planning

The Wave Interactive LED Coffee Table www.becausewecan.org This motion sensor, eco-friendly coffee table is a trip. Run a hand across it and watch as hundreds of LEDs dance across the surface. Set a glass down and watch it be surrounded by a galaxylike light show. And cats seem to love it. But basically, we just like the name. (Tip: if you want your product featured in our Hit List, just call it “The Wave.” It’s that simple. We’re so bigheaded that anything with our beloved name on it will receive high praise.) $2,215 TW


HIT LIST: EDITORS’ PICKS

HIT L IST

THEWAVEMAG.COM JUNE 16-29, 2008

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Celebrate America 2008 27th Annual Summer Shoreline Amphitheatre, One Amphitheatre Festival & Chili Cook-off

Pkwy., Mountain View www.bethel.org/ celebrateamerica2008.htm June 29: A full day of family entertainment with live music featuring a 90-voice choir, kids choir, exhibits, a laser light show and fun!: 5pm

Movies on the Square: Independence Day Courthouse Square, 2200 Broadway St., Redwood City www.redwoodcity.org/ events/movieschedule.html July 3: Pack up the whole family and head to Courthouse Square to enjoy a free outdoor showing of Independence Day on a 25-foot inflatable screen: 8:45pm

San Jose America Festival San Carlos St. & Woz Way, San Jose www.americafestival.com July 4 – 6: Enjoy two stages of live music featuring Night Ranger, Greg Kihn and Starship, with cultural entertainment, arts & crafts from around the world, great food, activities for the kids and more!

Fireworks Spectacular Downtown Redwood City, Broadway & Jefferson www.parade.org July 4: You’ll keep busy at this year’s festival, with arts & crafts, clowns, food, a kids area, an awesome parade and fireworks.

Family Past Times Program San Mateo County History Museum, 2200 Broadway St., Redwood City July 4: Celebrate Independence Day by making whirligigs, parachutes to fly, American flags and hand-cranking homemade ice cream: 10am – 4pm

Independence Day Celebration

Mitchell Park, 600 E. Meadow Dr., Palo Alto www.cityofpaloalto.org July 4: Teams of amateur and professional chili makers will bring their “A” game in this battle for cash and prizes, along with live music and plenty of activities for the kids: Noon – 5pm

Ardenwood Historic Farm, 34600 Ardenwood Blvd., Fremont (510) 796-0663 July 4: Celebrate the Fourth 1900s-style, with patriotic music by a brass band on the lawn, fiddle music in the farmyard, and games and contests for everyone! Don’t forget to bring your picnicking gear.

San Jose Giants Fireworks Extravaganza

Fourth of July All City Picnic and Fireworks Extravaganza

Municipal Stadium, 588 E. Alma Ave., San Jose www.sjgiants.com July 4 – 5: Bring the whole family and watch some great baseball, and on the Fourth, enjoy a fabulous pyrotechnics display: 6:30pm

July Fourth Fireworks Cruise Red and White Fleet, Pier 43 ½, San Francisco www.redandwhite.com July 4: Come aboard the Red and White Fleet to enjoy fantastic views of San Francisco’s spectacular Fourth of July fireworks: 7 – 10:30pm

Fourth of July Fireworks on the San Francisco Bay Yacht Cruise San Francisco Bay Cruise, 310 Harbor Dr., Sausalito www.empressevents.com July 4: All aboard the yacht Empress for an evening of appetizers, buffet dinner with cash bar and a wonderful view of the fireworks: 7 – 11pm

Central Park, 969 Kiely Blvd., Santa Clara (408) 615-3140 santaclaraca.gov/ events/fourth-of-july.html July 4: Bring the whole family for a day filled with carnival rides, petting zoo, face painting, live music, great food, activities for the kids, patriotic music and fireworks.

Radio Disney’s Evening of Magic & Music: A Fourth of July Fireworks Spectacular Shoreline Amphitheatre, One Amphitheatre Pkwy., Mountain View www.shorelineamp.com July 4: When we say this is a full-day event, we mean it’s FULL of events: a three-hour preconcert Radio Disney Family Festival Zone with interactive games, prizes, giveaways, live music, followed by a performance from the San Francisco Symphony and concluding with an enormous fireworks show: 5 – 10pm

Los Gatos Celebrates the Fourth Of July 110 E. Main St.,Los Gatos

July 4: Los Gatos says “Happy Birthday, America” in a good old-fashioned way. The town gets all decked out in red, white and blue and holds an All-American Picnic & Games event, with a traditional band concert on the high school lawn. After the concert, there’s a free cake and ice cream social. The daylong activities end with a twilight dance featuring music for every generation.

Morgan Hill July Fourth Celebration Downtown Morgan Hill www.mhidi.com July 4: Morgan Hill’s patriotic celebration features a parade, 5K race and a family festival with live music, great food and a dazzling fireworks celebration: 7:45am

Fourth of July Celebration Roaring Camp, Graham Hill Rd. & Mt. Hermon Rd., Felton www.roaringcamp.com July 4 – 6: Pack up the family and head to Roaring Camp for a day of family fun, with sack races, balloon tosses, hula-hoop contests, music and more.

Fourth of July at the Berkeley Marina 201 University Ave., Berkeley www. cityofberkeley.info/marina/events.html July 4: Spend the Fourth enjoying free sailboat rides and dragon boat rides, live entertainment, arts & crafts and, of course, a fireworks display.

USS Potomac July Fourth Dessert Cruise

presidential yacht for an evening of cruising around the Bay while enjoying wonderful desserts, champagne and beautiful fireworks: 7:30 – 10:30pm

Pier 39 July Fourth Celebration Pier 39, Beach St. & The Embarcadero, San Francisco www.pier39.com July 4: Listen to live music from Big Bang Beat and Tainted Love, followed by an amazing pyrotechnics show: 1- 9:30pm

Independence Day on the USS Hornet Pier 3, Alameda www.uss-hornet.org July 4: Spend the day aboard the carrier USS Hornet, enjoying ongoing tours, live music from The Unauthorized Rolling Stones, The Cocktail Monkeys, The Replay Band, Romano Marchetti Orchestra, and Starboard Watch, along with games, beer and wine, great food and a great view of the fireworks.

Rose, White & Blue Fourth of July Parade Hanchett & The Alameda, San Jose www.the-alameda.com July 4: Your family will enjoy a great parade, live music, dance performances, jump houses, art booths and great food: 10am

Red, White & Cool Gilroy Gardens, 3050 Hecker Pass Hwy., Gilroy www.gilroygardens.org July 6: Gilroy Gardens invites you to enjoy the annual all-you-can-eat barbecue with the whole family. TW

(510) 627-1215 www.usspotomac.org July 4: All aboard! It’s time to hop on FDR’s THEWAVEMAG.COM JUNE 16-29, 2008

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» FEATURE

Sports&Adventure Santa Cruz Roller Girls

» FEATURE » EXERCISE & LIFEST YLE

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and when the whistle blows, each team’s jammer (scorer) attempts to earn points by passing the opposing team’s three blockers (defense) and single pivot (last line of defense). Each team does its best to clear a path for its own jammer while preventing the opponent’s jammer from scoring. As you can imagine, the competition can get every bit as brutal as any male full-contact sport, sometimes resulting in concussions, dislocations, broken bones and even missing teeth. Because knee injuries are by far the most common affliction, roller girls are strongly encouraged to replace their knee pads regularly, wear gaskets underneath them, and know how to fall properly. Further helping to minimize injury, many players supplement the extensive training they do with stretching, cross-training, gym workouts or yoga. In a rough-and-tumble sport like this, however, preventative measures only go so far. “You definitely get beat up,” says 24-year-old SVRG blocker Lauren Hulten (aka Lindsay LoHanded), adding that if she wears a skirt to her job at a property management company, it appears to observers as though someone has beaten her legs. “Or, I was playing the other night and ripped my earring out, so, of course, my ear was bleeding,” she adds. “You’re always going to have a mark of derby, but all of our girls wear those marks with such pride. We show it off: ‘Who’s got the best injury ever?’”

Roll Models SPOR T S & A DVEN T URE

Inside the adrenalinesoaked world of women’s roller derby. BY DAMON ORION

U

ntil just a few years ago, most people thought of roller derby as little more than a camp relic of ’70s culture. But here in the 2000s, this fast-paced, brutally competitive game is enjoying an unexpected rebirth. With approximately 250 leagues currently in existence here in the US, roller derby is clearly alive and kicking, but with some notable updates: While kitschy theatrics are still an important part of the sport, there’s now a greater emphasis on athletics – whereas yesteryear’s leagues often counted men as members, roller derby is now almost exclusively a female phenomenon. Twenty-five-year-old grad school student Erin Gay, who uses the moniker Death by Dollface when she acts as blocker for the Silicon Valley Roller Girls (SVRG), says she thinks the element of female

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empowerment is an important factor in the sport’s current resurgence. “We’ve been on the coattails of so many men’s sports, and this is something that women really can own,” she says. Thirty-six-yearold Santa Cruz Roller Girls (SCRG) founder Robin Hoff, alias Robin YoLife, sees roller derby as a direct extension of the women’s movement. “It’s almost like some new brand of feminism, where women feel OK with being sexy and tough at the same time, because for so long, it was mutually exclusive: If you were tough, you were manly,” she notes. “This is just the perfect outlet for people that are really trying to find their authentic self that they’re OK with.” Not every roller girl is so emphatic about the sport’s “girl power” aspect, however. Hoff ’s SCRG teammate Evie Smith, aka Raven Von Kaos, says she plays the game not to make any sort of statement, but for sheer enjoyment. “You can consider any sport that a girl plays a feminist act,” she points out. “I mean, I’m not sitting at home sewing dresses or anything. But I don’t consider myself an over-the-top feminist. I’m just hanging out with the girls.” Whether or not it’s a feminist activity, a roller derby bout is hardly a seminar in traditionally “ladylike” behavior. In brief, the game works like this: Two teams of five women converge on a circuit track,

Tales like these leave little doubt as to why we frequently hear the word “violent” used in association with the sport of roller derby. But Hoff sees this description as indicative of a widespread misperception of women in full-contact sports. “I don’t really see [roller derby] as [violent]. I see it as being allowed to be fearless instead of being – since you’re a woman – you have to fear men, or you have to fear somebody hitting you really hard and knocking you down.” Violent or not, though, there’s no question that being a roller girl requires a certain fierceness of disposition. As such, the game provides a much-needed opportunity for many fiery characters to release a little pent-up angst. For instance, SVRG pivot T.C. Kinzy, a 32-year-old mother of two who describes herself as “a punk at heart,” often has to suppress her hard-core side at the daycare center she runs when she’s not tearing up the track. “My wild days are long gone, but now, as I settle down, [roller derby] is an outlet for me to express that part of me that has kind of been buried,” she says. Smith, who says she’d been known to snap at people from time to time when working as a bartender before graduating college, believes roller derby has helped her to be less aggressive outside the rink. She comments that having the opportunity to yell and throw herself at people three or four times a week has generally made her a nicer, more even-keeled person. 28


SPORTS&ADVENTURE: FEATURE

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SPORTS&ADVENTURE F E AT U R E

[ C O N T. ] Santa Cruz Roller Girls

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Hoff, too, says that roller derby has helped her to express her confidence and drive in more positive ways. “General quality of life improves when you feel good about your place in the world, and it helps you figure out that it’s OK to say what you want and go for what you want,”

she muses. “It’s not only OK; you have to.” TW For more information, go to Silicon Valley Roller Girls www.svrollergirls. com, www.myspace.com/svrollergirls or Santa Cruz Roller Girls www.santacruzrollergirls.com, www. myspace.com/santacruzrollergirls.

SV

EXERCISE & LIFESTYLE

» EXERCISE & LIFEST YLE

DANCE STUDIOS

Western Ballet 914 Rengstorff Ave., Unit A, Mountain View (650) 968-4455 www.westernballet.org Western Ballet provides an atmosphere of care and dedication for all levels, from absolute beginner to professional dancers. Students range in age from four to 95.

SPOR T S & A DVEN T URE

FITNESS CENTERS

American Kickboxing Academy 1830 Hillsdale Ave. Ste. 2, San Jose (408) 371-4235, 168 E. Fremont Ave., Sunnyvale www.akakickbox. com The American Kickboxing Academy offers top-level public instruction for men, women, and children. In addition, AKA provides private professional training.

AlaVie Fitness 120 W. Campbell Ave., Ste. D, Campbell www. alaviefitness.com Cutting edge outdoor fitness boot camps for all ages and fitness levels. Ten Bay Area locations. 5K/10K training and other fitness events and services. Women’s, Coed and Corporate programs.

Ernie Reyes West Coast Martial Arts 668 Lincoln Ave., San Jose (408) 993-8122, 7050 Santa Teresa, San Jose (408) 629-2441 www.erniereyes.com For children and adults, martial arts teaches focus, confidence, self-discipline, fitness, flexibility, coordination and weight, as well as respect for themselves and others.

South Bay Athletic Club

Fairtex Muay Thai Fitness 2044 Old Middlefield Way, Mountain View (650) SOUTH 938-8588 www.fairtex.com FairtexBAY Muay Thai is RUNNING an internationally recognized sportsCLUBS fitness facility specializing in authentic Muay Thai training since 1971. AIDS Marathon: Marathon training Silver Creek Sportsplex www.aidsmarathon.com/home/sf.html 800 Bay Embedded Way, San (408) 225-1843 Trail Runners: TrailJose Running www.silvercreeksportsplex.com www.baytrailrunners.com The 240,000-sq.ft. facility is the largest under one roof in North America Sanstate Jose:of-the-art Half and whole marathon — aGalloway truly unique, complex cateringtrainto ingactive www.urbansports.info today’s families and individuals. Palo Alto Run Club: www.parunclub.com Quicksilver Running Club: Fun run, marathon, and ultra marathon training (408) www.quicksilver-running.com 271 Houret Dr., Milpitas 946-0600 Spartans Club: Interval training www.southbayathleticclub.net Southwww.gospartans.org Bay Athletic Club Stevens has always beenStriders: a leader Trail withrunning innovative fitness Creek programs, and yet we always keep the old favorites www.stevenscreekstriders.org around – like racquetball and swimming! Team in Training: Half and whole marathon training www.teamintraining.org/sj

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SPORTS&ADVENTURE: FEATURE

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» FEATURE

Health&Beauty Mighty Leaf Tea herbal tea trio

A Healthy Brew Ten reasons why tea, with its many health benefits, should be your beverage of choice. BY KATHY CHIN LEONG

E

very Saturday my kid brother and I tagged along with Mom and Dad for our weekly dim sum ritual in the heart of San Francisco’s Chinatown. Once there, we swirled and devoured cups and cups of oolong, chrysanthemum, or whatever the waiter poured. We weren’t picky. “Drink more to cut the grease,” my mom would say.

Simple tea – the stuff of my childhood memories – has now gained its rightful superstar status. In recent years we’ve learned that tea is much more than a digestive aid to block the effects of too much dim sum: It yields mega benefits, making this age-old elixir a modern tonic for the masses. It can boost your energy, help you sleep, leave you with clearer skin, and even help lower your cholesterol. And, according to the Tea Association of USA (www.teausa.org), tea contains compounds known as flavonoids, which boast antioxidant properties. Antioxidants are the good guys that help reduce cardio disease and lower the risk of certain cancers. “I know of no other beverage that offers such an experience that is as healthy, tasty, and visual,” says Gary Shinner, founder of Mighty Leaf Tea in San Rafael.

HE A LT H & BE AU T Y

Could this tiny cup give you superhuman powers or be the key to everlasting life? Perhaps that’s overstating it – but if you peruse these following truths about tea, it soon becomes clear just how beneficial this beverage can be. 01 All teas offer health benefits. Regular tea

drinking can reduce risk of kidney stones and osteoporosis. For men, daily consumption can improve the prostate. However, you must be careful what you are drinking the tea for, according to Preeti Kulkarni, a naturopathic practitioner at Pharmaca Integrative Pharmacy’s Los Gatos store. Some products have more caffeine than others, and you must know how your own body reacts to caffeine or other compounds, she warns. 02 You can drink too much tea. Even though the

caffeine from tea does not give you the buzz that coffee does, do be careful. “Too much of a good thing, anything, isn’t good for you,” Kulkarni says.

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» FEATURE » SPA PROFILES

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03 Free-flowing, loose leaf tea is tastier than teas trapped in traditional tea bags. This is true because the whole leaf has not been oxidized too much, and the leaves have a chance to float in the water and marinate, says Shinner, who sells gourmet tea leaves in exquisite silk bags. “The flavor experience is better, and the nuances of the tea come through in a whole leaf.” 04 Tea never truly expires, but you should consume it within a year. That can of leaves you were given two Christmases ago won’t kill you if you make a cup out of it today, but the flavor will have diminished, just like old spices hidden in your cabinet for years. It’s best to use the leaves within five to six months, says Randall Hisle of Peet’s Coffee & Tea in San Jose. Keep tea in an airtight container in a cool, dry place. Storing in a ceramic jar or wooden box is best because it keeps out the heat more than metal, glass or plastic, he advises. 05 Green tea is loaded with antioxidants and

seems good for whatever ails you. One study in Japan noted that green tea can slow the aging process, because it reduces infection and bacterial stress. Other research papers have shown that green tea can aid in burning fat, lowering blood pressure, relieving arthritis, helping to prevent certain cancers, and preventing plaque buildup on teeth. 06 Peppermint, mint or spearmint tea is an excellent pick-me-up. With its minty zing, these teas are also great for soothing the lower digestive tract, says Kulkarni. It can also provide relief for allergy sufferers. “If you are getting sinus congestion, this is good for you, but you have to take it as needed.” It is not recommended to drink daily, as the mint is high in essential oils, and too much of the essential oils can overpower the body, she explains. 07 Licorice or dandelion tea does the trick for

better skin, hair and nails. Also, look for teas that blend in milk thistle or burdock. 08 Natural herb and spice teas can help relieve

constipation. Look for teas made with fennel, cinnamon, or grated ginger. 09 Black tea can lower LDL (bad) cholesterol. It

has also been shown to help reduce the risk of heart disease and stroke. 32

WHERE TO SIP TEA Fantasia Tea House, 10933 Wolfe Rd., Ste. 120, Cupertino (408) 865-1689 Lisa’s Tea Treasures, 1875 S. Bascom Ave., Ste. 165, San Jose (408) 371-7377; 1175 Merrill St., Menlo Park (650) 322-5544; 277 Santana Row, Ste. 145, San Jose (408) 247-3613 Peet’s Coffee & Tea, 144 W. El Camino Real, Sunnyvale (408) 636-0545; 1140 Lincoln Ave., Ste. C, San Jose (408) 975-9281; 377 Santana Row, Ste. 1130, San Jose (408) 213-1071; for more locations, go to www.peets.com Tea Time Tea Lounge, 542 Ramona St., Palo Alto (650) 328-2877 www.tea-time.com


HEALTH&BEAUT Y: FEATURE

HE A LT H & BE AU T Y

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10 Think twice about adding

HE A LT H & BE AU T Y

milk, as it can negate the positive heart health effects of tea. When consumers drink black tea, the flavonoids in the tea help the arteries to relax. A recent study published by the European Heart Journal revealed that pouring milk into black tea counteracted the effect completely. TW

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WHERE TO BUY TEA Pharmaca Integrative Pharmacy, 54 N. Santa Cruz Ave., Los Gatos (408) 395-1231 www.pharmaca.com Elephant Pharmacy, 4470 El Camino Real, Los Altos (650) 472-6800 www.elephantpharm.com Lupicia Fresh Tea, Westfield Valley Fair, 2855 Stevens Creek Blvd., Santa Clara (408) 246-5800 www.lupiciausa.com Teavana, Westfield Valley Fair, 2855 Stevens Creek Blvd., Santa Clara (408) 244-0455; 3 Stanford Shopping Center, Palo Alto (650) 326-5151 www.teavana.com Whole Foods Market, 20955 Stevens Creek Blvd., Cupertino (408) 257-7000; 1690 S. Bascom Ave., Campbell (408) 371-5000; 15980 Los Gatos Blvd., Los Gatos (408) 358-4434; for more locations, go to www.wholefoodsmarket.com Ranch 99 Market, 10983 N. Wolfe Rd., Cupertino (408) 532-8899; 1688 E. Hostetter Rd., San Jose (408) 436-8899 www.99ranch.com


HEALTH&BEAUT Y: FEATURE

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HEALTH&BEAUT Y: SPA PROFILES

HEALTH&BEAUTY » SPA PROFILES

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DESIGNER’S LTD. SALON & SPA $$ 2523 Winchester Blvd. (408) 378-7300

Services: Massage, hair styling, highlighting, waxing, facials, microderm, glycolic peels, reflexology, make-up, manicure, pedicures. Special Features: With over 28 years of experience, Designer’s will provide you with all your beauty needs, from your basic manicure to a cutting edge hair style. Book any service over $50 and receive a $25 gift card towards a facial or massage on your next visit. STAR SALON & SPA $ 2260 S. Bascom Ave. (408) 377-2151 www.starsalonspa.com

Call 408.371.CLIPS or Walk-ins are available

Services: Facials (refresher, classic European, ultimate European), massages (back and neck, full body, deep tissue, foot reflexology), tanning, hair removal, nail care and full salon services. Special Features: If a regular facial just doesn’t cut it for you, go for the Ultimate at Star Salon & Spa. It’s 80 minutes of pure facial bliss, with an AHA chemical peel that smoothes fine lines, lightens hyper pigmentation and promotes cell growth, followed by hydrating, toning, a facial, and a neck and shoulder massage, and ending with a nourishing masque. Also, check out the massage packages, which are a great bargain at $240 for six half-hour sessions.

FREMONT CLARITY SPA $$

40000 Fremont Blvd., Ste. D (510) 656-2100 www.clarityspa.com

HE A LT H & BE AU T Y

Services: Facials (purifying, skin resurfacing, dendrology, tri-enzyme, hydrating, vitamin C, gentlemen’s, skin balancing, lymphatic cleansing, superlifting, aromatherapy, refresher), microdermabrasion, peel (sensi, ultra peel I/II, PCA), body treatments (back, lymphatic drainage cellulite treatment, mind and body rejuvenation, French soft and silk salt glow, perfect legs), waxing, and tinting. Special Features: Extra means better at Clarity Spa with $20-andbelow add-ons that will enhance your spa experience. Get an instant super lift for $20 or the special ampoule containing vitamins A, E, C, collagen, DNA, and oxygen for $12. EUROPEAN DAY SPA $

40643 Grimmer Blvd. (510) 770-1237 www.europeandayspa.com

Services: Massages (hot stone, Swedish, deep tissue, reflexology, integrated, aromatherapy, prenatal, spa hand and foot), facials (European deep pore cleansing, Dermalift nonsurgical facial lift, glycolic acid, acne, back, men’s), body treatments (salt glow body polishing with hydrotherapy bath, cellulite, seaweed body wrap, mud body wrap, slimming/detoxification, buff and bronze w/hypnotherapy), makeup, eye treatment, manicures, and pedicures. Special Features: Spa packages are the way to go if you can’t decide 34

THEWAVEMAG.COM JUNE 16-29, 2008

PROFILES

how best to pamper yourself. From career women and moms-to-be to teenagers and couples, European Day Spa has you covered. LAVENDER BEAUTY SPA $$$

47854 Warm Springs Blvd. (510) 353-1311 www.lavenderbeautyspa.com

Services: Facials (classic, Repechage four layer, Hungarian organic, hyper hydrating, teen, acne, silkpeel, anti-wrinkle firming and lifting defense, lightening, puffy-eye treatment, oxygen treatment, LumiLift, Lumifacial), body treatments (mud wrap, body contour wrap, lemon sugar body polish, spa paraffin, cellulite treatment), waxing, and eyelash perming. Special Features: Rehydrate with oxygen and choose one of Lavender’s facial treatments like the ECHO2Plus Oxygen Treatment System, which uses pure medical grade oxygen packed with 87 different vitamins, minerals, enzymes, and amino acids. VISUAL IMAGE SALON $

5200 Mowry Ave., Ste. C (510) 792-5922 www.visualimagesalon.com

Services: Facials (signature, traditional European, acne, glycolic acid peel, microdermabrasion, back), eye, lip and neck treatments, eyebrow and lash tinting, waxing, hair salon, and makeup. Special Features: Become a model and get your haircut or colored for free. Models are used for training future hair stylists, and qualified educators are on hand to supervise.

GILROY BEAUTY LOUNGE $$$

1275 First St. (408) 846-5172

Services: Massages (reflexology, shiatsu, prenatal, sports, Swedish, aromatherapy, warm stone), tanning, facials (anti-aging, deep pore, acne, glycolic, enzyme peel, microdermabrasion), permanent makeup, hair treatments, and waxing. Special Features: Take a dip in their hydrotherapy tub and take home something special from their boutique, which sells designer jewelry, lingerie, and health products.

HALF MOON BAY PRIMROSE COUNTRY DAY SPA $

630 Purissima St. (650) 726-1244 www.primrosespa.com

Services: Massages (Swedish, deep tissue, four hands, aromatherapy, warm stone, couples, prenatal), facials (pumpkin, resurfacing, rosacea, Jan Marini C-ESTA, teen, enzyme peel, hyper pigment treatment, acne), body wraps (herbal, mud, seaweed), scrubs, waxing, tinting, hand and feet care, and electrolysis. Special Features: Facials are Primrose’s specialty, with options like Epicurean enzyme and oxygen treatment, salicylic acid, microcurrent eye treatment, and frozen live cell therapy.

RITZ-CARLTON, HALF MOON BAY SPA $$$$

One Miramontes Point Rd. (650) 712-7040 www. ritzcarlton.com/en/Properties/ HalfMoonBay/Spa/Default.htm

Services: Massages and touch therapies (Half Moon Bay signature, couples, sports, reflexology, prenatal, Thai, invigorating scalp, shiatsu, healing stone, deep tissue), facials (calming lavender, the Half Moon Bay, men’s protection, renovateur, deep cleansing, Carita intense hydrating renovateur, Carita extreme softness renovateur, Carita purifying balance renovateur, Carita lift firming renovateur, Prada radiance visage), body treatments (pumpkin body peel, Prada replenishing body facial, fresh lavender wrap, aromatherapy body polish), nailcare, hair salon, hair removal, makeup, fitness center, and wellness services. Special Features: This ritzy spa’s fitness center, steam room, sauna, whirlpool, and coed Roman mineral bath are complimentary for guests purchasing a treatment.

LOS ALTOS CIANA DAY SPA AND SALON $$

111 Main St. (Salon); 107 Main St. (Spa) (650) 941-1285 www.cianasalonspa.com

Services: Facials (essential, ultimate, elemental nature, outer peace acne relief, men’s, LaStone, purifying facial for acneprone skin, 55-minute express, microdermabrasion), waxing, hand and feet therapy, hair salon, and makeup. Special Features: If you want the pampering to continue at home, throw a microdermabrasion party, where a certified esthetician from Ciana visits you. YELKA DAY SPA $$$

2049 Grant Rd. (650) 9691117 www.yelkadayspa.com

Services: Facial therapies (Treatment 21TM, pumpkin pie refining peel, hydraplenishing oxygen, MoistureLock collagen, ultimate decadence, mini decadence, regenerating caviar pearl, frosty mint spirulina, intense glycol-firming, microdermabrasion, Lumi, acne), massages (deep tissue, aromatherapy, aqua-thermal trio, personalized plus, mom-to-be, Treatment 21TM deep relaxation), body treatments (Adriatic lavender salt polish, chocolate raspberry buff, cellulite reduction, slimming detox, hand brightening and retexturizing, reflexology, aromatic scalp treatment), waxing, tinting, and spa packages. Special Features: Caviar used to be something you ate, but now it’s something you put on your face – well, almost. The Regenerating Caviar Pearl Facial takes the finest of caviar extracts, which compel skin cells to metabolize, leaving your face radiant.

LOS GATOS CLOUD 9 SKIN & BODY CARE $$

501 N. Santa Cruz Ave., Ste. 2 (408) 354-0710 www.cloud9x.com 36


HEALTH&BEAUT Y: SPA PROFILES

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HEALTH&BEAUT Y: SPA PROFILES

HEALTH&BEAUTY SPA 34

Services: Massages (deep tissue, trigger-point, acupressure, Thai, reflexology, Swedish gentle, hot stone, Reiki, lymphatic drainage, prenatal), facials (Cloud 9), body treatments (herbal cellulite wrap with foot reflexology, fabulous bodacial with salt scrub, herbal mask, aroma steam, moisture treatment), hair removal, nail care, naturopathic medicine, chemical and metabolic rebalancing, and chiropractic services. Special Features: Feel weightless in a flotation tank filled with 800 pounds of Epsom Salts – proven to relieve stress and muscle tension. GABRIELLE SALON $$

540 N. Santa Cruz Ave., Ste. D (408) 395-7260

For a Sizzling New and Vibrant Attitude

Services: Massages (aromatherapy, Swedish, deep tissue, hot stone, prenatal, sports, chair, focus), facials (Aromessance, men’s, teen, sea, sensitive skin, deep pore cleansing, antioxidant, glycolic peel, back), body treatments (salt glow, moor mud, coffee scrub, airbrush tanning), waxing, nail care, hair salon, and makeup. Special Features: Coffee lovers should try the Café Latte manicure, in which the hands are soaked in coffee beans, and steamed milk before the rest of the treatment. LUSCIOUS SKIN $

401 Alberto Way, Ste. D (408) 370-9121 www.lusciousskin.com

Services: Massages (therapeutic Esalen, Reiki technique), facials (fountain of youth petite, tropical, deep cleansing European, firming, deep pore cleanse, soothing “C,” paprika with AHA, Lisa’s seasonal special), brow/lash tinting, and hair removal. Special Features: Try the Paprika Facial with AHA, the signature treatment which “regenerates, rejuvenates, and detoxifies” the skin. THE MOMMY SPA $$

413-A Monterey Ave., (408) 395-2009 www.themommyspa.com

HE A LT H & BE AU T Y

Services: Massages (specializing in pregnancy and postpartum massage, plus Swedish relaxation, deep tissue, and hot stone massage, trigger point therapy, and couples and infant massage classes). Also offers Reiki and guided meditation. Special Features: Founder Lindsay MacInnis has extensive training and experience, studying under such recognized experts as New York’s Elaine Stillerman, and San Diego’s Carol Osborne-Sheets. As a result, she has advanced certification in pregnancy massage, and over 70 hours of specific prenatal training. For new mommies, newborns to three-month-olds are welcome during postpartum therapy sessions, with time for infant care and feeding as needed. RENDEZVOUS SALON & DAY SPA $$

529 N. Santa Cruz Ave. (408) 354-3085

Services: Massages (warm stone, Swedish body, therapeutic, aromatherapy), facials (Rendezvous ultimate, detoxifying, anti-aging rejuvenation, acne controlling), skin resurfacing (microdermabrasion, exfoliation power peels), hair salon, nail care, hair removal, brow design, and makeup. Special Features: Rendezvous offers 36

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PROFILES

special add-on services, including detoxifying arm treatment, décolleté microdermabrasion and rejuvenation treatment, balancing back facial, hydrating hand and paraffin treatment, and after facial makeup application. Makeup applications in styles such as film, photography, and television are also provided. SHANGRI-LA LOTUS $$

412-A Monterey Ave. (408) 3951139 www.jennysbeauty.com

Services: Eyelash extensions, permanent makeup, hair styling, curling and straightening, facials (Heavenly Indulgence, classic, teen facial, Dermafile, back treatment), microdermabrasion, waxing, spa pedicures, manicures and nail care, makeup for weddings and special occasions. Special Features: Owner Jenny Dinh has been doing eyelash extensions for over 15 years. During the wedding season, she’s given as many as 10 brides a month the long, lush lashes of their dreams. STUDIO JOULE $$

130A N. Santa Cruz Ave. (408) 395-3773 www.studiojoule.com

Services: Massages (30-, 60-, 90minute; sole session foot reflexology treatment; Joule face and body duo, mother-to-be, eucalyptus escape), facials (classic Joule, petite studio, studio teen, microdermabrasion, lightening, Obagi skincare system, Joule facial packages, Jan Marini signature), hair removal, lash and brow tint, and makeup. Special Features: Find out which makeup looks best on you with a complimentary consultation with Jane Iredale Mineral Cosmetics. YVETTE’S INSTITUTE DE BEAUTE $$

248 W. Main St. (408) 395-1551

Services: Massages (aromatherapy massage, aromatic sauna wrap, tension relief neck and shoulder, renewing hand treatment), facials (deep pore cleansing, Guinot hydradermie oxygenating, hydradermie plus anti-aging, ultimate hydration, calming sensitive skin, purifying teen, regulating, aromaplasty mineral, luminizing, lift defense – collagen, oxyliance revitalizing, flash beaute vitamin C, evidence antiaging firming, refreshing mini, deep cleansing back, soothing eye contour treatment), body treatments (Swiss herbal wrap, anti-cellulite body mask, toning/ firming sculptural, mother-to-be, firming neck and décolleté mask), makeup, lash and brow tint, hair removal, and nail care. Special Features: For intensive care, go for the Glycolic Acid Peel or the Beta Hydroxy Acid Peel. The Glycolic is designed to make skin healthy and glowing, and with the Beta you can choose a booster to treat a particular problem area.

MENLO PARK INSPIRATION DAY SPA $$

325 Sharon Park Dr. (650) 854-5885 www.inspirationdayspa.com

Services: Massages (signature, deep tissue, heated desert stone,

neck, back and shoulders, prenatal, reflexology, shiatsu, Swedish), facials (inspiration, rose quartz, age perfecting, collagen veil mask, microdermabrasion), body treatments (Hamman, green clay mud wrap, champagne, caramel chocolate sundae, journey to serenity, bronzing), waxing, hair salon, makeup, and nail care. Special Features: The DNA CryoStemTM skin therapy system fuses the synergy of DermaNutraceutical technology with cryogenic bio-cell therapy to hydrate your skin. Integrate it into your day at the spa and take some home for later use. PERSONA DAY SPA $

1166 El Camino Real (650) 328-2836 www.personadayspa-mp.com

Services: Facials (European, vitamin C, collagen, teen, men’s, glycolic), body treatments (botanical body buff, parafango firming and anti-cellulite series, back cleansing), massages (Swedish, reflexology, deep tissue), makeup, lash tinting and perming, and waxing. Special Features: Marriage should not be taken lightly and neither should the wedding day. That’s why Persona Day Spa offers prewedding consultations on makeup application, and, if needed, onlocation assistance on your big day. THERMAE DAY SPA $$$

103 Gilbert Ave. (650) 8333131 www.thermaespa.com

Services: Massages (classic relaxing, deep tissue, hydrotherapy, lymphatic, maternity, warm soothing stone specialty, aromatherapy, neck, back and shoulder), facials (purifying/deep hydrating, oxygen, aromatherapy, anti-aging, vitamin C, teen, men’s, microdermabrasion), body treatments (exfoliating salt scrub, hydrating and healing mud wrap, detoxifying herbal wrap, hydrotherapy baths, nail care, waxing, and makeup. Special Features: It’s not enough just to look great on the outside. Therma’s wellness center takes care of your inner being with services such as counseling, a 25-minute meditation session and personalized Ayurveda nutrition sessions (to help you understand what foods are best for you, according to your mind and body type).

MOUNTAIN VIEW AMERICAN MALE SALON $$$

560 Showers Dr. (650) 9419994 www.americanmale.com

Services: Waxing, salon services, paraffin hand dips, foot and hand detailing, skin and back treatments, and massages (Swedish stress relief, deep tissue sports, reflexology). Special Features: American Male Salon offers a host of packages to help men look and feel great, such as the three-and-a-half-hour Ultimate American Male Combo that includes a Swedish massage, facial, hand and foot detailing plus a professional haircut. TW


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» FEATURE

Style&Shopping

The Anatomy of a Suit

hem to check the quality of workmanship. Many people are very loyal to their tailors, and once they find one they are comfortable with, they will return for many years.

A timeless style of a custom-made ensemble is ideal for those who want to dress to impress.

02 Once a tailor is chosen, the next thing to do,

ST Y L E & SHOPPING

BY MITCHELL ALAN PARKER

A

ccording to Manuel Carvajal, owner of Manuel’s Custom Tailoring in San Jose, a suit should be an investment, something that will last and look good for a long time. In other words, don’t skimp. Places like Men’s Warehouse sell good quality suits at very reasonable prices, even offering free tailoring for life on alterations they make to your suit. But Carvajal says that nothing can compare to the quality of having a hand-basted, custom-made, professionally tailored suit. For some, that can be intimidating. Where do you start? How do you have a fine quality suit made to order, one that confors to your specific measurements? We asked tailoring expert Carvajal, who’s been making fine quality suits for 40 years at his Stevens Creek store, how to go about getting well suited.

01 The most important thing to do is find a good tailor. Ask around, read reviews, talk to friends, maybe even bring in a suit for a minor alteration or 38

THEWAVEMAG.COM JUNE 16-29, 2008

Carvajal says, is choose a fabric. He suggests that it’s best to stick with wool, and we agree. Linen should be avoided at all costs unless you live on the equator, and polyester should be avoided unless you’re entering a ’70s disco contest. As for the quality of the wool, the more threads per square inch, the softer the fabric will be, therefore the more the fabric will cost. Carvajal notes that a good quality suit should have a thread count of anywhere from 110 to 150, the finest of which are usually fabrics from Italy and France, but are distributed through warehouses in the US and Canada, taking about three or four days to arrive at Carvajal’s shop. 03 From there, Carvajal hand-cuts the fabric accord-

ing to style preference and begins to design the suit accordingly. He says that customers equally choose American- and European-cut suits (a cut refers to how the fabric fits the contours of an individual’s body). The American cut is a standard cut, while the European cut is more tapered at the waist, which is meant for people who are on the trim side. Typically, Carvajal says, it takes about two to three fittings to get the fit just right, as some people have one shoulder that sits lower than the other, or one arm that is longer than the other. But the result is unparalleled, as there is nothing that can complement an individual more than custom-fit apparel. 04 Custom-made suits at Carvajal’s are generally

between $950 and $1,695 and usually take about three to five weeks to complete. Due to the quality of custom suits, Carvajal says that some customers are still wearing the same suit they purchased 10 years ago, making the investment in a quality tailored suit well worth the cost. TW WELL-TAILORED TIPS Fabric: Wool (at least 110 thread count) Cut: American or European (European if you are slimmer) Color: Dark or navy blue Style: Single-breasted, two to three buttons Accessories: Dress socks are a must, and belt and shoes should match, while the tie should match or complement the suit color. Shirts: You can’t go wrong with the traditional solid blue or solid white, although subtle stripes are becoming increasingly popular. Just beware the striped shirt, striped tie faux pas. Fused or hand-basted: Fused means that layers of fabric were glued together, a shoddy way of crafting a suit. Hand-basted, as done by Carvajal, means that layers of fabric are hand-stitched together, making the suit softer and more manageable.

WHERE TO GO Paris Tailor, 353 Main St., Los Altos (650) 941-6604 Designer’s Tailoring, 2119 El Camino Real, Palo Alto (650) 321-1570 Ricardo’s Tailoring, 765 E El Camino Real, Sunnyvale (408) 736-4194 Manuel’s Custom Tailoring, 3237 Stevens Creek Blvd., San Jose (408) 246-8128 Elegant Tailoring & Bridal, 103 Serra Way, Milpitas (408) 236-5526 Barcelino, Westfield Valley Fair, 2855 Stevens Creek Blvd., Ste. 1385, San Jose (408) 556-6666 www.barcelino.com


ST YLE&SHOPPING: FEATURE

SV

FASHION

» FASHION

IBI Boutique 1231 Franklin Mall, Santa Clara (408) 261-2050 www.ibiboutique.com IBI Boutique is the modern woman’s dream closet! They have a large selection of women’s clothing, accessories, footwear, jewelry and handbags. Located right in Franklin Square across from the Santa Clara Post Office.

Kitsch Couture 20490 Saratoga-Los Gatos Rd., Saratoga (408) 8721104 www.kitschcouture.com At Kitsch Couture, they want fashion to capture your individuality. They have transformed a quaint historic church into a wonderfully distinct contemporary boutique, featuring an eclectic mix of fashion-forward pieces, unique accessories and gifts. Customers often leave saying “There truly is something for everyone.” Brands include Free People, T-Bags, Trina Turk, Kensie and Michael Stars.

Signature Lifestyle Amy B. Boutique BOUTIQUES

Alta

519 E. Campbell Ave., Campbell (408) 370-3433 www.myspace.com/signaturelifestyle Features casual clothing for young guys and gals, with a large selection of accessories at very affordable prices. Complimentary gift wrapping is also available.

Ursula’s Boutique

1342 Lincoln Ave., San Jose (408) 288-5940; 701 Laurel St., San Carlos (650) 596-9599; 779 Santa Cruz Ave., Menlo Park (650) 326-7390; 130 N. Santa Cruz Ave., Los Gatos (408) 354-0069 Alta has been carrying original contemporary clothing and accessories for the past 25 years. Visit any of their four locations and experience the excitement.

Amy B. Boutique Corner Stone Shopping Center, 15994 Los Gatos Blvd., Los Gatos (408) 358-8600 Exceptional men’s and women’s contemporary clothing and accessories from Ted Baker, Diane Von Furstenberg, Oliver Peoples, James Perse, Vince and Paige Denim.

Bella James

140 W. Main St., Ste. B, Los Gatos (408) 395-1400 The wide range of clothing and styles at Ursula’s Boutique will have you dressed for any event. With an array of jewelry, handbags and accessories, Ursula’s Boutique is all you need to complete your outfit. LINGERIE

Dutchess Intimates Boutique 346 E. Campbell Ave., Campbell (408) 866-8006 www.dutchessboutique.com Dutchess specializes in fine lingerie, bras, panties and accessories at affordable prices. Visit their brand new boutique in downtown Campbell for something sweet or sexy. Private party hosting available.

1165 Lincoln Ave., San Jose (408) 292-0000 350 E. Campbell Ave., Campbell (408) 866-9000 www.bellajames.com Located in the Garden Theatre in Willow Glen and now in downtown Campbell, Bella James features inspiring and affordable contemporary women’s clothing and accessories, including Michael Stars, Joe’s Jeans, Havaianas, Free People, Hudson, Citizens and more. TO HAVE YOUR BUSINESS LISTED IN SVGUIDE: FASHION, CALL

(408) 467-3200

ST Y L E & SHOPPING

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» FEATURE

Home&Design 01

» FEATURE » LISTINGS

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HOME & DESIGN

WHERE TO BUY

On the Boil Designers go wild when it comes to creating tea pots and kettles. BY MITCHELL ALAN PARKER

W

e now know that there are numerous health benefits associated with drinking tea [see Health and Beauty feature, page 30]. But who would have thought that boiling water would turn into the design grudge match that it is today? Go ahead and blame Michael Graves for designing a “postmodern pop-influenced” teakettle for Alessi in 1985 that has sold more than two million units. 40

THEWAVEMAG.COM JUNE 16-29, 2008

Now, when it comes to teakettles, anything goes. The zanier the better – and the more oblique, deranged, obtuse, provocative and ridiculous the design, the more likely you’ll see it on shelves at kitchen and home stores. And why not? Most avid tea drinkers leave kettles on the stovetop for readiness should the mood call for a soothing cup of tea. Thus, the kettle becomes one of the least expensive ways to spruce up a kitchen and add some evidence of your design savvy. A sleek kettle can accent and highlight a contemporary kitchen, while an overthe-top kettle will draw attention away from the otherwise appalling cabinets and linoleum nightmare of a fixer-upper. From whistling to electric, or classic to modern chic, there are no boundaries when it comes to teakettles. TW

Mitsuwa, 675 Saratoga Ave., San Jose (408) 255-6699 Santo Market, 245 E. Taylor St., San Jose (408) 295-5406 Sur La Table, 378 Santana Row, Ste. 1030, San Jose (408) 244-4749 www.surlatable.com Teavana, Westfield Valley Fair, 2855 Stevens Creek Blvd., Santa Clara (408) 2440455; 3 Stanford Shopping Center, Palo Alto (650) 326-5151 www.teavana.com Williams-Sonoma, Westfield Valley Fair, 2855 Stevens Creek Blvd., Santa Clara (408) 985-1507; 122 N. Santa Cruz Ave., Los Gatos (408) 354-7302; Stanford Shopping Center, 180 El Camino Real, Palo Alto (650) 321-3486 www.williams-sonoma.com Bed Bath & Beyond, Eastridge Mall, 2200 Eastridge Loop, San Jose (408) 274-2039; 515 Hamilton Ave., Campbell (408) 871-9214; 5201 Stevens Creek Blvd., Santa Clara (408) 260-2219; 2470 Charleston Rd., Mountain View (650) 691-0364 www.bedbathandbeyond.com 01 02 03 04 05 06

Le Creuset Ogive enamel-on-steel kettle, Sur La Table, $74.99 Windsor whistling teakettle, Williams-Sonoma, $115 - $130 Oxo Good Grips Uplift, Bed Bath & Beyond , $59.99 Chantal LiveStrong whistling loop, Bed Bath & Beyond, $49.99 Chantal ball kettle, Williams-Sonoma , $50 Zojirushi VE Hybrid electric boiler, Mitsuwa, Santo Market, Sur La Table, Teavana, www.zojirushi.com, $184.95 07 Michael Graves teakettle for Alessi, Bed Bath & Beyond, $159 08 Tea Ball teakettle, Sur La Table, $49.95 09 Finum Tea Control glass teapot, Sur La Table, $34.95


HOME&DESIGN: LISTINGS

HOME&DESIGN

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LISTINGS LOS ALTOS Valet Organizers, 359 State St. (650) 941-7761 www.valetorganizers.com Vintage Bath, 351 Main St. (650) 948-3147 www.vintagebath.com

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LOS GATOS Galleria of Los Gatos, 210 N. Santa Cruz Ave. (408) 395-3180 www.gallereiaoflosgatos.com

MENLO PARK Traditions Furniture, 850 Santa Cruz Ave. (650) 325-4849 www.traditionsforthehome.com

Grennanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Murphy Beds CAMPBELL American Mirador, Inc., 1550 Dell Ave., Ste. H (408) 370-2252 www.americanmirador.com Grennanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Murphy Beds, 166 Kennedy Ave. (888) 291-1306 www.grennans.com Peninsula Fireplace, 46 E. Campbell Ave. (408) 866-9200 www.peninsulafireplace.com Phantom Screens, 425 Salmar Ave. (408) 374-8156 Pool, Patio & More, 1870 S. Bascom Ave. (408) 377-8880 Valet Organizers, 1190 Dell Ave., Ste. J (408) 370-1041 www.valetorganizers.com Woodpeckers Wood Furniture, 877 E. Hamilton Ave. (408) 626-9000

GILROY

MOUNTAIN VIEW Busy Body Home Fitness, 1939 W. El Camino Real (650) 969-1703 www.busybody.com The Fireplace Element, 1970 W. El Camino Real (650) 938-2000 Western Appliance, 1730 W. El Camino Real (650) 969-4440

PALO ALTO The Futon Shop, 2180 El Camino Real (650) 493-2727 www.thefutonshop.com Medallion Rug Gallery, 323 University Ave. (800) 300-7847 www.medallionrug.com Palo Alto Hardware, 875 Alma St. (650) 327-7222

Garden Accents, 11155 Lena Ave. (408) 846-4555 www.garden-accents.net

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PROMOTION

Axis Tours Reveal Urban Oasis

HOME & DESIGN

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xis, Downtown San Joseâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s first luxury highrise residence, commands a premier location neighboring historic Hotel De Anza at the apex of palm-lined Almaden Blvd. With initial occupancy just months away, and initial sales well underway, Axis is truly an oasis in the making. Three well-appointed model homes and a visit to the 18th floor and pool area offer an exclusive glimpse into the urban living trend coming to the heart of Silicon Valley. Tours, starting out from the Axis Presentation Center, are conducted Mon-Thu (3:30-5:30pm), Fri (2:30-5:30pm), and SatSun (11am-5:30pm). The 329 homes at Axis offer a chance to explore a genuine urban, cosmopolitan lifestyle. For a busy urban professional or empty nester looking to simplify, more time can be spent doing the things one likes. Condo living allows a â&#x20AC;&#x153;lock and leaveâ&#x20AC;? lifestyle with the freedom to jet away for the weekend and not worry about taking care of a house or yard work. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Axis is a stunning addition to the San Jose skyline,â&#x20AC;? says community sales manager Sandra Eaton. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve had all kinds of interested parties, including first-time and move-up buyers, in every age group, from every demographic â&#x20AC;&#x201C; you name it, the advantages of highrise urban living meets the needs of so many people these days, and Axis offers a beautiful upscale product with real appeal.â&#x20AC;? Visit Axis for these upcoming events; call (408) 297-

9888 to RSVP: Wed, Jun. 25, 6-8pm, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Simplify at Axisâ&#x20AC;? Professional organizers, lenders, financial planners and more show you how simplify your life and adopt the â&#x20AC;&#x153;lock and leaveâ&#x20AC;? condo lifestyle. RSVP suggested. Fri, Jun. 27, Noonâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;1pm, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Axis for the Third Ageâ&#x20AC;? Seminar for seniors, retirees and empty nesters exploring a condo lifestyle from a â&#x20AC;&#x153;third age perspective.â&#x20AC;? Visit the Downtown farmers market, then pop into Axis for a free lunch, tours, advice, and tips about enjoying the Axis lifestyle in the prime of your life. RSVP required. Sat-Sun, Jun. 28-29, 11amâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;6pm, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Pet Axis Weekendâ&#x20AC;? Bring your pet and check out the Axis model homes together. Then get your dog washed for free, courtesy of Diva Dogs and Axis (Sat only). Axis Presentation Center, 38 N. Almaden Blvd., San Jose. Open daily 11am-6pm. For more information, call (408) 297-9888 or visit www.axissanjose.com.


HOME&DESIGN: LISTINGS

Is this the new coffee table?

Own Cool Furniture That Makes You Feel Proud For Less Than You’ll Pay For Furniture-In-A-Box.

Really?

New Stock Every Day All at Consignment Prices SAN MATEO

MOUNTAIN VIEW

SARATOGA

650-577-8979

650-964-7212

408-871-8890

1888 South Norfork

141 E. El Camino Real

600 El Paseo De Saratoga

SAN RAFAEL 415-456-2765 863 E. FRANCISCO

DANVILLE 925-866-6164 1901 CAMINO RAMON (behind Marshall’s)

Additional Locations in Roseville, Folsom, Laguna Niguel, Yorba Linda, Foothill Ranch, Newport Beach, CA. Austin,TX. Las Vegas, NV.


HOME&DESIGN: LISTINGS

HOME&DESIGN LISTINGS Grand Flooring, 894 Commercial St. (408) 441-1021 www.grandflooring.com Helm of Sun Valley (Patio furniture), 1111 Saratoga Ave. (408) 996-7669 www.helmofsunvalley.com Jimyko (Furniture), 1919 Monterey Rd., Ste. 10 (408) 993-0918 www.jimyko.com Leather Show Room, 4910 Stevens Creek Blvd. (408) 260-9928 www.leathershowroom.com Modern TV, 1228 S. Bascom Ave., Ste. B (408) 293-1330 www.moderntvonline.com Western Appliance, 1976 W. San Carlos St. (408) 297-2440; 646 Blossom Hill Rd. (408) 281-2444 Willow Glen Kitchen & Bath, 351 Willow Glen St. (408) 293-2284 Willow Glen Hardware, 2253 Lincoln Ave. (408) 2670223 willowglenace.com Woodpeckers Wood Furniture, 942 Blossom Hill Rd. (408) 578-8000

42

SANTA CLARA

Helm of Sun Valley SAN JOSE All World Furniture, 981 Stockton Ave. (408) 292-6833 www.allworldfurniture.com All American Home Fitness Equipment, 1223 The Alameda (408) 293-9966 www.allamericanfitness.com Black Sea Gallery (Furniture), 27 S. First St. (408) 998-8885 www.blackseagallery.com Design Within Reach Santana Row, 3080 Stevens Creek Blvd., Ste. 1010 (408) 261-8875 www.dwr.com The Futon Shop, 1080 Blossom Hill Rd. (408) 978-5696 www.thefutonshop.com California Casual Dining Specialists, 1272 S. Bascom Ave. (408) 294-7353 www.casualdiningspecialists.com

Anderson’s TV, 5241 Stevens Creek Blvd. (408) 554-1617 www.andersonstv.com The Complete Backyard (Patio furniture), 1600 Duana Ave. (408) 748-8100 www.patio101.com Sun Marble Tile & Counter Tops, 1300 Norman Ave. (408) 727-8300

SARATOGA Audio Arts, 14460 Big Basin Way (866) 262-8346 www.askaudioarts.com

SUNNYVALE Bay Area Gadgets (Audio), 1030 E. El Camino Real (408) 393-4779 TW

PROMOTION

Messina Gardens and Grandview Terrace Luxury Condominiums

N

HOME & DESIGN

ew from Pinn Bros. Fine Homes, these two luxurious properties in the South Bay offer a comfortable and affordable lifestyle unparalleled in Silicon Valley. Messina Gardens and Grandview Terrace have released 35 townhome-style condominiums, which are now available starting in the low $400,000s. Unlike so many contemporary condos, which are stacked on top of each other, these homes face one another on the street – so there are no above or below units, only shared walls. There are five unique floor plans to choose from: 1,300- to 1,800-square-foot, two- to four-bedrooms. Each home boasts Zodiac slab countertops, stainless steel Bosch appliances, custom made cabinets, and exquisitely upgraded hardwood floors, carpet and tile. Refrigerator and washer and dryer options are also available. Views include the east Alum Rock Foothills, while the Penitencia Creek Trail is within walking distance from the properties. The condos are conveniently located near a light rail station, plus offer quick and easy access to Interstate 680. Additionally, Messina Gardens will soon have a large, private park complete with playground and picnic areas for a comforting

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THEWAVEMAG.COM JUNE 16-29, 2008

family atmosphere. Every Messina Gardens and Grandview Terrace home has a private two-car garage and plenty of parking for guests. For more information, stop by the Messina Gardens office and tour one of the model homes – which, furniture aside, is identical to the available homes on the properties. Messina Gardens, 590 Cedarville Ln., San Jose; Grandview Terrace, 698 N. Capitol Ave., San Jose. Sales office open Fri-Tue 11am-5pm (Messina Gardens location). (408) 254-4006 www.pinnbros.com


Starlight, Starbright see the forest lit at night! Located on Graham Hill Rd., Felton, CA For more information or reservations call (831) (831 (831)) 335-4484 or visit www.roaringcamp.com www.roaringcamp.com

Wonder Wonder at the beauty of a redwood forest lit up at night during a 2-hour, 2-hour, round-trip railway excursion from the boardwalk in Santa Cruz. Reservations recommended.

St rol l . Brows e . E njoy.

David D. Bohannon Organization

www.menloparkchamber.com

Nirvana for the Festival Lover Les R. Koonce

July 19-20, 10am-6pm Santa Cruz Avenue, Menlo Park s#ONTEMPORARY!RT&INE#RAFTS s&ABULOUS&OOD7INE s2EFRESHING-ARGARITAS -ICROBREWS s$RAEGERS7ORLD #LASS#OOKING $EMOS s/RGANIC!LLEY3AMPLES4REATS s"URTS"EESh"EE UTIFY9OUR7ORLDv &REE(AND-ASSAGESAND3AMPLES

s,IVE2OCKN2OLL "LUES *AZZ 0ARTY-USIC s3ATURDAY!FTER (OURS#ONCERT 7ITH$OUBLE&UNK#RUNCH TOPMIN&REMONT0ARK

s#APTIVATING+IDS&UN:ONE s#OOL#ITY %CO &RIENDLY&ESTIVAL s!MPLE"ICYCLE0ARKING s!DMISSIONIS&REE

I n f o - l i n e : 6 5 0 - 3 2 5 - 2 8 1 8 | w w w. m i r a m a r e v e n t s . c o m

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MON 6/16

TUE 6/17

WED 6/18

THU 6/19

FRI 6/20

SAT 6/21

SUN 6/22

MON 6/23

TUE 6/24

WED 6/25

THU 6/26

FRI 6/27

SAT 6/28

SUN 6/29

Snapshots

JUNE 16-29, 2008

Your timely guide to the next two weeks in Silicon Valley entertainment. Billy Idol

50 WAYS TO LEAVE YOUR SOFA » EVENT LISTINGS

48

DINING

» FEATURE » HOT SPOTS » CATERING

50 54 56

NIGHTLIFE & MUSIC

» » » » » » » »

FEATURE HEADLINERS WINE TASTING & MORE CD RELEASES ALBUM REVIEWS CONCERT PREVIEWS SPORTS BARS THIS TIME IN MUSIC HISTORY

62 64 64 64 65 66 66 67

MOVIES & TV » » » »

INTERVIEW MOVIE REVIEWS & PREVIEWS DVD RELEASES CINEMA DIRECTORY

68 70 70 70

ARTS

» FEATURE » EVENT LISTINGS » COLUMN: HOT TICK ET

72 74 75

FAMILY & COMMUNITY

» EVENT LISTINGS » FARMERS MARK ETS » WEDDING PL ANNING

THEWAVEMAG.COM JUNE 16-29, 2008

78 78 79

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50 Ways June 21: You’ve seen highland games on ESPN2, now see them in person: The caber toss, the stone putt, and the dreaded Scottish hammer throw. Bagpipe bands and Celtic food and crafts make this a full-fledged Celtic festival: 9am – 5pm 14. JAMMIN’ AT THE JAMBOREE

Off San Carlos St., San Jose (408) 947-8711 www.sancarlosstreet.com

June 21: We at The Wave love jamborees, and you’ll love this one, too, featuring an evening of live music with The Groove Kings, two movies (Some Like It Hot and Happy Feet)and let’s not forget the barbecue from Armadillo Willy’s, children’s area, and community booths: 5 – 10pm 15. BACKYARD CHICKENS

Common Ground Educational Center, 559 College Ave., Palo Alto (650) 493-6072 www.commongroundinpaloalto.org

June 21: Learn everything you need to know to raise happy hens, including houses, nesting boxes, water, feed, suppliers, care, and favorite crops to grow for your chickens: 10:30am – 1:30pm

12

16. ICE CREAM ZOOFARI

6/16 MONDAY

1. ART AT THE BEACH

Esplanade Park, Capitola Beach (831) 419-7485

Thru August 17: If your name is Art, this event could reach intergalactic heights of surreal double meaning. If not, you can always enjoy the fine painting and sculpture display on the first and third Sunday of each month, through September, at the picturesque Capitola Beach: 11am – 6pm 2. AVIATION DAY CAMP

50 WAYS

Hiller Aviation Museum, 601 Skyward Rd., San Carlos (650) 654-0200 www.hiller.org/daycamp.shtml

June 16 – August 22: Kids ages six to 10 will enjoy an exciting week of exploring the science behind how airplane and helicopter wings work, plus designing and testing paper airplanes, and meeting pilots and other people who work in aviation.

6/18

WEDNESDAY 3. SHAKESPOD

City Lights Theater 529 S. Second St., San Jose (408) 295-4200 www.cltc.org

June 18 – 22: Shakespeare on shuffle! All the world’s a stage when Rosalind puts on her iPod, leaves home in disguise, and encounters a strange new world. Experience the romance, politics, intrigue, deception, and sexual antics of the Bard’s greatest works as classic Shakespeare is recharged and reimagined for an entirely new adventure! One week only.

48

4. SNAPSHOTS

Mountain View Center for the Performing Arts, 500 Castro St., Mountain View www.theatreworks.org

June 18 – July 13: TheatreWorks presents Snapshots, a glorious musical telling the tale of a marriage that has lost its way.

6/19

THURSDAY 5. PICASSO AT THE LAPIN AGILE Black Box Theatre, 848 E. William St., San Jose (408) 2887820 www.northsidetheatre.com

June 19 – July 13: In this Steve Martin-penned comedy, Pablo Picasso matches wits with Albert Einstein at a famous Parisian cabaret bar in 1904. 6. SONGWRITERS UNDER THE STARS

In the Concierge Lounge at Santana Row, Olin Ave. (408) 551-4611 www.santanarow.com

Thursdays thru July 24: Head on over to Santana Row and listen to some great bands such as Randy Maher, Eric Bolvin, Ray Soto, Miena Yoo, and Steve Krizer: 6 - 9pm 7. MOONLIGHT DINNER TRAIN PARTY Roaring Camp, Graham Hill Rd. & Mt. Hermon Rd., Felton www.roaringcamp.com

June 19: This romantic train excursion chugs through a redwood forest aglow with star and moonlight. The evening includes a BBQ steak dinner, train ride, and dancing to country western bands. Advance reservations required. 8. 11TH ANNUAL MUSIC IN THE OTHER PARK

St. James Park, First & James Sts., San Jose www.sjdowntown.com

THEWAVEMAG.COM JUNE 16-29, 2008

Thursdays thru June 26: If you like music, and we think you do, you should come for some great live music (outdoors) from Augustana and Ben Lee on Jun. 19, and Midnight Star and Ryze The Band on Jun. 26: 5:30 – 9:15pm 9. THE “SEX AND MONEY” TOUR

Books Inc., 301 Castro St., Mountain View (650) 428-1234 www.booksinc.net

June 19: It’s a night for primal urges as Soquel author Rupert Hart and San Jose author Michael J. Vaughn bring their “Sex and Money” book release party to Books Inc. The evening will feature a lively presentation and Q&A with Hart, followed by a dramatized reading of excerpts from Vaughn’s novel Double Blind with the help of local actors: 7pm 10. MOVIES ON THE SQUARE

Courthouse Square, 2200 Broadway, Redwood City www.redwoodcityevents.com

Romantics, Rare Earth, John Waite, Blue Oyster Cult, Gin Blossoms, and many more. 12. TOYOTA / SAVE MART 350

Infineon Raceway, 29355 Arnold Dr., Hwy. 37 at Hwy. 101, Sonoma www.infineonraceway.com

June 20 – 22: Three days of exciting racing from top NASCAR drivers, including defending champion Tony Stewart, along with Jeff Gordon, Dale Earnhardt Jr., and many more!

6/21

SATURDAY 13. 30TH ANNUAL CAMPBELL HIGHLAND GAMES

Campbell Community Center, One W. Campbell Ave., Campbell (408) 219-9264 www.campbellgames.com

Thursdays thru August 28: Grab a blanket, pop some popcorn and head over to Courthouse Square for some outdoor cinema fun all summer, with such great flicks as Grease, Flushed Away, Independence Day, Rocky, Close Encounters of the Third Kind, and many more: Dusk

June 21: Enjoy all-you-can-eat wild ice cream treats, live entertainment, animals, rides, puppet shows, and other fun activities. 17. VERTICAL CHALLENGE HELICOPTER AIR SHOW

Hiller Aviation Museum, 601 Skyway Rd., San Carlos (650) 654-0200 www.hiller.org

June 21: Hiller Aviation Museum’s annual helicopter show isn’t just about helicopter watching – you’ll even be able take a ride in one: 9am – 5pm 18. PRO-AM SAND SOCCER CHAMPIONSHIPS

Santa Cruz Beach Boardwalk, 400 Beach St., Santa Cruz www.ussandsoccer.com

June 21 – 22: South Africa has the World Cup, but Santa Cruz has the Sand Soccer Championships, where you can check out the accelerated action of soccer played on the beach.

Montgomery Theatre, 291 S. Market St., San Jose (408) 9861455 www.lyrictheatre.org

June 21 – 29: Frederic, mistakenly apprenticed to a pirate, falls in love with young, beautiful Mabel, but his pirate apprenticeship hinders their union. 20. DEATH CAB FOR CUTIE

Greek Theatre – UC Berkeley, Gayley Rd., Berkeley www.ticketmaster.com

June 21: Join Death Cab For Cutie for a night of great music at the breathtaking Greek Theatre in Berkeley. [See our interview, page 62] 21. CIVIL WAR REENACTMENT

Casa de Fruta Country Park, 6680 Pacheco Pass Hwy., Hollister (408) 842-9316 www.casadefruta.com

June 21 – 22: Step back in time to the War Between the States with an authentic battle re-enactment, settler encampments, military headquarters, medical facilities, and lots of gunfire. 22. SECOND ANNUAL REGIONAL PRE-SCHOOL ARTS FESTIVAL Emma Prusch Farm Park, 647 S. King Rd., San Jose (408) 998-2787

June 21: Bring out the family for this fabulous one-day mini arts festival, featuring work from children ages three to five, along with hands-on activities, dancing, face painting, mask making, puppetry, and more!: 11am – 3pm 23. 31ST ANNUAL VINTAGE MUSTANG OWNERS ASSOCIATION CAR SHOW

DeAnza College, Stevens Creek Blvd., Cupertino (408) 374-4966 www.mustangassociation.net

June 21: If you’re into vintage Mustangs, you won’t want to miss the largest gathering of Mustangs and Muscle Fords in Northern California: 10am – 3pm

6/22 SUNDAY

24. FIRST SILICON VALLEY DUCK RACE

Vasona Lake County Park, 333 Blossom Hill Rd., Los Gatos (408) 357-7406 www.siliconvalleyduckrace.org

June 22: Adopt a rubber duck for just the minuscule price of five dollars and help raise needed funds for local nonprofits. You’re also invited to listen to live entertainment, eat some tasty food, play some games, and have loads of fun!

6/20 FRIDAY

25. ALICE’S SUMMERTHING

11. FREE FRIDAY NIGHT BEACH CONCERTS

Golden Gate Park – Speedway Meadow, San Francisco www.radioalice.com

Santa Cruz Beach Boardwalk, 400 Beach St., Santa Cruz (831) 4235590 www.beachboardwalk.com

June 20 – August 29: Summer again brings exciting free Friday night concerts to the Boardwalk’s Beach Bandstand. Look for classic bands from the ’60s, ’70s, and ’80s: The

Happy Hollow Park & Zoo, 1300 Senter Rd., San Jose www.brownpapertickets.com

19. THE PIRATES OF PENZANCE

June 22: Make your way to beautiful Golden Gate Park and enjoy a day of FREE music from Lifehouse, Ingrid Michaelson, The Last Goodnight, Marie Digby, and Secondhand Serenade: Noon – 5pm

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50 WAYS TO LEAVE YOUR SOFA

26. FIFTH ANNUAL CLASSICS & HOT RODS

41. SAN FRANCISCO DRAGONS vs. BOSTON CANNON

Elks Lodge, 1680 Martin Ave., Santa Clara (408) 370-3473 www.hospicevalley.org

Spartans Stadium, San Jose (650) 375-1208 www.sanfranciscodragons.com

June 22: If you’re an owner of, or just admire, classic automobiles, you won’t want to miss the Fifth Annual Classics & Hot Rod Show, featuring customs and classic hot rods, cars, trucks, and motorcycles: 9am – 3pm

June 28: Please welcome the SF Dragons lacrosse team to San Jose as they take on and heartily destroy the Boston Cannon: 7pm

6/29

6/24

SUNDAY

TUESDAY

42. CELEBRATE AMERICA 2008

27. FOSSIL FINDERS

Guadalupe River Park & Gardens Visitor & Education Center, 438 Coleman Ave., San Jose (408) 298-7657 www.grpg.org

June 24: Kids ages five to seven are invited to get dirty and dig up the long distant past – a time when Columbia mammoths once roamed this area. You’ll learn how fossils form and, even participate in a simulated fossil dig: 9am – Noon

6/25

WEDNESDAY 28. JAZZ ON THE PLAZZ

Los Gatos Town Plaza, W. Main St. & Santa Cruz Ave., Los Gatos www.jazzontheplazz.com

Wednesdays thru August 27: Los Gatos invites you to visit them every Wednesday for some wonderful FREE jazz from such notable artists as Sophie Milman, Houston Person, Claire Martin, and many more: 6:30 – 8:30pm 29. 2008 US AIR GUITAR TOUR

The Independent, 628 Divisadero St., San Francisco www.usairguitar.com

June 25: Oh, yes, friends, you read correctly. We’ve all done it, but now it’s time to get serious about our air guitar playing. For there can only be one CHAMPION OF THE AIR GUITAR!

Shoreline Amphitheatre, One Amphitheatre Pkwy., Mountain View www.bethel.org/ celebrateamerica2008.htm

June 29: A full day of family entertainment with live music featuring a 90-voice choir, kids choir, exhibits, a laser light show, and fun!: 5pm

43 puppets as they present a half-hour musical comedy show, featuring a cast of more than 20 friendly dinosaurs dressed as cowboys that will entertain you with songs, jokes, and skits. Oh, and let’s not forget the hot dog dinner from 5:30 - 6:30pm.

6/27 FRIDAY

32. 37TH ANNUAL STANFORD JAZZ FESTIVAL

Stanford Campus – Stanford University www.stanfordjazz.org

June 27 – August 9: The Stanford Jazz Festival showcases more than 100 artists, including Terence Blanchard, Josh Redman, Kenny Burrell, Mulgrew Miller, John Scofield, Gary Bartz, and many more. 33. HOMELAND PRAYER

The Pear Avenue Theatre, 1220 Pear Ave., Unit K, Mountain View (650) 254-1148 www.thepear.org

June 27 – July 13: A stunning, gut-wrenching glimpse into the life of a contemporary American family turned upside-down by the return of a wounded young soldier.

June 25 – August 27: Cruise over to Sunnyvale every Wednesday and enjoy a fine collection of arts & crafts, food booths, and live music from T.Y.T., The Hitmen, Andre Thierry, Sage, Mama Pacho, Dub FX, Double Funk Crunch, and many more: 5 – 8pm

34. CHILDREN’S THEATRE IN THE PARK

S. Murphy Ave., between Washington & Evelyn, Sunnyvale www.downtownsunnyvale.com

6/26

THURSDAY 31. WILD WEST PUPPET SHOW AND HOT DOG DINNER Gamble Garden, 1431 Waverly St., Palo Alto (650) 329-1356 x201 www.gamblegarden.org

June 26: Join Nick Barone and his

Mountain View Center for the Performing Arts, 500 Castro St., Mountain View (650) 903-6000

June 27 – August 17: The Peninsula Youth Theatre invites one and all to join them for their free theatre in the park, featuring presentations of The Little Mermaid, Under the Big Top, Jack and the Three Sillies, and Elves and the Shoemaker. 35. ROBERT PLANT AND ALISON KRAUSS

Greek Theatre – UC Berkeley, Gayley Rd., Berkeley www.ticketmaster.com

June 27: Bluegrass is the latest rage, and with that, it’s time to jump on the bandwagon and get a healthy dose of BG from Led Zep front man Robert Plant and the amazing Alison Krauss.

36. MAMAFEST!

Parkside Hall, 180 Park Ave., San Jose, www.bayareamama.com

June 28: A one-day event that will show all you moms how to strive for the perfect balance between work and family. 37. GREAT TRAIN ROBBERIES

Roaring Camp, Graham Hill Rd. & Mt. Hermon Rd., Felton www.roaringcamp.com

June 28 – 29: The whole family will surely enjoy 1880s justice unfold right before their own eyes as live bandits and lawmen unleash their guns in a blazing showdown. 38. LICK OBSERVATORY CONCERTS

Summit of Mt. Hamilton in the Diablo Range, east of San Jose (408) 274-5061 www.ucolick.org

June 28 – September 6: On Saturday evenings, you’ll enjoy live music followed by an interesting astronomy lecture and viewing of stars: 7:30pm 39. WOODIES ON THE WHARF

Santa Cruz Wharf, Beach St., Santa Cruz www.santacruzwharf.com

June 28: Check out the original surfmobile. Over 100 pre-1950s “woodies” will line the wharf, with live music and a chance to win big prizes: 10am – 4pm 40. MORE THAN POPCORN: THE LIFE OF ORVILLE REDENBACHER Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Library, 150 E. San Fernando St., Second Fl., Rm. 225/229, San Jose (408) 808-2397

June 28: Join Kevin Fish, grandson of Orville Redenbacher, for an informative talk and slideshow about how his grandfather turned his obsession with making perfect popcorn into a multimillion dollar business: 3 – 4:30pm

7/1

TUESDAY 43. US FENCING SUMMER NATIONAL CHAMPIONSHIPS

San Jose McEnery Convention Center www.usfencing.org

July 1 – 10: “My name is Inigo Montoya. You killed my father. Prepare to die!” 44. FIRST SILICON VALLEY INTERNATIONAL PIANO MUSIC FESTIVAL Le Petit Trianon, 72 N. Fifth St., San Jose (408) 725-7521 www.kpmff.org

July 1 – 2: The Kurosawa Piano Music Foundation presents a showcase featuring international known professional piano duo artists from Armenia, Latvia, Japan, Italy and the United States, along with two days of intensive educational workshops, master classes, and performances from aspiring piano artists.

7/2

WEDNESDAY 45. STYX

The Mountain Winery, 14831 Pierce Rd., Saratoga www.mountainwinery.com

July 2: “The Best of Times,” “Too Much Time on My Hands,” “Renegade,” “Come Sail Away,” need we say more? See you at the show, Mr. Roboto.

7/4

FRIDAY 46. 27TH ANNUAL SUMMER FESTIVAL & CHILI COOK-OFF

Mitchell Park, 600 E. Meadow Dr., Palo Alto www.cityofpaloalto.org

13 July 4: Teams of amateur and professional chili chefs will bring their “A” game to this battle for cash and prizes, along with live music, activities for the kids, and more: Noon – 5pm 47. RADIO DISNEY’S EVENING OF MAGIC & MUSIC: A FOURTH OF JULY FIREWORKS SPECTACULAR

Shoreline Amphitheatre, One Amphitheatre Pkwy., Mountain View www.shorelineamp.com

July 4: When we say this is a full-day event, we mean it’s literally FULL of events, with a three-hour preconcert Radio Disney Family Festival Zone with interactive games, prizes, giveaways, live music, followed by a performance from the San Francisco Symphony and ending with an enormous fireworks display!: 5 – 10pm 48. FOURTH OF JULY CELEBRATION

7/5

SATURDAY 49. PATRIOTIC POOCH PARADE

Park Valencia, Santana Row, San Jose (408) 551-4611 www.santanarow.com

July 5: Nothing says “independence” like a Most Patriotic Dog costume contest, pooch parade, and a hot dog bobbing contest for man’s best friend. GOD BLESS AMERICA! 50. 24TH ANNUAL FILLMORE JAZZ FESTIVAL

Fillmore St., from Jackson to Eddy, San Francisco (800) 310-6563 www.fillmorejazzfestival.com

July 5 – 6: Two days of world-class jazz featuring the likes of Kim Nalley, Archie Williams, Liberty Ellman, Amanda King, and many others. TW

Roaring Camp, Graham Hill Rd. & Mt. Hermon Rd., Felton www.roaringcamp.com

July 4 – 6: Pack up the family and head to Roaring Camp for a day of family fun, with sack races, balloon tosses, hula hoop contests, music, and more. THEWAVEMAG.COM JUNE 16-29, 2008

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50 WAYS

30. NINTH ANNUAL SUNNYVALE SUMMER SERIES

6/28

SATURDAY

05


» FEATURE

Dining

» FEATURE » HOT SPOTS » CATERING

Cin-Cin Wine Bar, Los Gatos

50 54 56

Joining forces with five ECO EATS other West Coast restaurants (including The Cin-Cin Wine Bar, 368 Village Ln., Basin in Saratoga and Los Gatos (408) 354-8006 www.cincinwinebar.com Fish in Sausalito), Cool Cool Café, Cantor Arts Center, has vowed never to serve Stanford University (650) 725-4758 farmed salmon, so long as www.cooleatz.com rivers still run from their Crimson, 15466 Los Gatos Blvd., Los Gatos (408) 358-0175 mountain ice-water gravwww.crimsonrestaurant.com el beds to the open blue Flea Street Café, 3607 Alameda sea. Together these resde las Pulgas, Menlo Park (650) 854-1226 www.cooleatz.com taurants held a two-day La Fondue, 14550 Big Basin Way, salmon education festival Saratoga www.lafondue.com in Oakland on the last jZcool Eatery, 827 Santa Cruz weekend in May. Called Ave., Menlo Park (650) 325-3665 www.cooleatz.com Salmon Aid, the event Parcel 104, 2700 Mission College featured live music, food, Blvd., Santa Clara (408) 970-6104 drinks, public speakers www.parcel104.com and information booths, Trevese Restaurant and Lounge, 115 N. Santa Cruz Ave., with proceeds going Los Gatos (408) 354-5551 toward salmon habitat www.trevese.com recovery. Organizers expect many more restaurants to take the pledge in the coming year, and they encourage consumers to buy wild salmon. Cin-Cin Wine Bar in Los Gatos, which opened May 8, also walks a straight line. Though known for such innovative global comfort cuisine as crispy chicken stuffed with lemon, wild mushrooms, arugula, romesco sauce and citrus-scented yogurt, the restaurant’s primary focus is on serving organic, biodynamic and otherwise sustainable wines. Organic wines are produced under stringent nonpetrochemical guidelines, while biodynamic wines, says sommelier Lisa Rhorer, are “organic times 10.”

DINING

Ethical Dining These local restaurants take environmental friendliness a step further. BY ALASTAIR BLAND

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or many in the restaurant industry, “going green” is not only trendy, but a matter of smart business. Some restaurateurs, however, go beyond the buzzword-heavy talk and step straight to the walk, infusing their businesses with practices that are ecologically and economically sound. And few walk as honestly as Jesse Ziff Cool, the accomplished author and socio-environmental activist who owns three restaurants in Menlo Park: Cool Café, jZcool Eatery and the Flea Street Café. Over the years, Cool has refined a service philosophy that

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cuts sharply against the grain. “The customer comes last,” she says. “We don’t use ingredients or follow trends just to impress people.” The idea is that when all other elements are considered first, the customer is bound to have a positive experience. So while diners savor Cool’s global comfort food marked with its seasonal signatures and local flavors, complemented by organic wine and beer, Cool offers her employees generous benefits, uses cleaning agents so pure you can eat them, and sources strictly organic ingredients. Recently, Cool also committed herself to bringing back the wild Sacramento River Chinook salmon – which, due primarily to freshwater diversions and stream pollution, has all but disappeared (biologists expect an upcoming fall spawning run of less than 10 percent of prior returns) – while its archenemy, farmed salmon, continues to thrive. Farmed salmon comes from disease-infested open-ocean pens, often found in Canada and Europe – where many wild salmon runs have dwindled following the development of local salmon aquaculture.

Developed in Europe a century ago, biodynamic farming is a practice that emphasizes the nutritional health of the soil. Intensely flavored wines naturally follow. Yet Rhorer strives not to overpower the delicately layered, intoxicating flavors of the cuisine with grandiose fruit bombs (often a characteristic of California wines). Instead she leans toward the lighter tannic wine styles of Europe, though the Golden State’s organic and biodynamic wine production is growing at a promising rate. Cin-Cin’s other priorities include supporting California farmers, buying hormone-free meat and organic produce and sourcing line-caught fish from nearby ports. The farmed salmon, though, comes from Scotland’s Loch Duart, widely touted as a clean, “sustainable” facility (at least, for a salmon farm). Then there are restaurants like Trevese, which take “going green” a step further by getting certified as such with a stamp of approval from the Green Restaurant Association. Located in the modernized interiors of a Victorian mansion in Los Gatos, Trevese is the first fine dining establishment in Northern California to attain such status, which 52


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Trevese Restaurant and Lounge, Los Gatos

is granted “in accordance with the Green Restaurant Association’s rigorous, audited and national guidelines.” Practices such as diligent composting, recycling, washing up with biodegradable soaps, utilizing low-flow faucets, and a daily reconsideration of seafood sources are what drive the business.

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Trevese co-owner and executive chef Michael Miller combines American traditions, European touches and faint Asian scents; the crispy duck with oatmeal-rice rolls and the lamb with artichoke salad stand among the favorites. The cuisine also receives a generous dose of ethical consideration. Local, seasonal and organic produce keep this ship afloat, and California is a first-rate place to embrace such a philosophy. “California could fall off the map and sustain itself on its own,” says Miller. “It’s got all the resources.” Well, aside from wild salmon, and the farm-raised kind Trevese imports from Loch Duart, that’s certainly true: California does produce just about everything a chef could want. Yet some restaurants, like Parcel 104, keep even closer to home. Now seven years old, Parcel 104 has grown up on intensely local food, with most ingredients coming from within a two-hour drive. Executive chef Robert Sapirman says quality is never compromised in the process. “We won’t use 52

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something just because it’s local,” he says. But in many cases, local not only works, but is extremely high quality. Fava beans from Half Moon Bay are some of the sweetest Sapirman has tasted, while the Salinas Valley provides an unmatched wealth of artichokes, Brussels sprouts, kale and other greens. In the winter season, the Coast Range’s splendor of wild mushrooms inflects the menu. Further abroad, the world-renowned abundance of the North Bay wine country, the fertile delta and the Central Valley lies within reach of the restaurant’s 104-mile tentacles. “It only makes sense to take advantage of the bounty that’s outside our door,” Sapirman notes. To honor its name and ethics, Parcel 104 hosted an event on Jun. 7 billed as the 104-Mile Supper, a private dinner in which everything that traveled from kitchen to table originated within 104 miles of the premises. Salt came from a commercial evaporation flat under the Dumbarton Bridge, while wheat, always a challenge for the restaurant, came from Mendocino County. Diners, however, had to go without tropical ingredients like pepper, cinnamon, chocolate and post-dessert espressos – all from jungle origins. Nonetheless, in California, from field to sea to pasture to plate, it’s a bounty out there. TW


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Parcel 104 at the Santa Clara Marriott 2700 Mission College Blvd., Q Santa Clara 408.970.6104 Q Parcel104.com

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PRICE GUIDE: $[5-15]

CAMPBELL CAPERS EAT & DRINK $$

[American] 1710 W. Campbell Ave. (408) 374-5777 www.caperseatanddrink.com

Capers – which could mean either the delicious Mediterranean condiment or a playful escapade – seems a particularly appropriate name for this popular spot. You’ll find more than just perfect pasta and juicy steaks here. Fire-roasted marinated artichokes, flash-fried calamari with jalapeños, a killer chicken marsala, and a meatloaf entrée with a wholesome reputation are just some of the enticing menu items. HAWGS SEAFOOD BAR $$

[Seafood] 1700 W. Campbell Ave. (408) 379-9555 www.hawgsseafoodbar.com

Those who love seafood, but hate dealing with the sand, crowds, seagulls and hairstylesavaging salty winds of beachside establishments, will love Hawgs for its marinalike feel and selection of fresh fish. From the depths of the ocean there are oysters, mussels and clams, succulent fish and shellfish. Landlubbers can nosh on favorites such as New York steak and Australian lamb.

SPOTS

$$[15-25]

$$$[25-40]

this cozy restaurant goes beyond Singaporean cuisine, blending Thai, Malaysian, Indian, and Chinese influences into its pocket-friendly menu. Lunch entrées are priced anywhere from $6 to $15 and dinner entrées go for $10 - $30. A transparent wine cellar adds to the sophisticated interior ambience and offers an extensive selection.

HALF MOON BAY HALF MOON BAY BREWING COMPANY $

[American] 390 Capistrano Rd. (650) 728-2739 www.hmbbrewingco.com

A tasty array of eight different home-brewed beers takes center stage, but the HMB Brewing Company has definitely raised the bar for “bar food.” Steamed clams, seared ahi tuna, prawn cocktails, and the smoked fish are all top rate… and those are just the appetizers. Be sure to try the Mavericks Amber Ale – it has unseated Corona as the perfect oceanside sunset beer.

LOS GATOS LITTLE LOU’S BBQ $

CUPERTINO ARYA $$

[Global] 19930 Stevens Creek Blvd. (408) 996 9606 www.aryarestaurant.com

Visitors can enjoy a distinctive dining experience in a restaurant that exudes relaxed elegance. The menu here is a unique mix of Persian, Italian and classic American cuisines, with dishes including shish kebab, cioppino, chicken marsala, and flavorful Persian soups, stews and meats. Before your meal, allow time to enjoy a glass of wine from their extensive list in the cozy, fireside lounge. MERLION RESTAURANT AND WINE BAR $$

DINING

[Asian Fusion] 19628 Stevens Creek Blvd. (408) 777-8228 www.merlion.us

Though named for Singapore’s wellknown tourist icon, the Merlion (a lion head with the body of a fish),

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[Barbecue] 15466 Los Gatos Blvd., Ste. 111 (408) 356-5768 www.littlelousbbq.com

A tiny little place with no more than a dozen tables inside and out, Little Lou’s nevertheless manages to fill the air with the smell of summer barbecue in all its basted glory. House specialties include the Louisiana burger, Texas-style brisket, and the pulled pork meal. Meatballs and buffalo wings, combo dinners, burgers, dogs, and sandwiches round out the menu, with traditional sides of coleslaw, corn bread, corn on the cob, potato salad, and BBQ beans.

MOUNTAIN VIEW KAPP’S PIZZA BAR AND GRILL $

[American, Italian] 191 Castro St. (650) 961-1491 www.kappspizza.com

$$$$[40+]

Featuring a “lively sports atmosphere,” Kapp’s offers a fresh and affordable menu of pizzas, calzones, burgers, sandwiches, pasta, and finger foods. Pizza combinations such as Kapp’s Special and the Stromboli – handmade with fresh, ingredients – keep patrons coming back for more. The black bean or chicken Cobb salads provide light, refreshing alternatives.

PALO ALTO MANTRA RESTAURANT & LOUNGE $$ [Contemporary Indian, California] 632 Emerson St. (650) 322-3500 www.mantrapaloalto.com

The gold wallpaper, cherry wood veneers, and occasional live jazz hint that this isn’t your typical Indian restaurant. Executive chef Sachin Chopra has created a winning menu that juxtaposes the Indian and California tastes, ranging from appetizers like golden cumin cauliflower soup to entrées like mustard and roasted Kashmiri cayenne pepper-marinated sea bass filet on a bed of leeks and fresh vegetables.

SAN JOSE AIRPORT

HOUSE OF GENJI $$$

[Japanese, Steakhouse] 1335 N. First St. (408) 453-8120 www.houseofgenji.com

If you’re craving teppanyaki, House of Genji is the place in the South Bay to watch some tableside juggling and chopping. Start with some salad and soup, sipped Japanesestyle, and then watch as your chef plays with your food, threshing your choice of meats and vegetables into bite-sized pieces with circus-worthy flair on his teppan (Japanese for “iron”). ISLAND GRILL $$

[Steakhouse, Seafood, Modern American] 1355 N. Fourth St. (408) 392-2468 www.theislandgrill.com

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BURGER PIT $

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equivalents of sun, sand, and long walks on the beach: blackened chicken salad with mango citrus vinaigrette; plenty of pasta and seafood dishes, like pineapple and chipotle and fried plantains with chili pepper jelly; and jerk sauce, jerk sauce everywhere. SPENCER’S FOR STEAKS AND CHOPS $$$

[American, Steakhouse] 2050 Gateway Pl. (408) 437-2170 www.spencersforsteaksandchops.com

This is a steakhouse-away-fromhome for grilling fanatics, located in the San Jose DoubleTree Hotel. George Foreman wannabes will appreciate the variety of premium grade cuts on the menu and envy the state-of-the-art infrared broiler that sears each one to an unholy 1,700 degrees. Any of the full-bodied reds on the menu will help wash down those eight-to-12 ounces of grilled-to-order meat, and the 16-to-18-ounce prime rib calls for a shot of serious single malt Scotch.

SAN JOSE

[American] 1349 Blossom Hill Rd. (408) 269-8062

Having called Silicon Valley home since 1956, this burger joint has withstood the test of time. Their classic Steerburger remains a strong seller, but they also have chicken, seafood, ribs, and steak plates, including their eight-ounce Rancher’s Choice sirloin that comes with a hearty helping of side dishes. For the weight-conscious, they also have several low calorie plates. FISH MARKET RESTAURANT $$

[Seafood, American] 1007 Blossom Hill Rd. (408) 2693474 www.thefishmarket.com

Fresh seafood at a fair price – a goal Fish Market is able to meet because they operate their own fishing vessels, fishery, and oyster farm. The dazzling menu includes linecaught Pacific swordfish, Hawaiian hebi, Pacific Miyagi oysters, and live Maine lobster tail, plus a choice of having your fish cooked over a mesquite wood fire, baked, steamed, smoked or fried.

SAN JOSE DOWNTOWN

ALMADEN VALLEY

BANGKOK TASTE THAI $

[Thai] 1769 Blossom Hill Rd. (408) 358-2525 www.bangkoktaste.com

Owner Chutima Thongpreecha and her father opened Bangkok Taste in San Jose in 1993, serving slightly Americanized Thai food in their comfortable small dining room. The prawn curry is a favorite served as spicy as you like it. Many of the dishes come with Nok’s Plum Sauce, which is available in jars to take home. Use the printable coupon on Bangkok Taste’s website that gives half off any entrée with the purchase of another.

BELLA MIA $$

[Italian, Modern American] 58 S. First St. (408) 280-1993 www.bellamia.com

Come for the old-world charm; stay for amazing pasta dishes. Bella Mia’s dark mahogany wood and beautiful chandeliers make the place dreamily cozy, and the house-made pastas are always pleasing. For the carb-conscious, the restaurant carries a variety of starter and main-course salads; other splurgers might prefer the seafood saffron risotto or the grilled pork chops.

FAHRENHEIT ULTRA LOUNGE & RESTAURANT $

[Modern American, Asian Fusion] 99 E. San Fernando St. (408) 998-9998 www.fahrenheitultralounge.com

For starters, try the Mandalay beef with roti bread, or gingerpoached chicken salad, and cruise to gratifying large plates such as the grilled cabernet skirt steak or pan seared wild Alaskan salmon. Cocktails get as every bit as much attention here; it’s the only South Bay joint where bottle-flipping bartenders add a shot of energetic flair to their service. LOFT BAR & BISTRO $$

[Modern American] 90 S. Second St. (408) 291-0677 www.loftbarandbistro.com

A historic stone-and-marble exterior belies the airy urban-chic warehouse interior, complete with upstairs loft and a second-story patio. The menu features gourmet turns on classic comfort foods, as exemplified by the meatloaf, made with smoked ham and smothered in a wild mushroom sauce that migrates to the garlic mashed potatoes. THE MELTING POT $$$

[Modern American] 72 S. First St. (408) 293-6020 www.meltingpot.com

This popular franchise takes the Swiss-born craze of dipping stuff in hot pots way beyond standardissue “cheese with bread.” The four-course menu features varied entrées cooked in one of four styles, with an assortment of savory breads, vegetables, and choice of salad. The regular menu includes dishes like lobster, chicken, pork tenderloin, shrimp, and Florentine ravioli – and, of course, chocolate fondue dessert.

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CATERING

» CATERING

INDIAN/CHINESE

Temptations

Temptations DINING

288 Castro St., Mountain View (650) 625-1234 www.temptationsca.com Contact: Neela Shukla MALAYSIAN

Spice Islands Cafe 210 Hope St., Mountain View (650) 961-3500 Contact: Elizabeth Chen MEDITERRANEAN

Cafe Baklava 341 Castro St., Mountain View (650) 969-3835 Contact: Illiano Yuksel CALIFORNIA

Crimson 15466 Los Gatos Blvd., Los Gatos (408) 358-0175 www.crimsonrestaurant.com Contact: Chef Diane Rose CUBAN

Habana Cuba 238 Race St., San Jose (408) 998-2822 www.998cuba.com Contact: Jennifer Cannella

MEXICAN

Taqueria La Bamba 2058 Old Middlefield Way, Mountain View (650) 965-2755 Contact: Leo Munoz VIETNAMESE

19 Market 19 N. Market St., San Jose (408) 280-6111 www.19market.com Contact: Hanna Pham

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MUSTARD CAFE $$

[American] 975 The Alameda (408) 295-9000 www.mustardcafe.com

Bringing the famous New York deli taste to the West Coast, Mustard Café has an almost endless array of sandwiches on offer, thanks to its create-your-own sandwich menu. Choose from six artisan breads, six gourmet mustards, and pile your creation high with a selection of fine Boar’s Head meats, nine different cheeses and more. Or try one of their signature creations, such as the popular Cranturberry sandwich, which boasts turkey, mesclun greens, red onion, mayonnaise, and a house-made cranberry sauce, served on whole grain bread. NAZCA PERUVIAN CUISINE $$

[Peruvian, Latin American, Fusion] 167 W. San Fernando St. (408) 295-2828

Oceanfront Dining On-Site Brewery Fresh Seafood Fire Pits Cocktails & Wine Live Music & Dancing

According to Nazca owner Jose Bohorquez, Peruvian gastronomy is at its highest level in the nation’s history, with a boom of culinary schools in Lima sending Peruvian chefs to all corners of the world. And it’s no secret why. Traditional Peruvian food, Bohorquez says, is a mixture of several cuisines brought to Peru from Spain, China, Japan, Italy, and Africa, which were then blended with Peruvian flavors. Nazca embodies that tradition, serving modern Peruvian and fusion cuisine rich in seafood and meat. Main dishes include Peruvian ceviche, lomo saltado, arroz con mariscos, black ink risotto, and Peruvian-style lamb shanks. PICASSO’S TAPAS RESTAURANT $$

[Spanish, Tapas] 62 W. Santa Clara St. (408) 298-4400 www.picassosrestaurant.com

Picasso’s offers a tapas menu so multifaceted, even a Cubist painter would be impressed. Start off with the tangy, garlic-spiked specialties, like clams in white wine garlic

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HALF MOON BAY BREWING COMPANY

4 Miles North of Half Moon Bay

390 Capistrano Road Princeton-by-the-Sea 650.728.BREW www.hmbbrewingco.com 58

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SPOTS

sauce, then switch it up with the stewed chicken and tortilla Española (a potato and onion frittata). The paella is served for two or more, so bring friends to share it with you over a pitcher of sangria.

York with blue cheese butter – but burgers with garlic fries are always a pleaser.

SAN JOSE WILLOW GLEN

SAN JOSE SANTANA ROW & WEST

BLOWFISH SUSHI $$

[Japanese, Sushi, Asian Fusion] 355 Santana Row, Ste. 1010 (408) 345-3848 www.blowfishsushi.com

If you like your sushi trendysophisticated, with a little DJ music and anime thrown in, you’ll be hooked. A menu of Sakizuke (Japanese fusion appetizers) mixes up sea bass and miso, salmon roe, and quail egg. Try special sushi rolls like the Special Dragon or the Super Dynamite Roll, and fill up on their extensive list of imported, hard-tofind sakes. ROSIE MCCANN’S IRISH PUB AND RESTAURANT $$

[Irish, American] 355 Santana Row, Ste. 1060 (408) 247-1706 www.rosiemccanns.com

Rosie McCann’s reinvents traditional pub fare. Quaff a pint or two at the elegant curved bar, and you, too, will be singing praises to Rosie’s Irish Nachos, a mountain of guacamole, salsa, and all the fixings atop (of course) potatoes. The Irish sausage bangers with garlic mashed potatoes and Guinness gravy, and Alaskan cod fish ‘n’ chips are delectable. VAQUERO’S BORDER CHOP HOUSE $$

[Steakhouse, American] 1010 El Paseo de Saratoga (408) 871-1114

Vaquero’s cowboy dining lassoes all things meat: seafood, steak, pork chops, baby back ribs, and hamburgers. Gather round the booth tables to admire the huge rodeo mural and antler chandeliers. Steak is a popular choice here – among the favorites is the New

CREEKSIDE INN $$

[Classic American] 544 W. Alma Ave. (408) 289-9781

The Creekside recalls the days at the height of classic American cuisine. A meat-and-potatoes menu pleases with favorites like lobster, sole, meatloaf, and rack of lamb, and while the décor can’t be called cuttingedge, it wins points for coziness. Karaoke (Wednesdays) comes with a free buffet – get there early. WILLOW STREET PIZZA $

[Italian, Pizza] 1554 Saratoga Ave. (408) 871-0400; 1072 Willow St. (408) 971-7080 www.willowstreet.com

Friendly service, a convivial, neighborhood atmosphere, and fresh ingredients have made Willow Street Pizza a longtime local favorite. Their wonderful, wood-fired pizzas have a crispier edge than regular oven-baked pies, and their scrumptious pasta combinations are creative palate-pleasers.

SANTA CLARA BIRK’S RESTAURANT $$$

[Modern American, Steak] 3955 Freedom Cir. (408) 9806400 www.birksrestaurant.com

Almond wood and mesquite charcoal fuel the tender flavors emanating from this upscale American grill designed by Pat Kuleto. The open kitchen features superb steaks cut from tender, dry-aged, free-range beef, and organic, local produce, including the popular creamed spinach side. A business-casual hot spot for local 60


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white collars who like the kitchen energy at the grill and the succulent seafood at the oyster bar. Couples should request the lighter, Ushaped “Snoopy room” (shaped like Snoopy’s nose) for more intimacy. CHATANOGA $$

[Persian] 2725 El Camino Real (408) 241-1200 www.chatanogaonline.com

Diners not familiar with Persian cuisine are in for a treat at Chatanoga (named after a river in Iran, not Chattanooga, Tenn.). The restaurant’s traditional dishes combine the delectable sauces, meats, kebabs, and rice dishes for which the region is renowned with a fine dining atmosphere. Popular appetizers include the eggplantbased dishes, such as Haleem Bademjan – a blend of eggplant, seasonings, crispy fried onions, and sautéed mint, served with optional ground beef. LA PALOMA RESTAURANT $

[Mexican] 2280 El Camino Real (408) 247-0990

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There’s nothing fancy about the interior of this adobe-style building, but, then, you’ve come to get plenty of food for a reasonable price. La Paloma serves up mostly traditional Mexican fare (good burritos and enchiladas) with a few Nuevo dishes like mango

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SPOTS

chicken quesadilla. Their chile verde – a hearty sauce of green chiles, tomatoes, and onions over tender pork – lures meat eaters back again and again. PARCEL 104 $$$$

[Modern American] 2700 Mission College Blvd. (408) 970-6104 www.parcel104.com

Celebrity chef Bradley Ogden and executive chef Robert Sapirman transform farm-fresh, local ingredients into works of seasonal art at this crown jewel of Santa Clara fine dining. The result: An ever-evolving, palate-provoking and inventive menu that pairs well with the extensive list of wines from Parcel 104’s award-winning cellar. YE OLDE ROYAL OAK PUB $$

[Pub] 1240 Coleman Ave. (408) 588-1111 www.meetmeattheoak.com

A traditional British pub with all the entertainment ye’d expect: live Celtic music, karaoke, trivia night, live bands and, of course, British breakfast served on Sundays. Feast on fish and chips with mushy peas, bangers and mash served with vegetables du jour, or splurge on the beef Wellington – a hearty 16-ounce filet mignon doused in a Madeira mushroom sauce and wrapped in puff pastry before being baked. It’s enough food for two people, but takes 45 minutes to cook, so start off with some fried calamari and a pint of draught beer while ye wait.

Varieties include Boddingtons, Guinness, Newcastle, Stella, Harp, Blue Moon and Strongbow Dry Cider

SARATOGA BELLA SARATOGA $$

[Italian] 14503 Big Basin Way (408) 741-5115 www.bellasaratoga.com

Comfortable family dining is served up daily at this elegant Victorian home turned restaurant in the heart of Saratoga. Bella Saratoga’s extensive Italian menu features award-winning pasta, flat bread pizzas, and a comprehensive wine list to complement any meal.

SUNNYVALE OCEAN BLUE RESTAURANT $$

[Japanese, Asian Fusion] 1010 E. El Camino Real (408) 720-8840

This elegant restaurant features fresh, top quality sushi and sashimi, a full bar stocked with premium sake and stylish music, ranging from classic Japanese to current hip-hop. Try their signature Kabuki Roll: salmon, yellowtail tuna and radish sprouts wrapped in cucumber; or the more classic Firecracker Roll, topped with sliced jalapeños and hot sauce. TW


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Our specialties are Tapas, Paella and Sangria Try Our Selection Of Best Spanish Wines 62 W Santa Clara St. San Jose, Ca 95113 Tel/ Fax: 408.298.4400

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» FEATURE

Nightlife&Music

» » » » » » »

HEADLINERS WINE TASTING & MORE CD RELEASES ALBUM REVIEWS CONCERT PREVIEWS SPORTS BARS THIS TIME IN MUSIC HISTORY

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tion than I’ve felt as a city dweller in some time.

Death Cab For Cutie, L-R: Nicholas Harmer, Jason McGerr, Chris Walla and Ben Gibbard

Cabin Fever Death Cab for Cutie front man Ben Gibbard sought inspiration in the woods of Big Sur for the band’s latest album.

NIGH T L IFE & MUSIC

BY TOM LANHAM

S

ome artists could wax poetic for hours about their latest magnum opus. Not Ben Gibbard. The bespectacled bohemian front man of Death Cab For Cutie – which just released Narrow Stairs, the introspective follow-up to their 2005 breakthrough album, Plans – would rather discuss the work of other musicians: Let It Be by The Replacements, London Calling by The Clash, even the mid-’70s ABBA catalog. All are classic albums that, he believes, beg the same creative question: “I wonder if you really pull that kind of thing off, a really landmark record, if you have any perspective on it. Because I think you’d be too close to really appreciate it the way other people do.” For inspiration, Gibbard has been delving back into his vintage vinyl collection, as well as visiting record stores that only stock old LPs. “My reaction to this seemingly insatiable need to find whatever the newest, hottest thing is, every f**king day, is to try and discover things that don’t have a contemporary context,” he says. Gibbard is all about moving the band forward, even if he has to journey back in time to do so. “I’d love it if people are maybe looking back at our records as

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THEWAVEMAG.COM JUNE 16-29, 2008

classics one day,” he says. “I just never wanna be that talking head that always goes on about how great it was when we made this record and that record. That’s always one of the horrible pitfalls as one moves on through their career.” The Wave: There was another retro influence for Narrow Stairs. You actually relocated to Jack Kerouac’s original cabin in Big Sur. Ben Gibbard: I spent a couple of weeks down there. I took part in this independent documentary about Kerouac’s book Big Sur. As part of being in this documentary, I got to go down and see the cabin that Kerouac stayed at, [which] was the central setting for most of the book. And they were like, “Oh, if you wanna rent the place, we know who owns it.” I thought it would be rather romantic to rent the cabin for a couple of weeks and finish writing songs for the album. It was a pretty idyllic place to be, although rather lonely – it was in a canyon – but still, it was just a really beautiful place. There’s a level of introspection that’s gonna come out when you isolate yourself in any capacity, [especially] when it’s in a location where you’re as cut off as you can be – I mean, no internet, no phone.... It was more isola-

TW: Anything scary happen? BG: When it got dark, I tended to stay in. But that’s more a show of my cards as a city kid. It’s funny how the silence of nature in its purest form is a far more terrifying sound – or lack thereof – than being in a bustling city, where people are smoking crack out in front of your apartment.... I’ve become pretty immune to all the perceived perils that someone from a rural area who came to the city would be scared about – those have just become so commonplace for me. But at Big Sur, my mind immediately turned to thoughts of “What if there’s a mountain lion out there? What if there’s some kind of crazy, deranged lunatic who lives in these woods?” And all of a sudden, my fears became these weird horror-movie scenarios, and it took me a couple of days to realize how ridiculous that was. A mountain lion is not gonna bust into this cabin and eat me, and there’s probably no psychopath living in or around Big Sur. But just the creaks that happen in an old house, the sound of the building further settling into the ground, those made me go, “What was that? What was that?” I always had this idea that I was gonna go to that location to write out 20 amazing songs, but really the hit-to-miss ratio was probably more like one to five. So I ended up getting a lot less work done than I wanted to, but the work that I did get done was the stuff that I was really, really happy with. And a couple of things ended up making the record – “Bixby Canyon Bridge” is the obvious one, but a version of “Long Division” made the record, as well. TW: What conclusions did you draw, artistically, from your stay? BG: I kind of allude to it in “Bixby Canyon Bridge.” I’ve always been a destination, rather than a journey, person. And I always want the answer. So for me, the closest thing to an answer is a conclusion that a lot of people have come to – that the people who are closest to you are the people who are the most important, and those are the elements of your life that are the most worth preserving. In specific relation to what I do for a living, I feel like the four of us [in Death Cab for Cutie] have done as good a job as anybody could in adjusting our lives to this extraordinary thing that we do. We play music for a lot of people, and there are people trying to get to us when we’re a collective, just walking down the street. I certainly don’t wanna give the impression that I’m some kind of sad sack about it, but you have to adjust to it, and it can kind of run counter to the people that have been important in your life. It’s like the person you used to be known as means as much to your family and friends as to the people who are coming to see you play. And if there’s anything I took away from that, it’s that I love what I do for a living, and I wanna do this for as long as I possibly can. TW Death Cab for Cutie plays at the Greek Theatre – UC Berkeley on Jun. 21. For tickets, go to www.ticketmaster.com.


NIGHTLIFE&MUSIC: INTERVIEW

$2 PABST

$2 PABST

$2 PABST

WII VIDEO

LADIES COUGAR NIGHT

SATURDAY NIGHT DANCE FEVER

LIVE MUSIC

DJ / LIVE MUSIC

DJ / LIVE MUSIC

THE ESCAPE BAR & GRILL, 2942 S.

$2 PABST

MULLETT MADNESS

$2 PABST WII VIDEO

$2 PABST TRIVIA

$2 PABST OPEN POOL TOURNAMENT

Bascom Ave., San Jose (408) 377-5436

R&B, FUNK, JAZZ

BAMBOO LOUNGE, 1355 N. Fourth St., San Jose (408) 392-2468 www.TheIslandGrill.com

LIVE MUSIC R&B, FUNK, JAZZ

HAPPY HOUR HAPPY HOUR THE BANK, 14421 Big Basin Way,

$1 OFF ALL DRINKS 5 - 6:30PM

$1 OFF ALL DRINKS 5 - 6:30PM

$2 PBR ON TAP

$3.50 KAMIKAZES

HAPPY HOUR HAPPY HOUR $1 OFF ALL DRINKS 5 - 6:30PM

$1 OFF ALL DRINKS 5 - 6:30PM

$2 PBR ON TAP

$2 PBR ON TAP

HAPPY HOUR $1 OFF ALL DRINKS 5 - 6:30PM

Saratoga (408) 867-5155

BERT’S ALIBI, 1313 W. El Camino Real Mountain View (408) 561-4339

AFTER 10PM $1 KAMIKAZES $3.50

$3.50 KAMIKAZES

BUDDHA LOUNGE, 251 Castro St., Mountain View (650) 965-7665 www.myspace.com/buddhalounge

SOUTH BAY’S LONGEST HAPPY HOUR!

KARAOKE & DJ

THE ULTIMATE HAPPY HOUR

THE ULTIMATE HAPPY HOUR

$1 BEER, $2 WINE, $3 $1 BEER, $2 WINE, $3 MIXED DRINKS 7-10PM MIXED DRINKS 7-10PM

Santa Clara (408) 241-1200 www.chatanogaonline.com

4 - 7PM

4 - 7PM

4 - 7PM

LIVE ENTERTAINMENT 8PM-MIDNIGHT

LIVE ENTERTAINMENT 9PM-MIDNIGHT

LIVE ENTERTAINMENT 9PM-MIDNIGHT

MARTINI FRIDAYS

RHYTHM

BOMBS AWAY THURSDAYS

DIVE BAR, 78 E. Santa Clara, San Jose (408) 288-5252 www.sjdivebar.com

Fernando St., San Jose (408) 998-9998 www.fultralounge.com

9:30PM - 1:30AM

INDUSTRY NIGHT LIVE CELTIC MUSIC

Ave., Santa Clara (408) 588-1111 www.meetmeattheoak.com

TEMPLE BAR & LOUNGE, 52 S. First St.,

CHILL SUNDAYS

HAPPY HOUR

WEDNESDAYS

THE ULTIMATE HAPPY HOUR

THE ULTIMATE HAPPY HOUR

HUMPDAY DRINK SPECIALS

HAPPY HOUR

4 - 7PM

4 - 7PM

4 - 7PM

MARAGARITA MONDAYS

TOP SECRET TUESDAYS

KARAOKE WEDNESDAYS

HAPPY HOUR

DRINK

DRINK

JAM NIGHT

KARAOKE NIGHT

JAM NIGHT

LIVE ART SHOW & HOUSE MUSIC

KARAOKE NIGHT

HOUSE MUSIC

5-7PM, 3 BEERS & SPECIALS SPECIALS $3 WELLS & ½ PRICE SPECIALTY COCKTAILS $3 BEERS, $3 WELLS, $5 SPECIALTY DRINKS, $3 JAGER, BEER PONG 30% OFF BOTTLE OF WINE ALL NIGHT

7 - 10PM, HAPPY HOUR SPECIALS

$2 WELL DRINKS, $5 TOKYO, AMF, LONG ISLANDS

KARAOKE NIGHT

9:30PM - 1:30AM

LIVE MUSIC

HAPPY HOUR 4 - 7PM HAPPY HOUR 4 - 7PM 50 CENTS OFF DOMESTIC 50 CENTS OFF DOMESTIC BEER & WELL DRINKS BEER & WELL DRINKS

CLUB NIGHT

LIVE MUSIC

TOP 40’s-80’s

CLUB NIGHT

LIVE MUSIC

LIVE MUSIC

#1060, San Jose (408) 247-1706 www.rosiemccanns.com

YE OLDE ROYAL OAK PUB, 1240 Coleman

$2 TUESDAYS

9:30PM - 12:30AM, HAPPY HOUR SPECIALS

2 FOR 1 ANY SHOTS 9 - 10PM

JAM NIGHT 8PM

R&B, HOUSE

9:30PM - 12:30AM

8PM HAPPY HOUR 4 - 7PM 8PM HAPPY HOUR 4 - 7PM 50 CENTS OFF DOMESTIC 8PM HAPPY HOUR 4 - 7PM 50 CENTS OFF DOMESTIC 50 CENTS OFF DOMESTIC BEER & WELL DRINKS BEER & WELL DRINKS BEER & WELL DRINKS

1ST MON. OF THE MONTH

OPEN MIC

7PM - 1AM, SPONSORED BY GUITAR SHOWCASE

KARAOKE

9PM - 1AM, HAPPY HOUR SPECIALS

TRIVIA

7:30 - 10PM, HAPPY HOUR SPECIALS

KARAOKE

HAPPY HOUR SPECIALS

$3 WELL DRINKS & BEER

San Jose (408) 288-8518

THEWAVEMAG.COM JUNE 16-29, 2008

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NIGH T L IFE & MUSIC

KARAOKE NIGHT

MAD MIX JAM

ROSIE MCCANN’S, 355 Santana Row

AFTER 10PM $1 KAMIKAZES $3.50

HAPPY HOUR HAPPY HOUR

$4 DRAFT BEERS, 1/2 5-7PM: 3 BEERS & $3 5-7PM: 3 BEERS & $3 PRICED ROTATING SPECIALS, WELLS & ½ PRICE SPE- WELLS & ½ PRICE SPECOMPLIMENTARY CHAMCIALTY COCKTAILS CIALTY COCKTAILS PAGNE - 9:30-10:30PM

GOOSETOWN, 1072 Lincoln Ave., San Jose (408) 292-4835 www.goosetownlounge.com

QUARTER NOTE, 1214 Apollo Way, Sunnyvale (408) 732-2110 www.quarternote.com

AFTER 10PM $1 KAMIKAZES $3.50

SATURDAYS $6 GREY GOOSE & KETEL ONE FREE POOL $5 JAGER BOMBS & $5 HOUSE MARGARITAS $3 JACK $3 JAGER 9PM-1AM: $3 CORONA MARTINIS, $4 FINLANDIA $6 PATRON B4 10PM $2 DOMESTIC BOTTLES $3 & PALOMAS, $4 TOP $2 BLUE MOON IRISH CAR BOMBS B4 11PM $3 PACIFICO COSMOS B4 9PM ROTATING DJ OTREBOR & CREW SHELF MARGARITAS $1 TOP SHELF JELLO SHOTS $3 LANDSHARK $4 JAGER DJ OTREBOR & CREW LOCAL DJS DRINK SPECIALS HAPPY HOUR

FAHRENHEIT ULTRA LOUNGE, 99 E. San

$2 PBR ON TAP

$1 BEER, $2 WINE, $3 $1 BEER, $2 WINE, $3 MIXED DRINKS 7-10PM MIXED DRINKS 7-10PM

HAPPY HOUR HAPPY HOUR HAPPY HOUR CHATANOGA, 2725 El Camino Real

AFTER 10PM $1 KAMIKAZES $3.50

HAPPY HOUR LADIES NIGHT SUNDAYS KARAOKE & DJ

COLLEGE NIGHT

BRANHAM LOUNGE, 1116 Branham Ln., San Jose (408) 265-5525

$3.50 KAMIKAZES


» HEADLINERS

NIGHTLIFE&MUSIC HEADLINERS BIAFRA FIVE-O

THE ROMANTICS

PEPPER

OLD 97’s

THIEVERY CORPORATION

INDIGO GIRLS

June 16 – 17, Great American Music Hall, San Francisco www.gamh.com June 17, The Fillmore, San Francisco www.livenation.com

SEA WOLF

June 17, The Independent, San Francisco www.theindependentsf.com

TED NUGENT

June 18, The Catalyst Club, Santa Cruz www.catalystclub.com June 19, The Fillmore, San Francisco www.livenation.com

GEORGE MICHAEL June 19, HP Pavilion, San Jose www.hppsj.com

June 20, Santa Cruz Beach Boardwalk www.beachboardwalk.com

June 22, The Catalyst Club, Santa Cruz www.catalystclub.com

BILLY IDOL

BRAD PAISLEY WITH JEWEL

June 26 – 27, The Fillmore, San Francisco www.livenation.com

June 20, Shoreline Amphitheatre, Mountain View www.livenation.com

July 4, Shoreline Amphitheatre, Mountain View www.livenation.com

OURS

STEVIE WONDER

June 27, Slim’s, San Francisco www.slims-sf.com

O.A.R.

June 21 - 22, The Fillmore, San Francisco www.livenation.com

July 5, Shoreline Amphitheatre, Mountain View www.livenation.com

ROBERT PLANT AND ALISON KRAUSS

BOSTON

July 7 – 8, Mountain Winery, Saratoga www.mountainwinery.com

June 27, Greek Theatre – UC Berkeley www.ticketmaster.com

DEATH CAB FOR CUTIE

DIA DE SAN JUAN FESTIVAL

June 28, Shoreline Amphitheatre, Mountain View www.livenation.com

SV

WINE TASTING & MORE

» WINE TASTING & MORE

Hahn Estates, Smith & Hook Winery 37700 Foothill Rd., Soledad (831) 678-2132 www.hahnestates.com Wine Tasting: Mon-Fri 11am4pm, Sat-Sun 11am-5pm.

Pedrizzetti Winery 1645 San Pedro Ave., Morgan Hill (408) 779-7389 www.pedrizzettiwinery.com Open Tue-Sun 10am-5pm (closed most holidays).

Cooper-Garrod Estate Vineyards WINERIES

Rabbit’s Foot Meadery

Burrell School Vineyards & Winery

1246 Birchwood Dr.,Sunnyvale (408) 261-1603 www.rabbitsfootmeadery.com Their famous cider is available at Whole Foods Markets and Oliver’s Markets.

24060 Summit Rd., Los Gatos (408) 353-6290 www.burrellschool.com Burrell School Vineyards & Winery produces “Wines at the Head of Their Class”: wines of unmistakable mountain character. Estate grown Cabernet Franc, chardonnay, merlot, pinot noir, Cabernet Sauvignon, and Syrah. Open Thu-Sun 11am5pm, Fri-Sat 11am-6pm.

NIGH T L IFE & MUSIC

RADIO DISNEY PRESENTS FOURTH OF JULY FIREWORKS SHOW WITH THE SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY

June 25, The Catalyst Club, Santa Cruz www.catalystclub.com

June 20, Greek Theatre – UC Berkeley www.ticketmaster.com

June 21, Greek Theatre – UC Berkeley www.ticketmaster.com

Cinnabar Winery Tasting Room 14612 Big Basin Way, Saratoga (408) 867-1010 www.cinnabarwine.com We invite you to visit our beautiful tasting room. Located in the quaint, historical village of Saratoga, flanked by the magnificent Santa Cruz Mountains. Open daily 11am - 5pm and Friday and Saturday evenings until 8pm for the summer months.

Cooper-Garrod Estate Vineyards 22645 Garrod Rd., Saratoga (408) 867-7116 www.cgv.com Wine Tasting: Mon-Fri Noon-5pm, SatSun 11am-5pm.

Fortino Winery 4525 Hecker Pass Hwy., Gilroy (408) 842-3305 www.fortinowinery.com Wine Tasting: Tue-Sat 10am5pm, Sun 11am-5pm.

Fleming Jenkins Vineyards & Winery 45 W. Main St., Los Gatos (408) 358-4949 www. flemingjenkins.com Wine Tasting: Tue-Sun Noon-6pm.

Roudon-Smith Winery 2364 Bean Creek Rd., Scotts Valley (831) 438-1244 www.roudonsmith.com Wine Tasting: Sat Noon-4:30pm.

Thomas Fogarty Vineyards

THEWAVEMAG.COM JUNE 16-29, 2008

COMING SOON MARK KNOPFLER

STYX

BIG SANDY & HIS FLY-RITE BOYS

REVEREND HORTON HEAT / SUPERSUCKER / NASHVILLE PUSSY

June 28, Greek Theatre – UC Berkeley www.ticketmaster.com

June 28, The Blank Club, San Francisco www.theblankclub.com

July 2, Mountain Winery, Saratoga www.mountainwinery.com

CAMPER VAN BEETHOVEN

» CD RELEASES

CYNDI LAUPER / THE B-52s

Chicago, Stone of Sisyphus Coldplay, Viva La Vida Daft Punk, Electroma DVD Judas Priest, Nostradamus Julieta Venegas, MTV Unplugged Katy Perry, One of the Boys Notwist, The Devil, You + Me The Offspring, Rise and Fall, Rage and Grace

June 28, The Fillmore, San Francisco www.livenation.com

June 29, Greek Theatre – UC Berkeley www.ticketmaster.com

MIKE NESS & HIS BAND

July 2, The Fillmore, San Francisco www.livenation.com July 6, The Catalyst Club, Santa Cruz www.catalystclub.com

CD

American Idols Live, Stevie Wonder, Slipknot, The Police, Elvis Costello, Aimee Mann, Alan Jackson, Peter Frampton, Jonas Brothers, Lynyrd Skynyrd, Jimmy Eat World, Agent Orange, Feist, Blue Oyster Cult, Toby Keith, Stone Temple Pilots, Pat Benatar, Lyle Lovett, Mötley Crüe, and many more… TW

RELEASES

JUNE 17

JUNE 24 Amos Lee, Last Days at the Lodge Edwin McCain, Nobody’s Fault But Mine Billy Idol, The Very Best of Billy Idol: Idolize Yourself Dolly Parton, Collector’s Edition Less Than Jake, Gnv Fla Mötley Crüe, Saints of Los Angeles

19501 Skyline Blvd., Woodside (650) 851-6777 www.fogartywinery.com Wine Tasting: Thu-Sun 11am-5pm. WINE SHOPS

Savvy Cellar Wines 2048 Broadway St., Redwood City (650) 363-8737 www.savvycellar.com Experience top quality wines without having to spend an arm and a leg. Savvy Cellar Wine Bar & Wine Shop features wines from all the great wine producing regions of the world – all wines rated 90 points or higher and retail for $39/bottle or less. Check website for details on: wine classes, wine clubs, private events, tasting specials, live jazz and online sales (including gift certificates).

Vino Locale 431 Kipling St., Palo Alto (650) 328-0450 www.vinolocale.com Vino Locale is the perfect place to host a business or social event in an elegant and private setting. Open Tue-Sat 11am-9pm, Sun Noon-5pm.

Vintage Wine Merchants 377 Santana Row #1135, San Jose (408) 260-1115 www.vintagewinemerchants.com Open Mon-Wed 10am-9pm, Thu-Sat 10am-10pm, Sun Noon-8pm.

FOR MORE INFORMATION, LOG ON TO WWW.THEWAVEMAG.COM 64

July 3, The Catalyst Club, Santa Cruz www.catalystclub.com

George Michael, HP Pavilion, June 19

Quarter Note Q ot 1/6sq q .167 N&M


NIGHTLIFE&MUSIC: ALBUM REVIEWS » ALBUM REVIEWS

NIGHTLIFE&MUSIC ALBUM REVIEWS

KATY PERRY

BY TOM LANHAM

One of the Boys 

(CAPITOL)

The child of a strict religious upbringing, sharp-clawed sex kitten Katy Perry appears to be making up for lost time on her long-delayed debut disc, scratching her way through sin after delectable sin and loving every lascivious minute of it. Rarely has an image contoured to the music so well – in video and album art, Perry projects the vampiness of a seasoned ‘40s film star, while her camp, synth-buttressed music echoes vintage Pat Benatar. It’s difficult not to like an artist who has the temerity to admit, right from the opening title track, “I saw a spider, I didn’t scream / ‘Cause I can belch the alphabet, just double-dog dare me” – or who has the balls to call her boyfriend on his metrosexual tendencies with “Ur So Gay.” And when she trills “I kissed a girl and I liked it” on the current iTunes smash “I Kissed a Girl,” it’s tough to tell where honesty ends and tongue-in-cheek humor begins. Ultimately, that self-deprecating wit is Perry’s biggest asset, and with any luck she’ll be one of ’08’s biggest breakout stars.

MICK HUCKNALL

Tribute to Bobby 

( AT C O )

Anyone familiar with Mick Hucknall’s long career with Simply Red can attest to the Brit’s affinity for vintage R&B. Hell, the guy even launched his own retro-reggae label, Blood & Fire, hell-bent on reviving long-forgotten artists like King Tubby. So it’s no surprise that ole Red has gone full-scale blue with this home-tracked tribute to Bobby “Blue” Bland. And it’s mostly a solid success – Hucknall’s velvet pipes may creak a bit on selections just outside his range, like “I Pity the Fool,” but when he falls in swinging soulful step (“Yolanda”, “Cry, Cry, Cry”), he really swings, and his passion for the project is palpable. He even adds a sinister new creepiness to the classic “Ain’t That Lovin’ You.” So this should, at the very least, put Simply Red back on the radar of any listener who’s dismissed their blip from the screen.

THE OFFSPRING

Rise and Fall, Rage and Grace 

(COLUMBIA)

NIGH T L IFE & MUSIC

For a while there, it might’ve been all too easy to dismiss SoCal punkers The Offspring as some sort of novelty act – their long string of sing-along, triple-kegger hits had those kooky “Keep ‘em separated” quirks. But if you dug deeper, there was always a sociopolitical commentary pulsing just beneath the surface. Now it’s positively overt – front man Dexter Holland vents his fury and frustration on almost every track here. Sleekly produced by metal vet Bob Rock, the arrangements are more adventurous: A T. Rex-ish “Stuff Is Messed Up,” and three (count ‘em, three) punk-rock power ballads. There’s even the stomping “Nothingtown,” which seems to be a good-natured spoof of Green Day’s “American Idiot.” But when Holland gets down to brass anti-war tacks on “Hammerhead,” “Trust in You,” and the Status Quostyled smackdown of celebrity rehab and self-absorption in “Let’s Hear It for Rock Bottom,” the set really fires on all six. Holland gets extra points for actually rhyming “genocide” with Pimp My Ride. “I don’t know much, but I know this sh*t is f**ked up!” he snarls at one point, making his case in the best common-man tradition. Even the brattiest punk has to grow up sometime.

ROB DICKINSON

Fresh Wine for the Horses – Deluxe Catherine Wheel Edition  ( F O N TA N A )

It’s one of rock’s weirdest mysteries – why the panoramic ’90s goth/prog combo Catherine Wheel never broke through to the alt-scene mainstream. Even last year’s solo bow from gale-force front man Rob Dickinson didn’t catch fire, a mistake Fontana hopes to rectify with a classy repackaging of this overlooked gem. Now complementing ethereal anthems like “Oceans” and “My Name is Love” are: 1) A sweeping, Pink Floydian new track, “The End of the World,” which showcases the singer’s dark, pneumatic style, and 2) A bonus disc with six CW classics (“Crank” and “Black Metallic” among them) that Dickinson pares down into skeletal acoustic arrangements. With its original label folding shortly after its release, the album never stood a ghost of a chance. But maybe now this brainy, barnstorming Brit can finally achieve the tornado career velocity he so richly deserves. TW THEWAVEMAG.COM JUNE 16-29, 2008

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NIGHTLIFE&MUSIC: CONCERT PREVIEWS / SPORTS BARS » CONCERT PREVIEWS

NIGHTLIFE&MUSIC CONCERT PREVIEWS

Rock stardom is a bumpy ride, but resilience is the name of the game as three huge acts hit the Bay Area to prove they are still alive and kicking. BY MITCHELL ALAN PARKER

GEORGE MICHAEL J U N E 1 9 , H P PAV I L I O N , S A N J O S E W W W. H P P S J . C O M

Sometimes you just gotta have faith. And that’s exactly what George Michael has: faith in his talent. Despite being arrested in the late ’90s for “engaging in a lewd act” in a Beverly Hills public toilet, followed by a string of run-ins with the law in 2006 for drug possession, Michael has amassed a slew of awards for his musical prowess, including two Grammys and three AMAs. Michael is on a North American tour in support of the US release of a greatest hits album – a massive three-disc compilation totaling 44 songs, including “Faith,” “Freedom,” “Don’t Let the Sun Go Down on Me” and even some old Wham! tunes. He’s obviously talented and his live performances are reportedly spot on. Better catch him now, before he gets into any other shenanigans.

BILLY IDOL JUNE 26 – 27, THE FILLMORE, SAN FRANCISCO W W W. L I V E N AT I O N . C O M

Get your rebel yell in tune, and bring a friend, otherwise you’ll be dancing with yourself. The spiky peroxide blond Brit swoops into the Bay Area to support his new greatest hits compilation album, The Very Best of Billy Idol: Idolize Yourself, so expect a lot of classic tunes performed at this

show, from “White Wedding” to “Mony Mony” and “Cradle of Love.” Idol is known as a provocateur, but rumor has it that he’s matured since, oh, let’s see: getting arrested, getting kicked out of Thailand, overdosing on drugs, punching a woman in the face and having a couple of kids out of wedlock. But as Idol knows, it’s a nice day to start again.

BOSTON J U LY 7 – 8 , M O U N TA I N W I N E R Y, S A R AT O G A W W W. M O U N TA I N W I N E R Y. C O M

The story is a crazy one. Boston lead singer Brad Delp committed suicide in March of last year. A devout lifelong fan of Boston, Tommy DeCarlo, had been recording covers of the band and posting them on his MySpace page for years. After hearing of Delp’s death, DeCarlo wrote a song, posted it on his page, then sent it to a Boston representative. DeCarlo was soon contacted by the band’s leader, Tom Scholz, and subsequently became one of the lead singers of the band, a la Mark Wahlberg in Rockstar. Along with lead vocalist Michael Sweet from the Christian rock band Stryper, DeCarlo will be doing vocals on a 30-show tour that, thankfully, makes its way through the South Bay. What better place to rock out to “More Than a Feeling” than at the Mountain Winery? TW

SV

SPORTS BARS

» SPORTS BARS

NIGH T L IFE & MUSIC

Firehouse Brewery

TVs: 18 HDTV flat screens Food/Drink Specials: Yes Team Affiliations: 49ers Hours: Mon-Thu: 4:30pm-12:30am, Fri: 4:30pm-1am, Sat: 11:30am-1am, Sun: 11:30am-Midnight SUNNYVALE

Firehouse Brewery 111 S. Murphy Ave. (408) 773-9500 www.firehousegrill.com CUPERTINO

Strike Cupertino Square, Wolfe Rd., right after Hwy. 280 (408) 252-2695 www.bowlstrike.com TVs: 29 Team Affiliations: All Bay Area teams Hours: Sun: 11am-Midnight, Mon: 11am-1am, Tue - Wed: 11am-Midnight, Thu - Sat: 11am-2am SANTA CLARA

Characters Sports Bar & Grill

TVs: 13 HDTVs, NFL Package Food/Drink Specials: Bloody Mary discount Team Affiliations: Raiders, 49ers Hours: Mon - Fri: 11:30am-10pm, Sat: Noon-10pm, Sun: 9am-9pm SUNNYVALE

Quarter Note 1214 Apollo Way (408) 732-2110 www.quarternote.com TVs: 6 Food/Drink Specials: Daily, Happy Hour MonFri: 4 - 7pm, Sun: breakfast & lunch specials Team Affiliations: Vote, majority wins Hours: 10am-2am

2700 Mission College Blvd. (408) 988-1500 FOR MORE INFORMATION, LOG ON TO WWW.THEWAVEMAG.COM 66

THEWAVEMAG.COM JUNE 16-29, 2008


NIGHTLIFE&MUSIC: MUSIC HISTORY » THIS TIME IN MUSIC HISTORY

NIGHTLIFE&MUSIC THIS TIME IN MUSIC HISTORY JUNE 21, 1989: THE NEW KIDS ON THE BLOCK RELEASE “HANGIN’ TOUGH.” JUNE 22, 1981: MARK DAVID CHAPMAN PLEADS GUILTY TO KILLING JOHN LENNON. JUNE 22, 1990: BILLY JOEL BECOMES THE FIRST ROCK ARTIST TO PERFORM AT YANKEE STADIUM.

Jim Morrison JUNE 16, 1995: PEARL JAM BEGINS A TOUR WITHOUT USING TICKETMASTER… THEN CANCELS THE TOUR BECAUSE NO ONE CAN GET TICKETS. JUNE 17, 1980: LED ZEPPELIN HEADS OUT ON THEIR LAST TOUR. JUNE 18, 1987: A WOMAN SUES MÖTLEY CRÜE FOR $5,000, CLAIMING SHE LOST HER HEARING BECAUSE A CONCERT WAS TOO LOUD.

JUNE 23, 2003: IN LONDON, EMINEM GIVES A $450,000 NECKLACE TO A FAN IN THE FRONT ROW OF A CONCERT. JUNE 30, 1977: MARVEL COMICS ISSUES THE FIRST OF TWO COMIC BOOKS BASED ON THE GROUP KISS. JULY 1, 1973: JESUS CHRIST SUPERSTAR CLOSES IN NEW YORK CITY AFTER 720 PERFORMANCES ON BROADWAY. JULY 2, 1991: AXL ROSE SPARKS A RIOT DURING A CONCERT OUTSIDE OF ST. LOUIS WHEN HE JUMPS OFF THE STAGE AND ATTACKS A FAN WHO WAS VIDEOTAPING THE CONCERT. JULY 3, 1971: JIM MORRISON DIES IN PARIS, AGE 27. TW

JUNE 18, 1948: COLUMBIA RECORDS PUBLICLY UNVEILS ITS NEW LONG-PLAYING PHONOGRAPH RECORD, THE 33 1/3, IN NEW YORK CITY. JUNE 19, 1988: MORE THAN 3,000 EAST GERMANS GATHER AT THE BERLIN WALL TO HEAR MICHAEL JACKSON PERFORM ON THE OTHER SIDE IN WEST BERLIN. JUNE 21, 1999: PANTERA RIDES A FLOAT IN THE DALLAS STARS STANLEY CUP VICTORY PARADE IN DOWNTOWN DALLAS BECAUSE THEY WROTE THE STARS’ THEME SONG.

Pantera

NIGH T L IFE & MUSIC

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» INTERVIEW

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INTERVIEW MOVIE REVIEWS & PREVIEWS DVD RELEASES CINEMA DIRECTORY

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the role of Agent 99 (Smart’s smart and sexy partner, originally played by Barbara Feldon). We recently sat down with them both to chat about the original Smart, some gross mishaps in making the movie, and what a yummy kisser Carell is. The Wave: You’re a funny guy. How much of this movie is your own ad-lib contributions? Steve Carell: It was a mix. We stuck to the script but there were chances to play. In collaboration with [director] Pete [Segal] and the writers and the cast, we would come up with alternatives because you never know in the final outcome what will or won’t work. So we tried to give ourselves some options on various takes. There’s a scene in the movie when Alan [Arkin, who plays the Chief] is trying to pronounce a name in the Cone of Silence. The scene probably took five times longer than it should have because I couldn’t control myself. That just killed me. TW: Anne, we hear you are a big Office fan. What was it like to make out with Steve? Anne Hathaway: Well... SC: I’m interested in this. AH: You were there. You know. To say that I am a fan of The Office is really putting it mildly. When Steve and I don’t see each other for a few weeks, my first question is, of course, “What’s coming up?” I agree the season finale was awesome.... I’m rooting for Jim and Pam. Phyllis is my favorite character. I love humor that kind of makes you feel uncomfortable, and that show is so brilliant at it. Actually, when I went to audition for this movie, I didn’t think in a million years I was going to get the part. I really just wanted to meet Steve. And I did and it went well. Making out with him is like the yummiest lollipop ...

MOVIES & T V

SC: You are so full of it.

Playing It Smart

Steve Carell and Anne Hathaway put their own spin on TV’s Get Smart. BY FRED TOPEL

MOVIE: Get Smart DIRECTED BY: Peter Segal STARRING: Steve Carell, Anne Hathaway, Dwayne Johnson, Alan Arkin, Terence Stamp STUDIO: Village Roadshow Pictures / Warner Bros.

G 68

et Smart is a TV series that poses a challenge for movie makers. Whether you watched the show in the ’60s, or caught it in reruns

THEWAVEMAG.COM JUNE 16-29, 2008

on Nick at Nite in the ’90s, Don Adams left such an impression as intrepid yet inept superspy Maxwell Smart, it’s hard to imagine remaking it. But if anyone’s up to the task, it’s Steve Carell. When it comes to delivering ridiculous lines with a straight face, he’s among the best – which makes him an inspired choice to fill Adams’ shoe phone in the Get Smart movie. Yet while Carell shied away from the TV show out of respect for Adams, his co-star, Anne Hathaway, went back to it – and dare we say, loved it – as she assumed

AH: ... dipped in sunshine ... SC: Stop it. AH: ... and wrapped with a masculine wrapper. That’s the only way I can think to describe it. You’ve got to hear this. That day was the day of [the scene at] the train tracks. Somehow there was a health scare last year. A certain contact lens solution – I won’t say the name of it, but it was the one that I used – gave you conjunctivitis. I had a sinus infection at the same time, so I had to go up to Steve, and my eye is red, puffy and dripping green. I am just snotty and I’m just like, “Come here.” And the worst thing was, we didn’t know that I had conjunctivitis at the time, so I had to call our producer Alex Gartner that night and say, “Yeah, you might want to call Steve and let him know I had pinkeye and my tears kind of got in my


MOVIES & TV: INTERVIEW

“A LAUGH A MINUTE.‘GET SMART’ IS A SUMMER SMASH!” – LARRY KING

mouth, so he might want to worry about that.” So it was very glamorous, and I’d do it again in a heartbeat. TW: Did you get pinkeye, Steve? SC: No, I didn’t. TW: Did you look at the classic TV show or stay away from that influence? SC: I steered away from it because I didn’t want to do an impression of Don Adams. I figured there was no way to improve upon what he had done, and I thought the more I watched of him, the more I would be inclined to be an impersonation because he was so good and so definitive in the role. AH: I actually grew up watching the show on Nick at Nite and loved it, so it was really fun to revisit it. I wanted to revisit it because I was one of the last people cast, so I wanted to make sure that I understood what tone we were trying to achieve. I really think that in the final product, we’ve managed to kind of have that silly, sweet yet sophisticated feel that the original series had.

Devil Wears Prada for how to run around wearing them, so when it came time to just add some high kicks and jumps, it wasn’t that bad. Having a stunt double who did it much better than me helped, though. SC: And if I may comment about the high heels for Anne, there were several scenes in the movie where we are running toward Disney Hall at full tilt. I was running as fast as I possibly could run. Anne Hathaway was wearing 4-, 5-, 6-inch heels and she was kicking my ass. I have no idea how that is physically possible. TW: What was the most dangerous stunt you did yourselves? SC: There’s a scene in which we’re riding a banner behind a moving SUV. We were on a platform. We weren’t hooked in to anything and are just being pulled down train tracks riding on top of this platform. The only reason I think it was dangerous was because everyone said, “Okay, are you ready to go? Good, okay, let’s go. Let’s do it.” Then we just did it. But the safety crews, everybody was great. I never felt that anything was in jeopardy and the stunt people did the really heavy lifting and did a great job. AH: Yeah, being pulled by the train was definitely our Titanic moment – if I jump, you jump. I did feel so safe all the time that the danger really never entered my mind. When I would describe to my mother what I was doing, she would have the heart attack for me. Being dropped 50 feet, being strapped to a cable having nothing but sidewalk [under you] – well, I guess in the shot they did have a pad. But it was on a street in Montreal, so you weren’t in a closed set, and so you felt a little bit more exposed, but I just remember giggling. You would just kind of laugh and I had to put my head down because I was laughing so hard, it was just such a rush, it was just lovely, lovely. It was so exhilarating. So, yeah, we just felt so safe the whole time that it just felt like being at the best amusement park ever. TW

TW: How did you kick butt in high heels? AH: I had excellent training in The

Get Smart opens on Jun. 20. Get tickets at www.cineluxtheatres.com and www.cameracinemas.com

–– SSHAWN HAWN E EDWARDS DWARDS,, FOX-TV FOX-TV

–– M MARK ARK S SEMAN EMAN,, SIRIUS SIRIUS SATELLITE SATELLITE RADIO RADIO

–– M MARK ARK S. S. A ALLEN LLEN,, CBS-TV CBS-TV

–– B BILL ILL B BREGOLI REGOLI,, WESTWOOD WESTWOOD ONE ONE

www.getsmartmovie.com MOBILE USERS: For Showtimes, Text Message SMART and your ZIP CODE to 43KIX (43549)

STARTS FRIDAY, JUNE 20 - CHECK DIRECTORIES FOR LISTINGS MOVIES & T V

TW: Speaking of iconic roles, Anne played Jane Austen, and The Devil Wears Prada has become iconic, too. Do you feel a lot of pressure to live up to these icons? AH: I think Meryl [Streep] had the iconic role. I was just the one who was kind of keeping the story moving and trying to keep the audience entertained while she was off screen. I’m 25 years old, and I’ve had tremendous luck in my life in terms of movies that I’ve made for artistic reasons and have gone on to become commercial successes. It’s kind of dumb luck. You never know what’s going to hit. Some movies that you think will have mass appeal [actually] flop. Other movies that you think will be in a niche – you think it’s going to be limited – [end up] making their money back and go on to way outgross any of your other films. The process is, you just try to pick the best you can from what’s available and you try to work with people that inspire you. That’s just about it.

“FUNNIEST MOVIE OF THE SUMMER!” “THIS DYNAMITE CAST DELIVERS AN EXPLOSION OF LAUGHS.” “FUNNY AND SMART. STEVE CARELL BRINGS IT!” “YOU’LL BE OUT OF CONTROL WITH LAUGHTER. CRAZY AND IRREVERENT. STEVE CARELL IS PERFECT.”

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» MOVIE REVIEWS & PREVIEWS

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KIT KITTREDGE: AN AMERICAN GIRL S TA R R I N G : A B I G A I L B R E S L I N , J O A N C U S A C K , S TA N L E Y T U C C I D I R E C T E D B Y: PAT R I C I A R O Z E M A

This quaint, wholesome family movie does not stand a chance during the summer blockbuster season. Young Kit (Breslin) is staying optimistic and hopeful during the Great Depression. She has written an article solving a spate of burglaries in her town, and expects the city newspaper to publish it. Of course, they do not take a little girl seriously. Have they never seen an underdog triumph over adversity? Kit Kittredge is sure to be charming and full of positive messages. Yeah, try getting kids to sit through that when they’d rather be watching martial arts-savvy pandas or metallic superheroes.

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S TA R R I N G : J A M E S M C AV O Y, ANGELINA JOLIE, MORGAN FREEMAN D I R E C T E D B Y: T I M U R BEKMAMBETOV

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S TA R R I N G : S T E V E C A R E L L , A N N E H AT H AWAY, D WAY N E J O H N S O N D I R E C T E D B Y: P E T E R S E G A L

Fans of the original TV series may be disappointed in this modern interpretation of Get Smart, but Steve Carell fans will be happy to see him deadpan his way through blockbuster stunts. Maxwell Smart (Carell) is an analyst at US spy agency CONTROL who is promoted to field agent when the identities of other agents are compromised. His lack of experience puts him into funny situations, while more veteran agents (Hathaway, Johnson) endure endless frustrations for the audience’s amusement. There’s no stunt or joke that hasn’t been done in another movie, but » DVD RELEASES

THE LOVE GURU  S TA R R I N G : M I K E M Y E R S , J E S S I C A ALBA, JUSTIN TIMBERLAKE D I R E C T E D B Y: M A R C O S C H N A B E L

Mike Myers has done it again. The Love Guru is another character sure to be quoted ad nauseum and spawn a new comedy franchise. A hockey team hires guru Pitka (Myers) to save their star player’s love life so he can focus on the game. The plot is incidental, as the real humor is in all of Pitka’s ridiculous sayings and mantras. Timberlake plays a funny love rival with a cheesy French accent. Myers clearly has insight into the spiritual industry and he skewers all the popular concepts with love and bite. He might not be as monumental as Shrek or Austin Powers, but he’s good company for 90 minutes.

DVD RELEASES

MOVIES JUNE 17 Be Kind Rewind Fool’s Gold The Nude Bomb – The Original Get Smart Movie The Sword in the Stone – 45th Anniversary Special Edition

MOVIES JUNE 24 Charlie Bartlett Definitely, Maybe Journey to the Far Side of the Sun 10,000 B.C. 70

Carell’s unique reactions transcend them, while his co-stars give him a team of straight men to frazzle. It’s all in good fun and the perfect light action comedy for the summer.

THEWAVEMAG.COM JUNE 16-29, 2008

TV JUNE 17 Californication – Season One ER – The Complete Ninth Season The Hudson Brothers Razzle Dazzle Show – The Complete Series Jericho – The Complete Series

TV JUNE 24 Early Edition – The First Season Futurama: Beast with a Billion Backs The New Adventures of Old Christine – Season Two The Ruth Rendell Mysteries – Set Three

CINEMA

CAMPBELL Camera 7 Cinema, 1875 S. Bascom Ave. (408) 559-6900 CineLux Plaza Theatre, 2501 S. Winchester Blvd. (408) 378-2425 L O S G AT O S Los Gatos Cinema, 41 N. Santa Cruz Ave. (408) 395-0203 GILROY Platinum Theatres, 6851 Monterey St. (408) 84-MOVIE HOLLISTER Premiere Cinemas 5, 581A McCray St. (831) 638-1800 M E N L O PA R K Guild, 949 El Camino Real (650) 266-9260 M I L P I TA S Century 20 Great Mall, 1010 Great Mall Dr. (408) 942-5550 Cinema Saver 10, 577 E. Calaveras Blvd. (408) 942-SAVE MORGAN HILL Cinema 6, 750 Tennant Station Way (408) 779-5151

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Wanted could have been a four-star movie, if only the characters had just shut the hell up. The action sequences are so original and visually creative, they take John Woo and The Matrix to the next level. Yet so much of Wanted features characters explaining their backstory, explaining their methods, explaining their relationships – and it’s not even fun exposition, either. In fact, it’s rather annoying. The corporate chump (McAvoy) never stops whining, even after the experts (Jolie and Freeman) teach him to be a badass assassin. This will be a DVD to watch with the sound off.

» CINEMA DIRECTORY

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S TA R R I N G : V O I C E S O F B E N B U R T T, JEFF GARLIN, FRED WILLARD D I R E C T E D B Y: A N D R E W S TA N T O N

Boy, those Pixar geniuses sure know how to tug at our heartstrings. They’ve created the most adorable cinema robot since R2D2, and given him the personality of a puppy. Left on Earth to clean up the remains that humans left behind, Wall-E gets lonely and has many adventures communicating only with a series of beeps. Not since Jessie the cowgirl doll was donated to charity by her teenage owner has a cartoon jerked this many tears. With typical top-notch animation, mind-blowing visuals and more new frontiers for the world of filmmaking, Pixar’s latest looks like another sure thing. TW

DIRECTORY

CineLux Tennant Station 750 Tennant Ave. (408) 778-6500 M O U N TA I N V I E W Century Cinema 16 1500 N. Shoreline Blvd. (650) 960-0970 PA L O A LT O Aquarius, 430 Emerson St. (650) 266-9260 Stanford Theatre, 221 University Ave. (650) 324-3700 Century CineArts at Palo Alto Square, 3000 El Camino Real, Bldg. #6 (650) 493-3456 REDWOOD CITY Century Park 12, 557 E. Bayshore Blvd. (650) 365-9000 S A N TA C L A R A AMC Mercado 20, 3111 Mission College Blvd. (408) 871-2AMC SAN JOSE AMC Saratoga 14 Theatre, 700 El Paseo de Saratoga (408) 871-2AMC Almaden Cinema Five 2306 Almaden Rd. (408) 265-7373 Camera 12, 201 S. Second St.

(408) 978-2787 Century 20, Oakridge, 925 Blossom Hill Rd. (408) 225-2200 Century 21, 3161 Olsen Dr. (408) 984-5610 Century 22, 3162 Olsen Dr. (408) 984-5610 Century 23, 3164 Olsen Dr. (408) 984-5610 Century 24, 741 Winchester Blvd. (408) 984-5610 Century 25, 1694 Saratoga Ave. (408) 984-5610 Century Berryessa 10 1171 N. Capitol Ave. (408) 926-7091 Century Capitol 16 San Jose 3690 Hillcap Ave. (408) 972-9276 Century Capitol Drive-In Capitol Expwy. and Snell Ave. (408) 226-2251 CineArts@Santana Row 3088 Olsen Dr. www.cinearts.com Hackworth IMAX Dome 201 S. Market St. (408) 294-TECH India Movie Center 6 1433 The Alameda (408) 830-9999


MOVIES & TV: REVIEWS & PREVIEWS

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Why are businesswomen joining eWomenNetwork? MOVIES & T V

â&#x20AC;˘ To acquire more customers. â&#x20AC;˘ To market and promote what they offer. â&#x20AC;˘ To join our community of women helping women.

Letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s get connected. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d love to learn more about you. Kristy Rogers Managing Director kristyrogers@eWomenNetwork.com 408-288-8484

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Pandemonium, Theatre on San Pedro Square » FEATURE

Arts

» FEATURE » EVENT LISTINGS » COLUMN: HOT TICK ET

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Schwartz describes the process he and Stern are following after a run-through with the cast. “The staging is basically all sketched in,” he says. “We had a work day today, where we put some changes into the show, based on what we saw. We fixed keys, changed some transitions. It was very smart of Kelley, because the next time we’re back, they’ll be into previews, and it’s better to make changes now.”

L-R: Brian Crum, Courtney Stokes, Michael Marcotte, Molly Bell, Beth DeVries, and Ray Wills

A Second Act Legendary Broadway composer Stephen Schwartz has a West Coast rebirth. BY MICHAEL J. VAUGHN

ARTS

S

ometime in the early ’90s, playwrights David Stern and Michael Scheman were waiting around in a rehearsal hall to help out with the ill-fated musical Nick & Nora (which lasted all of nine performances yet still got a Tony nomination). The two writers had a lot of time on their hands, so they began to kick around an intriguing idea: taking the best songs of Stephen Schwartz, composer of Godspell, Pippin and The Magic Show, and weaving them into an entirely new musical. But when the two presented the idea to Schwartz himself, they got a less-than-enthusiastic response. The composer was very skeptical about bringing songs into a show for which they were not written. When Stern and Scheman did a reading for him, however, Schwartz began to see the possibility for creating a very rare entity: a retrospective show that not only avoids the paper-thin plot lines of your average musical revue, but actually stands as its own independent piece of musical theater. He gave them the go-ahead, provided they let him rework the lyrics of his songs to better fit the duo’s storyline. Of course, a lot has happened since that meeting – primarily the smash 2003 musical Wicked, which 72

THEWAVEMAG.COM JUNE 16-29, 2008

has given Schwartz the kind of career rebirth that most artists only dream of. He followed that up with a trio of Oscar nominations for his work on last year’s Disney spoof, Enchanted. Stern and Scheman’s brainchild, Snapshots, made its debut in 2005 in Seattle, and has now arrived in Mountain View, where the duo is fine-tuning it for a production at TheatreWorks. The story centers on Sue, who is preparing to leave her husband of 30 years when she stumbles upon a box of old photos. The pictures seem to come to life, re-enacting the couple’s teenage experiences, and as upwardly mobile twentysomethings, as they now face the possibility of a midlife separation. The show will use the song “Popular” from Wicked, as well as “Making Good,” a tune that was cut from that show during its last week of rehearsals. Other entries include “Corner of the Sky” from Pippin, “All Good Gifts” from Godspell, and a new song, “Snapshots.” Hunting for analogies, I suggest that the show is like a greatest hits album with a couple of bonus tracks. Schwartz counters that it’s more like when a band does a live double-album concert, and readdresses and rearranges their songs. “It’s been a very interesting, circular process,” he says. “We hope it’s like one of those botanical hybrids that produces a beautiful flower – and not some mismatched, mutant creation.” Schwartz has worked with TheatreWorks and its artistic director, Robert Kelley, on previous productions of his shows, including Working (1980) and Rags (1989), and also wrote incidental music when the company presented his son Scott’s adaptation of Willa Cather’s My Antonia (2004). “I knew the theatre and personnel,” he says, “and have always been impressed with the level of production here.”

Although a work using old songs might seem a little retrospective, Schwartz’s next project is anything but. At the age of 60, he’s writing his very first opera, Séance on a Wet Afternoon (based on a 1964 British film), for Opera Santa Barbara (OSB). The piece will premiere at OSB in September 2009. “I’ve always been interested in opera,” says Schwartz. When OSB offered him the chance to write one, he immediately recalled Wet Afternoon, which he had previously rejected as an idea for a musical. Learning a new genre, although being “a huge and daunting undertaking,” has been a rewarding challenge for Schwartz. “I’m writing for different kinds of voices than I’m accustomed to,” he says. “And from a technical point of view, I’m learning a lot. And yet, the job of using lyrics to illuminate characters is the same. I think that [the musical style] will be recognizably me, but it will sound different than anything I’ve done before. It’s traditional – a 45-piece orchestra, voices unamplified – and more sophisticated harmonically than pop or show writing. Still, I’m trying to write out of my own instincts – what feels musically expressive to me.” After his recent late-life boom, Schwartz is fond of mocking F. Scott Fitzgerald’s quote, “There are no second acts in American lives,” and says that it is precisely that second act which has given him “the emotional freedom” to delve into new forms like opera and retrospective musicals. He’s also seeing it all with a sense of perspective that his younger self sorely lacked. “I appreciate it more,” he says. “I was in my early 20s then. Everything happened so fast, I didn’t get it, and how unusual it was. I handled it badly.” Part of that new appreciation is a sense of awe at his own accomplishments – nicely illustrated by a remarkable statistic related to him by a colleague on the eve of Wicked ’s 1,900th show. It revealed, he explains, “that I am the only writer in the history of Broadway to have three shows – Wicked, Pippin and The Magic Show – to run 1,900 performances.” That’s not even counting Godspell, most of its 2,600 performances running off-Broadway (though this summer’s Broadway revival might change that). Put them all together, and Schwartz is clearly one of the most successful Broadway composers in history. And right now, he’s in our backyard. TW Snapshots, $26-$64, TheatreWorks, Jun. 18-Jul. 13, Mountain View Center for Performing Arts, Castro and Mercy Sts. (650) 903-6000 www.theatreworks.org


ARTS: FEATURE

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THEWAVEMAG.COM JUNE 16-29, 2008

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» EVENT LISTINGS

ARTS EVENT

LISTINGS Pirates of Penzance, Lyric Theatre

MOVIE MAGIC: THE DANCE AFFAIR

San Jose Center for the Performing Arts, 255 Almaden Blvd., San Jose (800) SAN-JOSE

Featuring dance performances with music from various Hollywood movies: 6/28. WSPA CULMINATING RECITAL

San Mateo Performing Arts Center, 600 N. Delaware Ave., San Mateo (650) 762-0258

The Westlake School for the Performing Arts rounds out the spring with its summer culmination recital: 6/20 – 6/22.

MUSEUMS CANTOR ARTS CENTER

Palm Dr. at Museum Way, Stanford University (650) 7234177 www.museum.stanford.edu

City Lights Theater Company, 529 S. Second St., San Jose (408) 295-4200 www.cltc.org

David Robertson conducts, with Alisa Weilerstein on cello: 6/26.

Makishi: Mask Characters of Zambia: An exhibition of 24 masks selected from the Fowler Museum at UCLA is making its way up north. Featured masks originate from the Three Corners region of Zambia, Angola, and the Democratic Republic of the Congo and date from the late 19th to the 20th century, providing a glance into the traditional and sociopolitical events important to the people of central Africa: Thru 6/29. A New 19th Century: The reinstalled Mondavi Family Gallery features newly acquisitioned works by Monet, Renoir, Sargent, and more: Ongoing. Auguste Rodin Collection: The largest collection of Rodin bronzes outside of Paris: Ongoing. African Art in Context: Photography, dress, and other artifacts: Ongoing. Papua New Guinea Sculpture Garden: Wood and stone carvings of people, animals, and mythical beings: Ongoing. Living Traditions: Arts of the Americas: A collection of work from diverse Native American peoples and times: Ongoing. Explore Outdoor Sculpture: Enjoy beautiful weather and the works of Auguste Rodin, Maya Lin, Beverly Pepper, Richard Serra and Andy Goldsworthy: Third Sunday of each month. Andy Warhol Prints: Featuring multiples from the Mao and Flowers series and from the Electric Chair series in addition to images of Elizabeth Taylor and Mick Jagger: Thru 11/30. Experiments in Navigation: The Art of Charles Hobson: An exhibit of Hobson’s artists books, a medium he has worked with for two decades: Thru 7/6.

Written by Jeffrey Bracco and directed by Kit Wilder, this play is touted as “Shakespeare on shuffle,” featuring a hodgepodge of classic drama, tragic comedy and sexual innuendo when Rosalind puts on her iPod and steps out into the world: 6/18 – 6/22.

FROM GLORIA TO GOSPEL

CHILDREN’S DISCOVERY MUSEUM

IF YOU HAVE AN IDEA FOR A LISTING, OR KNOW OF SOMETHING HAPPENING THAT YOU'RE AFRAID WE'LL OVERLOOK, PLEASE EMAIL YOUR ARTS EVENT TO EVENTS@THEWAVEMAG.COM.

THEATRE GREASE

If you don’t know who the Thunderbirds or Pink Ladies are, check your pulse, then go see this classic musical with all the classic tunes: 6/21 – 7/19.

Kicking off the California Theatre Center’s Summer Rep series is this exquisite double bill of two short plays. Mary’s Wedding is Stephen Massicotte’s love story that “examines the enduring, painful cost of war,” while The Dock Brief is John Mortimer’s dark comedy about an “aging barrister asked to represent an alleged wife murderer”: Thru 7/20.

Saratoga Civic Theater, 13777 Fruitvale Ave., Saratoga (408) 268-3777 www.saratogadramagroup.com

ARTS

MARY’S WEDDING AND THE DOCK BRIEF

Sunnyvale Community Center Theatre, 550 E. Remington Dr., Sunnyvale (408) 720-0873

GROSS INDECENCY

Dragon Theatre, 535 Alma St., Palo Alto (650) 493-2006

Moisés Kaufman penned this play about the trials of the famous playwright Oscar Wilde: Thru 6/22. THE IMPORTANCE OF BEING EARNEST

Bus Barn Theatre, 97 Hillview Ave., Los Altos (650) 941-0551 www.busbar.org

This unforgettable comedy by the flamboyant Oscar Wilde “lampoons the Victorian obsession with wealth, breeding and propriety”: Thru 6/21. LIBERTY INN

Sunnyvale Community Center Theatre, 550 E. Remington Dr., Sunnyvale (408) 720-0873

Part of the California Theatre Center’s Summer Rep series, this witty comedy by the Bay Area’s Dakin Matthews follows Mirandolina as she shrewdly runs the Liberty Inn during the American Revolution and encounters numerous eligible suitors, forcing her to make a decision: Thru 7/6.

74

THE MATCHMAKER

Sunnyvale Community Center Theatre, 550 E. Remington Dr., Sunnyvale (408) 720-0873

This classic farce, which spawned the hit musical Hello, Dolly!, follows a wealthy 1880s New Yorker who hires a matchmaker to find him a wife. Only the matchmaker is trying to find love herself: 6/26 – 7/27.

Pablo Picasso talking in a Parisian café in 1904, pre-Theory of Relativity and Cubism: 6/19 – 7/13. THE PIRATES OF PENZANCE

Montgomery Theater, 291 S. Market St., San Jose (408) 9861455 www.lyrictheatre.org

A pirate’s apprentice falls in love with a young woman, only to have his apprenticeship begin to falter: 6/21 – 6/29. SHAKESPOD

SNAPSHOTS

PERFECT WEDDING

Mountain View Center for the Performing Arts, 500 Castro St., Mountain View (650) 903-6000 www.theatreworks.org

The title is deceiving, as the lead character wakes up hung over and in bed next to a woman who is not his bride-to-be, just hours before his wedding. Perfect, indeed!: Thru 6/29.

The latest musical by renowned Broadway and Hollywood composer Stephen Schwartz is a “musical scrapbook” of sorts that follows a struggling marriage: 6/18 – 7/13. [See Arts feature, page 72]

PICASSO AT THE LAPIN AGILE

TWELFTH NIGHT

Lucie Stern Community Center, 1305 Middlefield Rd., Palo Alto (650) 463-4949

Black Box Theatre, 848 E. William St., San Jose (408) 2887820 www.northsidetheatre.com

Billed as a “21st-century Alice in Wonderland,” this comedy penned by Steve Martin has Albert Einstein and

THEWAVEMAG.COM JUNE 16-29, 2008

Theatre on San Pedro Square, 29 N. San Pedro St., Ste. 200, San Jose (408) 460-1696

As part of the first annual Shakespeare on the Square, the Arclight Repertory Theatre is putting

on a festival featuring the romantic comedy Twelfth Night, and The Green Show, a free performance of Indian classical music performed by the Abhinaya Dance Company of San Jose: Thru 6/28. [See Hot Ticket, page 75]

CLASSICAL MUSIC & OPERA SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY – DVORAK’S CELLO CONCERTO

Flint Center for the Performing Arts, 21250 Stevens Creek Blvd., Cupertino (408) 864-8820 www.flintcenter.com

First Presbyterian Church of San Jose, 49 N. Fourth St., San Jose (408) 297-7212

The Crossroads Youth Choir, from Adventure of Faith Presbyterian Church in Port Orchard, Wash., will perform a concert to lucky revelers: 6/21.

DANCE THE GREEN SHOW

Theatre on San Pedro Square, 29 N. San Pedro St., Ste. 200, San Jose (408) 460-1696

A performance of “Indian classical music, dance and love poetry” by the Abhinaya Dance Company of San Jose precedes the Shakespeare on the Square performance of Twelfth Night: Thru 6/28.

180 Woz Way, San Jose (408) 298-5437 www.cdm.org

Exciting interactive displays, galleries and activities for the whole family to enjoy: Ongoing. DE SAISSET MUSEUM

500 El Camino Real, Santa Clara (408) 554-4528 www.scu.edu/desaisset

Eye on the Sixties: Vision, Body & Soul: Focusing on one of the most vibrant and dynamic decades in modern history, this exhibit includes painting, sculpture, drawings, and prints by artists ranging from Frank Stella to Claes Oldenberg: Ongoing. HAKONE GARDENS

21000 Big Basin Way, Saratoga (408) 741-4994 www.hakone.com

Hina Doll and Kimono Exhibition: The Upper House of Hakone Gardens, one of the oldest Japanese estates in the Western Hemisphere, is now

showcasing a display of ornamental dolls representing the Emperor and other historical figures in the traditional dress of the Heian period: Ongoing. HISTORY SAN JOSE

1650 Senter Rd., San Jose (408) 287-2290 www.historysanjose.org

A Breath of Plein Air: A show featuring 54 pieces by 25 local artists, showcasing the beauty of the Santa Clara Valley: San Jose, Santa Clara and Silicon Valley: Thru 9/21. JAPANESE AMERICAN MUSEUM OF SAN JOSE

535 N. Fifth St., San Jose (408) 294-3138 www.jamsj.org

Jack Matsuoka’s Cartoons: Making the Best of Poston: Documenting the incarceration of Japanese Americans during the 1940s: Ongoing. MEXICAN HERITAGE PLAZA

1700 Alum Rock Ave., San Jose (408) 928-5524 www.mhcviva.org

Robots: Evolution of a Cultural Icon: An optimistic, pessimistic and at times humorous exhibition, examining the development of robot iconography in fine art over the last half century: Thru 10/19. 01SJ Biennial: Supertight: Interactive, digital and other art media are exhibited as part of the Second Biennial 01SJ Global Festival of Art on the Edge: Thru 8/30.

Mi Coche / My Culture – Livin’ the Lowrider Lifestyle: A unique, visual art experience that delves into the art and Chicano subculture of automobiles. Exploring the history of the Lowrider lifestyle, this exhibit pays homage to this cross-cultural movement through a variety of artistic genres: Thru 6/30. ROSICRUCIAN EGYPTIAN MUSEUM

1660 Park Ave., San Jose (408) 947-3636 www.egyptianmuseum.org

History of the Rosicrucian Egyptian Museum Exhibit: This exhibit shows the museum’s transformation from one artifact in an office to a museum with more than 4,000 artifacts: Ongoing. SAN JOSE INSTITUTE OF CONTEMPORARY ART

560 S. First St., San Jose (408) 283-8155 www.sjica.org

Night Moves: Unique window installation series that can only be viewed at night. Crater Bay Area: A participatory exhibition that is a lunar drawing competition to win deeds of land on the moon: Thru 8/2. Brendon Lott: Memories I’ll Never Have: Photographs from internet sharing networks are sent to China and reproduced as oil paintings: Thru 8/2. SAN JOSE MUSEUM OF ART

110 S. Market St.San Jose (408) 271-6840 www.sjmusart.org

SAN JOSE MUSEUM OF QUILTS & TEXTILES

520 S. First St., San Jose (408) 971-0323 www.sjquiltmuseum.org

Artful Knit: A Sculptural Approach to Knitting: A hands-on workshop introducing 3-D knitting: 6/21. The New World of Knitting: Co-curator and art knitter Adrienne Sloane hosts an “illustrated” discussion of the art of knitting: 6/22. Beyond Knitting: Uncharted Stitches: An exhibition of contemporary sculptural knitting as defined by art knitting of the 21st century: Thru 8/24. Pun Intended: The Appliquéd Wit of Dorothy Vance:


» COLUMN: HOT TICK ET

ARTS

EVENT

LISTINGS

HOT

TICKET

India Mood for Love

Homeland Prayer, Pear Avenue Theatre

Twelfth Night gets a new identity with an Indian setting and a dash of Bollywood glamour. BY MICHAEL J. VAUGHN

I

t’s awfully nice to have a beer with your Shakespeare, which is just one of the benefits provided by Shakespeare on the Square, the company presenting Twelfth Night at onetime comedy club Theatre on San Pedro Square. The other benefits include sprightly, funny Shakespeare by an ensemble that includes several veterans of what might be considered the Bay Area’s “Shakespeare Underground.” Producer/director David Koppel has set the comedy in India, which not only matches well with the play’s air of exoticism (while also giving a nod to the South Bay’s growing Indian population), but provides the irresistible opportunity for a Bollywood production number at the multiplewedding conclusion.

TECH MUSEUM OF INNOVATION

201 S. Market St., San Jose (408) 294-TECH www.thetech.org

IDEA House: An interactive program space encourages you to formulate and synthesize like never before: Ongoing. Green by Design: Designs with a green approach, aiming to prevent environmental problems and improve lives: Ongoing. View from Space: Science made visible in an exhibit that displays weather, aircraft, and daily patterns from space: Ongoing. TRITON MUSEUM OF ART

1505 Warburton Ave., Santa Clara (408) 247-3754 www.tritonmuseum.org

Midsummer’s Art Celebration: An affordable collection of fine art created by more than 100 local artists, including the Santa Clara Valley Watercolor Society. Music and food will be available: 6/21.

GALLERIES AICON GALLERY

535 Bryant St., Palo Alto (650) 321-4900

A solo exhibit of intricate heads and totemic sculptures by India native Mayyur Kailash Gupta, this will be his first exhibit in the United States: Thru 7/12. ANNO DOMINI

366 S. First St., San Jose (408) 271-5155 www.galleryAD.com

Fim do Mundo: The debut US solo exhibit by Brazilian artist Stephan Doitschinoff (aka CALMA) presents his evocative work, which combines Brazilian folklore, baroque religious imagery, and pagan symbols with the artist’s urban art and pop culture roots: Thru 6/21. U.S. Department of Homeland Graffiti: Partnering with Graffiti Research Lab, this exhibit is listed as a joint effort in “liquidating all confiscated, high-tech graffiti artifacts and tools, expunged evidence, court exhibits, anti-graffiti technology and office furnishings, priced to sell”: Thru 6/28.

GREGORY KATE GALLERY

925 The Alameda, Ste. 101, San Jose (408) 271-2661 www.gregorykategallery.com

Therese May and Donna Orme exhibit their work together for the first time: Thru 6/29. LOS ALTOS LIBRARY

13 S. San Antonio Rd., Los Altos (650) 948-7683 www. santaclaracountylib.org/losaltos

Interpretations: The Santa Clara Valley Watercolor Society presents an exhibit by its members, who were each given the prompt of interpreting a favorite quote, phrase or excerpt through one of their paintings: Thru 6/30. THE MAIN GALLERY

1018 Main St., Redwood City (650) 701- 1018 www.themaingallery.org

Contained: The Box Show: An exhibit of various artists featuring dozens of different artistic boxes: big, small, hung from a wall, glazed, unglazed, ceramic, porcelain, you name it, they got it: Thru 6/29. TW

To the company’s credit, this identity labyrinth comes through pretty clearly, and is accompanied by an inspired sense of mirth, owing to the small touches thrown in by its veteran comedian cast, which includes one of the Bay Area’s best rapscallion-players, Mark Drumm, who begins one of Sir Toby Belch’s entrances by pre-

Twelfth Night, $10-$15, thru Jun. 28, Theatre on San Pedro Square, 29 N. San Pedro, San Jose (800) 838-3006 www.arclightrep.org.

paring to urinate on a potted plant. Drumm’s perfect partners in crime are Daniel Norberg, who lends Sir Andrew Aguecheek an enormously lovable goofiness, and Shruti Tewari, who endows lady-in-waiting Maria with a great sense of playfulness and a genuine Indian accent that gives Shakespeare’s words a delicious resonance. Mark W. Jordan plays the eternal joke-butt Malvolio with divine fustiness, Melissa Navarro delivers Feste with great energy, and Fiona Lawson makes of her Viola a strong, almost-sane pivot point for all the zaniness. The Indian atmosphere is aided greatly by the presence of sitar player Gavin O. Takase-Sanchez and the costume design of Alyssa Lichtenstein. A fun diversion is listening for the many occasions when the players substitute “Vishnu” for “Jove” or “Jupiter.” An additional attraction is The Green Show, a free performance of classical Indian dance and poetry by the Abhinaya Dance Company, outside the theatre at 7pm Saturdays and 6pm Sundays. TW THEWAVEMAG.COM JUNE 16-29, 2008

75

ARTS

Fourteen humorous quilts featuring folk art, politics and pop culture: 8/24.

More than any other play but Comedy of Errors, Twelfth Night is built upon mistaken identities. Shipwreck victim Viola washes up on the shores of Illyria (which, in real history, was an ancient kingdom in the Balkans), disguises herself as a man and goes into the service of Duke Orsino. Naturally, while courting the lady Olivia on Orsino’s behalf, Viola falls for Orsino, while Olivia falls for Viola (or rather her masculine persona, Caesario). It all gets a little dizzying, and is typified by two lines: Feste the fool’s declaration of “Nothing that is so, is so” and Viola’s reverse-Popeye statement, “I am not what I am.” And this is all before Viola’s identical twin brother, Sebastian, arrives on the scene.

TICKET INFO


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Family&Community

» EVENT LISTINGS 78 » FARMERS MARK ETS 78 » WEDDING PL ANNING 79

seasonal weather patterns. Boysenberries are ripe and ready for picking from around late June through the end of July, again, depending on the weather. Ollalieberries are ripe and ready for picking from around mid June through the end of July, for $2.75 per pound.

Buckley Farms 2950 Leavesley Rd., Gilroy (408) 842-4697 Cherries, cherries, and more cherries. This small family-owned farm just down the road from the Gilroy Premium Outlets is only open for a short while in June, when visitors can pick Rainier and Bing cherries for about three or four weeks. Rainier cherries are sweet with a creamy-yellow flesh, and Bing cherries have an appetizing red-mahogany color, a relatively small pit, and crisp and juicy fruit. Bring your own bucket so you can collect the fruit, which is around $2 to $2.25 per pound.

Andy’s Orchard

Fruitful Summer Fun

FA MILY & COMMUNIT Y

Forget the supermarket. Take kids straight to the source of locally grown fruits. BY JULIE ENGELHARDT

W

ith school out for the next couple of months, parents are probably wondering what they can do to keep their kids from complaining of boredom every five minutes. Our recent Super Summer Guide [Vol. 8, Iss. 12] was packed with family-friendly suggestions, but another that will surely beat those summertime blues is to load up the kids and visit some of the local farms in the area. “Visit a farm?” you hear your kids say dubiously, followed by the inevitable “How boring.” While that might be their initial take on it, there’s a good chance these young skeptics will change their tune once they realize that many of these family-run operations will actually let them pick their own fruit, and take it back home so they can savor the fresh flavor of nature’s sweet-as-candy bounty. 76

THEWAVEMAG.COM JUNE 16-29, 2008

Swanton Berry Farm (831) 469-8804 www.swantonberryfarm.com This farm has two ranches that are open seasonally to the public. There’s the Swanton Ranch, which is the location for u-pick strawberries, and Coastways Ranch, the site for u-pick olallieberries (a type of blackberry) and kiwi fruit. The Farm Stand on Swanton Road is the check-in point for strawberry u-pickers. These fields opened on May 1 and are open for pickers from 8am to 7pm. Keep in mind that these farms are a business, so there is a fee of $2.50 per pound to pick the berries. The olallieberry u-pick opened in June at the Coastways Ranch location, and those berries are also $2.50 per pound. The Farm Stand is approximately 10 minutes north of Santa Cruz, and Coastways is approximately 20 minutes. See the farm’s website for exact locations and directions.

1615 Half Rd., Morgan Hill (408) 782-7600 www.andysorchard.com Andy’s offers visitors something a little different – the farm is well known for its fruit tours, talks, and tastings. They have one of the largest selections of stone fruit in California and host several fruit tastings each year, where guests are invited to taste and evaluate the different fruit varieties grown on the farm. Usually, there are cherry, apricot and several peach, nectarine and plum tastings scheduled during the summer, and at times, cooking demonstrations are also part of the festivities. Talks are often planned in conjunction with farm tours, or field days, which provide an opportunity for visitors from urban areas to connect with the farmer and learn more about how the food they eat is grown. Check the orchard’s website under Event Calendar to find out more about the talks and tours, or call the main number for more details. 78

WHERE TO FIND FRUIT

Phipps Country Store and Farm 2700 Pescadero Rd., Pescadero (650) 879-0787 www.phippscountry.com Spend a glorious day on the farm at Phipps. Visitors can call in on the farm’s animals, pick olallieberries, strawberries and other fruit when it’s in season, or take a peaceful walk through the flower and herb gardens along the creek. The farm’s berries are hand-planted and no pesticides are ever used. Strawberries are ripe and ready for picking from around late April or mid May through the end of September, depending on

If you’re a city dweller, you might wonder how you go about finding these farms. One easy way is by checking with the friendly fruit purveyors at your local farmers markets. Many of the vendors who attend these markets have farms where you can pick your own produce. Another way is to log on to www.localharvest.org or www.pickyourown.org. Another tip for urban folk: Remember, this is a farm, and farms need soil in which to grow these delectable, ripe-for-the-picking fruits. With dirt roads everywhere, it’s wise to wear an old pair of sneakers that you don’t mind getting dirty. Ditto for jeans, and if donning a white T-shirt, be sure it’s one you don’t mind decorating with a few fruit-colored stains.


FAMILY & COMMUNIT Y: FEATURE

Summer Sports Camps start June 16!

Beat the heat and be active this summer with Camps & Classes at Silver Creek Sportsplex

SOCCER

Outstanding indoor and outdoor programs for 7-14 year olds. SOCCER ACADEMY: Build skills with professional coaching. Sign up for training and weekly games; or training alone. SOCCER LEAGUE: Outdoor league in partnership with PAL SOCCER CAMP: Full day and Half day camps

y! Call toda 74 7 .8 4 408.22

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Soccer-based child development program We use sports themes to help focus on physical development. Fun, non-competitive games promote physical fitness, motor skills development, and self confidence. CLASSES: For ages 18 mos. - 6 yrs. Flexible monthly plans. CAMP: Half day camp for 5 & 6 year olds.

www.silvercreeksportsplex.com/kids

Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Discovery Museum of San Jose 7OZ7AYs3AN*OSEs#!ss  sWWWCDMORG

FA MILY & COMMUNIT Y

EXHIBIT NOW OPEN! Discover a fascinating world that inspires curiosity and helps make the unknown more familiar, maybe even logical, and certainly fun!

lling nro 8! e Nowor 200 f Expository Writing Creative Writing Presentation Skills

Emerson School

Hacienda School

Palo Alto 650-424-1267

Pleasanton 925-485-5750

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$500

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$950

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Š2008 Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Discovery Museum of San Jose. All Rights Reserved. Aliceâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Wonderland exhibit is created and circulated by Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Discovery Museum of San Jose with major funding from the National Science Foundation and the MetLife Foundation.

THEWAVEMAG.COM JUNE 16-29, 2008

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» EVENT LISTINGS

FAMILY&COMMUNITY EVENT IF YOU HAVE AN IDEA FOR A LISTING, OR KNOW OF SOMETHING HAPPENING THAT YOU'RE AFRAID WE'LL OVERLOOK, PLEASE EMAIL YOUR COMMUNIT Y EVENT TO EVENTS@THEWAVEMAG.COM.

BOOK READINGS & SIGNINGS

Hiller Aviation Museum’s annual helicopter show isn’t just about helicopter watching – you’ll even be able take a ride in one: 9am - 5pm

THE “SEX AND MONEY” TOUR: 6/19

SECOND ANNUAL REGIONAL PRESCHOOL ARTS FESTIVAL: 6/21

Books Inc., 301 Castro St., Mountain View (650) 428-1234 www.booksinc.net

It’s a night for primal urges as Soquel author Rupert Hart and San Jose author Michael J. Vaughn bring their “Sex and Money” book release party to Books Inc. The evening will feature a lively presentation and Q&A with Hart, followed by a dramatized reading of excerpts from Vaughn’s novel Double Blind with the help of local actors: 7pm READING AND BOOK SIGNING WITH STEPHEN INGRAM: 6/27

Evergreen Library, 2635 Aborn Rd., San Jose (408) 715-7020 www.cnps-scv.org

Join author Stephen Ingram as he discusses and signs copies of his latest work, Spiny Succulents of California: 7 – 9pm

BUSINESS SAN JOSE SILICON VALLEY CHAMBER OF COMMERCE NETWORKING MIXER: 6/19

KBM Workspace, 320 S. First St., San Jose (408) 291-5286 www.sjchamber.com

Come and take part in this monthly networking event: 5:30 – 7:30pm ACCELERATED NETWORKING DINNER: 7/2

Villa Ragusa, 35 S. Second St., Campbell (408) 288-8484 www.ewomennetwork.com

FA MILY & COMMUNIT Y

Enjoy a great dinner followed by a presentation from Michelle Stone, “Overcoming the Terror Barrier”: 5 – 8:15pm

FESTIVALS & EXPOS VERTICAL CHALLENGE HELICOPTER AIR SHOW: 6/21

Emma Prusch Farm Park, 647 S. King Rd., San Jose (408) 998-2787

Bring out the family for this fabulous one-day mini arts festival featuring work from children ages three to five, along with hands-on activities, dancing, face painting, mask making, puppetry, and more!: 11am – 3pm

Summer again brings exciting free Friday night concerts to the Boardwalk’s Beach Bandstand. Look for classic bands from the ’60s, ’70s, and ’80s. Think bands such as The Romantics, Rare Earth, John Waite, Blue Oyster Cult, Gin Blossoms, and many more. 30TH ANNUAL CAMPBELL HIGHLAND GAMES: 6/21 Campbell Community Center, One W. Campbell Ave., Campbell (408) 219-9264 www.campbellgames.com

Celebrate the summer solstice with live music, dancing, drum circles, and more: 7pm

You’ve seen highland games on ESPN2, now see them in person: The caber toss, the stone putt and the dreaded Scottish hammer throw. Bagpipe bands and Celtic food and crafts make this a full-fledged Celtic festival: 9am – 5pm

Divine Science Community Center, 1540 Hicks Ave., San Jose divinesciencecommunitycenter.org

MAMAFEST!: 6/28

Parkside Hall, 180 Park Ave., San Jose www.bayareamama.com

A one-day event that will show all you moms how to strive for the perfect balance between work and family: 1 – 5pm 27TH ANNUAL SUMMER FESTIVAL & CHILI COOKOFF: 7/4 Mitchell Park, 600 E. Meadow Dr., Palo Alto www.cityofpaloalto.org

Teams of amateur and professional chili chefs will bring their “A” game in this battle for cash and prizes, along with live music, activities for the kids and more: Noon - 5pm

FAMILY ACTIVITIES AVIATION DAY CAMP: 6/16 – 8/22

Hiller Aviation Museum, 601 Skyward Rd., San Carlos (650) 654-0200 www.hiller.org/ daycamp.shtml

Kids, ages six to 10, will enjoy an exciting week of exploring the science behind how airplane and helicopter wings work, plus designing and testing paper airplanes, and meeting pilots and other people who work in aviation.

JAMMIN’ AT THE JAMBOREE: 6/21

Off San Carlos St., San Jose (408) 947-8711 www.sancarlosstreet.com

We at The Wave love jamborees, and you’ll love this one, too, featuring an evening of live music with The Groove Kings, two movies (Some Like It Hot and Happy Feet) and let’s not forget the barbecue from Armadillo Willy’s, children’s area, and community booths: 5 – 10pm ICE CREAM ZOOFARI: 6/2

Happy Hollow Park & Zoo, 1300 Senter Rd., San Jose www.brownpapertickets.com

FARMERS

CIVIL WAR REENACTMENT: 6/21 - 22

Casa de Fruta Country Park, 6680 Pacheco Pass Hwy., Hollister (408) 842-9316 www.casadefruta.com

Step back in time to the War Between the States with an authentic battle re-enactment, settler encampments, military headquarters, medical facilities, and lots of gunfire. FIRST SILICON VALLEY DUCK RACE: 6/22

MARKETS

Palo Alto: Sunday 9am – 1pm (year round) California Ave. & El Camino Real (800) 806-FARM San Jose: Sunday 10am – 3pm (year round) Stevens Creek & Winchester (800) 949-FARM San Jose: Friday 10am – 2pm (year round) Kaiser Santa Teresa Parking Lot (800) 949-FARM San Jose: Sunday 8:30am – Noon (year round) Japantown, Jackson between Sixth & Seventh Sts. (408) 298-4303 San Jose: Sunday 10am – 2pm (year round) Princeton Plaza, Kooser & Meridian (800) 806-FARM

THEWAVEMAG.COM JUNE 16-29, 2008

(408) 357-7406 www.siliconvalleyduckrace.org

Adopt a rubber duck for just the minuscule price of five dollars and help raise needed funds for local nonprofits. You’re also invited to listen to live entertainment, eat some tasty food, play some games, and have loads of fun. FOSSIL FINDERS: 6/24

Guadalupe River Park & Gardens Visitor & Education Center, 438 Coleman Ave., San Jose (408) 298-7657 www.grpg.org

Santa Clara: Thursday 10am – 2pm (year round) Santa Clara Kaiser Parking Lot (800) 949-FARM Santa Clara: Saturday 9am – 1pm (year round) Jackson St. between Homestead & Benton (510) 745-7100 Saratoga: Saturday 9am – 1pm (year round) Saratoga West Valley College, Fruitvale & Allendale Aves. (800) 806-FARM Sunnyvale: Saturday 9am – 1pm (year round) S. Murphy Ave. at Washington and Evelyn (510) 745-7100

NATURE NAVIGATORS: 6/27

Guadalupe River Park & Gardens Visitor Center, 438 Coleman Ave., San Jose (408) 298-7657 www.grpg.org/ riverdaycamp.html

Kids ages seven to 10 will enjoy a treasure hunt using GPS technology while learning about navigation, topography and satellites: 9am – 1pm CHILDREN’S THEATRE IN THE PARK: 6/27 – 8/17

Kids ages five to seven are invited to get dirty and dig up the long distant past – a time when Columbia mammoths once roamed this area. You’ll learn how fossils form and even participate in a simulated fossil dig: 9am - Noon NINTH ANNUAL SUNNYVALE SUMMER SERIES: 6/25 – 8/27

S. Murphy Ave., between Washington & Evelyn, Sunnyvale www.downtownsunnyvale.com

Cruise over to Sunnyvale every Wednesday and enjoy a fine collection of arts & crafts, food booths and live music from T.Y.T., The Hitmen, Andre Thierry, Sage, Mama Pacho, Dub FX, Double Funk Crunch, and many more: 5 - 8pm WILD WEST PUPPET SHOW AND HOT DOG DINNER: 6/26

Gamble Garden, 1431 Waverly St., Palo Alto (650) 329-1356 x201 www.gamblegarden.org

Join Nick Barone and his puppets as they present a half-hour musical comedy show, featuring a cast of more than 20 friendly dinosaurs dressed as cowboys that will entertain you with songs, jokes, and skits. Oh, and let’s not forget the hot dog dinner from 5:30 - 6:30pm.

Enjoy all-you-can-eat wild ice cream treats, live entertainment, animals, rides, puppet shows, and other fun activities.

Vasona Lake County Park, 333 Blossom Hill Rd., Los Gatos

» FARMERS MARKETS

78

Santa Cruz Beach Boardwalk, 400 Beach St., Santa Cruz (831) 4235590 www.beachboardwalk.com

CELEBRATING SUMMER SOLSTICE: 6/21

Hiller Aviation Museum, 601 Skyway Rd., San Carlos (650) 654-0200 www.hiller.org

Campbell: Sunday 9am – 1pm (year round) Campbell Ave. at Central & First Sts. (510) 745-7100 Cupertino: Friday 9am – 1pm (year round) Vallco Fashion Park Parking Lot, 10123 Wolfe Rd. (800) 949-FARM Los Gatos: Sunday 8am – 12:30pm (year round) Montebello Way & Broadway Extension (408) 353-5355 Mountain View: Sunday 9am – 1pm (year round) Hope & Evelyn (800) 806-FARM

FREE FRIDAY NIGHT BEACH CONCERTS: 6/20 – 8/29

LISTINGS

Mountain View Center for the Performing Arts, 500 Castro St., Mountain View (650) 903-6000

and Ben Lee on Jun. 19, and Midnight Star and Ryze The Band on Jun. 26: 5:30 – 9:15pm SHAKESPEARE ON THE SQUARE FESTIVAL: THRU 6/28

Theatre on San Pedro Square, 29 N. San Pedro St., San Jose www.brownpapertickets.com

Join the Arclight Repertory Theatre as they present Shakespeare’s Twelfth Night. SONGWRITERS UNDER THE STARS: THURSDAYS THRU 7/24

The Peninsula Youth Theatre invites one and all to join them for their free theatre in the park, featuring presentations of The Little Mermaid, Under the Big Top, Jack and the Three Sillies, and Elves and the Shoemaker.

In the Concierge Lounge at Santana Row, Olin Ave. (408) 551-4611 www.santanarow.com

GREAT TRAIN ROBBERIES: 6/28 - 29

Roaring Camp, Graham Hill Rd. & Mt. Hermon Rd., Felton www.roaringcamp.com

SIXTH VASONA VIBRATIONS FREE CONCERT SERIES: THRU 7/26

The whole family will surely enjoy 1880s justice unfold right before their own eyes as live bandits and lawmen unleash their guns in a blazing showdown.

What could be better than lounging by a lovely lakeside and listening to free music? NOTHING!

SUMMERPOOLOOZA: 6/29

Decathlon Club, 3250 Central Expwy., Santa Clara (408) 7382582 www.decathlon-club.com

The whole family will enjoy a day by the pool, along with a Kidzone that includes face painting, pool races, obstacle courses, carnival games and more: 11:30am – 2:30pm 11TH ANNUAL MUSIC IN THE OTHER PARK: THURSDAYS THRU 6/26

Head on over to Santana Row and listen to some great bands such as Randy Maher, Eric Bolvin, Ray Soto, Miena Yoo, and Steve Krizer: 6 - 9pm

Vasona Lake County Park, 333 Blossom Hill Rd., Los Gatos (408) 354-2608 www.southbayfolks.org

MIDNIGHT MOVIE MADNESS: THRU 8/30

Camera 7, The Pruneyard, 1875 S. Bascom Ave., Campbell www.cameracinemas.com

Not only are cult classics (like The Thing, The Big Lebowski, Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas) shown at the stroke of midnight, but Camera Cinemas will be giving away concert tickets, T-shirts and other goodies to attendees. And it’s only $7.50!

St. James Park, First & James Sts., San Jose www.sjdowntown.com

If you like music, and we think you do, you should come for some great live music (outdoors) from Augustana

F E AT U R E 76

Gizdich Ranch 55 Peckham Rd., Watsonville (831) 722-1056 www.gizdich-ranch.com Gizdich Ranch is known locally for its fantastic self-dubbed “Pik-yor-sef ” selection of tantalizing fruit. The ranch is open through July for strawberries, June for olallieberries, midJune for boysenberries, July for blackberries, and September for apples. Once you have your fill, take a selfguided tour of their berry farms and apple orchards. Gizdich is also a great place for picnics, so pack your basket and have a leisurely lunch under the apple trees while the kids play in the farm’s park areas. On Saturdays from September through May visitors can watch the apples get pressed for juice. For those who want to take home a tasty souvenir, the Ranch has a pie and baked goods shop (take home an apple pie, but be sure to try the madeto-order sandwiches), or for nonedible

[CONT’D]

mementos, there’s also a gift shop and antique store.

Crystal Bay Farm 40 Zils Rd., Watsonville (831) 724-4137 www.crystalbayfarm.com This farm is much smaller than Gizdich, covering about three acres. They do allow fruit picking from time to time, but it’s best to call ahead. They also have an self-serve fruit stand where you can pick up fresh produce and drop your money in the container provided. While their u-pick isn’t a big operation, they do offer a farm camp during the summer for kids ages seven to 11. During the four-day session, young farmers build relationships with farmers, the land, plants, and animals. They learn where food comes from, how to prepare healthy meals using fresh produce, how to take care of animals, and so much more. TW


EVENT FUNDRAISERS UNMASK THE MYSTERIES: 6/21

Rotary Summit Center, 88 S. Fourth St., Seventh Fl., San Jose (408) 451-9255 www.unmaskthemysteries.com

Enjoy an evening of champagne cocktails, hors d’oeuvres, fine wine, dancing, delicious desserts, silent auction and live entertainment from Gregangelo and Velocity Circus of San Francisco. Funds raised benefit HIV/AIDS care and support programs: 7 – 11pm GOOD OLE SUMMER BARBECUE: 6/22

Picchetti Winery, 13100 Montebello Rd., Cupertino (408) 973-1495

The Cupertino Historical Society & Museum will be holding their annual fundraising event that includes a fabulous dinner, live music, games, live auction and more!: 5 – 9pm

TAUPOU BINGO: THURSDAYS

San Jose Moose Lodge #401, 1825 Mt. Pleasant Rd., San Jose

Come out and play bingo and help raise funds for The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society: 6:45pm

GAY & LESBIAN SAME SEX MARRIAGE CEREMONY: 6/22

San Jose Center for Spiritual Living, 1195 Clark St., San Jose (408) 236-2076 www.sanjosecenter.org

The San Jose Center for Spiritual Living will open its arms to same-sex couples eager to legalize their love and dedication to their life partners: 1pm

HEALTH & WELLNESS MS SOCIAL: AN ACCELERATED CURE EVENT: 7/9

Gordon Biersch Brewery, 640 Emerson St., Palo Alto (415) 3920100 www.acceleratedcure.org

Come meet people with multiple sclerosis (MS), their families and significant others in a fun social setting: 6:30 – 9pm

VOLUNTEER BECOME A BIG BROTHER OR BIG SISTER

LISTINGS WORKSHOPS & CLASSES BACKYARD CHICKENS: 6/21

Common Ground Educational Center, 559 College Ave., Palo Alto (650) 493-6072 www. commongroundinpaloalto.org

Learn everything you need to know to raise happy hens, including houses, nesting boxes, water, feed, suppliers, care, and favorite crops to grow for your chickens: 10:30am – 1:30pm

THE JUNGLE BOOK BALLET CAMP 2008: 6/23 – 27

www.commonwealthclub.org

Western Ballet, 914 N. Rengstorff Ave., Unit A, Mountain View (650) 968-4455 www. westernballet.org

Ballet camp for kids ages four to seven from instructor Sarah Arnold: 9am – 1pm BICYCLE SAFETY TOWN HALL MEETING: 6/28

Join this urgent town hall meeting to discuss the ways to reduce the number of bicycle injuries and fatalities in our communities: 1 - 3pm SURVIVING THE WILD: 6/28

Coyote Lake Ranger Station, Coyote Bear Park (408) 842-7800

Learn basic skills that can help you survive in the wild: 9am TW

San Jose City Council Chambers, 200 E. Santa Clara St., San Jose (408) 280-5842

SV

WEDDING PLANNING

» WEDDING PL ANNING

(408) 876-4193 www.emp.org

Become a mentor and be a positive influence on a child’s life – it’ll only cost you two hours a week!

Learn about the value of your insurance coverage through a friendly review of your current policies and benefit from our multiline discounts for home, auto, and life insurance. CA License 0F86939 MAKEUP ARTIST

Professional Makeup by Tiffany Chiang

The Alexandria Salon & Spa ACCOMMODATIONS

Hotel Los Gatos & Spa 210 E. Main St., Los Gatos (408) 335-1700 www.hotellosgatos.com Mediterranean-styled villas providing luxurious guest rooms and suites. Nestled at the base of the Santa Cruz Mountains and within walking distance of the many shops, restaurants and galleries. Home to Preston Wynne Spa & Dio Deka Restaurant. BACHELORETTE PARTIES

Jewelsexpression 1445 Foxworthy Ave., San Jose www.jewelsexpression.com Jewelsexpression offers exotic dancing classes with a softer touch. Designed for women of all shapes, sizes and ages, you’ll learn the art of the “walk,” floor performing, and faux pole and chair dancing. Great for bridal showers and bachelorette parties. BEAUTY SALON

Shangri-La Lotus Salon & Spa

ENTERTAINMENT

Thoro-Bread Entertainment

Get into High Tech! Experience the science of computer chips and the evolution of their development firsthand. Reserve guided tours by phone or online: 408.765.0503 www.intel.com/museum Open Monday-Friday, 9 a.m.-6 p.m., and Saturday 10 a.m.-5 p.m., excluding holidays. FREE admission and parking. Audio tours are available in seven languages. In Santa Clara, off U.S. Hwy. 101 at the Montague Expressway and Mission College Boulevard. Copyright

©

2006 Intel Corporation. All rights reserved.

(650) 248-3803 We provide DJ services for all occasions, and offer a wide range of music, including today’s greatest hits, hip-hop, reggae, dancehall, soul, oldies, Spanish music and much more. So, next time you’re thinking about having a party, give us a call and leave the music to us! FLORIST

Abercrombie Flowers & Gifts 120 S. Sunnyvale Ave., Sunnyvale (408) 245-0130 Luscious wedding bouquets, distinctive reception and exotic centerpieces for your luxurious and lavish soiree. Corporate gifts, funerals, and events are other areas of our expertise! INSURANCE

Valerie Young Vedda

RECEPTIONS

Hotel Los Gatos & Spa 210 E. Main St., Los Gatos (408) 335-1700 www.hotellosgatos.com Mediterranean ambience provides luxurious banquet facilities for events to accommodate up to 130 guests at various locations, including our Indoor Monte Sereno Ballroom, Outdoor Courtyard & Pool Terrace. SALON

The Alexandria Salon & Spa 1346 The Alameda, Ste. 8, San Jose (408) 971-2926 www.thealexandriasalon.com Hair, skincare, massage, makeup and waxing services provided by a friendly and skilled staff in our relaxed spa environment. Come see our newly added clothing boutique. TANNING

Parlour 308 Airbrush Tanning 308 E. Main St., Los Gatos (408) 354-9308 www.parlour308salon.com Professional, comfortable and discreet. Your tan is applied by hand, using an airbrush. The solution is customized for every client, to create a natural sun-kissed tan. TRAVEL

Cruise Planners 5669 Snell Ave., Ste. 372, San Jose (408) 715-7196 Our travel agency specializes in designing a vacation that exceeds your expectations. Our passion is to plan a seamless and exciting cruise and travel experience. Call us today to start planning your dream vacation memories. WEDDING GOWNS

Nicolette Couture Bridal Boutique 15 El Toro Ave., Morgan Hill (408) 779-6146 www.nicolettecouture.com Features four gorgeous wedding gown designers, one of which is exclusive to our boutique for all of Northern California. We offer a no pressure, memorable shopping experience for your dream wedding gown.

181 Metro Dr., Ste. 290, San Jose (408) 930-1290 FOR MORE INFORMATION, LOG ON TO WWW.THEWAVEMAG.COM THEWAVEMAG.COM JUNE 16-29, 2008

79

FA MILY & COMMUNIT Y

413A Monterey Ave., San Jose (408) 623-3963 www.jennybeauty.com Look your very best for your day. We provide the perfect makeup for your entire wedding party – bride, attendants and both mothers. Flawless makeup complements your dresses and location, allowing your photographer/videographer to provide you with the best memories. Whether you come to us or we come to you, everything will be done to your satisfaction.

(408) 242-8154 www.beautyexperttiffany.com Camera-ready bridal and wedding makeup service specializing in customized color matching foundation and mineral powder just for you. I will make sure you have a flawless complexion and the perfect makeup for your special day.


SVMARKETPLACE » COLUMN: HOME WORK

HOME

IMPROVEMENT LANDSCAPING AND GARDENS

Zaira’s Gardening and Landscaping (408) 569-3389 Contact Hector for FREE ESTIMATES... Maintenance, Clean-ups, Trimmings, Pressure Wash, New Lawn and more. PATIO FURNITURE

The Complete Backyard 1600 Duane Ave., Santa Clara (408) 748-8100 www.patio101.com Come by and visit our 33,000square-foot showroom featuring all the top names in the patio business. We have over 250 sets on display from various manufacturers.

Staging by Karen Dayton www.staging-pros.com

TO ADVERTISE IN THE HOME IMPROVEMENT SVMARKETPLACE CALL: (408) 467-3201 EQUIPMENT RENTAL

A Tool Shed (Eight South Bay locations) (800)-ATOOLSHED www. atoolshed.com A Tool Shed Rentals should be your first stop for all your rental needs! We have the tools and equipment rentals to make your weekend or major project easier.

Black Sea Gallery 27 South First Street, San Jose (408) 998-8885 www.blackseagallery.com Welcome to Black Sea Gallery, where worldly furniture finds its home. Each piece is inspired by an exotic place, a past era, an antique lost but not forgotten.

FIREPLACE

At Home House Cleaning (408) 401-7755 Your home is our concern! We offer worry free insurance protection, bonded employees, window cleaning, and deep carpet cleaning. Call for a free estimate.

Beth’s House Cleaning

KITCHEN AND BATH

Peninsula Fireplace

Jimyko 1919 Monterey Road, Suite #10, San Jose (408) 993-0918 www.jimyko.com Provides fresh and unique ideas that attune to today’s casual and contemporary lifestyles. We invite you to explore our retail studio and experience the elements that define your home.

Grand Flooring 894 Commercial St., San Jose (408) 441-1021 www.grandflooring.com Beautiful homes deserve beautiful floors. At GrandFlooring.com we let nature customize your floor. Our solid hardwood flooring contains both clear and character planks that reflect all the best attributes of the natural wood.

Can-Do Construction

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THEWAVEMAG.COM JUNE 16-29, 2008

Arch Design Center (ADC)

ROOFING AND GUTTERS

1264 S. Bascom Ave., San Jose (408) 278-9056 ADC is a new showroom with an old-fashioned approach. A family oriented business whose main focus is bringing customer service back to the showroom.

Franklin’s Roofing Service

Willow Glen Kitchen and Bath

950 S. McGliney Ln., Ste. 505, Campbell (408) 371-9495 Offering emergency leak repair, roof maintenance, annual maintenance, reroofing of all types, and roofing inspections.

HARDWARE

(831) 539-1181 All phases of construction and excavation, residential remodel and additions, structural retaining walls, decks, and hardscapes. Licensed, bonded, and insured.

981 Stockton Ave, San Jose (408)292-6833 www. allworldfurniture.com All World Furniture Inc. was started over sic years ago and now has a one of the largest modern, contemporary furniture showrooms with attached warehouse in the San Francisco Bay Area.

www.mrpooltable.com Offering quality handcrafted 8-foot pool tables - custom made - factory direct to you. Also offering a wide variety of accessories from lamps to casino tables to spectator chairs.

Palo Alto Hardware

GENERAL CONTRACTOR

All World Furniture

POOL TABLES

Admiral Pool Tables

351 Willow Glen St., San Jose (408) 293-2284 Lighting, rugs and pottery are but a few of the items we feature in our “Complete Home Furnishing” selections; enabling you to experience a “One Stop Shopping” environment.

FLOORING AND CARPETS

FURNITURE

55 Newell Rd., Ste. 301, Palo Alto (650) 424-1616 Professional plumber 24 Hrs. / seven days a week video Inspection / Pipe locating / Fixture repair.

HOUSE CLEANING

Business: (408) 263-7091 Cell: (408) 202-5438 I Clean Your House Like It’s My Own! (Licensed & Bonded)*First-Time Clean-Up to 50% OFF * Free Estimates – Call Today. Family owned business 10+ years experience. Specializing in Modern Home Cleaning: Stainless Steel, Granite, Hard-Wood, Pergo, Laminate, etc…Good Referrals! Ask about our MoveOut Specials!

46 E. Campbell Ave., Campbell (408) 866-9200 www.peninsulafireplace.com Specializing in original designs. Offering screens and accessories, hand forged iron, wood and stone mantels, wood gas and electric fireplaces, glass and mesh doors.

PLUMBING

Smart Choice Plumbing

875 Alma St., Palo Alto (650) 327-7222 www.paloaltohardware.com At Palo Alto Hardware, “living green” is more than just a catchphrase. We work hard to put into place systems and programs that are environmentally friendly as we run our business.

STORAGE

LAWNS AND GARDENS

A-1 Self Storage

Garden Accents

(Four San Jose Locations) 1415 Old Oakland Rd.; 2900 Monterey Rd.; 131 Baroni Ave.; 3260 S. Bascom Ave. (800) 210-8979 www.a1storage.com Save money with A-1 Self Storage! Affordable pricing for personal and business needs.

11155 Lena Ave., Gilroy (408) 846-4555 www.garden-accents.net Our vision is a garden center to inspire the customers, not just to sell product. We provide a place where garden lovers become inspired and where gardening ideas can flourish.

HOME THEATRE

Heavenly Greens

Modern TV

(866) 724-8873 www.heavenlygreens.com A Heavenly Greens lawn is as close to natural grass as you can get without the need to water, mow or fertilize. Your lawn will look beautiful 365 days a year with little to no maintenance. AS SEEN ON TV!

1228 S. Bascom Ave., Ste. B, San Jose (408) 2931330 www.moderntvonline.com We can provide the home theater system you dream about. Whether it’s a dedicated theater with plush seating and a big screen, or a family room with a slim plasma TV and speakers built into the walls, we have the solution for you.

WOODWORKING CENTER

The Sawdust Shop 452 Oakmead Pkwy., Sunnyvale (408) 992-1004 www.sawdustshop.com The Sawdust Shop is a unique woodworking center located in the heart of Silicon Valley, combining a do-it-yourself woodshop, a woodworking store, and woodworking classes all under one roof.


PHOTO CREDITS D E S I G N @ T H E W AV E M A G . C O M

1, Cover / by Chris Schmauch, 3, Santa Cruz Roller Girls / Courtesy of Kelley Richardson, Death Cab For Cutie / Courtesy of Atlantic Records, Fireworks / Courtesy of iStock, Get Smart / By Tony Rivetti Jr., iPhone 3G / Courtesy of Apple, Le Creuset Ogive / Courtesy of Sur La Table, Old Woman / Courtesy of iStock, Swanton Berry Farm / By Chris Schmauch, Tea / Courtesy of iStock, 10, Cintra Wilson / By Chad Rachman, 12, Old Woman / Courtesy of iStock, 16, Ground PET plastic / Courtesy of HP, 18, Liquido Lounge, Four Seasons Silicon Valley / By Chris Schmauch, Seasonal Farmers Markets / By Chris Schmauch, 22, Absolut Rainbow / Courtesy of Absolut Vodka, DP1 / Courtesy of Sigma, Hillary in the Box / Courtesy of Pop Art Creations, iPhone 3G / Courtesy of Apple, The Wave / Courtesy of Because We Can, 28, Santa Cruz Roller Girls / Courtesy of Kelley Richardson, 30, Herbal Cup Pouch trio / Courtesy of Mighty Leaf, 32, Tea / Courtesy of iStock, 38, Measuring waist / Courtesy of iStock, 40, Chantal Ball teapot / Courtesy of Williams-Sonoma, Finum Tea Control / Courtesy of Sur La Table, Le Creuset Ogive / Courtesy of Sur La Table, LiveStrong Whistling Loop by Chantal / Courtesy of Bed Bath & Beyond, Michael Graves Tea Kettle / Courtesy of Alessi, Oxo Good Grips Uplift / Courtesy of Bed Bath & Beyond, Tea Ball / Courtesy of Sur La Table, VE Hybrid / Courtesy of Zojirushi, Windsor Teakettle copper / Courtesy of Williams-Sonoma, 42, Grennan’s Murhpy Beds / By Paul Ferradas, 44, Helm / By Chris Schmauch, 47, Snapshots / Courtesy of David Allen, 48, Robert Plant / Courtesy of Rick Diamond, Savemart 350 / Courtesy of Zane Terry, Until Now / Courtesy of Gallery Ad, 49, Campbell Highland Games / Courtesy of Sara Bruce, Fencing tournament / Courtesy of iStock, Picasso at the Lapin / Courtesy of Dana Grover, 50, Cin Cin / By Chris Schmauch, 52, Trevese / By Chris Schmauch, 62, Death Cab For Cutie / Courtesy of Atlantic Records, 66, Firehouse Brewery / By Chris Schmauch, 68, Get Smart / By Tracy Bennett, 70, Angelina Jolie in Wanted / Courtesy of Universal, The Love Guru / By George Kraychyk, 72, Snapshots Cast / Courtesy of TheatreWorks, 74, Pirates of Penzance / Courtesy of Lyric Theatre of San Jose, 75, Abhinaya Green Show / Courtesy of Abhinaya, Homeland Prayer / Courtesy of The Pear Avenue Theatre, 76, Swanton Berry Farm / By Chris Schmauch, 82, Seanbaby / By Chris Schmauch

ADVERTISER INDEX S A L E S @ T H E W AV E M A G . C O M

23 Skidoo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .39

Dr. Youbert Karalian . . . . . . . . . .32

Nazca Peruvian Cuisine. . . . . . . .53

A-1 Self Storage . . . . . . . . . . . . . .20

Easy Tan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8

New Breath of Life. . . . . . . . . . . .16

Aaron Sessions - State Farm . . .16

Elle Kiss. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .36

Nichols Research, Inc. . . . . . . . . .16

Alliance Development Group - Park Place . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .41

Emerson School . . . . . . . . . . . . . .77

Ocean Blue. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .56

Escape Bar & Grill. . . . . . . . . . . . .66

Alliance Development Group - Stone Crest . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .45

Off Ramp, The . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .29

Eternal Beauty . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .20

Off the Hook . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .67

American Kickboxing Academy 29

Everything and Hair. . . . . . . . . . .34

Parcel 104 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .53

Anise Cafe . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .54

eWomen. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71

Art Beat, The . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .73

Fahrenheit UltraLounge. . . . . . .61

Paul Love’s Silicon Valley Productions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .19

Art of Living. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .37

Firehouse Grill. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .67

Artsopolis. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .73

Fish Market, The. . . . . . . . . . . . . .56

Arya. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .51

Five Branches Institute. . . . . . . .35

At Home Cleaning . . . . . . . . . . . .44

Foxy Avenue Clips . . . . . . . . . . . .34

AVA Spa . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17

Galleria of Los Gatos . . . . . . . . . .44

Axis - Featured Business. . . . . . .42

Get Smart. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69

Axis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .42

Go Mobile. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9

Bangkok Taste Restaurant. . . . .51

Goosetown Lounge . . . . . . . . . . .65

Bay Dental . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13

Grand Century Dental . . . . . . . . .11

Beautiful by Design. . . . . . . . . . .36

Gulliver USA. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12

Bella Mia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .53

Half Moon Bay Brewing Company . . . . . . . . . . . .58

Bella Saratoga. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .60 Bert’s Alibi . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .66 Birk’s Restaurant . . . . . . . . . . . . .57 Blowfish. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .57 Braces For Pretty Faces. . . . . . . .31 Branham Lounge . . . . . . . . . . . . .66

Harrah’s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 Hawg’s Seafood . . . . . . . . . . . . . .57 Home Consignment Center . . . .43 House of Genji. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .57 iFlySFBay . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .28

Pearl River . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .59 Picasso’s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .61 Pinn Bros. - Featured Business .44 Pinn Bros.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Quarter Note . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .64 Radiance Health Solutions. . . . .14 Rejuve Medical . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .14 Roaring Camp - 4th of July. . . . .18 Roaring Camp Railroads. . . . . . .27 Roaring Camp Railroads. . . . . . .20 Roem Corporation Corde Terra . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .84 Rosie McCann’s. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .51 Sage Beauty Spa. . . . . . . . . . . . . .32 Sanctuary Salon . . . . . . . . . . . . . .33 San Jose Box Office . . . . . . . . . . .69 San Jose Redevelopment Agency . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7

Burger Pit. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .61

infobayarea.com . . . . . . . . . . . . .81

California Wheels. . . . . . . . . . . . . .8

Intel Museum . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .79

San Jose Rock ‘n’ Roll Half Marathon. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .15

Camera Cinemas. . . . . . . . . . . . . .71

Island Grill . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .52

Santa Cruz Big Trees . . . . . . . . . .46

Caper’s Eat & Drink . . . . . . . . . . .61

Jane Aesthetic Medicine & Surgery. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4

Scandalous . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .32

Cars for Kids. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .73 Century Graphics . . . . . . . . . . . . .39 Chardonnay II Santa Cruz. . . . . .29 Chatanoga Persian Cuisine . . . .60 Children’s Discovery Museum . .77

Japantown. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .77 JFK University . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .24 Kapp’s Pizza Bar & Grill. . . . . . . .53 Kim’s Auto Body . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11 La Paloma Restaurant. . . . . . . . .58

Sent Sovi . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .52 Silvercreek Sportsplex . . . . . . . .27 Silvercreek Sportsplex . . . . . . . .77 SINO. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .54 Sole di Paradiso . . . . . . . . . . . . . .33 Spencer’s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .55

Chrysalis Aesthetic & Reconstructive Surgery . . . . . . .17

Laser Beauty Center . . . . . . . . . .19

Ciana Day Spa . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .34

Lisa’s Tea Treasures . . . . . . . . . . .55

Cielito Lindo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .55

Little Lou’s BBQ. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .60

Cinelux Theatres. . . . . . . . . . . . . .71

Livorno Square . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .43

City Smog Check. . . . . . . . . . . . . .16

Loft Bar & Bistro. . . . . . . . . . . . . .61

Club One. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .35

Lyric Theatre . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .73

Club One. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .83

Mantra Palo Alto . . . . . . . . . . . . .55

Creekside Inn . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .55

Maple Tree Inn . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8

Cucina Bambini. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .77

Marbella Hair Salon. . . . . . . . . . .32

Dave & Buster’s. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6

Marketplace - Home Services . .80

Valley Transportation Authority . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .23

Dave and Busters . . . . . . . . . . . . .39

Mazda Laguna Seca. . . . . . . . . . .21

Vaqueros . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .53

Day Out with Thomas . . . . . . . . .79

Melting Pot, The. . . . . . . . . . . . . .59

Wall*E. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .19

Designers Ltd.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .33

Menara Moroccan . . . . . . . . . . . .52

West Coast Bartending School .65

Dive Bar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .65

Merlion. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .51

Westpark Dental . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9

Dr. Hoang K. Do. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11

Miramar Events . . . . . . . . . . . . . .46

West Valley College. . . . . . . . . . .13

Dr. Robert Ferguson . . . . . . . . . .37

Mix 106.5 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .46

Willow Street Pizza . . . . . . . . . . .59

Dr. Tony Pham. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .36

Mustard Cafe. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .59

Ye Olde Royal Oak Pub . . . . . . . .60

Straits Restaurant . . . . . . . . . . . .54 Sue Durfee, State Farm. . . . . . . .44 Tara’s Esthetics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .33 Team 72 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17 Temple Bar & Lounge, The. . . . .67 Trailsloggers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .29 Up and Running . . . . . . . . . . . . . .27 Ursula’s Boutique. . . . . . . . . . . . .39

THEWAVEMAG.COM JUNE 16-29, 2008

81


COLUMN: THE FINAL L AST WORD

THE FINAL LAST WORD B Y S E A N B A B Y - S E A N B A B Y @ T H E W AV E M A G . C O M

Judging a Dude By His Food

I

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’ve come to realize that the public perception about most subjects isn’t based on observations, or even facts. It’s based on cute things that TV shows or pop psychologists say. For example, someone may write a book like He’s Just Not That Into You, and suddenly a thing as complicated as individualistic behavior means exactly the same thing. You might argue that things like this make us dumber, but only if you like winning arguments.

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This would still be okay if our collective mind rarely allowed competition – but it doesn’t. If you were to write a book called He Might Really Have Stuff to Do, Oversexed Whores, it wouldn’t fight with the first book in mankind’s struggle for truth. The only thing that would happen is that no one would buy it or hear about it. Trust me: Whatever fun fact gets to our brain first is the one we go with, making observational armchair psychology more of a race than real science. That’s fine with me since, and I don’t want to name drop, it allows me to periodically invent my own stereotypes – like how midgets sneak into your home at night to repair your shoes. Others, however, use pop psychology for evil. The latest example I’ve found is a blog entry titled “How to Judge a Dude by his Food” by Maggie Nemser, and it’s exactly what it sounds like – a guide for single women to discern a man based entirely on his entrée. Finally, a less reliable way for women to make snap judgments! As if I don’t have enough problems on a date when I wear a sweater with my mom’s face on it, now some girl’s going to think she knows me because I order ice cream for dinner and cry throughout the meal. But how smart will you feel after reading Nemser’s post, when you have everyone in the world at a disadvantage as soon as they order food? Well, let’s see what kind of knowledge we have here: “Fajitas – You’re sizzling company. Just make sure you don’t get any of that sizzle on my sweater.” This is the fajitas write-up in its entirety, and yes, apparently the secret knowledge was a pun about fajita temperature the whole time. Which raises an issue even more important than sizzling: After someone thinks of this stuff, does their brain throw up? “Game – Uh, as long as it’s not accompanied by hunting-with-Daddy stories, do your thing. And one more thing... please don’t sport mandals.” In a blog entry that purports to teach us what food orders tell us about men,

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THEWAVEMAG.COM JUNE 16-29, 2008

it’s very strange for Nemser to suddenly turn it into a list of what’s okay for her date to eat, do and wear. Is this a psychological study of eating habits, or is this what happens when your brain is done vomiting all over itself from fajita puns? As for “mandal,” I’m a very tolerant person. You can squeeze words together all you like in a misguided attempt at being cute. But know this: If I’m a judge and you are a defendant who gave that as the reason for strangling someone to death, you are free to go. “Sushi – You’re a keeper. Especially if you do the omakase and if you have the courage to try blowfish, I’d like you to meet my family.” Yikes. If I were on a date with this woman, I’d order the beef brains and unwashed tomatoes and hope for something vital inside me to fail. “Turkey – If it’s not Thanksgiving and you’re not at Subway, don’t order turkey. I can’t explain it, but just trust me on this one.” You can’t explain it? YOU? Aren’t you the one who volunteered to explain exactly this type of thing? Statements like this make the reader so much less knowledgeable about the subject matter being discussed, it would have to improve to even be considered useless. “Greek salad – Points for culture, but just like we can’t do the salad, you can’t, either. I don’t care how much feta is in there.” What? This is so without reason that the only way this would even be worth reading is if it was cute (and in that respect, it’s relying entirely on the comical value of the word “feta”). That, speaking as a writer, is bold – like trying-to-hit-ahome-run-with-your-penis bold. Speaking of which, here’s some advice I want to leave the men with: If you really want your date to judge you by your food choices, go ahead and order whatever you’re in the mood for, then ask the waiter, “Oh, and can I have a side of giant dong cream for my enormous, oversized dong? Now... where were we?” TW


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The Wave Magazine - Volume 08, Issue 13: June 18 - July 1, 2008