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CONTENTS F E AT U R E S

16

18

WINTER TV PREVIEW 2008

54

CIRQUE DU SOLEIL’S MERRY PRANKSTERS

The writers of our favorite sitcoms and dramas might still be on the picket line – but the shows must go on. Director David Shiner talks about KOOZA, the show soon to hit the San Jose Big Top.

64

34

56

INTERVIEWS 16

THE CAST OF 30 ROCK

58

ALICIA KEYS

Tina Fey and company take us behind the scenes of the award-winning NBC comedy. Nothing’s gonna stop her now, and she’s not gonna talk it over. But she will sing about it.

DEPARTMENTS UPFRONT 6

EDITOR’S NOTE { we talk }

10

SPOTLIGHT { local news }

14

HIT LIST { editors’ picks } LIFESTYLE

24

SPORTS & ADVENTURE Feature: Tired of hearing the same old songs during sports games? So were these guys – and they did something about it.

26

HEALTH & BEAUTY Feature: Get clean and green with these soap stars of the growing artisan bar soap industry.

34

STYLE & SHOPPING Feature: Fluorescent accessories lit up the spring/summer 2008 catwalks – and they’re coming soon to a store near you.

36

HOME & DESIGN Feature: Wooden it be nice to warm up your home décor with design objects of luxe lumber?

40

DINING Feature: Roll up, roll up, for the increasingly popular fairground fare. It’s fine dining, only on sticks.

14 DAYS 56

50 WAYS TO LEAVE YOUR SOFA { top events }

60

NIGHTLIFE & MUSIC

62

MOVIES Feature: Rambo, Cloverfield, Untraceable, and more.

64

ARTS Feature: She may be gone, but the late, great Wendy Wasserstein’s work lives on, as TheatreWorks presents Third.

68

FAMILY & COMMUNITY Feature: Who knew there were so many fun family outings right here on our doorstep?

36

COLUMNS 8

DREGULATOR { media watchdog }

65

HOT TICKET { art alert }

74

THE FINAL LAST WORD { local opinion }

14

58

SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTIONS 50

CATERING

61

SPORTS BARS

72

WEDDING PLANNING

40 THEWAVEMAG.COM JANUARY 16-29, 2008

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MASTHEAD

OUR PEOPLE W R I T E U S @ T H E W AV E M A G . C O M

The Wave Magazine

Silicon Valley's Finest Entertainment & Lifestyle Magazine Volume 08, Issue 02 | Januar y 16 - 29, 2008

Medicine & Surgery BOTOX OBAGI

THE WAVE MEDIA President/Publisher: B. Peter Brafford Associate Publisher: Chris Rhoads Vice President, Corporate Relations: Dan Ferguson

EDITORIAL

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Editor-in-Chief: John Newlin Events Editor: Johnny Brafford Senior Editor: Jo Abbie Editor at Large: Irene Kew Copy Editor: Ed Robertson

Contributing Writers: Seanbaby, Fred Topel, Cintra Wilson, Michael J. Vaughn, Joanna Currier, Kevin Lynch, Steve Goldsdtein, Tom Lanham, Traci Vogel, Damon Orion Contributing Editor: Ryan Berg

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ONLINE IT Support: Jenny Phan Design / Code: Chris Schmauch

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Vice President, National Accounts: Bill Hargreaves Accountant: Jenny Phan

Circulation Representatives: Javier Segura, Guillermo Merino, Heather Deveraux, Luis Barreto, Alberto Velarde, Rogelio Galvez, Bertha Fernandez

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LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Send to writeus@thewavemag.com or use the mailing address below.

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The Wave Media publishes The Wave Magazine.

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All content of this issue is copyright ©2008 by The

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Wave Media, Inc., and may not be reprinted in

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whole or in part without the express written consent

Jane Chung MD, PhD American Association of Cosmetic Surgery American Society of Laser Medicine & Surgery International Academy of Cosmetic Dermatology

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of the publisher. The Wave is available throughout

E D IT O RIA L C O N T RIBU T IO N S

the Silicon Valley; one copy of each edition of

Unsolicited manuscripts and story ideas must be

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SUBSCRIP T ION INFORMAT ION BACK ISSUES of The Wave Magazine are available for $5. Please submit your request for a back issue to: 1735 Technology Dr., Suite 575, San Jose, CA 95110.

manuscripts, artwork and photographs to: The Wave Magazine, 1735 Technology Dr., Suite 575, San Jose, CA 95110

Phone: (408) 467-3200 Fax: (408) 467-3401


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5


EDITOR’S NOTE

EDITOR’S NOTE J O H N @ T H E W AV E M A G . C O M

A

s it turns out, I’m not an intellectual. Of course, this should come as no surprise to those who remember when I validated The Speedo in this very column. It’s no secret that I’ve always desperately wanted to be an intellectual – a real intellectual. I got my overpaid liberal arts degree in English. I know my Coleridge. I try to come up with innovative ideas that challenge the status quo. I read the book before I see the movie (and favor the book). I keep up with politics and global economics and can discuss why the two are not mutually exclusive. I’ve taken every opportunity (sometimes to an obnoxious fault) to hone my public speaking skills. I own several sweaters with suede elbow patches, and I even occasionally smoke a pipe. But the fact that I would trade in my entire library of books for that awesome 50-inch Pioneer plasma television that was unveiled last week at the 2008 Consumer Electronics Show in Vegas (it measures only at an eighth of an inch thick!) excludes me from the inner circle of thinkers who set the tone for what the rest of the world thinks smart people talk about. A real intellectual would never choose watching television over a good night’s rest, but I did that as recently as last night. I can’t resist a good History Channel documentary on shotguns, are you kidding me? I’m guessing there are thousands of people like me out there who have their television routine. You find a little downtime, scroll through your recorded programs and take it when you can get it. 30 Rock is my crack, and I’m thrilled to have an interview with the cast in this issue (page 16). I watched the entire first season in two viewings. That’s what I do: I power through shows a season at a time. I watched an entire season of Scrubs over the course of a day. Once I get caught up with a show, I follow it for a few episodes then lose interest. But I don’t think that will be the case with 30 Rock. To me, it’s not only the smartest show since Seinfeld, it might be the show that saves the great American sitcom. Other than The Simpsons and The Office, I can’t think of any other show in pro6

THEWAVEMAG.COM JANUARY 16-29, 2008

duction that has a wider range in humor, one that can go from addressing race and religion to porn and pretense. Tina Fey plays Liz Lemon, the head writer of The Girlie Show, a weekly network sketch comedy a la SNL, Fey’s alma mater. Alec Baldwin plays Jack Donaghy, the exec from The Girlie Show’s parent company sent to keep it on track. This is from the first season: Jack: Those jokes you wrote for me for my Mitt Romney fundraiser were top notch. Liz: Those weren’t jokes. That was an appeal for a return to common sense and decency. Jack: Well, they got big laughs. After winning the Emmy for Best Comedy Series last season, 30 Rock started its second season with great promise, rolling out 10 solid episodes before everything shut down. Not since the writers strike of 1988 (and pretty much what I remember of 1996) has television suffered so much creative starvation. When the ’88 strike ended and shows resumed production, it was too late. Viewership was down 10 percent across the board, many writers were out of work and the industry suffered millions of dollars in loss. This latest strike shows all the potential to do as much, if not more, damage. Since this might be our last chance in a long time to do a solid television wrapup, we’re running a Winter TV Preview feature this issue (page 18). There are a surprising amount of new shows coming out that I won’t be watching. (I can’t afford to watch reality TV anymore. I’ve broken way too many remote controls.) The networks are airing whatever episodes they were able to complete before the strike… then it’s anyone’s guess what will happen. Who knows, without television maybe I’ll start masquerading as an intellectual. Enjoy the issue, John Newlin Editor-in-Chief


LET TERS

THEWAVEMAG.COM JANUARY 16-29, 2008

7


COLUMN: THE DREGUL ATOR

THE DREGULATOR B Y C I N T R A W I L S O N - W R I T E U S @ T H E W AV E M A G . C O M

The Presidential Plotline Thickens

“I

f we get chased out of Iraq with our tail between our legs, that will be the fifth consecutive Third World country with no hint of a Navy or an Air Force to have whipped us in the past 40 years.” - Hunter S. Thompson, Nov. 18, 2003 Iowa, Schmiowa. Huckabee, Schmuckabee. Hillary… dammit. Barack Obama’s unquestionable sex appeal notwithstanding, Iowa was a good ole-fashioned witch burn. At the end of the day, boys still hate girls, girls still hate girls, and everyone hates mom-age women with a lot of hard wind in their lungs, unless they happen to be old whores with hearts of gold. Even Oprah is looking a bit shrill, now that she’s thrown her huge hat into the Ring of Power and dedicated her stupendous influence to manifesting something other than unconditional self-love.

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THEWAVEMAG.COM JANUARY 16-29, 2008

Hillary’s defeat recalls the words of Ice Cube: “They’d rather see me in the pen/ than me and Lorenzo/rollin’ in a Benzo.” Plenty of people would rather see Hillary’s heat chained next to Martha Stewart and Paris Hilton than have her ovulate in the Oval Office. Lennon was right – women are the N-word of the world. After this six-year trip down Christian-Republicanhegemony lane, if you have three holes in your body and want any serious reverence, you’d better be a bowling ball. Ironically, Hillary could actually win American female hearts and minds if she got busted in a torrid extramarital affair, preferably with John Edwards. This would endear them both to tabloid housewives to a degree incomprehensible by the ruling class. The supermarket shoppers of America would gladly forgive Hillary – even for snaking Edwards away from his sick wife – if she’d only whip out a genuinely female display of poor judgment based on something as real and irrational as human love. But she’s not that kind of animal, and they know it, and that’s why they don’t like her. Staying with Bill, after all, was politically prudent, and even women whose greatest intellectual accomplishments to date involve deals to use food stamps to buy menthol cigarettes understand that this represents a rather scurvy compromise in terms of quantifiable human feeling. Americans are so brain damaged by bad Hollywood narratives, they would rather gamble everything on the gut-intuitive scent of a pretty dream (Obama) than re-invest in an older, wiser, proven disappointment (Hillary). As a country, we are still haplessly immature and emotionally retarded by the Power of Dumb Mythology (i.e., the gratifyingly infantile World of Disney, as opposed to the hardcore and sometimes depressing Joseph Campbell). Our crazy-dreamer-style

political decision-making is based on a totally optimistic disregard for actual politics, the learning process, and logic in general. We’ve been absolutely clobbered over the last six years, but we’re still voting from instinct instead of intellect. Americans would rather play Texas Holdem than learn to calculate probabilities… but the interesting, and encouraging, thing about Americans is that they will eventually learn to calculate probabilities by playing Texas Holdem. It’s our great talent, and our only hope for competing with the stunningly selfabnegating, industrious groupthink of the Chinese: we still have the accidental genius that seems to happen when spoiled Americans overindulge themselves. Elvis. Madonna. Low-rider bicycles. Richard Pryor. Miles Davis. Gay fabulousness. Grand Theft Auto. These are our proudest exports: bursts of louche creative expression that have always been slightly too controversial, sexy, and intoxicating for our politicians to get too close to. Obama isn’t as developed on the issues as Hillary, but nobody cares: he’s the new TV toy consumers crave. The presidency, ultimately, will probably go to the candidate wearing the biggest codpiece, again. It still might be Hillary, even if the junk in her trunk is alarmingly foreign to commanders in chief, and Americans squirm like tweens when she tells them what to do. The next president, whomever it is, will inherit a horrible job. The lifelong enmity of a lot of guys named Muhammad. Light sweet crude at $100 a barrel. A Justice Department that will doubtlessly continue to investigate itself in connection to ongoing investigations of itself. The really interesting battle will be for the vice presidency, now that it is the most terrifying public office in the known universe, existing in that liminal space between executive and federal, man and übermensch, grace and damnation. But there is hope. Americans are geniuses when it comes to effing around. All it’s going to take is one guy who comes up with a car that runs on crack, and our whole economy will boom all over again. Dramatic reversals, fiends. It’s the one thing about life that Hollywood ever got right. TW


COLUMN: THE DREGUL ATOR

THEWAVEMAG.COM JANUARY 16-29, 2008

9


SPOTLIGHT: NOTEWORTHY NEWS

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SPOTLIGHT NOTEWORTHY

NEWS

Bee-ware The disappearance of pollinators could be a real buzz kill. n the late 20th century, it started becoming clear that pollinators – bees, moths, butterflies, and other such winged critters that move pollen from the male anthers of flowers to the female stigmas – were disappearing from ecosystems around the world. Experts don’t yet know why the pollinator herd is thinning, but some of the prime suspects are pesticide misuse, parasites, disease, loss of habitat, and pollution by the increasing use of outdoor artificial light.

I

This discovery has some pretty dire environmental, as well as sociological, implications. The fact that bees are a potential indicator species of environmental decay has led scientists to study this phenomenon

with great interest. It is also generally accepted that approximately one third of human nutrition is the direct result of pollination by bees. Biologist and photographer Carll Goodpasture displays 34 color photos of pollinators and the flowers they help fertilize in Vanishing Pollinators, an upcoming exhibition at San Jose’s Rosicrucian Egyptian Museum and Planetarium. Along with the symbiotic relationship between plants and insects, the exhibit explores the role that humans play in the pollination cycle. If you think this is strictly an issue for the birds and bees, consider this: If the pollinators go, so goes coffee, chocolate, and all kinds of other things that help keep us humans happy.

SPOT L IGH T

Vanishing Pollinators opens Jan. 27 at the Rosicrucian Egyptian Museum, 1342 Naglee Ave., San Jose (408) 9473636. For more information, see www. egyptianmuseum.org or www.goodpasture.ritardando.net.

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SPOT L IGH T

THEWAVEMAG.COM JANUARY 16-29, 2008

11


SPOTLIGHT NOTEWORTHY

NEWS

Idol Chatter

have a hit. So usually on radio, when we first hear songs we like, we have no idea what these people look like.

KFRC’s Dave Sholin on this year’s American Idol.

T

he writers strike has shut down just about every major show on television – but not American Idol, whose season premiere aired Jan. 15. Though its ratings were down last year, Idol continues to impact the music industry, launching the careers of Grammy winners Kelly Clarkson and Carrie Underwood, Oscar winner Jennifer Hudson and top-selling rocker Chris Daughtry, while changing the way new artists are discovered.

SPOT L IGH T

As Idol gears up for its seventh season, we asked music insider and KFRC 106.9 morning show host Dave “Your Duke” Sholin for his thoughts on the annual competition. A former Top 40 music editor for The Gavin Report, the radio and record industry bible, Sholin knows what it takes for an Idol contestant to break out in today’s music market.

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THEWAVEMAG.COM JANUARY 16-29, 2008

The Wave: How closely do you follow American Idol? Dave Sholin: I do watch it. I have a daughter who’s 17. She loves the show, watches it religiously, though for some reason, she wasn’t into it as much last season as the season before. She didn’t think the contestants last season were all that exciting – which I think was pretty interesting, because she’s a key demo. TW: Was it because last year’s favorites were considered older? DS: That’s possible, though the personalities you had [in ’06], with Taylor Hicks and Chris Daughtry, I think they had more talent. And that’s what this really comes down to: personality and talent, together.... It’s interesting. For acts to break out on radio for the first time, they’re not usually going to have a video, because it’s too expensive – that happens after they

With this show, the first thing you do is you’re looking at them, and that changes everything. Even if you have a great voice, if you don’t have that something special, that look or that spark, that can set you back a little bit. You’ve got to have that in today’s music business. Just look at who’s out there. Maroon 5, for example. Great band, great-looking guys, and they have a lead singer that women love. TW: Has American Idol been good for the music industry? DS: I think so, because it gets people engaged with music. It gets them excited about music and seeing new artists and hearing new songs. And I don’t think it’s any big surprise that Clive Davis [the record mogul who launched the careers of Whitney Houston and Alicia Keys, among others], jumped on the bandwagon before anybody else signed a deal. He’s one of the brightest people in the music business, and he had a feeling this would be a great vehicle. He’s sold a lot of CDs and made many careers since. TW American Idol airs Tuesdays and Wednesdays on Fox at 8pm. www.americanidol.com.


SPOTLIGHT: NOTEWORTHY NEWS

SPOT L IGH T

THEWAVEMAG.COM JANUARY 16-29, 2008

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» FEATURE

HitList

» FEATURE

37

COMPILED BY JO ABBIE

Belkin RockStar www.belkin.com Designed specifically to offer music lovers a new way to share and mix tunes with friends, Belkin International’s RockStar is a unique hub that allows users to link an array of MP3 players and headphones. The nifty, star-shaped device features five ports to attach headphone or MP3 player jacks, one hardwired connection for your MP3 player, and includes a cable to attach to another player – allowing you to not only tune in to your pals’ playlists, but mix songs from the different players together for your very own mashups. Available in the US March 2008. $20

Eva Schildt Umbrella Stand

HIT L IST

www.sfmoma.com The weather outside is frightful, so why not make the design indoors delightful? This whimsical umbrella stand from Swedish designer Eva Schildt was inspired by artist Yves Klein’s work using sponges. The large sea sponge at the base of the sky blue stand soaks up inevitable droplets, while the sculptural piece will be the envy of all your eccentricity-loving visitors. It’s almost enough to make you wish for rain… almost. $150

FlameReader www.flamereader.com For those neurotic multitaskers who want memos read to them while checking email, or are just tired of reading in general, there’s FlameReader, a relatively useful application from FlameSoft Technologies that reads blocks of text or documents you select. In its Powerreader mode, users can highlight text, hit the play button, and a robot inside the computer reads it aloud. Choose from several voices in six languages – or just go with “Microsoft Mikes’” soothing robotic Speak’n’Spell voice. It’s hard not to get hooked on having your email read to you in the voice of a woman from the English countryside. Standard version $39.50, Enterprise version $89.95 14

THEWAVEMAG.COM JANUARY 16-29, 2008

Velvet Idole Laptop Cases www.velvetidole.com We see a lot of nifty gadget storing devices these days, but these leather computer cases all the way from Switzerland really stood out of the pack. Swiss design firm Velvet Idole’s cases, specifically designed to house Apple laptops, are made from luxurious leather and feature stunning graphics. We like the baroque gold flowers on black calfskin of the Fortuny design, and the edgy, textbook-doodle-style graphics of the black on white Pinguins case (see above). For the traditionalists, there are also plain leather or nubuck cases with simple gold embossing. Cases are available (exclusively from the firm’s website) for a range of Apple laptops, including different sized MacBooks, MacBook Pros, PowerBooks and iBooks. From $96

Wave Hanger www.designhousestockholm.com Obviously, this wiggly little coat hook caught our attention here at The Wave Magazine with its name. But even without its splendid moniker, the Wave Hanger is a useful design object. Use it to keep your hallway and furnishings clutter free – keeping coats, jackets and scarves in order during the winter months – and to hang bags, baseball caps or even keys day in, day out. It also works in bathrooms for easy-access storage of items such as robes. With strategic lighting, the hanger’s wavy shapes can also produce intriguing shadow effects. Available from Design House Stockholm’s online store in black and white. Pack of two $35 TW


HIT LIST: EDITORS’ PICKS

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Testing hours: 9AM–9PM Mon-Fri / 9AM–6PM Sat-Sun The Church of Scientology Stevens Creek of San Jose 1865 Lundy Ave. San Jose, CA 95131 (408) 383-9400 stevenscreek@scientology.net © 2007 CSSNC. All Rights Reserved.

HIT L IST

THEWAVEMAG.COM JANUARY 16-29, 2008

15


INTERVIEW

30 Rock Strikes a Chord

The No. 1 reason TV audiences want the writers to go back to work. BY FRED TOPEL

SHOW: 30 Rock CREATED BY: Tina Fey STARRING: Tina Fey, Alec Baldwin, Tracy Morgan, Jane Krakowski, and Jack McBrayer NETWORK: NBC ina Fey has hit comedy pay dirt. 30 Rock was without a doubt the breakthrough sitcom of 2007, gaining over 6 million viewers in Nielson’s November 2007 ratings, while slicing itself a sizeable chunk of TV’s cult comedy pie. The behind-the-scenes comedy, inspired by Fey’s years as a writer and performer on Saturday Night Live, stars Fey as Liz Lemon, head writer of the fictional The

T 16

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Girlie Show, Alec Baldwin as crazy network exec Jack Donaghy, Tracy Morgan as kooky star Tracy Jordan, Jack McBrayer as doe-eyed Kenneth Parcell, and Jane Krakowski as insecure actress Jenna Maroney. We persuaded the cast to take time away from their busy schedule of not shooting any new shows (due, of course, to the ongoing writers strike, of which Fey is an active supporter), to chat about 30 Rock’s success.

Tina Fey

The Wave: Why haven’t you had Jack Donaghy leave any angry voice mails? Does Alec Baldwin have a sense of humor about that?

Tina Fey: I think he does, but I think maybe if he hosts SNL, maybe that’s a more appropriate place for that. TW: Do you ever want to write a love scene for you and Alec? TF: I don’t think so. I think Alec has said before, “We should have a pact that none of the characters on the show can sleep with each other,” because I do think then if it’s characters who are in that core family, then you get stuck in this Sam-and-Diane kind of thing. Also, in our writers room we describe that relationship as striving for either Mary Richards/Lou Grant or Princess Leia/Han Solo. TW: Except Leia and Solo did hook up. How much of Liz Lemon is based on you? TF: It’s sort of based on me and all of the lady writers that worked at SNL when I first started there. The biggest difference is that my character is not married, and also, apparently her jugs are bigger. TW: How is that? TF: I think they just put me in a bigger padded bra.


INTERVIEW That’s how we get that whopping 2.4 rating. TW: How do you feel about that? TF: I’m fine with it. Clearly I’m complicit. TW: How have you avoided a sophomore slump? TF: I think our biggest thing is we have to write as many episodes as we can before I start shooting, because once I leave the writers room, I can never get back in there. That’s probably it, just to stay ahead of the writing, because single-camera shooting is so intense.

Alec Baldwin

TW: As a big movie guy, were you hoping you wouldn’t have to come back and do another season? Alec Baldwin: No, I think everybody is very grateful to come back and do it again, and hopefully do it after that. I mean, if you get lucky and this thing runs and run and runs, it’s a great opportunity. We are incredibly lucky, because on this show, obviously, a part of it is shooting in New York. There are not a lot of halfhour comedies in New York right now, if any. They used to do Spin City here and they had Sex and the City. That was considered a single-camera comedy, I guess, although there were a lot of dramatic overtones. So we’re pretty much it in terms of half-hour sitcoms, and for those people that want to come and play and shoot for a week, some amazing people came into the show as guest stars. TW: Did you ever think you’d be doing a comedy series? AB: You know, when you do these things, what’s important is who’s doing the asking. So it was Lorne Michaels, who’s an old, old friend of mine. I’ve done SNL many times. His company and Marci Klein, his associate there, they asked me to do the show and Tina was the writer. I knew Tina was funny, I knew she was very funny. So I did the pilot. What I didn’t count on was how challenging this would be, because I think in the beginning we all wanted it to be funny, myself included. We kind of tried to make it pop, and tell the jokes and hit the jokes and everything. Then as the season went on, I think the show got better because we tried to make it more real. We still make it a little nutty, but I think everybody really tries to make it funny, and yet make it more honest. TW: Jack’s pretty zany sometimes. AB: Everybody is a little nuts, but we try to keep it in a certain range. Sometimes we go beyond that range. Speaking for myself, sometimes I do go too far, but we think it works best when we try to keep it as real as we can. What has really been great for me is just how great the writers are, and how funny the material is. It’s almost actor-proof in that way, that if you just get out there and do it, it’s very funny. One of my favorite things in the show is my artwork, and my office pictures of me with other famous people. We make a nice couple, me and Kim Jong-Il.

TW: What’s the ratio of real photos and Photoshopped ones? AB: They were all dummied. We have me with Jay [Leno], me with some Saudi sheiks. It’s all me with that whole Carlyle Group crowd that I hang out with, my character [that is].

Tracy Morgan

TW: Tracy Jordan isn’t really just Tracy Morgan, is he? Tracy Morgan: Tina knows my voice. She takes everything I do and say and she adds it to the script. That’s what I bring to it. Working with Rob Carlock and John Riggi and all of those writers, I’ve learned to be a part of some great writing. TW: How did coming from Saturday Night Live, which 30 Rock is based on, define you as an actor? TM: I think it made me crazier. I was hanging around Will Farrell, Colin Quinn and all those guys. As an actor, Saturday Night Live was like theatre, so it refines you in that theatrical way about cameras, how to open up, about blocking, and these things. As far as my sense of humor, I’m still f**king raw, dog! TW: You had lots of characters on SNL. Now you’re primarily Tracy Jordan. Do you worry about getting typecast? TM: I understand the role I have in a series. I’ve always wanted to make a distinction in everything that I did. I mean, when you look at Al Pacino, when he did Scarface he’s a Cuban. When you looked at Carlito’s Way he was Puerto Rican, but from the east side of Harlem, and you see that. I’ve always watched that. I don’t want my character in a movie to be the same as Tracy Jordan. So I have to find out what I have to do to make that distinction. That’s where knowing your craft comes in. TW: What does Tracy Jordan have that nobody else you play will? TM: Tracy Jordan is loveable, he’s likeable, he’s an international movie star. You don’t get to that level not being loveable and likeable.

Jack McBrayer

TW: How do you treat the real NBC pages? Jack McBrayer: I was worried that they were going to despise me for pretty much mocking what they do, but they have been so cool to me. I’ve always been very respectful to the pages. I used to actually work with them when I was working on Late Night with Conan O’Brien. It is a thankless job, but everybody there does it with a smile. So I have utmost respect for the real pages. TW: Kenneth is the butt of Tracy Jordan’s jokes, but behind the scenes, can you throw it back to Tracy Morgan? JM: Actually, I can dish it as well as take it, but with Tracy, he’s like a declawed kitten. [He says] crazy and funny and stuff, but he does not have a mean bone in his body. So it’s just been really a joy just goofing off with him offstage.

TW: Have you ever had a boss like Jack Donaghy? JM: I guess everybody has had crazy co-workers or bosses. Mine probably existed more in the restaurant world than in show business, but mainly because I’ve really just started [working in the industry]. TW: How much are you like Kenneth? JM: Well, I’m a people pleaser and I like doing a good job, and I look smashing in a navy blazer. But, for the most part, I don’t think I’m quite as naïve as Kenneth. Although I do fall for things – I’m a little bit gullible – but not dangerously so like Kenneth.

Jane Krakowski

TW: You’re an actress on a TV show playing an actress on a TV show. How weird is that? Jane Krakowski: I get a bit more nervous when we do the sketches that are within the show – the show within the show – because I feel like there’s this pressure because that’s all they ever show, 30 seconds or less of it. We have to show what that show is. For me, it tends to be musical moments. I kind of love that, because whatever The Girlie Show is, it’s an out-there kind of program. But I also think the pressure is a little bit off me because Jenna, from day one, got sort of downgraded. She was the star of The Girlie Show and got downgraded for Tracy’s character to come in. So I think it lets her off the hook a little bit. The mocking and making fun of all of our characters on the show is great fun for me. TW: What about when it’s not part of The Girlie Show, like the Mystic Pizza musical? JK: That one in particular I found hilarious, because the show really rides that fine line of the people that are involved and the real world of NBC and our fictional world. I kind of love that blurry line. Because I do a lot of musicals, and they are making a lot of musicals of movies from that time period, I thought it was just spot on. TW: Are you anything like Jenna? JK: What’s fun for me with Jenna, I get to really celebrate and bring out full throttle all of the actressy qualities that I definitely have, and many other actresses that I’ve known and worked with have. It’s kind of fun, instead of trying to hide all of those neurotic bits. TW: So your past co-stars see themselves in Jenna? JK: It’s not so specific. It’s definitely bits of many people I’ve worked with, and the things that they come up with, and all the dark secrets I have inside. TW: Will we ever see more of The Rural Juror? JK: When Tina told me about that story line, I think she and some of the other writers just, like, came up with it, and it made them laugh, but none of them could say it. Then a whole episode was born out of it. Now there are websites about it, about this fictional movie that was never made. There’s a line of T-shirts. It’s really, really funny. The clever mind of Tina Fey. TW

THEWAVEMAG.COM JANUARY 16-29, 2008

17


The Box Strikes Back. BY FRED TOPEL

ou may have heard about this writers strike thing and thought

Y

“Shows are written by writers, so if they stop writing that means no more shows, right?” Not so. The networks planned ahead,

saved some new episodes of their hits, and backlogged some new series to debut just in the event of some such artistic crisis. Here’s our guide to what you can see on TV this winter.

18

THEWAVEMAG.COM JANUARY 16-29, 2008


ABC

PREDICTION: Regardless of quality, everyone will tune in for a Lost fix, then complain about not getting any answers.

Cashmere Mafia

TALENT: Jim Belushi, Courtney Thorne-Smith, Kimberly WilliamsPaisley KNOWN ENEMIES: None. Absolutely none. PREDICTION: ABC will renew this show, just because it can.

NEW SHOWS

CASHMERE MAFIA NOW SHOWING WEDNESDAYS AT 10PM GENRE: Mini Chick Flick ONE SENTENCE SUMMARY: Four career women support each other as men can’t handle their power. TALENT: Lucy Liu, Frances O’Connor, Bonnie Somerville KNOWN ENEMIES: Lipstick Jungle, Sex and the City PREDICTION: If men are intimidated by powerful women, they’ve lost half the audience. Think about it.

TALENT: Johnny Lee Miller, Victor Garber, Natasha Henstridge KNOWN ENEMIES: Boston Legal, Shark PREDICTION: Denny Crane and Sebastian Stark will eat this guy alive.

THE BACHELOR MONDAYS AT 10PM, STARTING MAR. 17 GENRE: Obligatory Dating Show ONE SENTENCE SUMMARY: A new dude will audition new marriage prospects/amateur attention getters. TALENT: Chris Harrison KNOWN ENEMIES: Flavor of Love, I Love New York PREDICTION: The bachelor will really find true love and get married. Seriously, for real this time.

OPRAH’S BIG GIVE DANCE WAR: BRUNO VS. CARRIE ANN NOW SHOWING MONDAYS AT 8PM GENRE: Reality Spin-off ONE SENTENCE SUMMARY: Dancing with the Stars judges face off to see who can create the best dance team. TALENT: Bruno Tonioli, Carrie Ann Inaba, Drew Lachey KNOWN ENEMIES: Old-school Dancing with the Stars, So You Think You Can Dance PREDICTION: Carrie Ann Inaba will totally serve Bruno Tonioli, or vice versa, whatever.

ELI STONE THURSDAYS AT 10PM, STARTING JAN. 31 GENRE: Legal Fantasy ONE SENTENCE SUMMARY: A high-powered lawyer sees fantastic visions that make him take on pro bono work to help the little guy.

SUNDAYS AT 9PM, STARTING MAR. 2 GENRE: Reality Charity ONE SENTENCE SUMMARY: Oprah Winfrey gives teams money to see who can give it away to the most worthy causes. TALENT: Oprah Winfrey, Andre Agassi, Stefi Graf, et al. KNOWN ENEMIES: Extreme Makeover: Home Edition, Brewster’s Millions PREDICTION: Oprah will get an even bigger tax write-off than when she gave away all those cars.

RETURNING SHOWS

ACCORDING TO JIM NOW SHOWING TUESDAYS AT 9PM GENRE: Family Sitcom ONE SENTENCE SUMMARY: The one show in TV history that simply cannot be killed.

GREY’S ANATOMY NOW SHOWING THURSDAYS AT 9PM GENRE: Medical Soap Opera ONE SENTENCE SUMMARY: The interns have finally become residents, so now they’re in charge of the drama instead of victims to it. TALENT: Ellen Pompeo, Katherine Heigl, Patrick Dempsey KNOWN ENEMIES: General Hospital, homophobia PREDICTION: They may have new promos, but it’ll be the same old drama at Seattle Grace.

NOW SHOWING WEDNESDAYS AT 9PM GENRE: Parenting Substitute Reality ONE SENTENCE SUMMARY: There is no shortage of bratty kids in real life, so there are all new episodes of this British-style disciplinarian. TALENT: Supernanny Jo Frost KNOWN ENEMIES: Nanny 911, real parents PREDICTION: If it slumps in the ratings, they will resort to good old-fashioned spankings.

JUST FOR LAUGHS NOW SHOWING TUESDAYS AT 8PM AND 8:30PM GENRE: Hidden Camera ONE SENTENCE SUMMARY: Technically, pranks aren’t scripted, so they can get away with new episodes of this show. TALENT: Rick Miller KNOWN ENEMIES: Candid Camera, Jackass PREDICTION: This family hour program will show less naked scrotum than its more adultoriented competition.

DANCING WITH THE STARS MONDAYS AT 8:30PM, RESULTS SHOW TUESDAYS AT 9PM, STARTING MAR. 17 GENRE: Celebrity Dance Off! ONE SENTENCE SUMMARY: A new crop of celebrities compete for the greatest honor next to the Academy Award. TALENT: Tom Bergeron, Len Goodman, Carrie Ann Inaba, Bruno Tonioli KNOWN ENEMIES: The Celebrity Apprentice, Dance War PREDICTION: Nothing will top last fall’s backstage drama (Marie Osmond fainting, etc.), but people will still watch.

SUPERNANNY

UGLY BETTY NOW SHOWING THURSDAYS AT 8PM GENRE: Telenovela en Ingles ONE SENTENCE SUMMARY: Betty overcomes humiliation at the hands of her peers to make the world a better place. TALENT: America Ferrera, Vanessa Williams, Eric Mabius KNOWN ENEMIES: The Devil Wears Prada, Project Runway PREDICTION: First half of the season was uneven, but the Betty/ Henry/Gio triangle shows promise.

WIFE SWAP LOST THURSDAYS AT 9PM, STARTING JAN. 31 GENRE: Mind Game Island Mystery ONE SENTENCE SUMMARY: With only eight written scripts, Lost will begin exploring how to get off the island, then leave the audience hanging with no resolution, so it’s business as usual. TALENT: Matthew Fox, Evangeline Lily, Josh Holloway and The Others KNOWN ENEMIES: Itself, attention spans

NOW SHOWING WEDNESDAYS AT 8PM GENRE: Reality Platonic Adultery ONE SENTENCE SUMMARY: They don’t need scripts because when families swap wives, the show writes itself! TALENT: Wives, husbands, children KNOWN ENEMIES: Trading Spouses: Meet Your New Mommy, that Chappelle’s Show sketch that did this first. PREDICTION: Sooner or later, sexual harassment charges will shut this show down.

THEWAVEMAG.COM JANUARY 16-29, 2008

19


CBS

Welcome To The Captain

Jericho

PREDICTION: Jericho actually has a shot at picking up new viewers, but the story has to be much more exciting than last year.

48 Hours Mystery

NEW SHOWS

THE POWER OF 10

RETURNING SHOWS

NOW SHOWING WEDNESDAYS AT 8PM GENRE: Social Game Show ONE SENTENCE SUMMARY: Contestants guess what percentage of people fit shocking statistics, and the host makes fun of the world. TALENT: Drew Carey KNOWN ENEMIES: Family Feud, 1 Vs. 100 PREDICTION: This show may pick up 10 percent more viewers with nothing else to watch.

WELCOME TO THE CAPTAIN MONDAYS AT 8:30PM, STARTING JAN. 28 GENRE: Ensemble Comedy ONE SENTENCE SUMMARY: Seven diverse characters’ lives intertwine in the El Capitan apartment building. TALENT: Chris Klein, Jeffrey Tambor, Raquel Welch KNOWN ENEMIES: Friends, Seinfeld, Melrose Place PREDICTION: This ensemble cast is a more fascinating combination than any of the VH1 “Celebreality” shows.

COMMANCHE MOON WEEK OF JAN. 13 GENRE: Western Prequel Miniseries ONE SENTENCE SUMMARY: The prequel to Lonesome Dove has young Gus McCrae and Woodrow F. Call join up with Rangers pursuing outlaws, and loving the ladies. TALENT: Karl Urban, Steve Zahn, Val Kilmer KNOWN ENEMIES: TNT Westerns, Magnificent Seven: The Series PREDICTION: McCrae will turn to the Sith and Call will betray him. 20

48 HOURS MYSTERY

BIG BROTHER TUESDAYS AT 9PM, WEDNESDAYS AND SUNDAYS AT 8PM, STARTING FEB. 12 GENRE: Adult Real World ONE SENTENCE SUMMARY: For the first time ever, CBS locks strangers in a house… during WINTER! TALENT: Julie Chen KNOWN ENEMIES: Big Brother Summer, Big Brother Fall PREDICTION: Because it’s winter in LA, we’ll still see lots of bikinis.

THEWAVEMAG.COM JANUARY 16-29, 2008

NOW SHOWING TUESDAYS AT 10PM GENRE: Real Mystery ONE SENTENCE SUMMARY: The news team investigates true life stories. TALENT: Harold Dow, Richard Schlesinger, Erin Moriarty KNOWN ENEMIES: 20/20, Primetime Live PREDICTION: Someone will investigate why this show is still on.

JERICHO TUESDAYS AT 10PM, STARTING FEB. 12 GENRE: Apocalyptic Drama ONE SENTENCE SUMMARY: Fans rescued this end-of-the-world story from cancellation and now it’s one of the only dramas airing new episodes. TALENT: Skeet Ulrich, Ashley Scott, Pamela Reed KNOWN ENEMIES: I Am Legend, Mad Max

THE NEW ADVENTURES OF OLD CHRISTINE MONDAYS AT 9:30PM, STARTING JAN. 28 GENRE: Sitcom ONE SENTENCE SUMMARY: The adorably frazzled Christine still can’t balance work, kids and her love life. TALENT: Julia Louis-Dreyfus, Clark Gregg, Hamish Linklater KNOWN ENEMIES: Desperate Housewives, Cashmere Jungle (or whichever show is which) PREDICTION: An Emmy-winning series with new episodes? February sweeps will be good to Ms. Dreyfus.

SURVIVOR THURSDAYS AT 8PM, STARTING FEB. 7 GENRE: Contrived Reality ONE SENTENCE SUMMARY: A new batch of campers form alliances to outlast bug-eating competitors for the 16th time. TALENT: Jeff Probst KNOWN ENEMIES: Fear Factor, The Amazing Race PREDICTION: The show will survive for the 16th time.


FOX

TALENT: Emily Deschanel, David Boreanaz, Michaela Conlin KNOWN ENEMIES: Seven, Saw PREDICTION: People who don’t think the other crime shows are gory enough can tune in for their gruesome fix.

DON’T FORGET THE LYRICS!

AMERICAN IDOL Family Guy

NEW SHOWS

Thirtysomething PREDICTION: If this show’s a hit, expect all those quirky dramedies playing in arthouse cinemas to become quirky TV shows.

THE MOMENT OF TRUTH PREMIERES FEB. 25 AT 8PM, THEN WEDNESDAYS AT 9PM GENRE: Incriminating Trivia ONE SENTENCE SUMMARY: Contestants answer personal questions under a lie detector test. TALENT: Mark L. Walberg KNOWN ENEMIES: The Newlywed Game, The Power of 10 PREDICTION: See if Mark L. Walberg can get Mark Wahlberg to go under the polygraph, then you’ve got a show.

NEW AMSTERDAM MONDAYS AT 9PM, STARTING MAR. 10 GENRE: Superhero Cop ONE SENTENCE SUMMARY: A New York City cop has been around since it was New Amsterdam, because he’s immortal. TALENT: Nikolaj Coster-Waldau, Alexie Gilmore, Marina Re KNOWN ENEMIES: Heroes, NYPD Blue PREDICTION: Good luck finding Americans who know that New Amsterdam was in this country, or who can pronounce the actors’ names.

THE RETURN OF JEZEBEL JAMES PREMIERES MAR. 12, THEN FRIDAYS AT 9:30PM GENRE: Indie Movie on TV ONE SENTENCE SUMMARY: A high-powered author finds out she cannot have kids, so asks her free spirit sister to be the surrogate mother. TALENT: Parker Posey, Lauren Ambrose, Dianne Wiest KNOWN ENEMIES: Six Feet Under,

NOW SHOWING TUESDAYS AND WEDNESDAYS AT 8PM GENRE: Musical Audition ONE SENTENCE SUMMARY: William Hung impersonators haven’t learned their lessons, so another crop of hopefuls goes before the judges. TALENT: Simon Cowell, Paula Abdul, Randy Jackson, Ryan Seacrest KNOWN ENEMIES: Kelly Clarkson, Taylor Hicks PREDICTION: Phone companies will reap the revenues as Americans vote each week.

TERMINATOR: THE SARAH CONNOR CHRONICLES NOW SHOWING MONDAYS AT 9PM GENRE: Apology for Terminator 3 ONE SENTENCE SUMMARY: Sarah and John Connor are still on the run from future robots and trying to stop the next incarnation of Skynet. TALENT: Lena Headey, Thomas Dekker, Summer Glau KNOWN ENEMIES: Highlander: The Series, Ferris Bueller PREDICTION: Governor Arnold will be hooked to find out if there’s still a role for him in Terminator 4.

RETURNING SHOWS

AMERICAN DAD NOW SHOWING SUNDAYS AT 9:30PM GENRE: Leftist Satire ONE SENTENCE SUMMARY: Ultraviolent CIA operative Stan Smith spreads freedom by force in this subtle dig on the current administration. TALENT: Voices of Seth MacFarlane, Wendy Schaal, Rachael MacFarlane KNOWN ENEMIES: Family Guy, The Colbert Report PREDICTION: Sooner or later, even George W. Bush will realize what they’re doing and shut these guys down.

THURSDAYS AT 9PM, STARTING FEB. 28 GENRE: Musical Game Show ONE SENTENCE SUMMARY: Contestants have to sing karaoke without the benefit of the words. TALENT: Wayne Brady KNOWN ENEMIES: The Singing Bee, Name That Tune PREDICTION: This will get confused with American Idol and one of the contestants will end up with a record deal.

KING OF THE HILL NOW SHOWING SUNDAYS AT 8:30PM GENRE: Redneck Cartoon ONE SENTENCE SUMMARY: The Hill family still sells propane and lives a down home lifestyle. TALENT: Voices of Mike Judge, Kathy Najimy, Pamela Adlon KNOWN ENEMIES: Blue Collar Comedy Tour, Beavis and Butt-Head PREDICTION: In the words of Boomhaur: “Dip dang old cartoon, wawa episodes blkhdgoiuhag.”

FAMILY GUY NOW SHOWING SUNDAYS AT 9PM GENRE: Adult Animation ONE SENTENCE SUMMARY: The Griffin family has more adventures while comparing situations to obscure ’80s icons. TALENT: Seth Macfarlane, Alex Borstein, Seth Green KNOWN ENEMIES: South Park, It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia PREDICTION: These new episodes will be funnier than that time Pee Wee Herman got caught in a porno theater.

PRISON BREAK NOW SHOWING MONDAYS AT 8PM GENRE: Action Serial ONE SENTENCE SUMMARY: With Michael Scofield pulled from general population, how will the convicts live up to the show’s title and escape? TALENT: Wentworth Miller, Dominic Purcell, Robert Wisdom KNOWN ENEMIES: 24, MacGyver PREDICTION: Three years in, Prison Break still keeps up the cliffhangers.

ARE YOU SMARTER THAN A FIFTH GRADER? FEB. 21 AT 9PM, THEN THURSDAYS AT 8PM, STARTING MARCH 13 GENRE: Education Reform ONE SENTENCE SUMMARY: Grown-ups try to answer the same questions as kids to see who actually knows more. TALENT: Jeff Foxworthy KNOWN ENEMIES: Hollywood Squares, Double Dare PREDICTION: Some children will be left behind.

BONES FRIDAYS AT 8PM, FEB. 22, 29 AND MAR. 7 GENRE: Forensic Mystery ONE SENTENCE SUMMARY: The team of crime solvers looks at more dead bodies.

HOUSE FRIDAYS AT 9PM, STARTING FEB. 22 GENRE: Medical Drama ONE SENTENCE SUMMARY: With a new team of interns, Dr. Gregory House will continue to solve medical mysteries while berating patients and colleagues. TALENT: Hugh Laurie, Kal Penn, Omar Epps KNOWN ENEMIES: Grey’s Anatomy, ER PREDICTION: Vital signs will remain healthy until House can’t solve the mystery of the missing scripts.

THE SIMPSONS NOW SHOWING SUNDAYS AT 9PM GENRE: Neverending Satire ONE SENTENCE SUMMARY: Since it takes a year to animate an episode, there’s still a full season of Simpsons hilarity. TALENT: Voices of Dan Castellaneta, Julie Kavner, Nancy Cartwright KNOWN ENEMIES: The Simpsons Movie, The Flintstones PREDICTION: Current topics, like election hoopla, keep the show relevant after 19 years.

THEWAVEMAG.COM JANUARY 16-29, 2008

21


NBC American Gladiators

KNOWN ENEMIES: Celebrity Fit Club, Are You Hot? PREDICTION: Either they’ll both get hot together, or one will suddenly realize they can do better.

LAS VEGAS NOW SHOWING FRIDAYS AT 10PM GENRE: Casino Drama ONE SENTENCE SUMMARY: The security team of the Montecito casino keeps its wild patrons happy while dealing with their own relationships. TALENT: Tom Selleck, Josh Duhamel, Molly Sims KNOWN ENEMIES: CSI: Las Vegas, Celebrity Poker Showdown PREDICTION: What happens on Vegas doesn’t actually happen in Vegas.

LAW & ORDER DEAL OR NO DEAL

NEW SHOWS

AMERICAN GLADIATORS NOW SHOWING MONDAYS AT 8PM GENRE: Steroid Infomercial ONE SENTENCE SUMMARY: Contestants compete in physical challenges against the musclebound title characters with no last names. TALENT: Hulk Hogan, Leila Ali, Titan, Crush, Wolf, etc. KNOWN ENEMIES: WWE Smackdown, the original American Gladiators PREDICTION: With network credentials and a historic TV legacy, American Gladiators will capture the sophisticated crowd who can’t bring themselves to watch full-on wrestling.

THE BABY BORROWERS MONDAYS AT 8PM, STARTING FEB. 18 GENRE: Birth Control/British Import ONE SENTENCE SUMMARY: Teenage couples are given infants to take care of, then toddlers and even old folks. TALENT: TBD KNOWN ENEMIES: Wife Swap, child labor laws PREDICTION: This will ruin prom for sure.

THE CELEBRITY APPRENTICE NOW SHOWING THURSDAYS AT 9PM 22

GENRE: B-list Career Resurrection ONE SENTENCE SUMMARY: The Donald gives famous people a chance to compete for a job they don’t need, but they’re working for charity, so it’s all good. TALENT: Donald Trump, Gene Simmons, Marilu Henner KNOWN ENEMIES: I’m a Celebrity, Get Me Out of Here, The Surreal Life PREDICTION: Getting fired from this show will end each contestant’s career. Only one can still call themselves an actual celebrity when it’s over.

LIPSTICK JUNGLE THURSDAYS AT 10PM, STARTING FEB. 7 GENRE: Girl Power ONE SENTENCE SUMMARY: Three career women support each other as men can’t handle their power. Wait a minute… TALENT: Lindsay Price, Kim Raver, Brooke Shields KNOWN ENEMIES: Cashmere Mafia, Chicago Hope PREDICTION: There’s room for two of the same show on TV.

RETURNING SHOWS

THE BIGGEST LOSER NOW SHOWING TUESDAYS AT 8PM GENRE: Reality Fitness ONE SENTENCE SUMMARY: Couples work together to try to lose more weight than enemy couples. TALENT: Alison Sweeney, Bob Harper, Jillian Michaels

THEWAVEMAG.COM JANUARY 16-29, 2008

NOW SHOWING MONDAYS AT 9PM, WEDNESDAYS AT 8PM GENRE: Negotiation Game ONE SENTENCE SUMMARY: Contestants pick suitcases containing unknown dollar amounts from models – and the writers say Hollywood needs them. TALENT: Howie Mandel KNOWN ENEMIES: The Price Is Right, Classic Concentration PREDICTION: There will be a deal or there won’t be a deal.

NOW SHOWING WEDNESDAYS AT 10PM GENRE: Old Standby ONE SENTENCE SUMMARY: Bringing new characters into both the law and the order halves of the program will be about the only thing that changes in this formulaic series. TALENT: Sam Waterston, Jeremy Sisto, Linus Roache KNOWN ENEMIES: CSI, reruns of Law & Order PREDICTION: Since they held all their finished scripts until now, even stories ripped from six-month-old headlines will seem fresh.

ER NOW SHOWING THURSDAYS AT 10PM GENRE: Medical Drama ONE SENTENCE SUMMARY: For some reason, people keep getting sick, so the ER stays open. TALENT: John Stamos, Maura Tierney, Mekhi Phifer KNOWN ENEMIES: George Clooney, Noah Wyle PREDICTION: The prognosis is strong for this super-long-running TV staple.

FRIDAY NIGHT LIGHTS NOW SHOWING FRIDAYS AT 9PM GENRE: Sports Metaphor ONE SENTENCE SUMMARY: The town of Dillon, Texas is obsessed with football, but it’s not really about football – it’s just that all the characters do nothing but football. TALENT: Kyle Chandler, Connie Britton, Aimee Teegarden KNOWN ENEMIES: Real football, tripods (because it’s all shot handheld, get it?) PREDICTION: Some day, the audience is going to finally figure out that football is just a metaphor for football.

TALENT: Mariska Hargitay, Christopher Meloni, Ice-T KNOWN ENEMIES: CSI: Miami, CSI: New York PREDICTION: The detectives will meet their match when they fail to make one of the victims feel special.

MEDIUM NOW SHOWING MONDAYS AT 10PM GENRE: Crime Solving From the Grave ONE SENTENCE SUMMARY: Psychic Allison Dubois begins helping a private investigator solve cases with her ghostly visions. TALENT: Patricia Arquette, Angelica Huston, Jake Webber KNOWN ENEMIES: Ghost Whisperer, Crossing Over with John Edward PREDICTION: We predict the psychic will make some awesome predictions.

1 VS. 100 NOW SHOWING FRIDAYS AT 8PM GENRE: Elimination Game ONE SENTENCE SUMMARY: A contestant must eliminate 100 other trivia buffs by knowing more inane facts than they do. TALENT: Bob Saget KNOWN ENEMIES: The Power of 10, Full House PREDICTION: Without writers providing family friendly banter, Saget will revert to his vulgar stand-up comedy.

LAW & ORDER: CRIMINAL INTENT NOW SHOWING WEDNESDAYS AT 9PM GENRE: Law without Order ONE SENTENCE SUMMARY: Reruns of the USA Cable episodes count as new programming for NBC. TALENT: Vincent D’Onofrio, Kathryn Erbe, Chris Noth KNOWN ENEMIES: Cops, The Shield PREDICTION: For viewers who hate the legal half of Law & Order, this pure cop drama will keep things simple.

LAW & ORDER: SPECIAL VICTIMS UNIT NOW SHOWING TUESDAYS AT 10PM GENRE: Another Law & Order ONE SENTENCE SUMMARY: The SVU division solves crimes of a sexual nature.

SCRUBS THURSDAYS AT 9:30PM, STARTING JAN. 24 GENRE: Live Action Cartoon ONE SENTENCE SUMMARY: Due to the writers strike, viewers may never find out how the show would have ended in a series finale, but the lack of resolution will be hilarious. TALENT: Zach Braff, John C. McGinley, Sarah Chalke KNOWN ENEMIES: Arrested Development, Freaks and Geeks PREDICTION: Being left hanging will only make this limited fan base hope for a big screen movie, a la Serenity.


THE CW CW NOW NOW SHOWING SUNDAYS AT 7PM GENRE: Teen News ONE SENTENCE SUMMARY: Bringing you all the important news those stodgy old political shows leave out, like which new iPod skins you can buy, or how to lose weight for Flag Day. TALENT: Tanika Ray, J. Boogie KNOWN ENEMIES: The Situation Room, high school AV club PREDICTION: If fans of The CW are watching news, that’s big news.

NEW SHOWS

CROWNED NOW SHOWING, WEDNESDAYS AT 8PM GENRE: Beauty Pageant Reality ONE SENTENCE SUMMARY: Mother/daughter teams compete to be the ultimate beauty queens. TALENT: Carson Kressley, Shanna Moakler, Cynthia Garrett KNOWN ENEMIES: My Super Sweet 16, America’s Next Top Model PREDICTION: The losers of this show should give Donald Trump a call. He’ll give them a second chance.

RETURNING SHOWS

ALIENS IN AMERICA SUNDAYS AT 8:30PM, STARTING MAR. 2 GENRE: Funny Stereotypes ONE SENTENCE SUMMARY: Foreign exchange student Raja continues to notice that small-town Americans make assumptions about his ethnicity. TALENT: Dan Byrd, Adhir Kalyan, Scott Patterson KNOWN ENEMIES: Tolerance, US foreign policy PREDICTION: In a very special episode, Raja will learn to just be himself no matter what anybody else thinks.

AMERICA’S NEXT TOP MODEL

EVERYBODY HATES CHRIS

WEDNESDAYS AT 8PM, STARTING FEB. 20 GENRE: Beauty Pageant ONE SENTENCE SUMMARY: Paulina Porizkova takes on judging duties, while Tyra Banks wrangles the sassy, wannabe models. TALENT: Tyra Banks, Paulina Porizkova, J. Alexander KNOWN ENEMIES: Project Runway, The Biggest Loser PREDICTION: In its tenth season, the next top model will join the previous nine on the list of celebrities no one’s ever heard of.

SUNDAYS AT 8PM, STARTING MAR. 2 GENRE: Standup Sitcom ONE SENTENCE SUMMARY: The Chris Rock sitcom has been shooting back-to-back seasons with no hiatus to beat the natural aging process, so they’ve already got new episodes in the bank. TALENT: Terry Crews, Tichina Arnold, Tyler James Williams KNOWN ENEMIES: Growth Spurts, Hormones PREDICTION: Everybody will start to love Chris, but then they’ll discover that they still hate him.

BEAUTY AND THE GEEK TUESDAYS AT 8PM, STARTING MAR. 11 GENRE: Sympathy Dating ONE SENTENCE SUMMARY: A frumpy, awkward bachelor has his pick of smoking hot dating prospects, as long as he can win them over with his mind. TALENT: Ashton Kutcher (producer) KNOWN ENEMIES: The Bachelor, ‘80s movies PREDICTION: Geeks already have all the brains and money. Give ’em their own TV show and they’re unstoppable.

GIRLFRIENDS MONDAYS AT 9PM, FEB. 4 AND FEB. 11 GENRE: Estrogen Sitcom ONE SENTENCE SUMMARY: With only two more episodes this year, tune in to find out who gets married, who has a baby and who focuses on her career. TALENT: Tracee Ellis Ross, Golden Brooks, Persia White KNOWN ENEMIES: Waiting to Exhale, Beauty Shop PREDICTION: First, it will make you laugh, then it will make you cry, then the commercials will make you want to buy stuff.

LIFE IS WILD

SMALLVILLE

NOW SHOWING SUNDAYS AT 8PM GENRE: Travelogue Reality ONE SENTENCE SUMMARY: A family moves to Africa to escape their old drama and finds all new drama there. TALENT: D.W. Moffett, Mary Matilyn Mouser, Stephanie Niznik KNOWN ENEMIES: Wild Thornberrys, Zoo Family PREDICTION: The CW will have to take a second mortgage on their studio to continue paying for this show’s African location shoot.

THURSDAYS AT 8PM, STARTING JAN. 31 GENRE: Comic Book ONE SENTENCE SUMMARY: Teenage Clark Kent exhibits superhuman powers and faces other crossover characters like Supergirl and Aquaman. TALENT: Tom Welling, Kristin Kreuk, Michael Rosenbaum KNOWN ENEMIES: Heroes, Superman Returns PREDICTION: With only one new episode this winter, geeks will have to resort to reading.

ONE TREE HILL

SUPERNATURAL

NOW SHOWING TUESDAYS AT 8PM GENRE: Generational Drama ONE SENTENCE SUMMARY: This generation’s Melrose Place (The O.C. was its 90210) jumps ahead from high school graduation past college to follow its characters as grown-ups. TALENT: Chad Michael Murray, Sophia Bush, Hilarie Burton KNOWN ENEMIES: Dawson’s Creek, Saved By the Bell: The College Years PREDICTION: If moving forward doesn’t work, they could always hire new younger actors and do the middle school years.

THURSDAYS AT 9PM, STARTING JAN. 31 GENRE: Ghostbusters ONE SENTENCE SUMMARY: Two brothers fight ghosts and other paranormal entities to solve their father’s disappearance and their mother’s death. TALENT: Jared Padalecki, Jensen Ackles, Jim Beaver KNOWN ENEMIES: Ghost Whisperer, The X Files PREDICTION: Also only has one new episode for the winter, so the Ghost of Reruns Past will haunt The CW.

PUSSYCAT DOLLS PRESENTS: GIRLICIOUS

WWE SMACKDOWN

MONDAYS AT 9PM, STARTING FEB. 18 GENRE: Bootylicious Reality ONE SENTENCE SUMMARY: The sexy dance troupe lets cameras document their harsh competition for the coveted spot of the next Doll. TALENT: Robin Antin, Ron Fair, Lil’ Kim KNOWN ENEMIES: American Idol, Making the Band PREDICTION: Don’t cha’ wish your girlfriend was pushin’ off her buttons when they stickwitu?

NOW SHOWING FRIDAYS AT 8PM GENRE: Wrasslin’ ONE SENTENCE SUMMARY: Wrestling is fake, but it’s not scripted, so the big brutes will be pummeling away throughout the strike. TALENT: Mr. Kennedy, The Greak Khali, Edge KNOWN ENEMIES: American Gladiators, Masterpiece Theater PREDICTION: It will look like the good guy is about to get pinned, but then the crowd’s energy will revive him to overtake the bad guy after all. TW

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» FEATURE

Sports&Adventure (L-R): Raffi Nalvarian, Adrian Cavlan

Nalvarian says it’s the pregame music that presents the biggest programming challenge. Players are trying to get charged up for the intensity of the game, while fans are just strolling into the stadium. “[Players] are into hard hip-hop and stuff that’s not popular yet,” he explains. “You have to play what those guys want, but then during the game, you have to look at your audience.” Sometimes, the two come together. When San Francisco tight end Vernon Davis causes fans to roar, the DJs play a song in tribute to his hairstyle. “We have part of a hip-hop track where it says ‘shake them dreds,’” says Nalvarian. “We play that only for him. And you can kind of see him grooving to it.”

Stadium Rock There’s more that goes into the music you hear at the game than meets the ear. SPOR T S & A DVEN T URE

BY STEVE GOLDSTEIN

T

he playing of music at sporting events isn’t a new phenomenon. According to historians, the ancient Greeks were the first to marry musical performance and sporting achievement. But if Socrates were around today he might still reach for the hemlock if he were subjected to Gary Glitter’s Rock and Roll Part 2 and the Stones’ Start Me Up during every single game at HP Pavilion or Monster Park. Raffi Nalvarian and Adrian Cavlan of Campbellbased Sound in Motion came to the realization that music in stadiums and arenas was dull and predictable, and decided to do something about it. As fans, they knew the tunes needed to enhance what they – and other game attendees – were feeling. Nalvarian and Cavlan have agreements with the San Francisco 49ers and San Jose Stealth to be the teams’ in-game DJs. The duo premixes the music and loads it onto their electronic playlists, but doesn’t 24

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decide which jams are used until game time. (Sound in Motion also produces the music for the San Jose Sharks, but the team has its own in-house employee who decides when it gets played.) Nalvarian says it’s vital for the DJ to be emotionally involved with what’s happening on the field, and to sense the mood of the crowd. “You have to watch the stands to get a feel for it,” Nalvarian says. “Sometimes you have to check yourself. ‘Am I the only one getting really charged up here?’” It’s also vital for a game DJ to understand that he’s not picking songs for his buddies, or for himself. “At a Niners game, 65,000 to 70,000 people walk in on a Sunday,” Nalvarian explains. “You’ve got people who are 16 and people who are 75. And they’re [from] every ethnic group under the sun. You have to play music that goes across all genres, and not worry about being the hippest person in the stadium.” A longtime Bay Area DJ, Cavlan’s first job is to remix the music and pick out the snippets of songs that are going to have the greatest impact. For a 49ers game, the pieces are divided according to their suitability for offense or defense, and grouped in categories such as “Upbeat” and “Big Play.” The aim is to get fans from all demographics pumped up and out of their seats. “We took ‘Hot in Here’ by Nelly, and [Cavlan] reconstructed it into a family-friendly song,” says Nalvarian. “We also do a clean remix of Justin Timberlake’s “SexyBack.” We’ve taken popular tunes and made them instrumentals.”

In some arenas, music is played not just to enhance the game, but as a constant soundtrack. As a fan himself, Nalvarian doesn’t think that’s what game -day audiences want. “If people wanted to hear music for three or four hours, they’d be at home listening to music for three or four hours.” So, Major League Lacrosse team the San Jose Stealth is going to be bucking a trend. As the in-game DJ for the team, Nalvarian came to an agreement with HP Pavilion, the Stealth’s home arena, to ease up a little on the music. Again, it’s about being tuned in to what’s going on in the stands. “We want fans to be able to feel the game and feel the excitement,” Nalvarian explains. “If the music’s too loud, you can’t hear the ball hitting the glass or a big, crushing hit. People love that, and feed off each other.” The use of music in US sporting arenas began to evolve in the 1970s, when organists playing “Charge” or “Take Me Out to the Ballgame” gave way to the sounds of rock ’n’ roll. Nalvarian says he and Cavlan hope to start a new trend by giving fans songs that are exciting, listenable and compatible with the game action, without being predictable. “You want people to walk out of the stadium, thinking ‘I hadn’t heard that song in a long time.’ Let’s get them fired up about hearing stuff that’s not typical stadium music.” So, the next time your local arena operator subjects you to Blur’s “Song Two” or anything by the Alan Parsons Project, put down your lighter and start penning a (constructive) complaint letter. Sports and music have complemented each other for centuries. Let’s try to keep it that way. TW Sound in Motion DJs & Video, Campbell, Santa Cruz, Monterey (408) 354-4050 www.simdjs.com


SPORTS&ADVENTURE: FEATURE

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» FEATURE

Health&Beauty

» FEATURE » SPA PROFILES

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Raising the Bar New, organic bar soaps may give liquid a run for its money. HE A LT H & BE AU T Y

BY JO ABBIE

I

t may not be as popular as its trendy new cousin – liquid body wash – but old-fashioned bar soap could be on the verge of a renaissance, as naturalloving, green-leaning consumers begin to favor pure, organic and cruelty-free bar soaps over their plasticclad liquid counterparts.

“The definition of cold-processed soap making is that during the process the temperatures are never forcibly going up above 145 degrees Fahrenheit. We actually keep those temperatures even lower,” he says. “We’re rarely going up above 120. What that means is that we’re able to keep the integrity of the high-quality raw materials that we use.” Pangea theorizes that as a result, its bar soap formulas – from calming to rejuvenating

These beautiful bars are a far cry from the ubiquitous cakes of Dial that sat in many people’s soap dishes growing up. Packed with natural ingredients rather than chemicals, and made using vegetable instead of animal fats, this new breed of soap is actually made using an ancient method. Pangea Organics, which produces around 600,000 bars of soap annually, was founded on bar soaps, when company CEO Joshua Onysko began making homemade bars using the old-fashioned cold-processed method. Pangea’s director of operations (and former head soap maker), Laurence Spiewak, explains how this method produces more natural, healthful soaps.

02

– are more SOAP STORAGE effective. “The ingreDue to their natural formulas, these artisan dients have soaps tend to break down more rapidly than more nutrigeneric bars. To prolong the life of your soap, tive qualistore it in a soap dish that allows water to ties still drain away. left intact, so it’s just healthier for your skin to begin with,” says Spiewak. According to Jo Ann Issenman, category manager of health and beauty at Pharmaca Integrative Pharmacy, the bar soap industry has seen tremendous growth in recent years, up 14 percent in 2005. And its fans are becoming increasingly discriminating. “Consumers who care about their health are beginning to ask questions about the soaps they use. They want healthy alternatives for themselves and for the environment.” At Pharmaca, the buyers look for soaps with no sodium laureth sulfates, no artificial colors or fragrances, and no animal testing. In addition to appealing to the company’s health conscious shoppers, these soaps also have a therapeutic influence on the stores’ environment. “New customers to Pharmaca always say that the store smells so good,” says Issenman. 28

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HEALTH&BEAUT Y: FEATURE

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“That is a direct reference to our signature presentation table of European Soaps – triple-milled soaps fragranced with essential oils.” Another company renowned for its stunning saponification displays is LUSH, the British-based company that now has over 510 shops across the globe. “Colorful soaps piled high in storefront windows is synonymous with LUSH,” says spokesperson Brandi Halls. LUSH also prioritizes a natural method and therapeutic ingredients in its vibrant range of bar soaps. “The formulations steer well clear of the animal fat often used to produce soaps, and instead a mix of coconut and palm kernel oil is used to create soap flakes, which is totally animal friendly and a more gentle product.

HE A LT H & BE AU T Y

“LUSH has moved away from commercial mass production to produce soaps by hand using a molten ‘pouring’ method,” Halls continues. The company utilizes an array of essential oils and nature’s fruits to create its artisan soaps, which smell great, have therapeutic effects, and are so pretty, Halls explains, they “are often chosen for their decorative properties, with customers considering both the color and scent of their custom-cut soaps.” Making soaps on a much smaller scale are Kasey and Kelly Evick, the sisters behind young line Biggs and Featherbelle. Their handmade, natural soaps are made using botanicals, vitamins, vegetable and nut oils, and various herbs and spices. They are also free of synthetic fragrances, 28

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WHERE TO BUY Briggs & Featherbelle, Available at www.biggsandfeather.com LUSH, Available at the LUSH shop, Valley Fair Mall, 2855 Stevens Creek Blvd., Santa Clara (408) 247-5874 www.lush.com Pangea Organics, Available at Pharmaca, Whole Foods, Wild Oats and World Market stores, and many websites www.pangeaorganics.com Pharmaca Integrative Pharmacy, 54 N. Santa Cruz Ave., Los Gatos (408) 395-1231 www.pharmaca.com 01 Pangea Organics bar soaps, $8 each 02 LUSH custom cut bar soaps, from $4.95 each 03 Biggs & Featherbelle Fixins Bar, $4.49 each

dyes and additives, and are packaged in recyclable paper. Adding to their appeal are the quirky names its makers have given the various bars, including Bar-tender, Bar-lesque and Granola Bar. Clearly, the bars from these manufacturers are a completely different breed than generic supermarket soaps. With their natural formulas they don’t have the drying effects often associated with bar soap, and in fact can help improve and soften the skin. They are free of controversial ingredients such as sodium laureth sulfates and parabens, and are impressively earth-friendly. (Pangea Organics bar soap’s post-consumer packaging is so eco, you can even plant it in the garden.) These relatively small manufacturers may not be able to compete with giant multinational beauty companies, that seem to launch a new variety of liquid shower gel every week, but in our book (and our bathrooms), they are making a difference. TW


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Express Wellness Engage your Passion for Health

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ver dream of making your passion your profession? In just a few months you can become certified to practice Integrative Medicine through Five Branches night and weekend or daytime programs. Stable, lucrative career choices range from hospitals to hotels, the possibilities are virtually endless.

E ■

OPEN HOUSE January 20th 1:00–4:00pm

Massage & Bodywork ■ Herbal Medicine ■ Acupuncture ■ Nutrition ■ Energetics & Exercise

Five BraNches university Graduate School of Traditional Chinese Medicine 3031 Tisch Way, San Jose ■ (408) 260-0208 (877) 838-6789 ■ www.fivebranches.edu

HE A LT H & BE AU T Y

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HEALTH&BEAUT Y: SPA PROFILES

HEALTH&BEAUTY » SPA PROFILES

SPA CAMPBELL INNOVATORS SALON & SPA $$ 1606 W. Campbell Ave. (408) 374-7435 www.innovators-salon.com

Services: Massages (Swedish, deep tissue, reflexology), facials (European, deep cleansing, express, fruit enzyme peel, glycolic acid peel, anti-aging vitamin repair), microdermabrasion, back facials, sea salt scrub, hand, nail and feet care, hair salon, waxing, tanning, makeup application and lessons. Special Features: Innovators provides in-salon or on-location styling, makeup application, manicures, pedicures, massages, and facials for special occasions such as a bridal party, prom or romantic date. STAR SALON & SPA $ 2260 S. Bascom Ave. (408) 377-2151 www.starsalonspa.com

M ASSAGE • N UTRITION • H ERBS • ENERGETICS • ACUPUNCTURE

The

Answer HE A LT H & BE AU T Y

for Aging

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ose weight, relieve symptoms of menopause, beautify your skin, ease back/neck/joint pain, brighten your eyes/hair, conquer cravings and addictions…this year your resolutions can become reality. Chinese medicine has been effectively, safely and naturally improving health and well-being for centuries. Don’t wait another year to make your resolutions a reality.

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Menopause & Infertility ft for You Our New Year Gi Treatment

ltation ly& FREE ConNesu w Patients On n Patients FF Retur 50% O Exp 3/15/08 trictions apply. Some res

BERKELEY CLAREMONT RESORT AND SPA $$$$

41 Tunnel Rd. (510) 843-3000 www.claremontresort.com

Services: Massages (therapeutic, warm stone, shiatsu, deep tissue, lomi-lomi, aromatherapy, sports, neck and shoulder, reflexology, couples, prenatal), herbal bath treatment, aqua latte milk bath and moisture treatment, body wraps and scrubs (essential oils, moor mud, herbal, Zen trilogy, coconut body polish, rosemary citron Dead Sea salt scrub, chamomile, raw sugar and ginger), men’s specialties, facials (perfect, ultimate exfoliating, Carita signature, back, collagen, hydrafacial), waxing, salon, and bridal services. Special Features: The Tibetan Sound Massage combines the standard full body massage with vibrating sound waves from sacred Tibetan bowls placed on your body.

FREMONT CLARITY SPA $$

lifting, aromatherapy, refresher), microdermabrasion, peel (sensi, ultra peel I/II, PCA), body treatments (back, lymphatic drainage cellulite treatment, mind and body rejuvenation, French soft and silk salt glow, perfect legs), waxing, and tinting. Special Features: Extra means better at Clarity Spa with $20-andbelow add-ons that will enhance your spa experience. Get an instant super lift for $20 or the special ampoule containing vitamins A, E, C, collagen, DNA and oxygen for $12. EUROPEAN DAY SPA $

HALF MOON BAY PRIMROSE COUNTRY DAY SPA $

630 Purissima St. (650) 726-1244 www.primrosespa.com

Services: Massages (hot stone, Swedish, deep tissue, reflexology, integrated, aromatherapy, prenatal, spa hand and foot), facials (European deep pore cleansing, Dermalift nonsurgical facial lift, glycolic acid, acne, back, men’s), body treatments (salt glow body polishing with hydrotherapy bath, cellulite, seaweed body wrap, mud body wrap, slimming/detoxification, buff and bronze w/hypnotherapy), makeup, eye treatment, manicures, and pedicures. Special Features: Spa packages are the way to go if you can’t decide how best to pamper yourself. From career women and moms-to-be to teenagers and couples, European Day Spa has you covered.

Services: Massages (Swedish, deep tissue, four hands, aromatherapy, warm stone, couples, prenatal), facials (pumpkin, resurfacing, rosacea, Jan Marini C-ESTA, teen, enzyme peel, hyper pigment treatment, acne), body wraps (herbal, mud, seaweed), scrubs, waxing, tinting, hand and feet care, and electrolysis. Special Features: Facials are Primrose’s specialty, with options like Epicurean enzyme and oxygen treatment, salicylic acid, microcurrent eye treatment and frozen live cell therapy.

LAVENDER BEAUTY SPA $$$

47854 Warm Springs Blvd. (510) 353-1311 www.lavenderbeautyspa.com

Services: Facials (classic, Repechage four layer, Hungarian organic, hyper hydrating, teen, acne, silkpeel, anti-wrinkle firming and lifting defense, lightening, puffy-eye treatment, oxygen treatment, LumiLift, Lumifacial), body treatments (mud wrap, body contour wrap, lemon sugar body polish, spa paraffin, cellulite treatment), waxing, and eyelash perming. Special Features: Rehydrate with oxygen and choose one of Lavender’s facial treatments like the ECHO2Plus Oxygen Treatment System, which uses pure medical grade oxygen packed with 87 different vitamins, minerals, enzymes and amino acids. VISUAL IMAGE SALON $

5200 Mowry Ave., Ste. C (510) 792-5922 www.visualimagesalon.com

Services: Facials (signature, traditional European, acne, glycolic acid peel, microdermabrasion, back), eye, lip and neck treatments, eyebrow and lash tinting, waxing, hair salon, and makeup. Special Features: Become a model and get your haircut or color for free. Models are used for training future hair stylists, and qualified educators are on hand to supervise.

GILROY BEAUTY LOUNGE $$$

40000 Fremont Blvd., Ste. D (510) 656-2100 www.clarityspa.com

1275 First St. (408) 846-5172

Putting Your Family First Since 1984

Services: Facials (purifying, skin resurfacing, dendrology, tri-enzyme, hydrating, vitamin C, gentlemen’s, skin balancing, lymphatic cleansing, super-

Services: Massages (reflexology, shiatsu, prenatal, sports, Swedish, aromatherapy, warm stone), tanning, facials (anti-aging, deep pore, acne, glycolic, enzyme peel,

THEWAVEMAG.COM JANUARY 16-29, 2008

microdermabrasion), permanent makeup, hair treatments, and waxing. Special Features: Take a dip in their hydrotherapy tub and take home something special from their boutique, which sells designer jewelry, lingerie and health products.

40643 Grimmer Blvd. (510) 770-1237 www.europeandayspa.com

Five BraNches Medical Centers 3031 Tisch Way, San Jose ■ (408) 260-8868 200 Seventh Avenue, Santa Cruz ■ (831) 476-8211 30

Services: Facials (refresher, classic European, ultimate European), massages (back and neck, full body, deep tissue, foot reflexology), tanning, hair removal, nail care and full salon services. Special Features: If a regular facial just doesn’t cut it for you, go for the Ultimate at Star Salon & Spa. It’s 80 minutes of pure facial bliss with an AHA chemical peel that smoothes fine lines, lightens hyper pigmentation and promotes cell growth, followed by hydrating, toning, a facial, and a neck and shoulder massage, and ending with a nourishing masque. Also, check out the massage packages, which are a great bargain at $240 for six half-hour sessions.

PROFILES

RITZ-CARLTON HALF MOON BAY SPA $$$$

One Miramontes Point Rd. (650) 712-7040 www. ritzcarlton.com/en/Properties/ HalfMoonBay/Spa/Default.htm

Services: Massages and touch therapies (Half Moon Bay signature, couples, sports, reflexology, prenatal, Thai, invigorating scalp, shiatsu, healing stone, deep tissue), facials (calming lavender, the Half Moon Bay, men’s protection, renovateur, deep cleansing, Carita intense hydrating renovateur, Carita extreme softness renovateur, Carita purifying balance renovateur, Carita lift firming renovateur, Prada radiance visage), body treatments (pumpkin body peel, Prada replenishing body facial, fresh lavender wrap, aromatherapy body polish), nailcare, hair salon, hair removal, makeup, fitness center, and wellness services. Special Features: This ritzy spa’s fitness center, steam room, sauna, whirlpool, and coed Roman mineral bath are complimentary for guests purchasing a treatment.

LOS ALTOS CIANA DAY SPA AND SALON $$

111 Main St. (Salon); 107 Main St. (Spa), (650) 941-1285 www.cianasalonspa.com

Services: Facials (essential, ultimate, elemental nature, outer peace acne relief, men’s, LaStone, purifying facial for acneprone skin, 55-minute express, microdermabrasion), waxing, hand and feet therapy, hair salon, and makeup. Special Features: If you want the pampering to continue at home, throw a microdermabrasion party, where a certified esthetician from Ciana visits you.

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SPA

THE MOMMY SPA $$

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YELKA DAY SPA $$$

2049 Grant Rd. (650) 9691117 www.yelkadayspa.com

Services: Facial therapies (Treatment 21TM, pumpkin pie refining peel, hydraplenishing oxygen, MoistureLock collagen, ultimate decadence, mini decadence, regenerating caviar pearl, frosty mint spirulina, intense glycol-firming, microdermabrasion, Lumi, acne), massages (aromatherapy, deep tissue, aqua-thermal trio, personalized plus, mom-to-be, Treatment 21TM deep relaxation), body treatments (Adriatic lavender salt polish, chocolate raspberry buff, cellulite reduction, slimming detox, hand brightening and retexturizing, reflexology, aromatic scalp treatment), waxing, tinting, and spa packages. Special Features: Caviar used to be something you ate, but now it’s something you put on your face – well, almost. The Regenerating Caviar Pearl Facial takes the finest of caviar extracts, which compel skin cells to metabolize, leaving your face radiant.

LOS GATOS CLOUD 9 SKIN & BODY CARE $$

501 N. Santa Cruz Ave., Ste. 2 (408) 354-0710 www.cloud9x.com

Services: Massages (deep tissue, trigger-point, acupressure, Thai, reflexology, Swedish gentle, hot stone, Reiki, lymphatic drainage, prenatal), facials (Cloud 9), body treatments (herbal cellulite wrap with foot reflexology, fabulous bodacial with salt scrub, herbal mask, aroma steam, moisture treatment), hair removal, nail care, naturopathic medicine, chemical and metabolic rebalancing, and chiropractic services. Special Features: Feel weightless in a flotation tank filled with 800 lbs. of Epsom Salt – proven to relieve stress and muscle tension. GABRIELLE SALON $$

540 N. Santa Cruz Ave., Ste. D (408) 395-7260

HE A LT H & BE AU T Y

Services: Massages (aromatherapy, Swedish, deep tissue, hot stone, prenatal, sports, chair, focus), facials (Aromessance, men’s, teen, sea, sensitive skin, deep pore cleansing, antioxidant, glycol peel, back), body treatments (salt glow, moor mud, coffee scrub, airbrush tanning), waxing, nail care, hair salon, and makeup. Special Features: Coffee lovers should try the Café Latte manicure, in which the hands are soaked in coffee beans, and steamed milk before the rest of the treatment. LUSCIOUS SKIN $

401 Alberto Way, Ste. D (408) 370-9121 www.lusciousskin.com

Services: Massages (therapeutic Esalen, Reiki technique), facials (fountain of youth petite, tropical, deep cleansing European, firming, deep pore cleanse, soothing “C,” paprika with AHA, Lisa’s seasonal special), brow/lash tinting, and hair removal. Special Features: Try the Paprika Facial with AHA, the signature treatment which “regenerates, rejuvenates, and detoxifies” the skin. 32

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PROFILES STUDIO JOULE $$

413 Monterey Ave, Ste. B (408) 395-2009 www.themommyspa.com

130A N. Santa Cruz Ave. (408) 395-3773 www.studiojoule.com

Services: Massages (specializing in pregnancy and postpartum massage, plus Swedish relaxation, deep tissue, and hot stone massage, trigger point therapy, and couples and infant massage classes). Also offers Reiki and guided meditation. Special Features: Founder Lindsay MacInnis has extensive training and experience, studying under such recognized experts as New York’s Elaine Stillerman, and San Diego’s Carol Osborne-Sheets. As a result, she has advanced certification in pregnancy massage, and over 70 hours of specific prenatal training. For new mommies, newborns to three-month-olds are welcome during postpartum therapy sessions, with time for infant care and feeding as needed.

Services: Massages (30-, 60-, 90minute; sole session foot reflexology treatment; Joule face and body duo, mother-to-be, eucalyptus escape), facials (classic Joule, petite studio, studio teen, microdermabrasion, lightening, Obagi skincare system, Joule facial packages, Jan Marini signature), hair removal, lash and brow tint, and makeup. Special Features: Find out what makeup looks best on you with a complimentary consultation with Jane Iredale Mineral Cosmetics.

RENDEZVOUS SALON & DAY SPA $$

529 N. Santa Cruz Ave. (408) 354-3085

Services: Massages (warm stone, Swedish body, therapeutic, aromatherapy), facials (Rendezvous ultimate, detoxifying, anti-aging rejuvenation, acne controlling), skin resurfacing (microdermabrasion, exfoliation power peels), hair salon, nail care, hair removal, brow design, and makeup. Special Features: Rendezvous offers specialty add-on services, including detoxifying arm treatment, décolleté microdermabrasion and rejuvenation treatment, balancing back facial, hydrating hand and paraffin treatment, and after facial makeup application. Makeup applications in styles such as film, photography and television are also provided. THE SPA ~ LOS GATOS $$$

100 S. Santa Cruz Ave. (408) 354-5901 www.thespalosgatos.com

Services: Massages (Swedish, deep tissue, sports, warm stone, massage sampler, prenatal, lomilomi, Endermologie®, reflexology), facials (DNA cryo-stem, glycolic, teen, back, gentlemen’s, vitamin C and papaya enzyme), body therapy (body detox, chardonnay bliss, bath rituals, hand and foot), waxing, Vichy shower treatments, wraps, hydrotherapy treatments, and hair salon. Special Features: All treatments at this large European-style day spa include a private aromatherapy steam session, plus use of a robe and slippers. Hot teas are available while you wait in the well-appointed “library” for your appointment. Along with the typical spa favorites of various massages and facials, The Spa ~ Los Gatos shows its dedication to the complete well-being of its clients by offering such services as oncology massage, detoxing body wraps, teen skin consultations and motherhood massage.

YVETTE’S INSTITUTE DE BEAUTE $$

248 W. Main St. (408) 395-1551

Services: Massages (aromatherapy massage, aromatic sauna wrap, tension relief neck and shoulder, renewing hand treatment), facials (deep pore cleansing, Guinot hydradermie oxygenating, hydradermie plus anti-aging, ultimate hydration, calming sensitive skin, purifying teen, regulating, aromaplasty mineral, luminizing, lift defense – collagene, oxyliance revitalizing, flash beaute vitamin C, evidence antiaging firming, refreshing mini, deep cleansing back, soothing eye contour treatment), body treatments (Swiss herbal wrap, anti-cellulite body mask, toning/ firming sculptural, mother-to-be, firming neck and décolleté mask), makeup, lash and brow tint, hair removal, and nail care. Special Features: For intensive care, go for the Glycolic Acid Peel or the Beta Hydroxy Acid Peel. The Glycolic is designed to make skin healthy and glowing, and with the Beta you can choose a booster to treat a particular problem area.

MENLO PARK INSPIRATION DAY SPA $$

325 Sharon Park Dr. (650) 854-5885 www.inspirationdayspa.com

Services: Massages (signature, deep tissue, heated desert stone, neck, back and shoulders, prenatal, reflexology, shiatsu, Swedish), facials (inspiration, rose quartz, age perfecting, collagen veil mask, microdermabrasion), body treatments (Hamman, green clay mud wrap, champagne, caramel chocolate sundae, journey to serenity, bronzing), waxing, hair salon, makeup, and nail care. Special Features: The DNA CryoStemTM skin therapy system fuses the synergy of DermaNutraceutical technology with cryogenic bio-cell therapy to hydrate your skin. Integrate it into your day at the spa and take some home for later use. TW


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» FEATURE

Style&Shopping 01

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Highlighter Hues Fluorescent accessories look set to stand out this season. BY JO ABBIE

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f you lived through the rave-era heyday of the early ’90s, you probably have a fluorescent item of clothing or two stashed away in your mental inventory of questionable style moments. Day-Glo-colored T-shirts and accessories were practically endemic to the house music scene. Earlier still, there were the fluorescent socks, slogan-emblazoned tees and fingerless gloves popularized by giddy ’80s pop videos.

ST Y L E & SHOPPING

Those who lived through those neon-dappled-style times may cringe slightly when they see what’s about to hit stores. In the spring/summer 2008 shows in New York, Milan and Paris, the catwalks were awash with neon. We’re not talking head-to-toe Day-Glo, but punctuations of the acid-bright colors – seen in bags, belts, shoes and jewelry. A few designers, including Philip Lim, were even brave enough to use the shades in 04 garments such as skirts (see far right), but the look was always offset with neutral pairings. The trend was truly established when stylesetting designer Marc Jacobs sent models down his runways clutching purses in fluorescent shades of yellow, pink and green. As his spring line starts arriving in stores, expect to see neon pink, green and acid yellow versions of his popular Stam purse. “To have a sense of color is a joyous thing,” gushed New York Times fashion scribe Suzy Menkes in her December 2007 feature “Shock of the Hue.” “So off with the black! On with the neon-bright shades!” Many of the industry’s most 06 lauded designers, including John Galliano and Karl Lagerfeld, added splashes of neon color to their latest collections: Galliano featured shockingly bright lime greens and oranges in his spring 2008 menswear collection, and Lagerfeld turned out the famed Fendi bag in neon hues. A slew of other labels used highlighter tones: Alexander McQueen, Miss Sixty, Missoni, Emilio Pucci, Moschino, Alexander Wang, Nanette Lepore… the list goes on. 34

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Naturally, the trend is already trickling down from the designer catwalks to the off-the-rack stores – the savvy buyers at early trend-adopting stores such as Urban Outfitters already have neon toned belts, T-shirts and sunglasses in stores. And while fluorescent tones have always been “au fait” in the sporting goods arena, Reebok has truly embraced the color scheme this season with its aptly named Freestyle high07 top shoe in Reign-Bow.

From high fashion to workout gear, these “fluo” (as said in Paris) hues look set to abound this spring. There’s really only two options: take Menkes’ advice and embrace the “neon-bright shades,” or invest in a very dark pair of shades to block out (and then wait out) the retina-scorching trend. TW

PRODUCT INFO 01 02 03 04 05 06 07

Miss Sixty, spring 2008, New York Marc Jacobs, spring 2008, New York Phillip Lim, spring 2008, New York Reebok Freestyle Reign-Bow high-top sneaker Reebok Men’s Pump running shoe Urban Outfitters neon lights sunglasses Urban Outfitters neon web belt


ST YLE&SHOPPING: FEATURE

ST Y L E & SHOPPING

THEWAVEMAG.COM JANUARY 16-29, 2008

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» FEATURE

Home&Design

» FEATURE » FURNITURE LISTINGS

Wood Works This age-old material adds warmth and depth to any home. BY JO ABBIE

F

looring, tables, desks, and bookshelves – these are the standard, large-scale items that invariably enter the mind’s eye when one thinks of wood in the context of home interiors. But such notions deprive wood of its rightful design dues. Since Charles and Ray Eames bent pieces of plywood into the curves of their now iconic molded plywood chairs back in 1946, wood has become a material that, in the hands of innovative designers, can take on many forms. A humble block of wood or sheet of plywood can be used to create everything from contemporary light fixtures to wine racks, wall clocks and a host of other lifestyle accessories. In contemporary home décor often dominated by solids and neutral tones, wood – with its natural grains and patterns – adds undeniable warmth to interiors. And with such an organic material, items crafted from wood are often truly one-of-a-kind. So whether it’s wine storage or a light source you’re looking for, next time you shop for home, forgo artificial plastic or sterile metal, and keep wood in mind for more than just your basic home furnishings. As acclaimed architect Ludwig Mies van der Rohe one observed, “We must remember that everything depends on how we use a material, not on the material itself.” TW

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HOME & DESIGN

WHERE TO BUY Design Within Reach, Santana Row, 3080 Stevens Creek Blvd., Ste. 1010, San Jose (408) 261-8875; 447 University Ave., Palo Alto (650) 328-2700 www.dwr.com Room & Board, 685 Seventh St., San Francisco (415) 252-9280 www.roomandboard.com SFMOMA Store, 151 Third St., San Francisco (888) 357-0037 www.sfmoma.com/museumstore Susan Bradley Design, www.susanbradley.co.uk Umbra+ Design Collection 2007/08, www.umbra.com

01 Creep pendant lamp, approx. $150, at www.susanbradley.co.uk 02 Curva frame $68.50, at www.umbra.com 03 Magazine stand in white oak $129, at www.roomandboard.com 04 Cava wine rack $145, at www.umbra.com 05 LO:CA LED clock $185, at SFMOMA www.sfmoma.com 08

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06 Eames molded plywood chair, from $649, at www.roomandboard.com 07 Cubix lamp $70, at SFMOMA Store www.sfmoma.com 08 Surge wall clock $126, at www.umbra.com 09 Wobble chess set $250, and Becca table $490, at SFMOMA Store www.sfmoma.com

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HOME&DESIGN: FURNITURE LISTINGS

HOME&DESIGN » FURNITURE LISTINGS

FURNITURE

CAMPBELL Grennan’s Murphy Beds, 166 Kennedy Ave. (888) 291-1306 www.grennans.com Rose Furniture, 393 E. Hamilton Ave. (408) 871-1297 www.rosefurnituredesign.com

MOUNTAIN VIEW Ethan Allen, 861 E. El Camino Real (650) 967-3059; 5285 Prospect Rd., San Jose (408) 996-9400; 925 Blossom Hill Rd., San Jose (408) 227-4900 www.ethanallen.com

PALO ALTO Crate & Barrel, 530 Stanford Shopping Center (650) 321-7800; 301 Santana Row, San Jose (408) 247-0600; www.crateandbarrel.com Design Within Reach, 447 University Ave. (650) 3285900 www.dwr.com IKEA, 1700 E. Bayshore Rd. (650) 323-4532 www.ikea.com

REDWOOD CITY Pier 1 Imports, 2501 El Camino Real (650) 364-6608; 20610 Stevens Creek Blvd., Cupertino (408) 253-4512; 5205 Prospect Rd., San Jose (408) 996-7136; 1009 Blossom Hill Rd., San Jose (408) 978-9555; 636 Blossom Hill Rd., Los Gatos (408) 358-3977 www.pier1.com Hoot Judkins Furniture, 1269 Veterans Blvd., (650) 367-8181

LISTINGS SAN JOSE All World Furniture, 981 Stockton Ave. (408) 292-6883 www.allworldfurniture.com California Stools, Bars and Dinettes, 1272 S. Bascom Ave. (408) 294-7353 www.castoolsbarsdinettes.com Casa Casa Furniture, 1355 Lincoln Ave. (408) 298-2272 Cost Plus Market, 4050 Stevens Creek Blvd., (408) 247-3333; 1084 Blossom Hill Rd. (408) 267-6666 www.costplus.com Design Within Reach, 3080 Stevens Creek Blvd., Ste. 1010, Santana Row (408) 261-8875 www.dwr.com The Futon Shop, 1080 Blossom Hill Rd. (408) 9785696; 2180 El Camino Real, Palo Alto (650) 493-2727 www.thefutonshop.com Hank Coca’s Downtown Furniture, 82 E. Santa Clara St. (408) 297-9486 Helm of Sun Valley, 1111 Saratoga Ave. (408) 996-7669 www.helmofsunvalley.com Jimyko Home Furnishings, 1919 Monterey Rd., #10 (408) 993-0918 www.jimyko.com Willow Glen Kitchen and Bath, 351 Willow St. (408) 293-2284

SANTA CLARA Cort Furniture Clearance Center, 2925 Mead Ave. (408) 727-1470 www.cort.com/furniture Pottery Barn, 2855 Stevens Creek Blvd. (408) 261-9882; 800 Stanford Shopping Center, Palo Alto (650) 321-1646 www.potterybarn.com

SUNNYVALE

HOME & DESIGN

Designer’s Furniture, 101 E. El Camino Real (408) 732-9880 TW

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HOME&DESIGN: FURNITURE LISTINGS

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HOME & DESIGN

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» FEATURE

Dining

» FEATURE » HOT SPOTS » CATERING

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Caramel apples at Trevese

Carnival of Flavors DINING

Step right up and enjoy these fanciful upscale tidbits on sticks. BY JOANNA CURRIER

C

all it comfort food’s quirky alter ego: When diners started cozying up to gourmet macaroni and cheese, pot pies, brisket and other oldtime favorites that began appearing on local menus after 2001, some chefs instead spun the wheel of nostalgia and landed, unexpectedly, on “fairground.” Colorful results – mostly crafted like bonbons on sticks, and ranging in flavor from savory to sweet – continue to amuse palates in what amounts to an increasingly popular sideshow of otherwise sophisticated ingredients. Award-winning restaurants serve delighted, well-heeled diners plates of high-brow corn dogs, luxe meat “lollipops” and even s’mores for dessert (paired with a lovely little muscat). Sentimentality once again wins over snobbishness: Add the word “lollipop” to anything, it seems, and people will, well, eat it up.

Chef Michael Mina’s menu at Arcadia has featured whimsy from the restaurant’s inception in early 2003, and his famed lobster corn dogs remain one of the restaurant’s top sellers. Chef de cuisine Daniel Patino wraps a decadent combination of lobster meat and shrimp onto sticks, fries the mixture in a delicate cornmeal batter, and pairs the results with a wholegrain mustard and crème fraiche sauce. Not your average carnival fare. Four of the addictive little suckers go for $12. Not on the menu, but a sort of “secret” Arcadia favorite for VIPs, regulars and anyone who is smart enough to ask, are chef Patino’s “frozen bonbons” ($8 for six): little scoops of house-made vanilla, sassafras and chocolate ice cream coated in exquisite chocolate, frozen, and served on extra long sticks – which, with childlike reasoning, makes them extra tasty.

Lobster corn dogs at Arcadia

Also served to those in the know, this time at Quattro Restaurant and Bar in Palo Alto, are the Four Seasons Restaurant’s playful cheesecake lollipops ($10 for four). These bite-sized squares of fluffy cheesecake – choose from raspberry, amaretto hazelnut, premium artisan chocolate and other seasonal flavors – are frozen on sticks and served with a variety of dips, including raspberry reduction, dark chocolate, and white chocolateamaretto sauce. Available only by special request a day or so ahead, the “shhhh” factor gives them extra-fun cachet. Call to make sure some are freshly prepared and in the freezer for your next visit. 42

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DINING: FEATURE


DINING: FEATURE

DINING F E AT U R E 40

Kung Pao chicken lollipops at SINO

Over at Trevese Restaurant and Lounge in Los Gatos, chef Michael Miller has developed a stellar reputation for playing with food – with lovely results. Much of his deluxe, imaginative menu appears to have been concocted with a wink and a twinkle, down to a newly minted take on the sticky caramel apple. Served as a garnish for cheese plates, Miller poaches lady apples, stuffs them with Spanish manchego cheese, coats them in caramel and honey, and serves them, of course, on a stick. Miller is currently tinkering with anther fine dining take on fairground fare – foie gras cotton candy.

DINING

Chef Robert Sapirman at Parcel 104 in Santa Clara performs daily magic with his ever-changing local, seasonal menu, but some of his exquisite offerings seem to appear straight out of the bleachers of a (very sophisticated) circus tent. When in season, he has been known to create an heirloom tomato snow cone, the shaved ice pumped with reduced and seasoned syrup of yellow taxi tomatoes. He’s also a sometime fan of cotton candy, preparing gourmet servings of it doused with unusual flavors such as Pernod, sweet balsamic or maple syrup. In an eco-friendly Asian twist, chef Chris Yeo sticks to using bones as a natural serving stick for his plump Kung Pao chicken lollipops ($10 for five) at SINO Restaurant and Lounge 42

THEWAVEMAG.COM JANUARY 16-29, 2008

on Santana Row. Drummettes are coated with a mixture of oyster sauce, soy, sugar and rice vinegar, rolled in crushed peanuts, and presented on their heads with the “sticks” poking straight up (see above). Who says a stick needs to be made of wood? At Poleng Lounge in San Francisco, innovative chef Timothy Luym’s satays ($7.50 for four) are skewered on whole lemongrass in yet another example of finger-friendly food, Asian style. Chef Yeo’s baby banana fritters ($9 for four) at his popular Straits Restaurant are equally playful, riding long wooden sticks that traverse the plate to encourage sharing across the table. Diners can have a ball nibbling on the azuki-bean-stuffed fried treats, and afterwards can enjoy a spot of jousting. See you at the fair.

TW

EATS ON STICKS Arcadia, 100 W. San Carlos St., San Jose (408) 278-4555 www.michaelmina.net Parcel 104, 2700 Mission College Blvd., Santa Clara (408) 970-6104 www.parcel104.com Straits Restaurant, 333 Santana Row, Ste. 1100, San Jose (408) 246-6320 www.straitsrestaurants.com SINO Restaurant and Lounge, 377 Santana Row, Ste. 1000, San Jose (408) 247-8880 www.sinorestaurant.com Trevese Restaurant and Lounge, 115 N. Santa Cruz Ave., Los Gatos (408) 354-5551 www.trevese.com Quattro Restaurant & Bar, 2050 University Ave., East Palo Alto (650) 566-1200 www.quattrorestaurant.com


DINING: FEATURE

DINING

THEWAVEMAG.COM JANUARY 16-29, 2008

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DINING: HOT SPOTS

DINING

» HOT SPOTS

HOT

PRICE GUIDE: $[5-15]

CAMPBELL CAPERS EAT & DRINK $$

[American] 1710 W. Campbell Ave. (408) 374-5777 www.caperseatanddrink.com

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Capers – which could mean either the delicious Mediterranean condiment or a playful escapade – seems a particularly appropriate name for this popular spot. You’ll find more than just perfect pasta and juicy steaks here. Fire-roasted marinated artichokes, flash-fried calamari with jalapeños, a killer chicken marsala, and a meatloaf entrée with a wholesome reputation are just some of the enticing menu items. Main-course salads are also popular, particularly for lunching customers – the Chinese Chicken Salad being No. 1 on the lunch charts for some time now. Capers offers a selection of more than 30 wines by the glass from the full bar.

#

TIGELLERIA RISTORANTE $$

[Contemporary Italian] 76 E. Campbell Ave. (408) 884-3808 www.tigelleria.com

Forget the scissors, don’t bother tearing out another coupon! Just dial the toll-free number listed from your cell phone and we’ll send you the coupon as a text message. Then just show your phone for great savings!

AZUCAR 888 - 377 - 9050 71 E. San Fernando St., San Jose (408) 293-1121

RECEIVE $10 OFF THE PURCHASE OF 2 DINNER ENTREES.

BELLA MIA 888 - 377 - 9053 58 S. First Street, San Jose (408) 280-1993

DINING

DINNER: RECEIVE $10 OFF THE PURCHASE OF TWO DINNER ENTREES OR $5 OFF TWO LUNCH ENTREES.

FAHRENHEIT ULTRA LOUNGE & RESTAURANT 888 - 377 - 9054 99 E. San Fernando St., San Jose (408) 998-9998

RECEIVE 10% OFF YOUR FINAL BILL FOR LUNCH OR DINNER.

HABANA CUBA RESTAURANT 888 - 377 - 9055 238 Race Street, San Jose (408) 998-2822

888 - 377 - 9061 155 W. San Fernando St., San Jose (408) 283-9400

RECEIVE 10% OFF YOUR TOTAL BILL, EXCLUDING ALCOHOL, TAX AND GRATUITY.

RECEIVE 15% OFF YOUR BILL, UP TO $10. RESTRICTIONS:

HAWGS SEAFOOD BAR

TANDOORI OVEN

888 - 377 - 9058 150 S. Second St, San Jose (408) 287-9955

RECEIVE A FREE APPETIZER WITH PURCHASE OF 2 ENTREES & 2 BEVERAGES

ONE COUPON PER TABLE EXP 9/15/07

MORTON’S THE STEAKHOUSE 888 - 377 - 9060 177 Park Ave., San Jose (408) 947-7000

RECEIVE A FREE DESSERT W/ DINNER.

ONE COUPON PER TABLE

Offers subject to change. Most national cell phone carriers supported. Standard text messaging rates apply.

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PIZZ’A CHICAGO IN SAN JOSE

THEWAVEMAG.COM JANUARY 16-29, 2008

This new eatery takes its name from the regional Italian flatbread customarily served with various cheeses, meats, vegetables and relishes. Fare here is traditional Italian with an organic twist. Think dishes such as shaved fennel and parmesan salad with pine nuts and organic Tuscan olive oil, or a cheese plate with some of the nation’s best-loved formaggios, including crescenza, taleggio, gorgonzola, pecorino Romano and, of course, parmesan – served with aged balsamic vinegar, honey, and fruit spread. Gourmands will want to try the Sweet Sweet Salami entrée – chocolate salami sprinkled with drops of balsamic vinegar, garnished with organic cherry preserves and served with a glass of dessert wine.

NOT VALID WITH ANY OTHER OFFERS.

CUPERTINO 888 - 377 - 9063 150 S. First St. #107, San Jose (408) 292-7222

LUNCH: FREE SODA WITH PURCHASE OF ANY ENTREE OR WRAP.

ARYA $$

[Global] 19930 Stevens Creek Blvd. (408) 996 9606 www.aryarestaurant.com

Visitors to Arya can enjoy a distinctive dining experience in a restaurant that exudes relaxed elegance. The menu here is a unique mix of Persian, Italian and classic American cuisines, with dishes including shish kebab, cioppino, chicken marsala and flavorful Persian soups, stews and meats. Before your meal, allow time to enjoy a glass of wine from their extensive list in the cozy, fireside lounge. HARVEST $

[American] 10630 S. De Anza Blvd. (408) 996-9700

Fans of the Flames that once stood here will no doubt flock to Harvest for their take on American breakfast favorites, such as the wine country omelet with peppers, smoked ham, tomatoes and Laura Chenel goat cheese. They should return for lunch or dinner at this casual, counter-service venue, opened by one of the Sonoma Chicken Coop founders. Expect some Coop-like dishes, but the kitchen also takes advantage of the $20,000 of pastamaking equipment, producing dishes

SPOTS

$$[15-25]

$$$[25-40]

that include silky, delicious goat cheese ravioli. With its kid-friendly offerings and wine country décor, the ambience is suitable for everything from family outings to business lunches.

HALF MOON BAY HALF MOON BAY BREWING COMPANY $

[American] 390 Capistrano Rd. (650) 728-2739 www.hmbbrewingco.com

A tasty array of eight different home-brewed beers takes center stage, but the HMB Brewing Company has definitely raised the bar for “bar food.” Steamed clams, seared ahi tuna, prawn cocktails, and the smoked fish are all top rate… and those are just the appetizers. Be sure to try the Mavericks Amber Ale – it has unseated Corona as the perfect oceanside sunset beer.

LOS GATOS 180 RESTAURANT & LOUNGE $$$

[California, Modern American] 15 1/2 N. Santa Cruz Ave. (408) 399-1804

Chef Nick Difu brings an urbanslash-Mediterranean sensibility to his restaurant – and it’s 180 degrees from the town’s usual pastoral dining offerings. A clubby interior with low lights and sofas sets a moody mod stage for a well-appointed seasonal menu that might include blackened ahi tuna or sea scallops with a macadamia nut crust. On Happy Wednesdays, receive 30 percent off all bar appetizers and drinks from 4:30-6:30. WILLOW STREET PIZZA $

[Italian, Pizza] 20 S. Santa Cruz Ave. (408) 354-5566 www.willowstreet.com

This family-oriented restaurant rotates around a social dining experience, where tables of locals devor baskets of Willow Street’s bread, made piping hot in-house daily. In addition to gourmet wood-fired pizzas like the Thin Crust Mediterranean (tomato sauce, mozzarella, roasted red peppers, kalamata olives, caramelized onions, fresh thyme, and goat cheese), the menu features sandwiches, grilled meats, and a number of savory pasta dishes. The fettuccini chicken tequila pasta is particularly popular.

MENLO PARK THE DUCK CLUB $$

[American] 100 El Camino Real (650) 330-2790 www.stanfordparkhotel.com

From duck sculptures and duck paintings to duck entrées, The Duck Club elegantly celebrates all things duck. Not feeling ducky? The pork porterhouse chop will please meat lovers, while the seashell seafood pasta in a lobster cream sauce is the stuff that pasta dreams are made of. The menu’s anchor dish is

$$$$[40+]

the Stanford Park roast duck; you’ll swear the meat actually melts on your tongue.

MILPITAS SUSHI MAMORU $$

[Japanese, Sushi] 138 S. Main St. (408) 946-5446

The bold red and black walls and chic surrounds of Sushi Mamoru set the stage for a medley of well-executed Japanese favorites – sushi, sashimi, and shabu-shabu. Count on thick, tender slices of sashimi, inventive special rolls such as the Milpitas roll and the Spicy Lovers roll, and a wide selection of tempura, udon, teriyaki, and vegetarian entrées. Ready for something different? Dunk and dine shabu-shabu style or go for something off the barbecue grill – we recommend the Mamoru Deluxe, a succulent combination of rib eye and lobster tail.

MOUNTAIN VIEW CANTANKEROUS FISH $$

[Seafood] 420 Castro St. (650) 966-8124 www.thecantankerousfish.com

A relaxed atmosphere meets a refined menu of seafood entrées in one of the Peninsula’s most popular destinations for business lunches and romantic dinners alike. Favorites include the Cantankerous Sea Bass and the crab-encrusted salmon. CASCAL $$

[Pan-Latin] 400 Castro St. (650) 940-9500 www.cascalrestaurant.com

Vibrant interior colors create a lively setting for Cascal’s huge, Latin-influenced tapas (small plates) menu. If you don’t feel like sharing, feel free to fall back on the full menu, which has a trio of ceviche dishes, plus several varieties of seafood paella. Weekdays from 3:30-6:30pm, you can enjoy your tapas with half-price mojitos, sangria or caipirinhas. TAQUERIA LA BAMBA $

[Mexican] 2058 Old Middlefield Way (650) 965-2755

Tucked away in this tiny taqueria are some of the biggest burritos this side of Texas. La Bamba’s super burrito comes with all the traditional fixings, such as meat, beans, rice, cheese, sour cream and guacamole, and is big enough to feed two hungry people. La Bamba’s menu also offers a taste of El Salvador with its pupusas, wonderfully crispy tortillas filled with pork, beans, and cheese. These delicacies are not designed to go – gobble them up in-house as they emerge piping hot from the kitchen. TIED HOUSE BREWERY $

[American] 954 Villa St. (650) 965-2739 www.tiedhouse.com

Tied House bustles with patrons as familiar with the microbrewery’s selection of homemade ale and ambers as they are with the menu of oversized burgers, deep-fried appetizers, and hearty salads. Pasta 46


DINING: HOT SPOTS

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DINING: HOT SPOTS

DINING HOT

MANTRA RESTAURANT & LOUNGE $$

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and seafood entrées offer up more refined options than the typical brew pub fare, but at the end of the day, any food you order is really just a side dish to the real main course: beer. On Sundays, kids under 12 eat for free when you buy two meals (Mountain View location only). VASO AZZURRO $$

[Italian, Mediterranean] 108 Castro St. (650) 940-1717 www.vasoazzurro.com

Rich in flavor and attentive service, Vaso Azzurro delivers punchy Italian classics with an upscale and contemporary feel. Enjoy tasty appetizers like calamari fritti (lightly fried springy squid rings served with a spicy herb sauce) or Insalata di spinaci (a spinach salad with rock shrimp, roasted bell peppers, bleu cheese, and pine nuts). Choose from a wide range of entrées with pasta, meat (veal, chicken, lamb steak) and seafood options. At less than $6, dessert’s practically compulsory.

PALO ALTO FISH MARKET RESTAURANT $$

[Seafood] 3150 El Camino Real (650) 493-9188 www.thefishmarket.com

Every Fish Market location (the first opened in 1976) houses a retail market, oyster bar, and restaurant. The menu changes daily, but no matter what day it is, there’s a dish for nearly every hankering: seafood cocktails, raw oysters and clams, baked shellfish, steamed shellfish, smoked fish, sashimi and sushi, oyster bar specialties, and a deep list of mesquite charbroiled entrées. Ask for the cheesy bread with crabmeat, and always choose the au gratin as one of your sides. Trust us. ITAPAS & WINE BAR $$

[International Small Plates] 445 Emerson St. (650) 3254400 www.itapaspaloalto.com

DINING

Executive chef and owner Hung Le, who also owns the upscale Vietnamese Three Seasons restaurants, takes the small-plate trend up a notch by giving it a global spin. At iTapas, tantalizing flavors are packed in inventive dishes such as crab spaghettini in tomato sauce, duck tacos with mango salsa, and lobster rolls with avocado and wasabi mayonnaise. The modestly priced menu pleases as much as the modern dark wood interiors, diverse wine list, and affable wait staff. L&L HAWAIIAN BARBECUE $

[Hawaiian Barbecue] 3890 El Camino Real (650) 858-2878 www.hawaiianbarbecue.com

2700 Mission College Blvd, Santa Clara 46

THEWAVEMAG.COM JANUARY 16-29, 2008

408.970.6104

parcel104.com

SPOTS

It’s no-frills dining at this famed Hawaiian plate lunch chain (you order at the counter and pick up your foam box when they call your number), but the below-$7-prices and generous portions of delicious Polynesian food more than make up for it. House favorites include the seafood combo (fried shrimp, mahi mahi with a choice of Hawaiian barbecue, chicken or short ribs), chicken katsu (fried boneless chicken covered with a special katsu sauce) and the Loco Moco (a hamburger patty topped with two eggs and drenched with gravy).

[Contemporary Indian, California] 632 Emerson St. (650) 322-3500 www.mantrapaloalto.com

The gold wallpaper, cherry wood veneers, and occasional live jazz hint that this isn’t your typical Indian restaurant. Executive chef Sachin Chopra has created a winning menu that juxtaposes the Indian and California tastes, ranging from appetizers like golden cumin cauliflower soup to entrées like mustard and roasted Kashmiri cayenne pepper-marinated sea bass filet on a bed of leeks and fresh vegetables. Equally pleasing are the elegant 78-seat dining room and Dual Happy Hour ($3 beer, $5 cocktails and half off bar food) at the sleek Daru Lounge. SHOKOLAAT $$$$

[Continental] 516 University Ave. (650) 289-0719 www.shokolaat.com

Visitors entering Shokolaat are greeted by an array of chocolates, artisan breads and pastries, including French macaroons and bittersweet chocolate cremeux. Past these sweet delights, you’ll find the fine restaurant, with food and wine menus highlighting the cuisines and wines of California and France. Try the filet of beef with seared foie gras and black truffle sauce, the gratin of escargot with bone marrow, or the lobster served with lobster ravioli. Pair dishes with wines from the restaurant’s extensive list, put together by consultant sommelier Catherine Fallis. SUNDANCE THE STEAKHOUSE $$$

[American] 1921 El Camino Real (650) 321-6798 www.sundancethesteakhouse.com

With mahogany paneling and low lighting, Sundance takes its setting as seriously as it does its steak, creating an intimate atmosphere for events with friends or co-workers alike. Start your meal with an order of sautéed sea scallops, enjoy a crisp tomato and mozzarella salad, and end with some of the best prime rib you’ve ever tasted. If you’re looking for the ideal atmosphere for your next make-or-break-business meeting, or if you just want to feel important, stop by the fireplace lounge for a dry martini. THAIPHOON RESTAURANT $

[Thai] 543 Emerson St. (650) 323-7700 www.thaiphoonrestaurant.com

Owner Tom Vongampai grew up eating delicately spiced, fresh, healthy Thai food, and his goal with Thaiphoon was to bring his childhood cuisine to life – so he hired his mother as the executive chef. Where some Thai restaurants underspice or oversweeten their dishes, Thaiphoon’s dishes reach an elegant balance. Try your dishes with brown Jasmine rice instead of white. It’s healthier, and adds a subtle nutty flavor. TRADER VIC’S $$$

[Asian Fusion, Modern American] 4269 El Camino Real (650) 849-9800 www.tradervicspaloalto.com

Have you ever gone out with friends and found it next to impossible to choose a restaurant? Next time, head for Trader Vic’s, a restaurant with a

fun, exotic atmosphere and a menu to match – from barbecued chicken pizza to macadamia-crusted mahi mahi to Sonoma chicken Calcutta curry (you read right). Legend has it that the Mai Tai was invented at the original Oakland Trader Vic’s. No visit to Trader Vic’s is complete without one of these rum masterpieces.

DOWNTOWN SAN JOSE 19 MARKET $

[Vietnamese, Asian Fusion] 19 N. Market St. (408) 280-6111 www.19market.com

Unlike the bare-bones eat-andrun feel of so many Vietnamese restaurants, 19 Market shines with Zen-inspired earth-tone interiors and an equally agreeable menu. This bar and bistro not only dishes out familiar favorites like beef noodle soup (pho) and imperial rolls, but adds a Singaporean, Chinese, and California twist to Vietnamese fare. Try the Shaking Beef, or Chilean sea bass, simmered with caramel sauce in a clay pot, and save room for their $7-a-plate desserts. ANISE CAFÉ $$

[Vietnamese, Asian Fusion] 1663 W. San Carlos St. (408) 298-8178 www.anisecafe.com

Small plates make a big impact with fresh local produce and seafood laced with tangy FrenchVietnamese sauces. Try the escargot and a slow-cooked stew for continental flair, and top it all off with some California wine. Anise Café’s tawny walls, lush greenery and earthy brown accents will have you believe you’re dining in tropical luxury. “Small plates” is a nice way of saying “small portions,” so plan to order three to four for two people. BELLA MIA $$

[Italian, Modern American] 58 S. First St. (408) 280-1993 www.bellamia.com

Come for the old-world charm; stay for amazing pasta dishes. Bella Mia’s dark mahogany wood and beautiful chandeliers make the place dreamily cozy, and the house-made pastas are always pleasing. For the carb-conscious, the restaurant carries a variety of starter and main-course salads; other splurgers might prefer the seafood saffron risotto or the grilled pork chops. THE BRITANNIA ARMS PUB & RESTAURANT $$

[British, American] 173 W. Santa Clara St. (408) 2781400; 5027 Almaden Expwy. (408) 266-0550 www.britanniaarms.com

You could call the Brit “Silicon Valley’s living room,” if living rooms came with a jovial menu of steak and kidney pie, shepherd’s pie, bangers and mash (British pork sausage with mashed potatoes, gravy and veggies), or fish ‘n’ chips. Along with the food, a full-service cocktail bar, domestic and imported beers on draft, and a friendly environment, Britannia Arms also offers sporting events on large screen plasma TVs, and live music and entertainment – now that’s a living room! 48


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Savor the Taste of Thailand DINING

xxx/mpthbuptuibj/dpn Mvodi;!Npo/.Tbu/!Ejoofs;!8!Ebzt!!Pqfo!Tvoebz!6.:;41qn!!¦!!Dbufsjoh!Bwbjmbcmf! THEWAVEMAG.COM JANUARY 16-29, 2008

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CIELITO LINDO $

[Mexican] 195 E. Taylor St. (408) 995-3447

This low-lit restaurant serves Mexican favorites and killer margaritas in a lively, yet romantic atmosphere. You can’t go wrong with the fajitas or one of the everpopular “combinacion” platters, but if you’re more adventurous, try the hooch-marinated Pollo Borracho with guacamole and nopales (that’s cactus, yo!). Cielito Lindo means “beautiful sky” or “little pretty heaven.” The phrase is taken from that famous “Ay, ay, ay, ay... ” song written in the 1800s, often sung by mariachis today. FAHRENHEIT ULTRA LOUNGE & RESTAURANT $

[Modern American, Asian Fusion] 99 E. San Fernando St. (408) 998-9998 www.fahrenheitultralounge.com

Fahrenheit’s exotic small plates have gotten so much attention, they’ve expanded their menu to include equally exceptional entrées. For starters, try the Mandalay beef with roti bread, or gingerpoached chicken salad, and cruise to gratifying large plates such as the grilled cabernet skirt steak or pan seared wild Alaskan salmon. Cocktails get as every bit as much attention here; it’s the only South Bay joint where bottle-flipping bartenders add a shot of energetic flair to their service. GORDON BIERSCH $

[American] 33 E. San Fernando St. (408) 294-6785 www.gordonbiersch.com

The restaurant’s lunch menu, peppered with burgers and sandwiches, rules only slightly less than the dinner menu’s truly golden steak, chicken, and seafood entrées. If Americanesque food seems tired, diners can enjoy pasta, stir-fry, pizza, and a host of Asian-influenced entrées. No meal is complete without their famous garlic fries or fresh beer, brewed just down the street. Also, look out for their seasonal beer selections. GUMBO JUMBO $$

DINING

[Cajun Fusion] 80 N. Market St. (408) 294-8626 www.gumbojumbo.com

San Jose gets a taste of something hot at Gumbo Jumbo, where popular menu choices include crawfish and traditional jambalaya packed with tiger prawns, wild salmon, big eye ahi tuna, free range chicken, spicy sausage and a mix of veggies. The delicious Cajun soups are sure to complement any meal, especially the restaurant’s renowned Gumbo Jumbo or the seafood gumbo. Feel free to stop by late, the kitchen is open until midnight Thursday through Saturday. ISLAND GRILL $$

[Steakhouse, Seafood, Modern American] 1355 N. Fourth St. (408) 392-2468 www.theislandgrill.com

The Island Grill in the resort-style Clarion Hotel cooks up the food equivalents of sun, sand, and long walks on the beach: blackened chicken salad with mango citrus vinaigrette; plenty of pasta and seafood dishes, like pineapple and chipotle and fried plantains with chili pepper jelly; and jerk sauce, 48

THEWAVEMAG.COM JANUARY 16-29, 2008

SPOTS

jerk sauce everywhere. Dig the dish appellations: Jerk Caesar, Volcano Salad, and Da Plane, Da Plane Burger. JERSEY’S CHEESESTEAKS $

[American] 325 S. First St. (408) 971-2898

Jersey’s has gone downtown and upscale, and what was once a tavern that served food is now a genuine restaurant and sports bar. Existing fans will surely flock to the new Downtown location, as it still serves those authentic Philly cheesesteak sandwiches, and remains the official West Coast home of the Philadelphia Eagles, complete with 16 HD plasma screens in its 6,000-square-foot space. New fans are sure to follow, due to the full kitchen and expanded menu, which includes salads, pastas, seafood and steaks. Not into cheesesteaks? Try their blackened chicken penne pasta, or an Oaxacan chicken burrito. LOFT BAR & BISTRO $$

[Modern American] 90 S. Second St. (408) 291-0677 www.loftbarandbistro.com

The roasted chicken with gourmet mac-n-cheese is a staple, but there are a few surprises, too, that change seasonally. Tables on the heated outdoor patio are highly coveted on warm nights, so make reservations; same goes for Friday and Saturday nights, when there’s live jazz. PICASSO’S TAPAS RESTAURANT $$

[Spanish, Tapas] 62 W. Santa Clara St. (408) 298-4400 www.picassosrestaurant.com

Picasso’s offers a tapas menu so multifaceted, even a Cubist painter would be impressed. Start off with the tangy, garlic-spiked specialties, like clams in white wine garlic sauce, then switch it up with the stewed chicken and tortilla Española (a potato and onion frittata). The paella is served for two or more, so bring friends over a pitcher of sangria. On weekends, there’s often a guitarist to keep guests entertained during the inevitable wait. PIZZ’A CHICAGO $$

[Pizza] 155 W. San Fernando St. (408) 283-9400 www.pizzachicago.com

Capers Eat and Drink impresario Kam Razavi has a Downtown hit with Loft. An historic stone-and-marble exterior belies the airy urban-chic warehouse interior, complete with upstairs loft and a second-story patio. The menu features gourmet turns on classic comfort foods, as exemplified by Razavi’s meatloaf, made with smoked ham and smothered in a wild mushroom sauce that migrates to the garlic mashed potatoes. The full bar on the second floor is a popular gathering spot on weekend nights.

Every Pizz’a pie offers a taste of the dee-lish deep-dish character of Chicago without the Windy City weather. Try the Al Capone’s pizza doppelganger with fresh spinach, ricotta, onions, and toasted almonds, and the Joliet Jake, a pie piled with portabella, crimini, shiitake and button mushrooms with basil, tomato, and apricots. For meatball lovers, there’s the Oprah sandwich. On Mondays, get 25 percent off your entire dinner at the restaurant from 4-10pm with an online coupon.

MENARA MOROCCAN RESTAURANT $$

[Modern American] 72 S. First St. (408) 293-6020 www.meltingpot.com

[Moroccan] 41 E. Gish Rd. (408) 453-1983 www.menara41.com

Recline on a pillowed couch with a Moroccan Magic cocktail in hand. Six different five-course prix fixe dinners include Casablancan delectables like lamb with honey, hare with paprika, and orange roughy with shermoula sauce. Meals are finished with mint tea. Moroccan arches, gilt accents, low-to-the-ground dining tables, and belly dancers might catch you hoping Master won’t rub the lamp just yet. MOTIF RESTAURANT & LOUNGE $$

[Asian Fusion] 389 S. First St. (408) 279-1888 www.motiflounge.com

This stunning new addition to the Downtown scene is a venue that is serious about food. Their lounge-y dining area serves up tasty plates that fuse contemporary cuisine with Asian flavors. Think appetizers of lobster dumplings in double broth with bean sprouts, or lemon marinated asparagus with daikon and egg. More substantial fare includes pork loin with roast peanuts, lardon, caramelized yam and sautéed greens, or griddled game hen with shoestring potatoes and hoisin jus. PARAGON RESTAURANT $$

[Modern American] 211 S. First St. (408) 282-8888 www.paragonrestaurant.com

This chic lounge and restaurant are the paragon of art-deco-gonehigh-tech décor, with cube lighting, polished-stone surfaces, and low booths that appear ready for takeoff.

THE MELTING POT $$$

This popular franchise takes the Swissborn craze of dipping stuff in hot pots way beyond standard-issue “cheese with bread,” and San Jose’s handsome location in a historic building is sophisticated, warm, and simple. The four-course menu features varied entrées cooked in one of four styles, with an assortment of savory breads, vegetables, and choice of salad. The regular menu includes dishes like lobster, chicken, pork tenderloin, shrimp, and Florentine ravioli – and, of course, chocolate fondue dessert. TIED HOUSE CAFE & BREWERY $$

[Modern American] 65 N. San Pedro St. (408) 295-2739 www.tiedhouse.com

Ravenous Sharks fans devour platters of smoked trout, smoked salmon, ribs, and sausages with a pint of Ironwood Dark, an English-style brown ale, while mall-weary shoppers gratefully chow down the blackened Louisiana catfish with Tied’s Cascade Amber. For bar snacks, it’s hard to beat the pestoparmesan calamari or the Harvest Quesadilla, roasted butternut squash, and red peppers with pepper jack cheese in a flour tortilla drizzled with lime-chipotle sour cream.

SAN JOSE BANGKOK TASTE THAI $

[Thai] 1769 Blossom Hill Rd. (408) 358-2525 www.bangkoktaste.com

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DINING: HOT SPOTS

Oceanfront Dining On-Site Brewery Fresh Seafood Fire Pits Cocktails & Wine Live Music & Dancing

HALF MOON BAY BREWING COMPANY

DINING

4 Miles North of Half Moon Bay

390 Capistrano Road Princeton-by-the-Sea 650.728.BREW www.hmbbrewingco.com THEWAVEMAG.COM JANUARY 16-29, 2008

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DINING: HOT SPOTS / CATERING

DINING HOT 48

Owner Chutima Thongpreecha and her father opened Bangkok Taste in San Jose in 1993, serving slightly Americanized Thai food in their comfortable small dining room. The prawn curry is a favorite served as spicy as you like it. Many of the dishes come with Nok’s Plum Sauce, which is available in jars to take home. Use the printable coupon on Bangkok Taste’s website that gives half off any entrée with the purchase of another. BLOWFISH SUSHI $$

[Japanese, Sushi, Asian Fusion] 355 Santana Row, Ste. 1010 (408) 345-3848 www.blowfishsushi.com

If you like your sushi trendysophisticated, with a little DJ music and anime thrown in, you’ll be hooked. A menu of Sakizuke (Japanese fusion appetizers) mixes up sea bass and miso, salmon roe, and quail egg. Try special sushi rolls like the Special Dragon or the Super Dynamite Roll, and fill up on their extensive list of imported, hard-tofind sakes. Try the Peach Nympho, the Mango Mojito or the Kiwi Appletini. BLUE MANGO $

[Thai, Asian Fusion, Vegetarian] 4996 Stevens Creek Blvd. (408) 248-7191 www.bluemangocuisine.com

Thai food jets to the next level at this comfortable spot, where favorites like pad Thai and Panang chicken share the menu with the fusion-y rock ’n’ roll clams – sautéed clams with a basil and chili sauce. White tablecloths, earth-toned walls and large murals of Thai temples may find you offering thanks to the food gods for this little hideaway. Vegetarian-friendly Blue Mango will customize dishes to your requests. CREEKSIDE INN $$

[Classic American] 544 W. Alma Ave. (408) 289-9781

The kind of place where quality comfort food and karaoke cohabitate, the Creekside recalls the big-shouldered days at the height of classic American cuisine. A meatand-potatoes menu pleases with favorites like lobster, sole, meatloaf, and rack of lamb, and while the

SPOTS

décor can’t be called cutting-edge, it wins points for coziness. Nick, the owner, promises the best steak in town. Karaoke (Wednesdays) comes with a free buffet – get there early.

tropical seasonings, will transport you to Old Havana instantly.

FISH MARKET RESTAURANT $$

While no longer part of the Max’s Opera Café franchise, Maxim’s still features the Max’s famous menu, packed with classic sandwiches, tasty Jewish cuisine and killer cakes. Their chicken matzoh ball soup is a take-out favorite, while other hearty bowls include Russian cabbage soup with diced brisket and traditional French onion. Classic potato latkes with sour cream and apple sauce and fresh Dungeness crab cakes are popular appetizers, but it’s the sandwiches that keep the regulars coming. Try the popular Philly Cheesesteak or the famed Maxim’s Reuben, which uses New York pastrami so good, fans buy the meat by the pound to go. You’ll be full, but you’ll want to squeeze in a slice of the renowned Niagara Falls cake, with layers of chocolate fudge and buttercream frosting.

[Seafood, American] 1007 Blossom Hill Rd. (408) 2693474 www.thefishmarket.com

Fresh seafood at a fair price – a goal Fish Market is able to meet because they operate their own fishing vessels, fishery, and oyster farm. The dazzling menu includes line-caught Pacific swordfish, Hawaiian hebi, Pacific Miyagi oysters, and live Maine lobster tail, plus a choice of having your fish cooked over a mesquite wood fire, baked, steamed, smoked or fried. Make sure to check out the weekly specialty fish and the sushi bar. FRATELLO’S $$

[Italian] 1712 Meridian Ave. (408) 269-3801

Tucked in a strip mall, with plenty of parking to go around, this well-loved neighborhood fixture impresses with a homey vibe, friendly service and straightforward Southern Italian fare served up with flair. Simple preparations and fresh ingredients rule, exemplified by the cozy restaurant’s no lack of exceptional pasta and pizza dishes. Winners include Pizza Margherita with a nicely browned thin crust dressed with fresh tomato sauce, mozzarella and shreds of basil, and Linguine Pescatore topped with clams, mussels and prawns in a rich wine sauce. HABANA CUBA $$

[Cuban] 238 Race St. (408) 998-2822 www.998cuba.com

A vivid dining experience, with jewel-tone rooms and, of course, a menu rich with traditional Cuban favorites. Each dinner entrée – roasted pork, sea bass – comes with soup or salad, white rice, and your choice of platanos maduros, frijoles negros or yucca con ajo. Portions are Latin-style generous. For lunch, a must-order is the Cuban sandwich: pressed Cuban bread, baked fresh daily, stuffed with slowroasted pork, Swiss cheese, ham, and pickles. The fresh mojitos and sangrias, along with the flavorful

MAXIM’S $

1620 Saratoga Ave. (408) 379-8886

ROSIE MCCANN’S IRISH PUB AND RESTAURANT $$

[Irish, American] 355 Santana Row, Ste. 1060 (408) 247-1706 www.rosiemccanns.com

Rosie McCann’s reinvents traditional pub fare. Quaff a pint or two at the elegant curved bar, and you, too, will be singing praises to Rosie’s Irish Nachos, a mountain of guacamole, salsa, and all the fixings atop (of course) potatoes. The Irish sausage bangers with garlic mashed potatoes and Guinness gravy, and Alaskan cod fish ‘n’ chips are delectable. Try the filet mignon medallion appetizer and order a couple of items from the kid’s menu. It’s cheaper, and you still get tons of food. SAM’S BAR-B-QUE $

[Barbecue] 1110 S. Bascom Ave. (408) 297-9151 www.samsbbq.com

Pig out on slow-cooked baby back ribs, pork shoulder or beef brisket in an old saloon atmosphere. Drizzled with Sam’s delicious homemade sauce, the meats are tender, savory, and generously portioned. The Italian sausage was born from a Carlino family recipe that goes back nearly a century, and Sam’s award52

DINING

SV

CATERING

» CATERING

CUBAN: Habana Cuba, 238 Race St., San Jose (408) 998-2822 www.998cuba.com Contact: Jennifer Cannella AMERICAN: Loft Bar & Bistro, 90 S. Second St., San Jose (408) 291-0677 www.loftbarandbistro.com Contact: Kam Razavi INDIAN/CHINESE: Temptations, 288 Castro St., Mountain View (650) 625-1234 www.temptationsca.com Contact: Neela Shukla MEXICAN: Taqueria La Bamba, 2058 Old Middlefield Way, Mountain View (650) 965-2755 Contact: Leo Munoz SUSHI: Blowfish Sushi, 355 Santana Row, Suite 1010, San Jose (408) 345-3848 www.blowfishsushi.com Contact: Andy FOR MORE INFORMATION, LOG ON TO WWW.THEWAVEMAG.COM 50

THEWAVEMAG.COM JANUARY 16-29, 2008


DINING: HOT SPOTS / CATERING

Lots of Enticing, New Lures. From our bar menu to our exciting new Lunch and Dinner offerings youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re gonna be hooked by The Fish.

420 Castro Street, Mountain View For Reservations call 650.966.8124 www.thecantankerousfish.com

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DINING: HOT SPOTS

DINING HOT 50

winning chili makes a perfect side dish. Save room for the fresh-baked apple pie, or get it (and a bottle of Sam’s barbecue sauce) to go. Live bluegrass bands add pickin’ and grinnin’ to Sam’s menu on Wednesdays from 6-9pm. SIAM THAI CUISINE $

[Thai] 1080 S. De Anza Blvd. (408) 366-1080 www.siamthaicuisine.com

Tucked in a strip mall, this unassuming Thai diner is usually surrounded by a lunch crowd awaiting inexpensive but carefully prepared versions of red-curryroasted duck, ginger pork and sweet-and-sour prawns. Noodle soups and entrée salads offer vegetarian diners plenty of options. The décor is sparse and the tables are packed in, but when you see how much food you get in a $6.95 lunch combination special, your only concern will be consuming it all before the boss expects you back at your desk. SINO RESTAURANT AND LOUNGE $$$

[Chinese] 377 Santana Row (408) 247-8880 www.sinorestaurant.com

Ultra-modern Asian chic ambience sets the stage for this upscale Chinese/dim sum hot spot. Owner Chris Yeo (of Straits fame) packs the menu with everything from General Yeo free-range chicken to char siu smoked sea bass, and packs SINO’s five large rooms full of Santana Row’s genetically privileged diners. Try the Peking barbecued baby back ribs. Delicious. STRAITS RESTAURANT $$

[Asian Fusion] 333 Santana Row, Ste. 1100 (408) 246-6320 www.straitsrestaurants.com

DINING

Pan-oceanic Singaporean small plates and noodle dishes are like romance on the high seas: unexpected, spicy, and utterly seductive once you begin to roll with it. A meal at Straits will take your taste buds on a whirlwind tour of Asia, starting with the buttery Indian-style roti prata flatbread and the Fuji apple and prawn salad in a mint vinaigrette, all the way to the Origami sea bass with ginger, shiitake mushrooms, and rice wine baked in parchment.

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WILLOW STREET PIZZA $

[Italian, Pizza] 1554 Saratoga Ave. (408) 871-0400; 1072 Willow St. (408) 971-7080 www.willowstreet.com

Friendly service, a convivial, neighborhood atmosphere, and fresh ingredients have made Willow Street Pizza a longtime local favorite. Their wonderful, wood-fired pizzas have a crispier edge than regular oven-baked pies, and their scrumptious pasta combinations (fettuccini with chicken, red bell peppers, red onions, and cilantro in a tequila-lime cream sauce) are creative palate-pleasers.

SANTA CLARA BIRK’S RESTAURANT $$$

PARCEL 104 $$$$

[Modern American] 2700 Mission College Blvd. (408) 970-6104 www.parcel104.com

Celebrity chef Bradley Ogden and executive chef Robert Sapirman transform farm-fresh, local ingredients into works of seasonal art at this crown jewel of Santa Clara fine dining. The result: An ever-evolving, palate-provoking and inventive menu that pairs well with the extensive list of wines from Parcel 104’s award-winning cellar. The restaurant does not serve weekend lunches or Sunday dinners, but offers a full breakfast menu for an inspiring weekday jump-start.

SARATOGA BELLA SARATOGA $$

[Modern American, Steak] 3955 Freedom Circle (408) 9806400 www.birksrestaurant.com

[Italian] 14503 Big Basin Way (408) 741-5115 www.bellasaratoga.com

Almond wood and mesquite charcoal fuel the tender flavors emanating from this upscale American grill designed by Pat Kuleto. The open kitchen features superb steaks cut from tender, dry-aged, free-range beef, and organic, local produce, including the popular creamed spinach side. A business-casual hot spot for local white collars who like the kitchen energy at the grill and the succulent seafood at the oyster bar. Couples should request the lighter, Ushaped “Snoopy room” (shaped like Snoopy’s nose) for more intimacy.

Comfortable family dining is served up daily at this elegant Victorian home turned restaurant in the heart of Saratoga. Bella Saratoga’s extensive Italian menu features award-winning pasta, flat bread pizzas, and a comprehensive wine list to complement any meal. Portions are generous but if your stomach still has room post-dinner, delicious desserts such as tiramisu and pecan turtle pie await.

FISH MARKET RESTAURANT $$

[Seafood, American] 3775 El Camino Real (408) 246-3474 www.thefishmarket.com

Rarely does a seafood restaurant operate its own certified processing, distribution, and wholesale company, but that’s Fish Market’s commitment to freshness. With 25 fresh fish dishes and a variety of shellfish on a daily changing menu, Fish Market satisfies any oceanic urge. If you can’t eat in, pick up some fish at their adjoining retail market. Catch the action at the oldschool oyster bar – and know that chefs here will cater readily to your special dietary needs or not-on-themenu cravings.

SUNNYVALE GINGER CAFE $

[Chinese, Asian] 398 W. El Camino Real #114 (408) 7362828; 8657 San Ysidro Ave., Gilroy (408) 847-2625 www.gingercafe.net

Named after an ingredient that’s dominant in Asian cuisine, the menu at Ginger Café draws inspiration from the region, blending Thai, Malaysian, Chinese, Vietnamese, and Japanese flavors to perfection. Small plates are a great way to go if you can’t decide what to have, but popular picks include the Tamarine Jumbo Prawns, Filet Mignon Luc La (tender cubes of beef and vegetables in a special house sauce), and Signature Sea Bass (fried with a spicy mandarin sauce or steamed with ginger scallion). To wash down that perfect meal, Ginger Café offers a wide variety of beers, sake, wine, and cocktails. TW


DINING: HOT SPOTS

Our specialties are Tapas, Paella and Sangria Try Our Selection Of Best Spanish Wines 62 W Santa Clara St. San Jose, Ca 95113 Tel/ Fax: 408.298.4400

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Cirque du Soleil gets back to classic circus fare with Kooza. BY TRACI VOGEL

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I

nside a small tent behind the famous blue-and-yellow-striped Grand Chapiteau (Big Top), a man in a white-and-pink-sequined tuxedo jacket carefully twirls one wrist. In his hand, he holds a magic wand.

At Cirque du Soleil, this is where the magic begins. This is the backstage rehearsal space for the traveling performers, and Jason Berrent, who plays the Trickster in Cirque’s newest show, Kooza, is being coached by director David Shiner. Shiner, a slim, intense-looking man in jeans and an olive-green military-style jacket, watches as Berrent drops an imaginary handkerchief, then pretends to fan himself. “Bigger, baby – volume!” says Shiner. “It’s like Liberace! You’re Scarlett O’Hara! ‘It’s too much for me, I need a fan!’” Shiner steps forward to demonstrate. He lifts his hand dramatically, and for a second, you could swear there’s a handkerchief falling from his palm. Berrent nods, as Shiner says, “It all needs to be bigger than normal, over the top.” Over the top is a good way to describe Cirque du Soleil, which, since its humble beginnings 23 years ago, has presented increasingly elaborate shows to an adoring public, mounting spectacle after spectacle using special effects that have ranged from a giant fan that blew paper snow into the audience, to a Las Vegas show performed largely in water. For Kooza, however, Cirque has mostly stripped away the special effects, and the result is a welcome return to the company’s original inspiration. Kooza is a showcase for pure circus arts, and Shiner has brought together marvelous practitioners of acrobatics, juggling, contortion, and more. “When Guy [Laliberté, Cirque du Soleil’s founder] called and asked me to put together a show, my first thought was that I wanted to go back to basics,” says Shiner, resting in the company’s traveling cafeteria after rehearsal (yes, it, too, is inside a tent). “I wanted to really make it a circus again, focus on the artists, take the high-tech out of the show.” Instead of technology, clowning is what makes Kooza tick. Shiner, who began his career as a street mime, is a transcendent clown himself. He helped create the 1990 Cirque du Soleil production Nouvelle Expérience, which was filmed for HBO, and performed for years, on and off Broadway, alongside Bill Irwin in the Tony Award-winning two-man show Fool Moon. “The clown’s archetype is the fool,” Shiner says. “A misfit, a character who’s never right about anything. What makes a clown funny is watching their attempts at trying to be human, and their continual shock at their failure.” Kooza contains some of the most hilarious clown antics ever seen in a Cirque show. Even before the two main characters, the Trickster and the Innocent (played by Stéphan Landry), appear, a group of buffoons who think they’re in charge of the show commandeer the stage. Their interaction with audience members sets the giddy, joyful tone of the show. Slapstick routines involving popcorn, pickpocketing, and a shaggy dog with a penchant for marking its territory will leave viewers rolling in the aisles (and mopping up water, if they’re in the line of fire). “It was important to break that fourth wall,” says Shiner. “It reinforces that the show is about all of us. The show needs the audience. We’re interconnected.”

Shiner’s approach to circus arts is based in emotion, and the idea that the group experience of awe, fear, and joy is a cathartic one. Viewers are likely to feel all three at once, as the circus performers roll out over a three-hour, two-act show. The first act features a group of young contortionists, whose sinuous, superhuman poses (pictured below) will make audience members gasp. A jaw-dropping balancing routine sees chairs wobbling precariously, and the high-wire act borrows one of the chairs for more gravity-defying amazement. A unicycle routine featuring Russian performers Diana Aleshchenko and Yury Shavro is like a beautiful ballroom dance, one that just happens to occur on top of a spinning one-wheeled cycle. And, for the grand finale, the 1,600-pound Wheel of Death spins faster and faster, trying to throw off the two men who run within and over it. Amidst all this, the Trickster and the Innocent introduce some gorgeous spectacle, including a Day-of-the- Dead-inspired procession that features a long cape made of skittering mechanical rats. All of the acts are backed up by a fantastic musical score that features the ethereal vocals for which Cirque du Soleil is known, as well as a few rock numbers that shake the big top. The narrative, however, is sparse. After all, says Shiner, “With a circus show, you can’t write a story that’s too involved – the narrative is always interrupted by the acts themselves.” Instead, Kooza hangs together because of Shiner’s vision: “That there is hope,” he says. “There may be a dark side, but at the deepest level there is hope. It’s a cathartic thing to be able to laugh at our own sufferings – it’s a relief. I’d rather do that than cry.” Shiner, the consummate clown, believes that at the core of the circus is “longing, and the wish to find meaning.” In the end, he says, “I want audiences to feel a sense of wonder about life, a sense of hope, joy, to experience a magical evening of what circus is in its purest form.” With Kooza, he has succeeded, amazingly. TW Kooza opens Jan. 31 and runs thru Mar. 16 at the Grand Chapiteau, Taylor St. Bridge, San Jose. For tickets, go to www.cirquedusoleil.com.

THEWAVEMAG.COM JANUARY 16-29, 2008

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50 Ways traditional food (yes, that means haggis), dancing, raffle, and music by Peter Daldry: 6 – 9pm 15. RAY MANZAREK WITH SPECIAL GUEST ROY ROGERS Little Fox Theatre, 2209 Broadway St., Redwood City www.foxdream.com

January 19: Join The Doors’ keyboardist for an insightful evening discussing Jim Morrison and the band’s music, followed by a live performance with special guest Roy Rogers. 16. CROSSROADS OF THE WEST GUN SHOW The Cow Palace, 2600 Geneva Ave., Daly City www.crossroadsgunshows.com

January 19 – 20: Are you a collector of old six-shooters? Shotguns? Flint locks? Pea shooters? Whatever your gun of choice, you’ll surely be able to find it at the Crossroads of the West Gun Show. 17. SATURDAY NIGHT SILENT MOVIES Edison Theater, 37417 Niles Blvd., Fremont www.nilesfilmmuseum.org

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WEDNESDAY 1. MACWORLD CONFERENCE & EXPO

50 WAYS

Moscone Center, 747 Howard St., San Francisco www.macworldexpo.com

Thru January 18: This is the convention that Macheads wait all year for: Steve Jobs will take the stage, introduce new products and explain all the cool new functions of said products. The crowd, of course, will go ape, as if he has just discovered the cure for cancer, solved the Middle East crisis and taught whales to speak. 2. GALLAGHER

The Saddle Rack, 42011 Boscell Rd., Fremont www.thesaddlerack.com

January 16: Join Gallagher at the Saddle Rack in Fremont as he bashes two cowgirls, a goat, and one rodeo clown with a large wooden mallet: 9pm 3. RECYCLE YOUR OLD CELL PHONES FOR THE ORANGUTAN CONSERVANCY

Happy Hollow Park & Zoo, 1300 Senter Rd., San Jose (408) 277-3000 www.hhpz.org

Ongoing: No one in the WORLD appreciates the orangutan more than the staff here at The Wave. That’s why we want everyone in the WORLD to donate their crappy old cell phones and pagers the next time they visit Happy Hollow Zoo. All funds raised will be donated to the Orangutan Conservancy, a nonprofit group that is helping preserve our orangutan brethren and their habitat.

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THURSDAY 4. SAN JOSE SHARKS VS. DALLAS STARS

Shark Tank, 525 W. Santa Clara St., San Jose www.sjsharks.com

January 17: The Stars’ Mike Modano is the all-time American-born scoring leader… BIG WHOOP! See you at the game: 7:30pm 5. ALAN ALDA

Berkeley Repertory Theatre, 2071 Addison St., Berkeley www.berkeleyrep.org

January 17: Join Alan “Hawkeye” Alda in conversation with Bob Osserman for a fun and interesting discussion on winning Emmys, M*A*S*H, directing, writing, becoming a super science nerd and hosting PBS’ Scientific American Frontiers: 7pm 6. DAVID ALAN GRIER

San Jose Improv, 62 S. Second St., San Jose (408) 280-7475

January 17 – 20: David Alan Grier will be bringing you the ultimate in hilarity for three nights, so make sure you drink plenty of fluids and your cheek muscles are loose and ready for laughter.

1/18 FRIDAY

7. SPA, POOL & PATIO SHOW

The Cow Palace, 2600 Geneva Ave., Daly City www.cowpalace.com

January 18 – 20: Okay, it’s still

THEWAVEMAG.COM JANUARY 16-29, 2008

winter, but that’s no reason not to be thinking about spring and springtime fun on your back deck. So, get on over to the Cow Palace and check out all the latest spa, pool and patio designs. 8. MY WAY, A MUSICAL TRIBUTE TO FRANK SINATRA Presentation High School, 2281 Plummer Ave., San Jose www.pres-net.com

January 18 – 27: You’ll enjoy more than 40 of Ole Blue-Eyes’ hits, such as “New York, New York,” “Summer Wind,” “All of Me,” “High Hopes,” “That’s Life,” “Lady Is a Tramp,” and more. Funds raised benefit the performing arts at Presentation High School. 9. SAN FRANCISCO SPRING HOME SHOW

The Cow Palace, 2600 Geneva Ave., Daly City www.acshomeshow.com/ HGExpo/CPF.html

January 18 – 20: You’ll find hundreds of exhibitors offering everything from landscape ideas to remodeling guides that can help turn your home into a DREAM HOME! 10. COPENHAGEN

Lucie Stern Theatre, 1305 Middlefield Rd., Palo Alto (650) 329-0891 www.paplayers.org

January 18 – February 3: During the race to create nuclear arms in World War II, physicist Werner Heisenberg secretly visited Niels Bohr in Nazi-controlled Copenhagen. Once student and mentor, these two are now on opposite sides to create the atomic bomb.

1/19

SATURDAY 11. ROSE PRUNING AND CARE

Common Ground Educational Center, 559 College Ave., Palo Alto (650) 493-6072

January 19: Believe it or not, there is actually a science to pruning your rose bushes. Swing by Common Ground and find out these secrets, along with info on soils, mulches and other ways to keep your roses happy: 10:30am – 1:30pm

Saturdays: Are your Saturday nights becoming mundane? Well, we’ve got something for you. Head over to Fremont and make your way to the Edison Theatre and enjoy an evening of silent films from all the greats: Will Rogers, Douglas Fairbanks, Laurel and Hardy, Lon Chaney. All movies are accompanied by a live pianist: 7:30pm 18. ANNIVERSARY OF THE SEA LIONS ARRIVAL

Pier 39, Embarcadero at Beach St., San Francisco www.pier39.com

January 19: Bring the family and enjoy the sights and sounds of sea lions flopping around the docks, along with guided tours from The Marine Mammal Center.

12. LAVAY SMITH & HER RED HOT SKILLET LICKERS

Café du Nord, 2170 Market St., San Francisco www.cafedunord.com

January 19: Pay homage to the Bay Area’s sexy and sassy diva of jazz and blues, Lavay Smith and Her Red Hot Skillet Lickers: 9:30pm 13. NEW YEAR’S KIMONO SHOW

Community School of Music and Arts, 230 San Antonio Circle, Mountain View (415) 986-4383 japansocietyofnortherncalifornia. myshopify.com/products/kimono

January 19: Come and check out some cool and happening kimonos, in styles seen throughout the ages, from Kyoto kimono stylist Nobuaki Tomita. 14. BURNS SUPPER & CEILIDH DANCE

Mountain View Masonic Temple, 890 Church St., Mountain View (408) 275-6889 www.southbayscots.org

January 19: A celebration of the birthday of Scotland’s immortal Robert Burns, with songs, poetry,

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1/22 TUESDAY

19. LITTLE SHOP OF HORRORS

San Jose Center for the Performing Arts, 255 Almaden Blvd., San Jose www.amtsj.org

January 23 – 27: This wacky musical is based on a 1960 lowbudget sci-fi horror movie about a nerdy flower shop attendant who inadvertently creates a monster when he gives the plant a few drops of blood. 20. HOW TO CUT SHAPES OUT OF METAL WITH THE CNC PLASMA CUTTER

Tech Shop, 120 Independence Dr., Menlo Park (800) 640-1975 www.techshop.ws/take_classes.html

January 22: Okay, a show of hands: who loves cutting metal, but finds using a hacksaw or blow torch just too frustrating? Thought so, that’s why you’re all invited to the Tech Shop to learn how to operate a CNC plasma cutter that can cut ANY shape from sheet metal, steel, aluminum, copper, stainless steel, and other metals, with beautifully cut edges. See you there!: 6pm

1/23

WEDNESDAY 21. SNOWSHOEING BASICS

REI, 2450 Charleston Rd., Mountain View (650) 969-1938

January 23: Enjoy a slide presentation from professional snowshoe guide Cathy AndersonMeyers and learn everything you need to know about the wonderful sport of snowshoeing: 7 – 8:30pm


50 WAYS TO LEAVE YOUR SOFA

22. CHINESE NEW YEAR SPECTACULAR

38. WYNTON MARSALIS

January 23 – 26: Load up the whole family and get prepared for an amazing performance celebrating the Chinese New Year, with dancing, music, spectacular costumes and fun!

January 27: Join legendary trumpeter Wynton Marsalis and his 15-piece orchestra as they perform the music of Duke Ellington: 8pm

Stanford University, Serra Mall & Galvez St., Stanford livelyarts.stanford.edu

Orpheum Theatre, 1192 Market St. San Francisco www.shnsf.com

39. STORYTELLING FESTIVAL

1/24

Palo Alto Children’s Library, 1276 Harriet St., Palo Alto (650) 329-2436

January 27: Visit the Palo Alto Children’s Library and enjoy professional storytellers from all over the Bay Area do what else? Share their favorite tales!

THURSDAY 23. FURTHER CONFUSION 2008

Doubletree Hotel, 2050 Gateway Place, San Jose www.furtherconfusion.org

January 24 – 28: Hmmm… now how can we put this… this convention is for anthropomorphics…in other words, it’s for people who like to dress up in furry raccoon, cat, and lion costumes and… we’re not sure, so if you find out, PLEASE let us know!

1/25 FRIDAY

24. COMMUNITY CRAB FEED

St. Joseph of Cupertino School, 10120 N. De Anza Blvd., Cupertino (408) 252-6441

January 25: Don’t miss this all-youcan-eat – that’s right, ALL YOU CAN EAT – fresh crab, salad, pasta and dessert dinner. Bibs not provided: 7pm 25. MADELEINE ALBRIGHT

Commonwealth Club of California, 595 Market St., San Francisco (415) 597-6700 www.commonwealthclub.org/ featured

January 25: Please welcome Ms. Albright as she discusses the steps our next president will need to take to rebuild our standing in the world and ensure a strong US well into the future: Noon

Santa Clara Convention Center, 5001 Great American Pkwy., Santa Clara (408) 748-7000

January 25 – 27: Start planning your spring garden now by getting tips and information on new products and the latest in home and garden design. 27. MARK HUMMEL’S BLUES HARMONICA BLOW OUT

Yoshi’s Jazz Club, 510 Embarcadero W., Oakland (510) 238-9200 www.yoshis.com

January 25 – 27: It’s a MEGA harmonica blowout, featuring the king of the blow-harp, Mark Hummel, along with John Mayall, Kenny Neal, Fingers Taylor, and Lazy Lester and the Blues Survivors.

1/26

SATURDAY 28. SALON DE MEXICO SPEAKER SERIES: JOSÉ RIVERA

Mexican Heritage Plaza Theatre, 1700 Alum Rock Ave., San Jose (800) 847-7730 www.mhciva.org

January 26: Join Oscar-nominated screenwriter José Rivera as he discusses the life and legacy of Che Guevera, one of Cuba’s most revolutionary socialist leaders: Noon 29. THE PEKING ACROBATS

Flint Center for the Performing Arts, 21250 Stevens Creek Blvd., Cupertino dimensionarts.org

January 26: China’s premier acrobatic troupe will perform amazing feats of balance, strength and stamina – maybe they’ll even do the mind-bending double somersault: 8pm 30. AMA SUPERCROSS AT&T Park, 24 Willie Mays Plaza, San Francisco www.supercrossonline.com

January 26: AT&T Park transforms into a giant dirt bike track, featuring some of the industry’s baddest supercrossers, such as James “Bubba” Stewart, Chad Reed, and Ivan Tedesco. 31. THE SEVENTH ANNUAL GREAT GLASS AUCTION Fourth Street Summit Center, 88 S. Fourth St., San Jose www.bagi.org

January 26: The auction will feature beautiful glass pieces from local and international artists, with funds benefiting the Bay Area Glass Institute’s equipment upgrades and public education programs: 5:30 – 10pm

TUESDAY

33. GOLDEN GATE KENNEL CLUB ALLBREED DOG SHOWS

Cow Palace, 2600 Geneva Ave., Daly City www.goldengatekc.com

January 26 – 27: Two days packed full of prancing dogs and dog owners fighting it out for the coveted prize of the Golden Gate Kennel Club AllBreed Champion! 34. SECOND ANNUAL ARLEN NESS BIKE SHOW & PARTS EXPO

San Jose McEnery Convention Center, 150 W. San Carlos St., San Jose www.arlennessbikeshow.com

January 26 – 27: If you’re into the motorcycle scene, you won’t want to miss this show featuring more than 225 beautiful machines, along with vendor displays, swap meet and special autograph sessions from super bike builders Arlen and Corey Ness and Donnie Smith. 35. CHEERLEADING CHAMPIONSHIPS

San Mateo Expo Center 2495 S. Delaware St., San Mateo (650) 574-3247 www.athleticchampionships.com

January 26 – 27: Two days of top notch cheerleading from squads across the Bay competing for a hooded sweatshirt and a trophy! 36. SANTA CRUZ ORCHID SOCIETY SHOW AND SALE Soquel High School, 401 Old San Jose Rd., Soquel (408) 954-2566

January 26 – 27: Spring is not that far off, so it’s time to start thinking about that flower garden of yours – and what better place to start than the Santa Cruz Orchid Society Show & Sale: 9am

1/27 SUNDAY

32. THE EDWARDIAN BALL WEEKEND 2008

37. SOAP AND SALVE

January 25 – 27: The Edwardian Ball is like waking up in Tim Burton’s A Nightmare Before Christmas, with bizarre live dance performances, ballroom dancing, DJs, and live music.

January 27: You’ll learn how to turn farm materials into products into hand-made healing salves and soap. Come willing to experiment and ready to take home some of your creations: 2 – 5pm

Great American Music Hall, 859 O’Farrell St., San Francisco www.edwardianball.com

Hidden Villa Community, 26870 Moody Rd., Los Altos Hills (650) 949-9704 www.hiddenvilla.org

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40. RYAN ADAMS & THE CARDINALS The Catalyst Club, 1011 Pacific Ave., Santa Cruz www.catalystclub.com

January 29: Ryan Adams has mellowed in recent years, but just to be safe, don’t shout out requests for the Bryan Adams track “Summer of ’69” – such behavior has been known to get wiseasses physically ejected from the venue by the singer himself.

1/30

WEDNESDAY 41. MARTIN LUTHER KING JR. MEMORIAL CONVOCATION

Santa Cruz Civic Auditorium, 307 Church St., Santa Cruz (831) 459-5003

January 30: UC Santa Cruz presents its 24th annual assembly with featured speaker Julian Bond, chairman of the Board of Directors of the NAACP, who has fought for more than 40 years for social equality: 7pm

1/31

THURSDAY 42. CIRQUE DU SOLEIL: KOOZA Taylor Street Bridge, San Jose www.cirquedusoleil.com

January 31 – March 1: Enter the magical world of Cirque du Soleil and witness high-flying acrobats, amazing music, and laughable clowning as the KOOZA story unfolds – a tale of a melancholy loner who is searching for his place in the world, and the interesting characters he meets. 43. STANFORD CARDINAL VS. USC TROJANS Maples Pavilion, Galvez & Campus Dr., Stanford University gostanford.cstv.com

January 31: Watch our very own Stanford women’s basketball team give USC a little payback for their last-second loss earlier this season. On a side note, did you know that “hella” originated right here in the Bay Area? Take that, SoCal!: 7pm

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FRIDAY 44. SAN JOSE COIN CLUB’S 40TH ANNUAL COIN STAMP COLLECTIBLES SHOW

Santa Clara County Fairgrounds, 344 Tully Rd., San Jose (408) 2947223 www.sanjosecoinclub.org

February 1 – 3: Are you a numismatist? How about a philatelist? We thought so – that’s why we’re letting you in on a great coin and stamp show, featuring more than 100 dealers buying, selling and trading their stamps and coins!

47. PLAYHOUSE DISNEY LIVE!

San Jose Civic Auditorium, 135 W. San Carlos St., San Jose www.sanjose.org

February 2: Bring the whole family and join the whole gang of Disney characters that include Mickey, Handy Manny, Winnie the Pooh, Tigger and many more, for an evening of singalongs, laughter and fun! 48. FOO FIGHTERS

Oracle Arena, 7000 Coliseum Way, Oakland www.oraclearena.com

February 2: Join Dave Grohl and his band for an evening of nothing but straight-up rock 'n' roll!: 7:30pm

45. SAN FRANCISCO OCEAN FILM FESTIVAL

49. LEAHY

February 1 – 3: Enjoy a three-day film festival celebrating the great-and-allpowerful ocean, where you’ll explore coastal cultures and ocean sports.

February 2: This is the craziest thing you’ve ever heard. This band consists of four brothers and four sisters who grew up on a farm in Canada – but, wait, it gets weirder. They perform Celtic music… and they RULE!

Cowell Theatre, Fort Mason Center, San Francisco www.oceanfilmfest.org

2/2

SATURDAY 46. HEART OF LADY DAY – A TRIBUTE TO BILLIE HOLIDAY

Campbell Heritage Theatre, One W. Campbell Ave. Campbell (408) 866-2700 www.heritagetheatre.org

50. MONSTER JAM

McAfee Coliseum, 7000 Coliseum Way, Oakland www.oraclearena.com

February 2: All your monster truck favorites will be on hand: Donkey Kong, Bounty Hunter, and the king of all monster trucks, Grave Digger!: 7:30pm TW

Center of Performing Arts – Santa Clara University, Franklin & Lafayette Sts., Santa Clara (408) 554-5503 www.scu.edu/cpa/

February 2: Internationally acclaimed jazz and blues vocalist Kim Nalley performs a moving tribute to the QUEEN of the blues, Billie Holiday: 8pm THEWAVEMAG.COM JANUARY 16-29, 2008

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50 WAYS

26. SOUTH BAY SPRING HOME AND GARDEN SHOW

1/29

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Nightlife&Music

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FEATURE EVENT LISTINGS SPORTS BARS HEADLINERS CD RELEASES

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The Wave: You seem to have learned lessons it takes most folks a lifetime to grasp. Do you think you’re what they would term an “old soul”? Alicia Keys: I do honestly think that I’m an old soul. People have been telling me that for as long as I can remember. And for whatever reason – maybe I passed on and then was reborn – I definitely feel a very clear connection with certain eras. It’s the '60s and the '70s for me. There’s a very close connection, and the only way I can be so connected, I feel, is if I belong there. Because sometimes I feel like I don’t belong here, that I’m in the wrong time. But then I know that I’m in the right time, because I’m able to bring something to this time that is not here. TW: People seemed much more politically active back then. Do you feel just as fired up inside? AK: I do, because I have such a fascination with that era. I even have a serious fascination with dictatorships, actually, and I know it sounds weird. I’m very fascinated with the Panther party, and I’m very fascinated with dictatorships – I’m just fascinated with well-organized parties. And I ask myself, “How can one group of people organize a massive amount of other people? How does that happen?” And I find that that’s kinda the key to what’s missing now – we’re so divided that we can’t organize. And so I do feel riled up about that.

NIGH T L IFE & MUSIC

Keys to the Kingdom With her new album, Alicia Keys proves (again) she’s in a league of her own. BY TOM LANHAM

W

hen 26-year-old, multiple Grammy winner Alicia Keys strolls in for an interview, she projects an aura of stardom that’s almost majestic. And you can practically hear clocks stop as she waves away her retinue of handlers, label reps and management folks, directing them to close the suite’s doors behind them. Her allure is so bewitching, one local radio personality gushes “I’ll get those doors for ya!” then proceeds to shut them from the inside. “Uhh...nooooo – you’re supposed to be on the other side,” Keys chastises in that same tough-but-honeyed voice we hear on her latest chart-topping single, “No One,” and its spunky parent album, As I Am . His plot foiled, the dejected DJ hangs his head, whispers “Sorry,” and shuffles out. As soon as he’s gone, the object of his affection giggles girlishly. She’s seen this type of crazy before. And she can handle it. 58

THEWAVEMAG.COM JANUARY 16-29, 2008

Not that Keys was always so confident. When this neosoul keyboardist’s '01 debut, Songs In A Minor, went on to move over 10 million copies, her life sped up to such a pell-mell pace that she soon spiraled into a vortex of depression. Sure, she continued to hit career pinnacles, like her bestselling book of poetry Tears For Water, the launch of her own production company, and roles in Smokin’ Aces and The Nanny Diaries. But inside, Keys was a wreck. “It got to a point where I’d been so good at always keeping everything in a nice, neat little box, tucked away in the perfect place where it belongs, that it was strangling me,” she growls. Hence her new song/ album titles, she explains, indicating that fans will have to take her as she is, and that no one will stand in the way of her happiness again. Least of all, Alicia Keys.

TW: Recently you said you learned at an early age to never divulge any personal information in conversation because people would inevitably use it against you. AK: I’ve always been like that. Even when I was younger. Even if there was something crazy that was burning me up inside and I really wished I could tell somebody, I never felt comfortable. That’s just my style. And it’s actually not until recently that I learned that that same mentality will apply in a much bigger way. And there’s also a certain “I don’t give a sh*t what you think about me” that I had to embrace, because it’s definitely liberating. There’s a certain point where it’s like “This is my life, this is my choice, this is what I want. And if you don’t like it, I really don’t care.” TW: What needs to happen for people to finally mobilize again? Every day, another one of our rights is taken away, and folks just shrug. AK: I was speaking to Ruby Dee about this. She’s very motivated, and came from an era where everyone was on the street corners, hollering about what was going on, meeting in people’s apartments and having dinners where they discussed the political climate, and what can be changed and how can we do it. During that time it was a very specific issue. But now, there are just so many broken issues – breast cancer, HIV in teenagers, undercover racism, genocide. I can pick any issue, and they’re all extremely worthy. But there are so many of them that there’s not just one big issue we can all get behind. And that kind of destroys our mega-rallying power. TW: So who do you support in the next election? AK: Obama and Clinton, actually. Can’t one be president and the other vice president? Now that would be amazing! TW


NIGHTLIFE&MUSIC: FEATURE

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THEWAVEMAG.COM JANUARY 16-29, 2008

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» EVENT LISTINGS

NIGHTLIFE&MUSIC EVENT IF YOU HAVE AN IDEA FOR A LISTING, OR KNOW OF SOMETHING HAPPENING THAT YOU'RE AFRAID WE'LL OVERLOOK, PLEASE EMAIL YOUR NIGHTLIFE / MUSIC EVENT TO EVENTS@THEWAVEMAG.COM.

LIVE MUSIC / DJ & DANCE

#1 BROADWAY 102 S. Santa Cruz Los Gatos (408) 354-4303 www.numberonebroadway.com

WEDNESDAYS: DJ Hollywood,

Karaoke with Mark Joseph THURSDAY 1/17: Second Story Band FRIDAY 1/18: Blind Pilots SATURDAY 1/19: Jam Funksush THURSDAY 1/24: Joint Chiefs FRIDAY 1/25: The Groove Kings SATURDAY 1/26: Johnny Smith Band

A PERFECT FINISH 55 S. First St. San Jose (408) 288-6000 www.apfwinebar.com

THURSDAYS: Tania’s Tasting

Thursday FRIDAYS & SATURDAYS: A

Perfect Finish Jazz Trio

A.P. STUMP’S 163 W. Santa Clara St. San Jose (408) 292-9928 www.apstumps.com

WEDNESDAYS: Jazz, featuring

Laurent Fourgo & His Ensemble

BAMBOO LOUNGE AT THE ISLAND GRILL 1355 N. Fourth St. San Jose (408) 392-2468 www.theislandgrill.com/03_bamboo.html

WEDNESDAYS & THURSDAYS:

R&B, funk, jazz FRIDAYS & SATURDAYS: DJs or

live entertainment

NIGH T L IFE & MUSIC

BLANK CLUB 44 S. Almaden Ave. San Jose (408) 292-5265 www.theblankclub.com

FRIDAY 1/18: High On Fire,

A Life Once Lost, Saviours, Intronaut SATURDAY 1/19: Sweet and Tender Hooligans, The Curse FRIDAY 1/25: The Hellbillys, Jail Weddings (featuring members of The Starvations), plus special guests SATURDAY 1/26: Big Sandy & His Fly-Rite Boys, Red Meat, The Careless Hearts, plus special guests

BLEU GINGER RESTAURANT AND LOUNGE 90 S. Abel Rd. Milpitas (408) 719-9998 www.bleuginger.com

FRIDAY 1/18: The Jazz

Mechanics FRIDAY 1/25: Jessica Johnson

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BLUE PHEASANT

CARDIFF LOUNGE

22100 Stevens Creek Blvd. Cupertino (408) 255-3300 www.bluepheasant.com

260 E. Campbell Ave. Campbell (408) 374-7477 www.cardifflounge.com

TUESDAYS & WEDNESDAYS:

SUNDAYS: Industry Night

Steve “Tigger” Tieger

WEDNESDAYS: Urban

THURSDAYS & SUNDAYS: Gene

Soup (Soul, funk, ’80s, underground, hip-hop) THURSDAYS: Foxy (Deep soulful house) FRIDAYS: Lowdown (DJs playing soulful house) SATURDAYS: Cardiff sessions, rotating DJs

Holiday FRIDAYS & SATURDAYS: Dave

Majur

BRANHAM LOUNGE 1116 Branham Ln. San Jose (408) 265-5525

MONDAYS & THURSDAYS:

Karaoke

BRITANNIA ARMS 173 W. Santa Clara St. San Jose (408) 278-1400 www.britanniaarmsdowntown.com

TUESDAYS: Poetry Slam WEDNESDAYS AND EVERY OTHER FRIDAY: College Night with DJ Radio Raheem (’80s, ’90s and today) THURSDAYS: Thumpin N Bumpin DJs & Drums EVERY OTHER FRIDAY: DJ Vex (Dance, funk and hip-hop) SATURDAYS: DJ As-Is (Hip-hop)

BRITANNIA ARMS 1087 De Anza Blvd. Cupertino (408) 252-7262 www.britanniaarms.com

DIVE BAR 78 E. Santa Clara St. San Jose (408) 288-5252 www.sjdivebar.com

MONDAYS: Happy Monday

(Happy hour all day!) WEDNESDAYS: Karaoke THURSDAYS: J5 Thursdays with DJ Robert (’80s music) FRIDAYS: Cosmo Fridays with DJ Dave or DJ Robert SATURDAYS: Absolut Saturdays with DJ Dave or DJ Robert SUNDAYS: Bottomless pints PBR & free pool

EL JARDIN TEQUILA BAR 368 Santana Row San Jose (408) 246-1744 www.jardintequilabar.com

THURSDAYS & FRIDAYS: Tequila

MONDAYS: Karaoke, pool

tasting (RSVP)

tournament TUESDAYS: Free Pool Night, karaoke, trivia contest WEDNESDAYS: Irish dancing, British Soccer Night, reggae 2ND & 4TH THURSDAYS: Celtic Night SUNDAYS: Jazz Jam with Dennis White, karaoke

WEDNESDAYS THRU SUNDAYS:

BRITANNIA ARMS 5027 Almaden Expwy. San Jose (408) 266-0550 www.britanniaarmsalmaden.com

MONDAYS: Live sports shown

all day TUESDAYS: Trivia, music with The Peelers WEDNESDAYS & SUNDAYS:

Karaoke with Davy K

BUDDHA LOUNGE 251 Castro St. Mountain View (650) 969-4847 www.vipzen.com

Live music SUNDAYS: Mariachi SATURDAYS: Gypsy Tribe

FAHRENHEIT ULTRA LOUNGE 99 E. San Fernando St. San Jose (408) 998-9998 www.fultralounge.com

TUESDAYS: Fashion Lounge 1ST FRIDAYS: Glamorous

with host Sebastian, DJ Fabian (Clothing & cosmetic giveaways) 4TH FRIDAYS: Blend 1ST SATURDAYS: Sinful with Brian Bass (’80s, house, hip-hop) 2ND SATURDAY: Bliss with DJ Adam Cova 4TH SATURDAYS: Euphoria

JJ’S BLUES 3439 Stevens Creek Blvd. San Jose (408) 243-6441 www.jjsblues.net

WEDNESDAY 1/16: Gene Washington, Lara Price and Laura Chavez “unplugged” THURSDAY 1/17: Turnaround Blues, Madalyn Rose FRIDAY 1/18: Exit 85, Red Beans and Rice SATURDAY 1/19: Lane Coker and Big Delta, Murali Coryell SUNDAY 1/20: Pro Jam, LD and Blues Redemption, Gene Washington and the High Fives MONDAY 1/21: Pro Jam, Dog House Riley, Oliver and Friends TUESDAY 1/22: Amateur Jam, Blue J, Seth Walker, Special Mid-Week Show WEDNESDAY 1/23: Jake Mackey, King Arthur and the Roundtable Rockers “unplugged” THURSDAY 1/24: High and Tight, Dr. Mojo FRIDAY 1/25: Funktional Soul Band, Brian Auger and Oblivion Express SATURDAY 1/26: Smokin’ Kingsnakes, Chris Cain SUNDAY 1/27: Pro Jam, Nuthin’ But Trouble, Alvin Draper MONDAY 1/28: Pro Jam, Dog House Riley, Dennis Dove TUESDAY 1/29: Pro Jam, Amateur Jam, Blue J, Doc and Chuck

KATIE BLOOM’S 369 E. Campbell Ave. Campbell (408) 379-9687 www.katieblooms.com

SUNDAYS: Karaoke WEDNESDAYS: Brainstormer

Pub Quiz

MONDAYS: Rotating parties

33 E. San Fernando St. San Jose (408) 294-6785 www.gordonbiersch.com

THURSDAYS, FRIDAYS & SATURDAYS: Live music

HEDLEY CLUB Hotel De Anza 233 W. Santa Clara St. San Jose (408) 286-1000 www.hoteldeanza.com

FRIDAY 1/18: The Jennifer

Lee Trio

LITTLE FOX THEATRE 2209 Broadway St. Redwood City (650) FOX-4119 www.foxdream.com

QUARTER NOTE 1214 Apollo Way Sunnyvale (408) 732-2110 www.quarternote.com

MONDAYS & SUNDAYS: Jam with

WEDNESDAYS: Redwood City

House Band

Blues Jam

TUESDAYS: Karaoke

THURSDAY 1/17: The Limeliters

WEDNESDAYS: Jam Night

plus Hookside FRIDAY 1/18: Elvin Bishop plus Ron Hacker and the Hacksaws SATURDAY 1/19: Ray Manzarek and Roy Rogers SUNDAY 1/20: Fred Eaglesmith & Band THURSDAY 1/24: Peppino D’Agostino FRIDAY 1/25: Maria Muldaur & Her Syncopatin’ Papas plus Blue SATURDAY 1/26: Led Zeppelin LIVE! starring Heartbreaker plus SDS SUNDAY 1/27: The Rick Vandivier Group, Wendy Waller & Primary Colors with Nate Pruitt MONDAY 1/28: David Lindley

THE LOFT BAR AND BISTRO 90 S. Second St. San Jose (408) 291-0677 www.loftbarandbistro.com

TUESDAYS: Trivia night THURSDAYS: Live jazz FRIDAYS & SATURDAYS: DJ

dancing

MISSION ALE HOUSE 97 E. Santa Clara St. San Jose (408) 292-4058 www.missionalehouse.com

FRIDAYS: Flashback Fridays,

Live music on the patio

MISSION CITY COFFEE 2221 Alameda St. Santa Clara (408) 261-2221

THURSDAYS: Live DJ

1ST TUESDAYS: Christian

1ST & 3RD SATURDAYS: Live DJ

2ND TUESDAYS: Hawaiian 3RD TUESDAYS: West Coast

KING’S HEAD PUB AND RESTAURANT

Song Writers

201 Orchard City Dr. Campbell (408) 871-2499 www.thekingshead.us

WEDNESDAYS: Thriving Artist

4TH TUESDAYS: South Bay Guitar

THURSDAYS: Mad Mix Night

“Acustic” FRIDAY 1/18: Ded Ringer with

Jonny Super SATURDAY 1/19: Clockwork

Allen, Rock More SATURDAY 1/26: Thunderhorse

THE SADDLE RACK 42011 Boscell Rd. Fremont (510) 979-0477 www.thesaddlerack.com

THURSDAYS THRU SATURDAYS:

Appaloosa WEDNESDAY 1/16: The Saddle

Rack Presents Comedy Legend Gallagher THURSDAY 1/17 – 20: The Saddle Rack Presents The LoCash Cowboys FRIDAY 1/18: Bocephus, East Coast Swing SATURDAY 1/19: Wild At Heart SUNDAY 1/20: The Saddle Rack and Annie Redwolf Productions Present Country Jam Auditions WEDNESDAY 1/23: Yee Haw, Drifter THURSDAY 1/24: Ain’t Goin Down, Caribbean Cadence FRIDAY 1/25: Bar Room Romeo SATURDAY 1/26: The Bell Brothers

SCRUFFY MURPHY’S IRISH PUB 187 S. Murphy Ave. Sunnyvale (408) 735-7394

THURSDAYS: Karaoke FRIDAYS & SATURDAYS: DJ

dancing

SMOKE TIKI LOUNGE 152 Post St. San Jose (408) 292-4266 www.smoketiki.com

THURSDAYS: South Bay Folk

WEDNESDAYS: Tiki Winter

SUNDAYS & WEDNESDAYS: Open

Open Mic

Wednesday (DJ dancing)

mic night

FRIDAYS & SATURDAYS: Live

THURSDAYS THRU SATURDAYS:

MONDAYS: Karaoke with DJ

bands

DJ and live bands

Curtis

SUNDAYS: Jazz open mic

TUESDAYS: Trivia Night THURSDAYS: King’s Country

Night

GORDON BIERSCH

THEWAVEMAG.COM JANUARY 16-29, 2008

FRIDAY 1/25: John Worley and WorlView 4.0 MONDAY 1/28: Terrence Brewer

THURSDAYS: House DJs

SUNDAYS: Karaoke

and special performances TUESDAYS: Lounge Lizard Night with DJ Real Deal WEDNESDAYS: Music Mix (Rock, hip-hop, mash-ups) THURSDAYS: Go-Go Rama FRIDAYS: The Jam with DJ Remedy SATURDAYS: City Lights with DJ Brotha Reese

LISTINGS

FRIDAY 1/18: Spank

MOLLY MAGEES 241 Castro St. Mountain View (650) 961-0108 www.fibbars.com

SATURDAY 1/19: Coakley Street

THURSDAYS: DJ Shamus

FRIDAY 1/25: Soundcheck

FRIDAYS & SUNDAYS: DJ Effren

SATURDAY 1/26: Groovus

SATURDAYS: DJ Dave

SOUTH FIRST BILLIARDS CLUB AND LOUNGE 420 S. First St. San Jose (408) 294-7800 www.sofapool.com

SUNDAYS: Karaoke and

Industry Night MONDAYS: $15 pool (Flat rate)

KYOTO PALACE 1875 S. Bascom Ave., Suite 2500 Campbell (408) 377-6456 www.kyotopalace.com

WEDNESDAYS: Karaoke with

Paul and Gina Jones

MURPHY’S LAW

TUESDAYS: APA League Night

135 Murphy Ave. Sunnyvale (408) 736-3822 www.murphyslawpub.com

WEDNESDAYS: Student Night,

MONDAYS: Blues Jam THURSDAYS: Karaoke FRIDAYS & SATURDAYS: Live music

Underground Sound 2ND & 4TH THURSDAYS: Mystic

Pilots FRIDAYS & SATURDAYS: DJ

Night


NIGHTLIFE&MUSIC EVENT FRIDAY 1/18: The Careless

1ST & 3RD SATURDAYS: Music

Hearts, Amaya, and more

Machine 2ND & 4TH SATURDAYS: Soul

STRAITS RESTAURANT 333 Santana Row, Ste. 1100 San Jose (408) 246-6320 www.straitsrestaurants.com

WEDNESDAYS: Karaoke THURSDAYS: Live cover bands

and/or jazz FRIDAYS & SATURDAYS: Live

DJs SUNDAYS: Live jazz or reggae

TASTE ULTRA LOUNGE 87 N. San Pedro St. San Jose (408) 885-1016 www.tasteultralounge.com

TUESDAYS: Tasty Tuesdays THURSDAYS: Lux Party 1ST FRIDAYS: Velvet Shop 2ND FRIDAYS: Ladies Night 3RD FRIDAYS: Recess 4TH FRIDAYS: Red Light

District 1ST SATURDAYS: Pillow Talk 2ND SATURDAYS: Wonderland 3RD SATURDAYS: Saturday

School 4TH SATURDAYS: Risque

Glo and Entourage 2ND & 4TH TUESDAYS:

Community Rebirth: A Night of DJs and Live Art with resident DJs Dank & Sizzlak (Mos-High Sound System) WEDNESDAY 1/16: Lemo THURSDAY 1/17: Deep Rooted: San Jose’s Monthly Reggae and Dance Hall Party with DJs Robert Rankin (KKUP, Solid Massive Sound) and I-Vier (Jah Warrior Shelter) SUNDAY 1/20: Hip Hop Show THURSDAY 1/24: Kung Fu Vampire Presents: Scripted CD release party with Good Hustle, Trikk Baby, Down n Durdy, and DJ Audio Dru SUNDAY 1/27: SB Hip Hop Showcase: Sacred Hoop (Luke Sick, Vrse Murphy) headlining for Substitute Teachers, Silence, Doujah Lounge, ETN (The Martin Avenue Project) with DJs Audio Dru and Abraham TUESDAY 1/29: Festivious: Celebrating the only way a Costanza can. You can’t leave till you wrestle the bartender. Drink specials all night

VOODOO LOUNGE Crème featuring DJs Aspect and As Is 3RD FRIDAYS: Soulstar 4TH FRIDAYS: Kill the Radio

Sideshow, Open mic night WEDNESDAY 1/16: Dana Carvey Special Event THURSDAY 1/17 – 20: David Alan Grier SUNDAY 1/20: Brubeck Brothers TUESDAY 1/22: Scott Cornfield’s Career – Capping Comedy Cavalcade and Roast WEDNESDAY 1/23: Adobe Holiday Show THURSDAY 1/24 – 26: Louis CK SUNDAY 1/27: Ernie Watts, Scott Capurro Erect

ROOSTER T. FEATHERS 157 W. El Camino Real Sunnyvale (408) 736-0921 www.roostertfeathers.com

WEDNESDAYS: New Talent

Showcase THURSDAYS: College Night SUNDAYS: Military ID Night THURSDAY 1/17 – 20: Marc

Maron THURSDAY 1/24 – 27: Arj

Barker

TW

COMEDY

14 S. Second St. San Jose (408) 286-8636 www.voodooloungesj.com

1ST FRIDAYS: Crème de le

» HEADLINERS

LISTINGS

Ryan Adams & The Cardinals

January 17, The Fillmore, San Francisco www.livenation.com

ELVIN BISHOP

January 18, Little Fox Theatre, Redwood City www.foxdream.com

LENNY KRAVITZ January 19, The Warfield, San Francisco www.livenation.com

YURI SHEVCHUK AND DDT

January 20, Fox Theatre, Redwood City www.foxdream.com

CIRCLE JERKS

January 22, Slim’s, San Francisco www.slims-sf.com January 24, The Catalyst Club, Santa Cruz www.catalystclub.com

MOUNTAIN

January 23, The Independent, San Francisco www.theindependentsf.com

HOWARD JONES January 24, The Great American Music Hall, San Francisco www.musichallsf.com

MR. T EXPERIENCE January 25, The Bottom of the Hill, San Francisco www.bottomofthehill.com January 25, The Catalyst Club, Santa Cruz www.catalystclub.com

62 S. Second St. San Jose (408) 280-7475 www.improv.com

TUESDAYS: IMPROV

MALO, LA VENTANA, SISTERS MORALES January 26, Fox Theatre, Redwood City www.foxdream.com

SPORTS BARS

» SPORTS BARS

AU REVOIR SIMONE CUPERTINO: Strike, Cupertino Square, Wolfe Rd., right after Hwy. 280 (408) 252-2695 www.bowlstrike.com

SANTA CLARA: Characters Sports Bar & Grill, 2700 Mission College Blvd. (408) 988-1500 TVs: 18 HDTV flat screens Food/Drink Specials: Yes Team Affiliations: 49ers Hours: Mon-Thur: 4:30pm-12:30am, Fri: 4:30pm-1am, Sat: 11:30am-1am, Sun: 11:30am-midnight

SUNNYVALE: Firehouse Brewery, 111 S. Murphy Ave. (408) 773-9500 www.firehousegrill.com TVs: 13 HDTVs, NFL Package Food/Drink Specials: Bloody Mary discount Team Affiliations: Raiders, 49ers Hours: Mon - Fri: 11:30am-10pm, Sat: noon-10pm, Sun: 9am-9pm

January 26, The Independent, San Francisco www.theindependentsf.com

BIG SANDY AND HIS FLY-RITE BOYS January 26, The Blank Club, San Jose www.theblankclub.com

PUDDLE OF MUDD

January 29, Slim’s, San Francisco www.slims-sf.com

» CD RELEASES

January 29, The Catalyst Club, Santa Cruz www.catalystclub.com

FOR A COMPLETE LIST OF SPORTS BARS, LOG ON TO

WWW.THEWAVEMAG.COM

King Diamond, Johnny Winter, UFO, Adrian Belew, Tesla, Social Distortion, The Wallflowers, Buckethead, Queensryche, Don Dokken, New Monsoon, Siouxsie, Built to Spill, Ministry, Barry Manilow, Keith Urban, Carrie Underwood, Death Angel, Matchbox Twenty, Fu Manchu, The Raveonettes, James Blunt, Bon Jovi, and more…

DEKE DICKERSON January 30, The Blank Club, San Jose www.theblankclub.com

DAVID GRISMAN BLUEGRASS EXPERIENCE

February 1, The Independent, San Francisco www.theindependentsf.com

CD

JANUARY 22 Cat Power, Jukebox – Deluxe Edition Drive-by Truckers, Brighter Than Creation’s Dark The Mars Volta, Wax Simulacra (Import) Maroon 5, The Lowdown: Unauthorized MGMT, Oracular Spectacular Natasha Bedingfield, Pocketful of Sunshine

SUNNYVALE: Quarter Note, 1214 Apollo Way (408) 732-2110 www.quarternote.com TVs: 6 Food/Drink Specials: Daily, Happy Hour Mon-Fri: 4 - 7pm, Sun: breakfast & lunch specials Team Affiliations: Vote, majority wins Hours: 10am-2am

COMING SOON

RYAN ADAMS & THE CARDINALS

JANUARY 29 Blind Boys of Alabama, Down in New Orleans Idina Menzel, I Stand Joe Jackson, Rain Louis XIV, Slick Dogs and Ponies

RELEASES Pat Metheny Trio, Day Trip Sarah Brightman, Symphony Shelby Lynne, Just A Little Lovin’ Willie Nelson, Moment of Forever

FEBRUARY 5 Alan Jackson, Good Times Bob Mould, District Line Dolly Parton, Backwoods Barbie Jack Johnson, Sleep Through The Static k.d. lang, Watershed Lenny Kravitz, It Is Time For A Love Revolution Sheryl Crow, Detours THEWAVEMAG.COM JANUARY 16-29, 2008

61

NIGH T L IFE & MUSIC

TVs: 29 Team Affiliations: All Bay Area teams Hours: Sun: 11am-midnight, Mon: 11am-1am, Tue - Wed: 11am-midnight, Thu - Sat: 11am-2am

TVs: 22 w/newly upgraded HDTV flat screens Team Affiliations: Raiders, 49ers Open for Breakfast: Sat: 9am, Sun: 9:30am

moe.

LOS LOBOS

IMPROV

SV

LOS GATOS: Double D’s Sports Grille, 354 N. Santa Cruz Ave. (408) 395-6882 www.doubleds.com

HEADLINERS


» MOVIE PREVIEWS

Movies&TV particularly after they get through the desperate gambler and the thug who sees the future. Note to the filmmakers – stop trying to teach lessons and just tell stories.

Rambo

RAMBO  S TA R R I N G : S Y LV E S T E R S TA L L O N E , JULIE BENZ D I R E C T E D B Y: S Y LV E S T E R S TA L L O N E

Stallone knows exactly what Rambo needs to be. Just send him into the jungle to kill everybody with his knife, a supply of exploding arrow tips and his bare hands. There is a basic plot in which Rambo is hired by missionaries to take them up the river into Burma. Rambo insists that they’re just going to get raped and murdered, but he has a soft spot for the idealistic girl (Benz), who he later saves from being raped, twice. Far gorier than any other Rambo movie, or any Saw or Hostel movie, for that matter, Rambo is pure fun. The classics die hard, speaking of other revived franchises. REVIEWS & PREVIEWS BY FRED TOPEL

kick those Mad Money chicks’ butts! Heigl plays a perennial bridesmaid who just loves giving her friends the perfect wedding. When her sister steals her unrequited love (Burns), she has to plan that wedding, too. Luckily there’s a reporter (Marsden), secretly doing a piece on her, who fights with her enough to become her real perfect match. All of these clichés totally work, because Heigl is adorable and Marsden is having a ball. The film makes no pretensions about what it is and delivers a harmless rom-com.

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MAD MONEY  S TA R R I N G : D I A N E K E AT O N , Q U E E N L AT I FA H , K AT I E H O L M E S D I R E C T E D B Y: C A L L I E K H O U R I

MOVIES & T V

It’s Thelma & Louise meets Inside Man, with a Set It Off twist. The three leading ladies are all janitors at the Federal Reserve, and conspire to steal a load of cash before it is destroyed. It’s the perfect crime and nobody’s the victim… well, to say the audience is the victim is just too easy. With all due respect to the actors, the script asks them to be mighty annoying while doing all the adorable estrogen-bonding activities, like dancing in piles of money. Money is a good heist concept with perfectly average clichés about greed and materialism. But if Katherine Heigl can get 27 Dresses, these A-listers should consider new management.

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S TA R R I N G : B R E N D A N F R A S E R , SARAH MICHELLE GELLAR, ANDY GARCIA D I R E C T E D B Y: J I E H O L E E

Along comes another film with a series of vignettes interweaving scenes with the same characters, told out of order. Try to guess which surprises pay off later on in the film, but earlier in the timeline. The cliché of the interweaving vignettes isn’t so bad. There are some genuine surprises. What really weighs the film down is the incessant narration, as each of the four lead characters describes the exact philosophy their story embodies. The stories themselves get progressively more interesting,

S TA R R I N G : K AT H E R I N E H E I G L , J A M E S M A R S D E N , E D WA R D B U R N S D I R E C T E D B Y: A N N E F L E T C H E R

Bumped from Jan. 11, because Katherine Heigl can

DVD RELEASES

MOVIES JAN. 22 Saw IV – Unrated Widescreen and Full-Screen Editions The Game Plan – Widescreen and Full-Screen Editions Sydney White – Widescreen and Full-Screen Editions The Hunting Party

5

THE AIR I BREATHE 

27 DRESSES 

» DVD RELEASES

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TV JAN. 22 Torchwood – The Complete First Season ER – The Complete Eighth Season Hustle – Season Four Simple Life 5: The Simple Life Goes to Camp

UNTRACEABLE   S TA R R I N G : D I A N E L A N E , C O L I N H A N K S , B I L LY B U R K E D I R E C T E D B Y: G R E G O R Y H O B L I T

Even in the internet age, serial killers are pretty much all the same. This one rigs victims to die depending on how many people view it on a webcam. Can an FBI agent (Lane) follow leads in time to stop the next murder? Nah, give it three or for more victims for thrills. Crime fans may like the clue hunting, but any CSI viewer can solve the contrived plot. For all its elaborate tricks, the murders are not as clever as Saw or as ironic as Se7en. It has a moral, but Hostel conveyed the same message better. At least the tech lingo is (probably) accurate.

CASSANDRA’S DREAM   S TA R R I N G : E WA N M C G R E G O R , C O L I N FA R R E L L , T O M W I L K I N S O N D I R E C T E D B Y: W O O D Y A L L E N

Perhaps drama has become Woody Allen’s calling in his old age. He’s at least a little more successful at serious stories than his recent comedies. Two brothers (Farrell and McGregor) have similar financial problems, the former a gambler and the latter stuck in the family business. To help the guys extricate themselves from their money woes, their uncle (Wilkinson) pays them to kill someone. Actually, this could have been a comedy, with a few different tonal choices. The boys bumble and whine through their criminal plans, and it’s certainly a different take on the inept crime plot. It drags a little before getting to the point, but it’s not bad.

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CLOVERFIELD MOVIES JAN. 29 The King of Kong: A Fistful of Quarters Groundhog Day – 15th Anniversary Edition The Invasion

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TV JAN. 29 Curb Your Enthusiasm – The Complete Sixth Season Damages – The Complete First Season Pioneers of Television – Complete Miniseries Chancer – Series Two

THEWAVEMAG.COM JANUARY 16-29, 2008

S TA R R I N G : M I K E V O G E L , JESSICA LUCAS, LIZZY CAPLAN D I R E C T E D B Y: M AT T R E E V E S

J.J. (Alias, Lost) Abrams may have produced this monster movie, but he didn’t do anything creative

like write or direct it. Despite attempting to build hype by way of keeping everything from the plot to the title a secret, Cloverfield sounds like a typical January horror movie. A monster’s attack on New York City is documented by pedestrians with video cameras. Only eight-and-a-half years later, they’re finally ripping off The Blair Witch Project. The most staggering image they could come up with is a destroyed Statue of Liberty, which we saw 40 years ago in Planet of the Apes. J

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After playing the festival circuit and having enough of a limited release to qualify for the Foreign Language Oscars, this Romanian abortion drama enters wide release, hoping for some buzz to propel it. The story of a 1987 college student trying to get an abortion during the communist days has already garnered rave reviews from highfalutin critics. Obviously, it’s not a mainstream topic. Nor is it a date movie for the casual Saturday night, but it must have something to say in an entertaining way. They don’t usually import B-movies from other countries. Winning Cannes didn’t hurt movies like Pulp Fiction or Fahrenheit 9/11, either.

HOW SHE MOVE S TA R R I N G : R U T I N A W E S L E Y, T R E ARMSTRONG, BRENNAN GADEMANS D I R E C T E D B Y: I A N I Q B A L R A S H I D

Step Up 2: The Streets just got served. This indie film beat the Disney sequel to theaters by a good month. It’s the too often told story of a preppy student (Wesley) forced to return to the streets, where she discovers what real dancing is all about. At least being a small indie film may give it more cred. Oh, it’s about sexism, too. She has to join a guys-only posse. Only when they realize “how she move” will she find acceptance. Hopefully, what the film lacks in grammar, it will make up for with hardcore steps.

MEET THE SPARTANS S TA R R I N G : K E V I N S O R B O , C A R M E N ELECTRA, DIEDRICH BADER D I R E C T E D B Y: J A S O N F R I E D B E R G A N D A A R O N S E LT Z E R

They already made Epic Movie, but epic movies keep getting made and released, so they had to break the formula in naming the latest spoof. Primarily mocking 300, Meet the Spartans also takes digs at Spider-Man 3, Transformers and The Apprentice along the way. The basic formula remains the same. They make up actors to look exactly like the famous characters. They recreate the memorable scenes exactly as they happened. Then they fall down. A Transformer plays the crying Britney fan from YouTube. Donald Trump fires Spider-Man, so he slings The Donald’s toupee off. Please, Zucker Brothers, come back to comedy and show these amateurs how it’s really done. TW


MOVIES & TV: NEW REVIEWS & PREVIEWS

Every applicant will automatically be awarded a special RAMBO prize! This film is rated R. Run-of-engagement passes received through this promotion do not guarantee admission to the theatre. Seating is on a first come, first served basis. Theatre is open to paying customers. All federal, state and local regulations apply. A recipient of tickets assumes any and all risks related to use of ticket and accepts any restrictions required by ticket provider. Lionsgate, Terry Hines & Associates, The Wave Magazine, Mel Cotton’s and their affiliates accept no responsibility or liability in connection with any loss or accident incurred in connection with use of a prize. Tickets cannot be exchanged, transferred or redeemed for cash, in whole or in part. We are not responsible if, for any reason, winner is unable to use his/her ticket in whole or in part. Not responsible for lost, delayed or misdirected entries. All federal and local taxes are the responsibility of the winner. Void where prohibited by law. No purchase necessary. Participating sponsors their employees & family members and their agencies are not eligible. NO PHONE CALLS!

IN THEATERS JANUARY 25

Get ready to be on the

edge of your seat! For your chance to receive a pass, good for two, to an advance screening in San Jose on Tuesday, January 22nd, bring a copy of this ad to SCREEN GEMS AND LAKESHORE ENTERTAINMENT PRESENT A LAKESHORE ENTERTAINMENT PRODUCTION IN ASSOCIATION WITH COHEN/PEARL PRODUCTIONS A GREGORY HOBLIT FILM “UNTRACEABLE” BILLY BURKE

COLIN HANKS JOSEPH CROSS MARY BETH HURT MUSICUSICBY CHRISTOPHER YOUNG EXECUTIVE EXECUTIV PRODUCERS RODUCERS RICHARD WRIGHT ERIC REID JAMES MCQUAIDE HARLEY TANNEBAUM PRODUCERS STEVEN PEARL AND ANDY COHEN PRODUCED STORY BY TOM ROSENBERG GARY LUCCHESI HAWK KOCH BY ROBERT FYVOLENT & MARK R. BRINKER SCREENPLAY DIRECTED DIRECT BY ROBERT FYVOLENT & MARK R. BRINKER AND ALLISON BURNETT BY GREGORY HOBLIT

BOOSTER J U ICE (90 Skyport Drive, Suite 120, San Jose)

beginning at 11:30am on Friday, January 18th.

20% OFF

Passes will be distributed on a first come, first served basis while supplies lasts. No purchases PURCHASE AT BOOSTER JUICE WITH THIS AD! EXPIRES 2/29/08. necessary. Limit one pass per person/household. THIS FILM IS RATED R. Theatre is overbooked to ensure a full house. Passes received through this promotion do not guarantee admission and must be surrendered upon demand. Seating is on a first come, first served basis. EXCEPT FOR MEMBERS OF THE REVIEWING PRESS. No one will be admitted without a ticket or after the screening begins. All federal, state and local regulations apply. A recipient of tickets assumes any and all risks related to use of ticket and accepts any restrictions required by ticket provider. Screen Gems, The Wave Magazine, Booster Juice and their affiliates accept no responsibility or liability in connection with any loss or accident incurred in connection with use of a prize. Tickets cannot be exchanged, transferred or redeemed for cash, in whole or in part. We are not responsible if, for any reason, winner is unable to use his/her ticket in whole or in part. Not responsible for lost; delayed or misdirected entries. All federal and local taxes are the responsibility of the winner. Void where prohibited by law. No purchase necessary. Participating sponsors their employees and family members and their agencies are not eligible. NO PHONE CALLS!

OPENS IN THEATRES FRIDAY, JANUARY 25TH THEWAVEMAG.COM JANUARY 16-29, 2008

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MOVIES & T V

Stop by MEL COTTON’S SPORTING GOODS STORE on January 18 from 11:00AM - 5:00PM for your chance to enter to win a complimentary ticket to view the new RAMBO in theaters anytime Monday – Thursday beginning January 28.


» FEATURE

Arts

» FEATURE » COLUMN: HOT TICK ET » EVENT LISTINGS

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doesn’t make it black and white. Look at how gray it is. And how do we get past our own biases? She doesn’t answer everything for you.” Although this is the first Wasserstein play she’s directed, Brandt has a clear idea of how one should approach the writer’s work. “She carefully constructs her plays,” she says. “You need to know every allusion she makes in the play. She gives you a real tapestry. And her wit – you can never lose sight of it. Even at the darkest moments, she can make you laugh. She was such a great voice for women. You don’t see richly drawn women on stage.” Wasserstein won a Pulitzer Prize in 1989 for The Heidi Chronicles. Her other works included her 1993 play The Sisters Rosensweig and the 1998 film The Object of My Affection, starring Jennifer Aniston. The New York Times described Wasserstein’s approach this way: “Her heroines – intelligent and successful but also riddled with self-doubt – sought enduring love a little ambivalently, but they did not always find it, and their hard-earned sense of self-worth was often shadowed by the frustrating knowledge that American women’s lives continued to be measured by their success at capturing the right man.” Brandt hails from San Diego, where for six years she was artistic director – and sometime playwright – for the cutting-edge Sledgehammer Theater. A few years before that, she was assistant-directing a small production of Moliere’s Tartuffe when she met lighting designer David Lee Cuthbert. The two eventually married, and came north in 2006 when Cuthbert accepted a position at UC/Santa Cruz’s theatre department. The two have collaborated on 29 productions (including This Wonderful Life and Third), and serve as an interesting example of the often overlooked relationship between director and lighting director.

ARTS

Third and Final

The late Wendy Wasserstein’s last play comes alive under the direction of Kirsten Brandt. BY MICHAEL J. VAUGHN

D

irector Kirsten Brandt, associate artistic director at San Jose Repertory Theatre, always knew she belonged off, not on, the stage. “I realized in high school that I was good at getting a performance out of somebody else,” she says. “That reward that actors talk about, the connection from the audience, just didn’t click with me. I much prefer trying to craft things.” Though Brandt mostly crafts things these days for the Rep (where she recently directed the one-man show, This Wonderful Life), she also takes on freelance assignments, including a very special project for TheatreWorks: Third, the final play written by the late, great Wendy Wasserstein.

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Third takes place during the school year of 200203, as a polarized America heads into the invasion of Iraq. A feminist college professor finds her beliefs shaken by a paper written by one of her students. The play debuted at Lincoln Center on Oct. 24, 2005; Wasserstein died of lymphoma on Jan. 30, 2006. “Everything she talks about is still current today,” says Brandt. “We’re living in such a state of perpetual fear and anxiety.” Although it is what Wasserstein termed an “activist” play, says Brandt, Third doesn’t operate in jingoistic simplicity. “I expect an audience to walk out and have a dialogue about what they’ve seen,” she says. “That’s what Wendy does. She

“A lighting designer can be your best camera,” says Brandt. “It’s about how lighting can zero in on a moment and give you a close-up. We’re a fabulous, solid collaborative team.” Brandt also worked as a playwright with Sledgehammer, and describes today’s playwriting scene as “amazingly difficult.” “Mine were written with my ensemble in mind,” she says. “It’s a different way of working and writing.” She says she feels “really blessed” to have found the position at the Rep. “Even when it’s tough, even at the end of a long rehearsal, I’ve just spent six to eight hours when I’m so happy.” She also values the chance to work independently. “It makes you a richer artist to direct actors you usually wouldn’t direct,” she says. “The Bay Area is such a rich tapestry – you want to pull actors from all over the area.” TW Third, TheatreWorks, Jan. 16-Feb. 10, Mountain View Center for Performing Arts (650) 903-6000 www.theatreworks.org $20-$56


» COLUMN: HOT TICKET

ARTS

HOT

January 24 - February 17

Nuclear Theatrics A play exploring a muchdebated meeting of minds during WWII. BY MICHAEL J. VAUGHN

O

ne of the more frightening speculations in history is “What if the Nazis had gotten the bomb?” Some theorize that the German nuclear program may have been deliberately slowed down by its director, Werner Heisenberg, to prevent such an occurrence. The question is explored in Michael Frayn’s provocative 1998 play Copenhagen. Frayn’s play focuses on a single meeting between Heisenberg and his mentor, Niels Bohr, in September 1941. Both men won Nobel Prizes in quantum mechanics – Bohr in 1922, Heisenberg in 1932 – and both had furthered the definitions of atomic structures that paved the way for nuclear research. Being a Jewish scientist in Nazi-occupied Denmark, however, Bohr was not living quite so well as Heisenberg.

Neither scientist left a complete record of that conversation, creating a fascinating gap that inevitably led to much speculation. In researching his 1957 book, Brighter than a Thousand Suns, Robert Jungk received a letter from Heisenberg claiming he was hoping that scientists every-

TICKET INFO

Copenhagen, Palo Alto Players, Jan. 18-Feb. 3, Lucie Stern Theatre, 1305 Middlefield Rd., Palo Alto (650) 329-0891 www.paplayers.org $18-$27. where would work to prevent the development of the atomic bomb, and had come to Copenhagen in 1941 to communicate this idea to Bohr. Upon reading Jungk’s book, however, Bohr vehemently disagreed, saying that Heisenberg had discussed nuclear weapons but had not alluded to any effort on his part to slow their development.

A THOUSAND CLOWNS BY HERB GARDNER

Box Ofce: (650) 349-6411 hillbarntheatre.org 1285 E. E. Hillsdale Hillsdale Blvd., Blvd., Foster Foster City City 1285

67th Season

Hillbarn Theatre HB - W 1/23

~Redening Community TheatreTM

In Frayn’s play, Heisenberg, Bohr and Bohr’s wife, Margrethe, attempt to reconstruct the now legendary conversation, coming up with three distinct versions. Bohr eventually escaped to the West and joined the Manhattan Project at Los Alamos, where he was considered the “father confessor” of the younger scientists assembled there. When Heisenberg heard of the nuclear attack on Hiroshima in 1945, he considered it a propaganda trick by the Allies, having decided that the development of such a weapon was simply unfeasible. (This gives more ammunition to Heisenberg skeptics, who say that the German was simply unable to solve the riddle of critical mass, and had no particular moral agenda.) Before the nuclear program, Heisenberg was best known for his development, with Bohr, of the Uncertainty Principle – the idea that we can never know everything about the behavior of a physical object. It is a principle that certainly seems to apply to one of the most debated walks ever undertaken. TW

ARTS

“Heisenberg arrives at Niels Bohr’s house,” said Frayn in a 2002 interview, “and it’s a very embarrassing meeting, because Bohr did not want to be visited by a German in 1941. He did not want to appear to be collaborating… The play begins with this very awkward conversation between them, and then they go out for a walk. Something goes wrong with the conversation, we don’t discover what, but they come back to the house and Bohr says Heisenberg’s leaving.”

Hillbarn’s 2007 - 2008 Season

TICKET

Experience High Tech Up Close

Open Monday–Friday, 9 a.m.–6 p.m. and Saturday, 10 a.m.–5 p.m., excluding holidays. FREE admission and parking.

Experience the science behind computer chips rst hand, and the evolution of their development.

Reserve guided tours by phone or online: 408.765.0503 • www.intel.com/museum Audio tours in seven languages are available. In Santa Clara, off U.S. 101 at the Montague Expressway and Mission College Boulevard. THEWAVEMAG.COM JANUARY 16-29, 2008

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» EVENT LISTINGS

ARTS EVENT

LISTINGS

True West, The Pear Theatre, 1/17 - 2/3

IF YOU HAVE AN IDEA FOR A LISTING, OR KNOW OF SOMETHING HAPPENING THAT YOU'RE AFRAID WE'LL OVERLOOK, PLEASE EMAIL YOUR ARTS EVENT TO EVENTS@THEWAVEMAG.COM.

THEATRE

ARTS

BED & SOFA

Theatre at San Pedro Square, 29 N. San Pedro Sq., San Jose (408) 904-7714 www.artiststheatre.com

Follow the journey of Ludmilla, a 1926 Moscow housewife who is fed up with her no-good husband, Kolya. So fed up, in fact, that when Kolya’s friend Volodya comes to pay a visit, he and Ludmilla become lovers, and Kolya is relocated to the couch: Thru 2/3. BOY GETS GIRL

City Lights Theatre, 529 S. Second St., San Jose www.cltc.org

Tony is head over heels for Theresa, but Theresa is in love with the life she created for herself, and it doesn’t include Tony. But not even family, friends, or the authorities can stop Tony’s obsession for Theresa. Will Theresa be willing to give up everything she has in order to escape Tony’s attention?: 1/17 – 2/17. COPENHAGEN

Lucie Stern Community Center, 1305 Middlefield Rd., Palo Alto (650) 329-0891 www.paplayers.org

Heisenberg secretly visited Niels Bohr in Nazi-controlled Copenhagen. Once student and mentor, these two are now on opposite sides to create the atomic bomb: 1/20 – 2/4 (see Hot Ticket, page 65). LITTLE SHOP OF HORRORS

San Jose Center for the Performing Arts, 255 Almaden Blvd., San Jose (800) SAN-JOSE http://cpa.sanjose.org

Come and see a very unusual plant with a huge appetite in this play based on the 1960s cult classic flick: 1/22 – 2/3. SCHOOL OF THE AMERICAS

Mexican Heritage Plaza Theatre, 1700 Alum Rock Ave., San Jose (408) 272-9926 www.teatrovision.org

Based on the final days of Che Guevara, this account takes place while he was held captive in a small Bolivian schoolhouse, where he befriended a teacher looking for her own revolution. The play is in English, with Spanish translation: 1/24 – 2/10.

During the race to create nuclear arms in World War II, physicist Werner 66

THEWAVEMAG.COM JANUARY 16-29, 2008

STEEL MAGNOLIAS

Broadway West Theatre, 4000-B Bay St., Fremont (510) 683-9218 www.broadwaywest.org

Set in the South at Truvy’s Beauty Salon in Chiquapin, La., this tale sees hilarious conversations take place while the women get their hair done. However, that eventually turns to tragedy when Shelby, a diabetic, puts her life in danger by getting pregnant. This makes all the women realize the fragility of their lives, and brings out their inner strength and love: 1/18 – 2/16. THE JUNGLE BOOK (STORIES ON STAGE)

Mountain View Center for the Performing Arts, 500 Castro St., Mountain View (650) 903-6000 www.pytnet.org

Take your children to see the adventures of Mowgli as he learns the ways of life from friends Baloo and Bagheera, in this rendition of the Disney classic: 1/18 – 19. THIRD

Mountain View Center for the Performing Arts, 500 Castro St., Mountain View www.theatreworks.org

Pulitzer Prize winner Wendy Wasserstein’s final play examines a polarized America. As if a hectic life

as a mother and daughter were not enough, a feminist college professor finds her views challenged by a new student. Follow her journey as she goes through an array of emotions, questions her convictions, and finally, finds clarity: 1/16 – 2/10. THIS IS HOW IT GOES

Historic Hoover Theatre, 1635 Park Ave., San Jose www.renegadetheatre.com

Once a typical couple, Belinda and Cody were teenage sweethearts who married, had children and lived in a luxurious home. Cody, however, is regarded as an outsider because he is “rich and black and different,” as Belinda puts it. She finds herself attracted to a (white) former classmate, and a battle for her attention ensues: 1/24 – 2/9. TRUE WEST

The Pear Avenue Theatre, 1220 Pear Ave., Mountain View (650) 254-1148 www.thepear.org

Insanity happens when a frustrated screenwriter is visited by his toasterstealing brother: 1/17 – 2/3.

CLASSICAL MUSIC & OPERA CHRISTOPHER O’RILEY, PIANO, REIMAGININGS: RADIOHEAD AND SHOSTAKOVICH

Dinkelspiel Auditorium,

471 Lagunita Dr., Stanford University (650) 725-2787 http://livelyarts.stanford.edu

Marvel at this radio host’s ability to meld the classical piano preludes of Shostakovich with the British rock sounds of Radiohead: 1/23. SUN RINGS

Memorial Auditorium, 551 Serra Mall, Stanford University (650) 725-2787 livelyarts.stanford.edu

Be swept away to the farthest reaches of the galaxy, as the Kronos Quartet and Stanford Chamber Chorale play out-of-this-world sounds to a lively and colorful multimedia show: 1/18. SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY: MAHLER’S SYMPHONY NO. 1

Flint Center for the Performing Arts, 21250 Stevens Creek Blvd., Cupertino (408) 864-8820 www.flintcenter.com

Hear the natural and heavenly sounds of this wonderful symphonic debut, with the first appearance in 25 years by living interpreter Myung-Whun Chung: 1/27. SARATOGA SYMPHONY CONCERT

St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church, 13601 Saratoga Ave., Saratoga (408) 867-3493 www.st-andrews-saratoga.org

This free concert aims to bring classic works such as An Elegiac Prelude in A Minor by Hugh Downs and Variations on a Children’s Song by Ernst von

Dohnanyi to the community’s cultural scene, and to give artists the opportunity to perform with an orchestra: 1/20. VIOLINS AND ENIGMAS

California Theatre, 345 S. First St., San Jose (800) SAN-JOSE californiatheatre.sanjose.org

Come hear the beautiful sounds of Ralph Vaughan Williams’ A Lark Ascending, Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart’s Violin Concerto No. 5, A Major Turkish, and Sir Edward Elgar’s Enigma Variations: 1/17 – 21.

DANCE CHARISMA!

Fess Parker Studio Theatre, 500 El Camino Real, Santa Clara University (408) 554-4015 www.scu.edu/cpa

Students in the Charisma group present a uniquely intimate exploration of faith and spirituality that combines art, music, dance, and spoken word: 1/18 – 20. MERCE CUNNINGHAM DANCE COMPANY

Dinkelspiel Auditorium, 471 Lagunita Dr., Stanford University (408) 725-6230 livelyarts.stanford.edu

After a successful 2005 tour, Merce Cunningham brings his dance company to Stanford to showcase two programs, one including the works Crises, CRWDSPCR, and BIPED, and the new eyeSpace, which lets


EVENT

LISTINGS LOS GATOS MUSEUM OF ART

Kronos Quartet, Memorial Auditorium, 1/18

Four Tait Ave. Los Gatos (408) 395-7375 www.museumsoflosgatos.org

Imaginative nature paintings by Florence de Bretagne: Thru 2/23. Abstract architectural photography by Jeff Zaruba: Thru 2/23. MARTHA HEASLEY COX CENTER FOR STEINBECK STUDIES

Martin Luther King Library 150 E. San Fernando St. San Jose (408) 924-4588 www.steinbeck.sjsu.edu

The largest Steinbeck archive in the world includes manuscripts, letters, photographs, and paintings: Ongoing. ROSICRUCIAN EGYPTIAN MUSEUM

1660 Park Ave. San Jose (408) 947-3636 www.egyptianmuseum.org

History of the Rosicrucian Egyptian Museum Exhibit: This exhibit shows the museum’s transformation from one artifact in an office to a museum with more than 4,000 artifacts: Ongoing. SARATOGA HISTORICAL MUSEUM

20450 Saratoga-Los Gatos Rd. Saratoga (408) 867-9229 www.saratogahistory.com

Explore the history of Saratoga with local Muwekma Ohlone Indian artifacts from the Saratoga archeological dig site. Photos, paintings, and information on the family of American abolitionist John Brown (his widow and family lived in Saratoga): Ongoing. SAN JOSE INSTITUTE OF CONTEMPORARY ART

560 S. First St. San Jose (408) 283-8155 www.sjica.org

the audience use iPods to help guide the sound and movement on stage: 1/25 – 26. SECOND STAGE 2008

Mountain View Center for the Performing Arts, 500 Castro St., Mountain View (650) 903-6000 www.mvcpa.com

TITO, STAR EGYPTIAN BELLY DANCER

Veterans Memorial Senior Center, 1455 Madison Ave., Redwood City (650) 780-7270 http:// classic.redwoodcity.org/about/ city_facilities.html

Viewed as one of the top belly dancers in the world, Tito’s skill, incredible charisma, and his dance company have been entertaining audiences around the world for many years: 1/26.

MUSEUMS CANTOR ARTS CENTER

Palm Dr. at Museum Way Stanford University (650) 723-4177 www.museum.stanford.edu

Frederic Church, Winslow Homer and Thomas Moran: Tourism and the American Landscape: An exhibition

CHILDREN’S DISCOVERY MUSEUM

180 Woz Way San Jose (408) 298-5437 www.cdm.org

SAN JOSE MUSEUM OF ART

110 S. Market St. San Jose (408) 271-6840 www.sjmusart.org

Joan Miró: Fantastic Universe: This exhibition features the work of pioneer European modernist Joan Miró, highlighting the artist’s exploration of printmaking towards the end of his career: Thru 2/3. SAN JOSE MUSEUM OF QUILTS AND TEXTILES

520 S. First St., San Jose (408) 971-0323 www.sjquiltmuseum.org

Marian Clayden: The Dyer’s Hand: A retrospective of the career of Marian Clayden, master dyer, textile artist and fashion designer, this exhibition spans her textile art designed for the wall through to her later works designed for the body: Thru 3/23. TECH MUSEUM OF INNOVATION

201 S. Market St. San Jose (408) 294-TECH www.thetech.org

IDEA House: An interactive program space encourages you to formulate and synthesize like never before: Ongoing. Green by Design: Designs with a green approach, aiming to prevent environmental problems and improve lives: Ongoing. View from Space: Science made visible in an exhibit that displays weather, aircraft, and daily patterns from space: Ongoing. Body Worlds 2 & The Three Pound Gem: Gunther von Hagen’s anatomical exhibit of real human bodies preserved through his patented process of Plastination: Thru 1/26.

GALLERIES COGSWELL POLYTECHNICAL COLLEGE

1175 Bordeaux Dr., Sunnyvale (408) 541-0100 www.cogswell.edu

Blue View and Other Observations: Recent paintings by Reid Winfrey: 1/18 – 2/15. FINN CENTER

Community School of Music and Arts, 230 San Antonio Circle, Mountain View (650) 917-6800 x306 www.arts4all.org

The Art of Collage: Works by Sylvie A. Serex-Bonnet: Proceeds from sale of artwork benefit CSMA’s Financial Aid Program: Thru 1/26. HEARTWORKS GALLERY

311 E. Campbell Ave. Campbell (408) 370-7278 www.heartworksgallery.com

Paintings, sculptures, and glassware by Debbie Arambula: Ongoing. LEONARD AND DAVID MCKAY GALLERY

1650 Senter Rd. San Jose (408) 287-2290 www.historysanjose.org

The Birth of California Car Culture: An exhibition of photographs from early California car culture: Thru 1/27. THE MAIN GALLERY

1018 Main St., Redwood City (650) 701-1018 www.themaingallery.org

Off the Wall Small: A group show of featured small works: Thru 2/10. MODERNBOOK GALLERY

494 University Ave. Palo Alto (650) 327-6325 www.modernbook.com

Photography from Roger M. Eberhard: Thru 1/31. SONYA PAZ FINE ART GALLERY

1793 Lafayette St., Ste. 110 Santa Clara (408) 294-7900 www.sonyapaz.com

The works of Sonya Paz, including framed pieces, watches, pillows, and more: Ongoing. TW

Exciting interactive displays, galleries and activities for the whole family to enjoy: Ongoing. INTEL MUSEUM

2200 Mission College Blvd. Santa Clara (408) 765-0503 www.intel.com/museum

ARTS

The faculty of the Teen Dance Company will be putting on their annual presentation of works in progress developed in part with the guest artist series: 1/26 – 27.

that explores the work of three influential artists in the context of the new and growing tourist industry in the United States: 1/30 – 5/4. Private and Public: Class, Personality, Politics, and Landscape in British Photography: This exhibition, from the Cantor Arts Center’s collection, explores the special qualities of the British as revealed in photographs: their obsession with class, individuality, the city, and the countryside. The exhibition includes works by Julia Margaret Cameron, Peter Henry Emerson, Francis Frith, and Bill Brandt: Thru 4/6. Dreaming of a Speech Without Words: The paintings, sculptures, and drawings of H.C. Westermann from the 1950s to the ’60s: Thru 3/2. A New 19th Century: The reinstalled Mondavi Family Gallery features newly acquisitioned works by Monet, Renoir, Sargent, and more: Ongoing. Auguste Rodin Collection: The largest collection of Rodin bronzes outside Paris: Ongoing. African Art in Context: Photography, dress, and other artifacts: Ongoing. Papua New Guinea Sculpture Garden: Wood and stone carvings of people, animals, and mythical beings: Ongoing. Living Traditions: Arts of the Americas: A collection of work from diverse Native American peoples and times: Ongoing.

Mapping Time: Doug Glovaski Works 1995 – 2007: Large-scale, intensely colored abstract paintings and works on paper based on childhood memories and current-day observances and experiences: 1/18 – 3/15. Susan Wexler: Berlin Wall Series: Paintings on paper reflecting her trip to Berlin in 1988 prior to

the fall of the Berlin Wall: Thru 1/19. The Landscape of War: A multimedia exhibition depicting the destruction caused from war: Thru 1/19.

More than 30 interactive exhibits throughout the museum describe the technology and history of the chipmaking industry. Take a video peek inside a real “fab” where chips are made, or try on a bunny suit worn by chip factory employees: Ongoing. JAPANESE AMERICAN MUSEUM OF SAN JOSE

535 N. Fifth St., San Jose (408) 294-3138 www.jamsj.org

1942: Luggage from Home to Camp: In collaboration with artist Flo Oy Wong, this exhibition displays the lives of WWII internees through mixed media: Ongoing. Jack Matsuoka’s Cartoons: Making the Best of Poston: Insightful cartoons that aim to make the best of the tragic incarceration of JapaneseAmericans: Ongoing. Pioneers of San Jose Japantown: Photo exhibit of San Jose’s Japantown from 1900: Ongoing. Asahi/Zebras Baseball: An exhibit featuring photos of Japanese-Americans playing baseball at relocation camps during World War II: Ongoing.

Tourism and the American Landscape, Cantor Arts Center, 1/30 - 5/4 THEWAVEMAG.COM JANUARY 16-29, 2008

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» FEATURE

Family&Community

» » » »

FEATURE 68 EVENT LISTINGS 70 FARMERS MARK ETS 70 WEDDING PL ANNING 72

Adventure Playground Berkeley Marina (south of University Ave.), Berkeley (510) 644-8623 www.cityofberkeley.info/marina/ marinaexp/adventplgd.html

Family Matters Take the kids out for some fun and adventure, and you’ll have some, too. BY IRENE KEW

FA MILY & COMMUNIT Y

J

ust because you have children, that doesn’t mean weekends have to be confined to neighborhood playgrounds, kiddie museums or watching Barney and Friends reruns at home. While hang gliding and shark diving may be out of the picture, the Bay Area offers many adventures packed with enough variety to engage every family member. From seashore sleepovers to bug walks, here are 10 kid-tested, parent-approved, off-the-beaten-track excursions and activities that will enthrall the young – and the young at heart.

Baby Loves Disco Avalon Nightclub, 777 Lawrence Expwy., Santa Clara (408) 241-0777 www.babylovesdisco.com/locations/ southbay

Afternoon dance parties in a hip hangout for the diaper set, Baby Loves Disco promises feel-good dance tunes from the ’70s and ’80s, a spread of healthy snacks and a baby-safe environment that includes bubble machines, baskets of musical instruments, a quiet 68

THEWAVEMAG.COM JANUARY 16-29, 2008

room with puzzles and books and, of course, diaper-changing stations. While it’s designed for six-month-olds to seven-year-olds, older and younger siblings, nannies and even grandparents are welcome. The cost per walking human? $12. The chance to boogie with your offspring? Priceless. The next party is scheduled for Feb. 2.

Earthbound Farm’s Farm Stand 7250 Carmel Valley, Carmel (831) 625-6219 www.ebfarm.com

Whether it’s a bug walk where kids help release armies of farm-friendly insects like ladybugs (free for adults, $3 for kids) or the opening of its organic corn maze every September with live music, trains, cooking demos, crafts and games (free admission), there’s always something exciting happening at Earthbound Farm. While the young ones learn how organic vegetables and flowers are grown, parents can also have fun with floral arrangement, gourmet cooking, as well as

the Cut-Your-Own Herb Garden and chamomile aromatherapy labyrinth on the farm’s 30-acre grounds. Besides specialty walks, Earthbound also holds four annual festivals that are free to the public. The best time to visit is between April and October, when most programs are held.

Palo Alto Junior Museum and Zoo 1451 Middlefield Rd., Palo Alto (650) 329-2111 www.cityofpaloalto.org/depts/csd/activities_and_ recreation/attractions/junior_museum.asp

Who would have expected a zoo in the middle of Palo Alto? One of the city’s little-known gems, this local hot spot offers two attractions in one, and it’s free. Opened in 1969, the zoo’s collection of more than 50 exotic and native animals includes bobcats, raccoons and hedgehogs. It may not rival its counterparts in San Jose, Oakland or San Francisco, but families can still expect a fun, educational experience. Among its exhibits are a bat habitat showcasing African and Egyptian fruit bats, and a 500-gallon saltwater tank that houses two swell leopard sharks. The museum features permanent, as well as rotating, hands-on science, nature and history activities, geared mostly toward toddlers. Perfect for all ages.

Skip the candy-colored, plastic-molded McPlaygrounds and supersize your family fun at Berkeley’s one-of-a-kind, build-it-yourself play paradise. Billed as one of the top five play spaces in America, this wonderland allows kids to build their own playground – using saws, glue, tempera paints, and hammers and nails. All construction takes place under the watchful eye of a play supervisor, of course. Build a fort with your little ones using scrapwood, ropes, wooden poles, old tires, even abandoned pianos, send your kid zooming across the playground on the zip line, or take part in the playground’s slew of staff-supervised summer activities, which can include fishing, crafts and tool workshops. Open weekends and holidays during the school year and every day in the summer, the Adventure Playground is free for kids accompanied by adults. For $5, parents can leave children seven or older in the playground for up to three hours. The venue is closed when raining.

Seashore Sleepover at Monterey Bay Aquarium 886 Cannery Row, Monterey (831) 648-4800 www.montereybayaquarium.org

This overnight adventure held throughout the year gives kids ages six through 14 and their parents a rare peek at what goes on in the aquarium after hours. For $50 per person, campers enjoy an educational, fun-filled evening, which comes with a bedtime snack, bedtime stories, and even a late-night movie. Participants go to bed beside schools of tunas, sharks, turtles and other sea creatures, and awaken in the morning to breakfast at the Portola Café, followed by another day of exciting aquarium action. The next sleepover is scheduled for Feb. 15. Visit the website for more dates.

Mrs. Grossman’s Paper Company and Sticker Factory Tour 3810 Cypress Dr., Petaluma (800) 429-4549 www.mrsgrossmans.com By reservation only

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FAMILY & COMMUNIT Y: FEATURE

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THEWAVEMAG.COM JANUARY 16-29, 2008

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» EVENT LISTINGS

FAMILY&COMMUNITY EVENT

LISTINGS READING AND BOOK SIGNING WITH TAHMIMA ANAM: 1/23

San Jose Coin Club’s 40th Annual Coin Stamp Collectibles Show: 2/1 - 3

Books Inc., 301 Castro St., Mountain View www.booksinc.net

FUN TIME SINGERS: WEDNESDAYS

Prince of Peace Lutheran Church, 12770 Saratoga Ave., Saratoga www.funtimesingers.org

Ms. Anam will be signing copies of her first novel, A Golden Age: 7:30pm

A lively and diverse community choir invites men and women to join their group: 7:15 – 9:30pm

STORY TIME AT BORDERS

DONATIONS

Borders Books, 356 Santana Row, San Jose (408) 241-9100

Story time every Wednesday and Saturday at 1pm in the children’s book section.

CLUB MEETINGS PENINSULA RUGMAKERS GUILD: THIRD THURSDAY OF THE MONTH

Rose Garden Branch Library, 1580 Naglee Ave., San Jose (831) 438-6628 groups. yahoo.com/group/Peninsula_ RugmakersGuild/

All rugmakers and enthusiasts welcome: 10am – 3pm

ONE WARM COAT: THRU 1/31

Santana Row, Winchester & San Carlos Blvds., San Jose www.santanarow.com/events/ ?eid=1041&m=1&d=01

Attention! If you have any coats that you know you’re not going to wear, visit Santana Row and donate them to One Warm Coat, a national nonprofit that distributes coats to people who need them. Donation bins located throughout the shopping center. RECYCLE YOUR OLD CELL PHONES FOR THE ORANGUTAN CONSERVANCY: ONGOING

Happy Hollow Park & Zoo, 1300 Senter Rd., San Jose (408) 2773000 www.hhpz.org

Donate your old cell phones and pagers the next time you visit Happy Hollow Zoo, and help support the

FARMERS

» FARMERS MARK ETS IF YOU HAVE AN IDEA FOR A LISTING, OR KNOW OF SOMETHING HAPPENING THAT YOU'RE AFRAID WE'LL OVERLOOK, PLEASE EMAIL YOUR COMMUNIT Y EVENT TO EVENTS@THEWAVEMAG.COM.

ART WALKS DOWNTOWN CAMPBELL ART WALK: 1/18

Downtown Campbell, along Campbell Avenue www.downtowncampbell.com

BOOK SIGNING AND COOKING DEMO: 1/19

Sur La Table, 378 Santana Row, Ste. 1030, San Jose (408) 244-4749

Ellie Krieger, host of Food Network’s Healthy Appetite, will give cooking demonstrations and sign copies of

FA MILY & COMMUNIT Y

A great opportunity to visit with the artists and view their exciting new works in a friendly, casual atmosphere every third Friday of the month: 6pm

BOOK READINGS/ SIGNINGS

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her new book, The Food You Crave: Luscious Recipes for a Healthy Life: Noon PICTURE BOOK PALS: 1/19

Books Inc., 301 Castro St., Mountain View www.booksinc.net

Story time for children ages three and up. First and third Saturday of every month: 10:30am

Campbell: Sunday 9am – 1pm (year round) Campbell Ave. at Central & First Sts. (510) 745-7100 Cupertino: Friday 9am – 1pm (year round) Vallco Fashion Park Parking Lot,10123 Wolfe Rd. (800) 949-FARM Los Gatos: Sunday 8am – 12:30pm (year round) Montebello Way & Broadway Extension (408) 353-5355 Mountain View: Sunday 9am – 1pm (year round) Hope & Evelyn (800) 806-FARM

Orangutan Conservancy, a nonprofit group that is helping preserve our orangutans and their habitat.

FAIRS/ EXPOS THE BRIDAL EXTRAVAGANZA: 1/20

Fairmont Hotel, 170 S. Market St., San Jose (408) 360-9333 www.bestbridalshow.com

Head over to the Bridal Extravaganza to see the latest in formal wear, wedding cakes, gowns and much more: 11am – 4pm SOUTH BAY SPRING HOME AND GARDEN SHOW: 1/25 - 27

Santa Clara Convention Center, 5001 Great American Pkwy., Santa Clara (408) 748-7000

Start planning your spring garden now by getting tips and information on new products and the latest in home and garden design. SECOND ANNUAL ARLEN NESS BIKE SHOW & PARTS EXPO: 1/16 - 27

San Jose McEnery Convention Center, 150 W. San Carlos St., San Jose www.arlennessbikeshow.com

If you’re into the motorcycle scene, you won’t want to miss this show

MARKETS

Palo Alto: Sunday 9am – 1pm (year round) California Ave. & El Camino Real (800) 806-FARM San Jose: Sunday 10am – 3pm (year round) Stevens Creek & Winchester (800) 949-FARM San Jose: Friday 10am – 2pm (year round) Kaiser Santa Teresa Parking Lot (800) 949-FARM San Jose: Sunday 8:30am – Noon (year round) Japantown, Jackson between Sixth & Seventh Sts. (408) 298-4303 San Jose: Sunday 10am – 2pm (year round) Princeton Plaza, Kooser & Meridian (800) 806-FARM

Santa Clara: Thursday 10am – 2pm (year round) Santa Clara Kaiser Parking Lot (800) 949-FARM Santa Clara: Saturday 9am – 1pm (year round) Jackson St. between Homestead & Benton (510) 745-7100 Saratoga: Saturday 9am – 1pm (year round) Saratoga West Valley College Fruitvale & Allendale Aves. (800) 806-FARM Sunnyvale: Saturday 9am – 1pm (year round) S. Murphy Ave. at Washington and Evelyn (510) 745-7100


FAMILY&COMMUNITY EVENT featuring more than 225 beautiful machines, along with vendor displays, swap meet and special autograph sessions from super bike builders Arlen and Corey Ness and Donnie Smith. SAN JOSE COIN CLUB’S 40TH ANNUAL COIN STAMP COLLECTIBLES SHOW: 2/1 - 3 Santa Clara County Fairgrounds, 344 Tully Rd., San Jose (408) 294-7223 www.sanjosecoinclub.org

This show features more than 100 dealers buying, selling and trading their stamps and coins.

FAMILY ACTIVITIES HARLEM GLOBETROTTERS: 1/18 - 19

HP Pavilion, 525 W. Santa Clara St., San Jose www.hppsj.com

Bring the whole family out for an evening of high-flyin’ basketball playing antics! KIDS NIGHT AT THE ART BEAT: 1/18, 25

The Art Beat, 68 E. Campbell Ave., Campbell (408) 370-5002

Children ages five to 12 are invited for a night of games, food, creating works of art, making friends and tons of fun!: 6:30 – 9pm FRIENDS OF THE LIBRARY BOOK SALE: 1/19 Los Gatos Public Library, 110 E. Main St., Los Gatos (408) 358-2571

It’s a super sale featuring thousands of books, CDs, DVDs, even collectible books! 10am – 2pm COMMUNITY CRAB FEED: 1/25

St. Joseph of Cupertino School, 10120 N. De Anza Blvd., Cupertino (408) 252-6441

Don’t miss this all-you-can-eat – that’s right, ALL YOU CAN EAT – fresh crab, salad, pasta and dessert dinner: 7pm THE PEKING ACROBATS: 1/26

China’s premier acrobatic troupe will perform amazing feats of balance, strength and stamina: 8pm SOAP AND SALVE: 1/27

Hidden Villa Community, 26870 Moody Rd., Los Altos Hills (650) 949-9704 www.hiddenvilla.org

You’ll learn how to turn farm materials into products such as handmade healing salves and soap. Come willing to experiment and ready to take home some of your creations: 2 – 5pm STORYTELLING FESTIVAL: 1/27

Palo Alto Children’s Library, 1276 Harriet St., Palo Alto (650) 329-2436

Visit the Palo Alto Children’s Library and enjoy professional storytellers from all over the Bay Area do what else? Share their favorite tales!

CIRQUE DU SOLEIL: KOOZA: 1/31 – 3/1

Taylor Street Bridge, San Jose www.cirquedusoleil.com

Enter the magical world of Cirque du Soleil and witness high-flying acrobats, amazing music, and laughable clowning as the KOOZA story unfolds – a tale of a melancholy loner who is searching for his place in the world, and the interesting characters he meets. PLAYHOUSE DISNEY LIVE!: 2/2

San Jose Civic Auditorium, 135 W. San Carlos St., San Jose www.sanjose.org

Bring the whole family and join the whole gang of Disney characters that include Mickey, Handy Manny, Winnie the Pooh, Tigger and many more, for an evening of sing-alongs, laughter and fun! POTTERY CLASSES FOR HOMESCHOOLERS: WEDNESDAYS

Black Leopard Clayware, 2213 Radio Ave. (408) 448-4597 www.bleopard.com

GARDENING ROSE PRUNING AND CARE: 1/19

Common Ground Educational Center, 559 College Ave., Palo Alto (650) 493-6072

Believe it or not, there is actually a science to pruning your rose bushes. Swing by Common Ground and find out these secrets, along with info on soils, mulches and other ways to keep your roses happy: 10:30am – 1:30pm SANTA CRUZ ORCHID SOCIETY SHOW AND SALE: 1/26 - 27

Soquel High School, 401 Old San Jose Rd., Soquel (408) 954-2566

Spring is not that far off, so it’s time to start thinking about that flower garden of yours – and what better place to start than the Santa Cruz Orchid Society Show and Sale: 9am ADVANCED FRUIT TREE PRUINING AND SHAPING: 1/27, 2/2

Children ages eight to 12 will enjoy fun projects using various forming techniques: 2 – 4:30pm

Yamagami’s Nursery, 1361 S. De Anza Blvd., Cupertino (408) 252-3347 yamagamisnursery.com

SATURDAY NIGHT SILENT MOVIES: SATURDAYS

You’ll learn how to lower an overgrown tree, espalier a tree and how to maximize harvest in a limited space.

Edison Theater, 37417 Niles Blvd., Fremont www.nilesfilmmuseum.org

Head over to Fremont and make your way to the Edison Theatre and enjoy an evening of silent films from all the greats: Will Rogers, Douglas Fairbanks, Laurel and Hardy, Lon Chaney. All movies are accompanied by a live pianist: 7:30pm

FESTIVALS/ CELEBRATIONS BURNS SUPPER & CEILIDH DANCE: 1/19

Mountain View Masonic Temple, 890 Church St., Mountain View (408) 2756889 www.southbayscots.org

A celebration of the birthday of Scotland’s immortal Robert Burns, with songs, poetry, traditional food (yes, that means haggis), dancing, raffle, and music by Peter Daldry: 6 – 9pm

FUNDRAISERS THE SEVENTH ANNUAL GREAT GLASS AUCTION: 1/26

Fourth Street Summit Center, 88 S. Fourth St., San Jose www.bagi.org

The auction will feature beautiful glass pieces from local and international artists, with funds benefiting the Bay Area Glass Institute’s equipment upgrades and public education programs: 5:30 – 10pm MALO, LA VENTANA, SISTERS MORALES: 1/26

Fox Theatre, 2215 Broadway, Redwood City (650) 369-4119 www.foxdream.com

Enjoy some great live music and help raise money for fighting autism: 7pm

GAY / LESBIAN COMING OUT SUPPORT: 1/23

Billy DeFrank LGBT Community Center, 989 The Alameda, San Jose (408) 2932429 www.defrank.org

A support group assisting individuals who are questioning, or are new to dealing with, the aspect of being gay, lesbian, or bisexual: 7 – 8:30pm DEFRANK GAY BINGO: WEDNESDAYS

Billy DeFrank LGBT Community Center, 989 The Alameda, San Jose (408) 293-2429 www.defrank.org/events/bingo.html

DeFrank Gay Bingo is a festive bingo game that has the flair of gay culture to boot. All orientations are welcome to join in the fun: 7pm

LOCAL GOVT. 2008 POWER REPORT LUNCHEON: 1/24

Fairmont Hotel, 170 S. Market St., San Jose (408) 297-5267 www.sjchamber.com

The San Jose Silicon Valley Chamber of Commerce invites you to join them and Lt. Governor John Garamendi as they discuss the state’s economic development efforts and our current business climate: 11:30am – 1:30pm

LECTURES ROBERT M. SAPOLSKY LECTURE: 1/16

Louis B. Mayer Theatre, 500 El Camino Real, Santa Clara (408) 554-4400

Join Stanford professor Robert

F E AT U R E 68

What’s not to like about factory tours? Families get an educational behindthe-scenes look at how their favorite things are made, pay little if anything for admission, and often walk away with lots of free samples. A tour at Mrs. Grossman’s (reputedly the country’s largest sticker factory) kicks off with a video presentation and a guided tour of the 110,000-square-foot plant and its high-tech equipment, including the Laserweb, a unique computercontrolled, laser cutting system that is used for their most delicate designs. At the end of the tour, everyone gets a pack of freshly minted stickers and a chance to create their own sticker project. One-hour tours are conducted on weekdays only; $3 per person for ages three and up.

Almaden Quicksilver County Park and Mining Museum 21350 Almaden Rd., San Jose (408) 323-1107 www.parkhere.org

Considered by many to be a ghost town, New Almaden – a 19th-century boomtown south of San Jose – is not only rich in history, but a great place for hikes. Declared a National Historic landmark district because of its mercury mines, which played a pivotal role in California’s gold rush era, this small town offers miles of stunning hiking, equestrian and bike trails, with ranger-guided nature and history walks available upon request. At the small mining museum, trace the history of the area’s mercury mines (some of the most productive in the world) and examine the lifestyles of the mining communities via the interesting array of photographs, exhibits and mining artifacts. The museum is open only on Fridays (noon-4pm) and weekends (10am-4pm).

Second Saturday Participation Plays Palo Alto Children’s Theatre, 1305 Middlefield Rd., Palo Alto (650) 463-4930 www.cityofpaloalto.org/depts/csd/activities_and_ recreation/attractions/childrens_theatre.asp

movement. Created by the Children’s Theatre High School Company, these plays are designed for fourto-six-year-olds, but babies are also welcome. Plays run between 30 to 45 minutes, so the kids won’t get as fidgety, but they will leave with an acting experience they’ll relish for a long time. In the lineup are The Little Red Hen (Feb. 9), The Emperor’s New Clothes (Mar. 8), The Little Mermaid (Apr. 12) and The Ugly Duckling (May 10). Tickets cost $8 for adults and $4 per child; a family pack of four tickets is $16.

Tumble & Tea 4210 Telegraph Ave., Oakland (510) 601-REST www.tumbleandtea.com

The brainchild of two (now former) stay-at-home moms who were looking for better ways to maintain their social life with junior in tow, Tumble & Tea has all the ingredients for quality family time. In this cozy, childproof space, parents can kick back with a latte and nosh on healthy organic fare, while turning their tykes loose in an enclosed soundproof play space buzzing with colorful play structures, creative toys and a host of activities such as sing-alongs and story-time. Access to the play area designed for newborns to five-yearolds costs $5.95 for the day and $2 for additional siblings. Babies play for free.

Elkhorn Slough Safari Moss Landing (831) 633-5555 www.elkhornslough.com

Perfect for a family “daycation” – the Elkhorn Slough Safari is a naturalist-led two-hour cruise (aboard a comfortable 27-foot pontoon boat) through Elkhorn Slough, one of California’s largest and last remaining coastal wetlands. A resting place for otters seeking shelter from winter storms and a vital stopover for migrating birds, you can expect to get up close with plenty of local wildlife, including harbor seals, otters and countless shorebirds. Two-hour tours available daily at varying times; reservations required. $28 adults, $26 seniors and $20 ages three to 14 (minimum age is three). TW

Families can get their act together with this fun-filled series of interactive plays based on fairy tales, where the audience participates in the performance, providing sound and THEWAVEMAG.COM JANUARY 16-29, 2008

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FA MILY & COMMUNIT Y

Flint Center for the Performing Arts, 21250 Stevens Creek Blvd., Cupertino www.dimensionarts.org

LISTINGS


FAMILY&COMMUNITY EVENT

LISTINGS HOW TO BUY HOMES AT SHAMEFUL PRICES: 1/24

71

Coldwell Banker, 2833 Junction Ave. #200, San Jose (408) 3487988 www.svreo.com

Find out how to purchase homes for 70 cents on the dollar, strategies to buy foreclosures, short sales and bank-owned property: 6:30pm TEACHING KIDS ABOUT THE OUTDOORS: 1/24

REI, 400 El Paseo de Saratoga, San Jose (408) 871-8765 www.rei.com/stores/22

Don’t miss this free presentation that explains how to enjoy and care for the great outdoors. ELECTROSTATICS: 1/26

Museum of American Heritage, 351 Homer Ave., Palo Alto (650) 321-1004 www.moah.org

In this workshop, students learn about static electricity, with each student building an electroscope, a Leyden jar, and an electrophorus to generate tribo-electric action! Students get to take home each experiment built: 10am – noon KNITTING AT THE LIBRARY: 2/2

Redwood City Public Library, 1044 Middlefield Rd., Redwood City (650) 780-7026 www.rcpl.info

Get started on your path to knitting with lessons for beginners, help with existing projects, and one-on-one assistance: 1pm

Cirque Du Soleil: KOOZA: 1/31 – 3/1 Sapolsky as he discusses “The Biology of Our Individuality”: 7:30pm NUTRITION & DETOXIFICATION: 1/17

Cubberly Center, 4000 Middlefield Rd., Rm. H-1, Palo Alto smartlifeforum.org

Attend this free lecture given by Elson Haas, M.D. on nutrition and detoxification: 7 – 10pm MULTIMEDIA LECTURE ON ASTRONOMY: 1/23

FA MILY & COMMUNIT Y

Smithwick Theatre – Foothill College, 12345 El Monte Rd., Los Altos (650) 949-7888

Astronomer Joel Primack of UC Santa Cruz and philosopher Nancy Abrams will give a multimedia presentation entitled “The View from the Center of the Universe: Discovering Our Extraordinary Place in the Cosmos”: 7pm SALON DE MEXICO SPEAKER SERIES: JOSÉ RIVERA: 1/26

Mexican Heritage Plaza Theatre, 1700 Alum Rock Ave., San Jose (800) 847-7730 www.mhciva.org

Join Oscar-nominated screenwriter José Rivera as he discusses the life and legacy of Che Guevera, one of Cuba’s most revolutionary socialist leaders: Noon

SELF-HELP ASH KICKERS STOP SMOKING CLASSES: THRU 2/6

O’Connor Hospital, 2105 Forest Ave., De Paul Room., San Jose (408) 998-5865 www.ggbreathe.org

Learn how to kick the habit every Wednesday at 7pm

ASH KICKERS STOP SMOKING CLASSES: 1/23 – 2/20

SQUARE DANCE CLASS: 1/21

Learn how to kick the habit every Wednesday at 7pm

Singles and couples are invited to come on out and learn how to square dance. Lots of fun and partners are not required, so you have no excuses: 7:30 – 9:30pm

Camino Medical Group, 701 E. El Camino Real, Rm. B, Mountain View (408) 998-5865 www.ggbreathe.org

FOOD ADDICTS IN RECOVERY ANONYMOUS: 1/26

St. Judas Church, 20920 McClellan Rd., Cupertino www.foodaddicts.org

Food Addicts in Recovery Anonymous will be holding a special community information session for anyone interested in learning more about the program: 10:30am - noon

VOLUNTEERING FARM & NATURE GUIDES NEEDED

Hidden Villa, 26870 Moody Rd., Los Altos (650) 949-9704 www.hiddenvilla.org

Guides are needed to teach children about farm animals, explore the vegetable garden, and hike in the wilderness.

WORKSHOPS/ CLASSES HOW TO GET INTO & PAY FOR COLLEGE WORKSHOP: 1/17

Campbell Public Library, 77 Harrison Ave., Campbell (408) 866-1991 www.santaclaracountylib.org/ campbell/CAprograms.html

Join Gen and Kelly Tanabe as they discuss everything you need to know to get into college, and how to pay for it: 7pm 72

THEWAVEMAG.COM JANUARY 16-29, 2008

Loyola School, 770 Berry Ave., Los Altos (408) 867-7715 www.bowsandbeaus.org

HOW TO CUT SHAPES OUT OF METAL WITH THE CNC PLASMA CUTTER: 1/22

Tech Shop, 120 Independence Dr., Menlo Park (800) 640-1975 www. techshop.ws/take_classes.html

professional snowshoe guide Cathy Anderson-Meyers and learn everything you need to know about the wonderful sport of snowshoeing: 7 – 8:30pm LEARN HOW TO TUNE AND WAX YOUR SKIS AND SNOWBOARD: 1/24

www.rei.com/stores/22

Join REI snow sports tech Jason Walton for a demonstration on tuning your ski/board for optimal performance in different snow conditions: 7pm

SV

WEDDING PLANNING

» WEDDING PL ANNING

BACHELORETTE PARTIES: Jewelsexpression, 1445 Foxworthy Ave., San Jose www.jewelsexpression.com Jewelsexpression offers exotic dancing classes with a softer touch. Designed for women of all shapes, sizes and ages, you’ll learn the art of the “walk,” floor performing, and faux pole and chair dancing. Great for bridal showers and bachelorette parties.

IT’S EASY BEING GREEN: 1/23

RECEPTIONS: Hotel Los Gatos & Spa, 210 E. Main St., Los Gatos (408) 335-1700 www.hotellosgatos.com

Computer History Museum, 1401 N. Shoreline Blvd., Mountain View www.commonwealthclub.org

Mediterranean ambience provides luxurious banquet facilities for events to accommodate up to 130 guests at various locations, including our Indoor Monte Sereno Ballroom, Outdoor Courtyard & Pool Terrace.

Experts will cover all the aspects on how to get on the path of becoming an eco-friendly household: 7pm

International Association of Nanotechnology, 1290 Parkmoor Ave., San Jose www.ianano.org

The Investment Forum 2008 will feature sessions with venture capital firms and major corporations seeking investment and technology licensing deals from small companies, followed by company presentations featuring 40 to 50 start-ups. FREE CLASS: SNOWSHOEING BASICS: 1/23 REI, 2450 Charleston Rd., Mountain View (650) 969-1938

Enjoy a slide presentation from

Almaden Branch Public Library, 6445 Camden Ave., San Jose (408) 808-3040 sjlibrary. org/gateways/multicultural/ conversation.htm

Adults are invited to join this free conversation club to practice their English language skills: Noon – 1pm TW

REI, 400 El Paseo de Saratoga, San Jose (408) 871-8765

You’re invited to the Tech Shop to learn how to operate a CNC plasma cutter that can cut ANY shape from sheet metal, steel, aluminum, copper, stainless steel, and other metals, with beautifully clean edges: 6pm

EMERGING TECH INVESTMENT FORUM: 1/23 – 24

ENGLISH SECOND LANGUAGE CONVERSATION CLUB: WEDNESDAYS

Makeup Artist: Professional Makeup by Tiffany Chiang (408) 242-8154 www.beautyexpertfiffany.com Call and book your bridal party makeovers from professional makeup artist Tiffany Chiang.

ACCOMMODATIONS: Hotel Los Gatos & Spa, 210 E. Main St., Los Gatos (408) 335-1700 www.hotellosgatos.com Mediterranean-styled villas providing luxurious guest rooms and suites. Nestled at the base of the Santa Cruz Mountains and within walking distance of the many shops, restaurants and galleries. Home to Preston Wynne Spa & Dio Deka Restaurant.

TANNING: Exotica Airbrush Tanning, 15466 Los Gatos Blvd., Ste. 207, Los Gatos (408) 358-4380 www.exoticaairbrushtanning.com Specializing in wedding parties. Customized bronze blends for your skin type for a perfect natural glow for your day. Check website for info.

TRAVEL: Cruise Planners, 5669 Snell Ave., San Jose, Ste. 372 (408) 715-7196 www.seafarescruises.com Our travel agency specializes in designing a vacation that exceeds your expectations. Our passion is to plan a seamless and exciting cruise and travel experience. Call us today to start planning your dream vacation memories.

FOR A COMPLETE LIST OF WEDDING VENDORS, LOG ON TO

WWW.SILICONVALLEYWEDDINGS.COM


PHOTO CREDITS D E S I G N @ T H E W AV E M A G . C O M 1, Cover / Designed by Chris Schmauch, 3, 30 Rock / Courtesy of NBC, Alicia Keys / By Thierry LeGoues, Cava Wine Holder / Courtesy of Umbra+, David Alan Grier / Courtesy of San Jose Improv, Belkin RockStar / Courtesy of Belkin, Freestyle Reign-Bow / Courtesy of Reebok, Third cast / Courtesy of TheatreWorks, Trevese Caramel Apples / By Chris Schmauch, 6, John Newlin / By Chris Schmauch, 8, Cintra Wilson / By Chad Rachman, 10, Vanishing Pollinators / By Carll Goodpasture, Courtesy of Rosicrucian Egyptian Museum, 12, American Idol / Courtesy of FOX, 14, Pinguins Laptop Case / Courtesy of Velvet Idole , Umbrella Stand / Courtesy of SFMOMA, Belkin RockStar / Courtesy of Belkin, Wave Hanger / Courtesy of Design House Stockholm , 12, American Idol / Courtesy of FOX, 16, 30 Rock / Cpurtesy of NBC Universal, 18, TV Preview cover / Designed by Chris Schmauch, 19-23, 48 Hours Mystery / Courtesy of CBS, According to Jim / Courtesy of ABC, Aliens in America / Courtesy of The CW, America’s Next Top Model / Courtesy of The CW, American Gladiators / Courtesy of NBC, American Idol / Courtesy of FOX, Are You Smarter Than A Fifth Grader? / Courtesy of FOX, Big Brother / Courtesy of CBS, Cashmere Mafia / Courtesy of ABC, Comanche Moon / Courtesy of CBS, Crowned / Courtesy of The CW, CW Now / Courtesy of The CW, Dance Wars / Courtesy of ABC, Dancing With the Stars / Courtesy of ABC, Deal or No Deal / Courtesy of NBC, Eli Stone / Courtesy of ABC, Everybody Hates Chris / Courtesy of The CW, Family Guy / Courtesy of FOX, Grey’s Anatomy / Courtesy of ABC, House / Courtesy of FOX, Jericho / Courtesy of CBS, Just For Laughs / Courtesy of NBC, Law and Order CI / Courtesy of NBC, Law and Order SVU / Courtesy of NBC, Lost / Courtesy of ABC, Oprah’s Big Give / Courtesy of ABC, Power of 10 / Courtesy of CBS, Prison Break / Courtesy of FOX, Pussycat Dolls / Courtesy of The CW, Scrubs / Courtesy of NBC, Supernanny / Courtesy of ABC, Survivor / Courtesy of CBS, Terminator: The Sarah Connor Chronicles / Courtesy of FOX, The Bachelor / Courtesy of ABC, The New Adventures of Old Christine / Courtesy of CBS, The Simpsons / Courtesy of FOX, Ugly Betty / Courtesy of ABC, Welcome to the Captain / Courtesy of CBS, WWF Smackdown / Courtesy of The CW, 24, Sound In Motion screen / Courtesy of The 49ers , 26, Pangea Organics bar soaps / Courtesy of Pangea Organics, LUSH custom cut soaps / Courtesy of LUSH, 28, Fixins Bar / Courtesy of Biggs & Featherbelle, 34, Marc Jacobs, Miss Sixy and Phillip Lim catwalk shots / Courtesy of Wireimage , Freestyle Reign-Bow / Courtesy of Reebok, Neon web belt and neon lights sunglasses / Courtesy of Urban Outfitters , Men’s Pump running shoe / Courtesy of Reebok, 36, Cava Wine Holder / Courtesy of Umbra+, Cubix Lamp / Courtesy of SFMOMA, Curva Frame / Courtesy of Umbra+, Eames Molded Plywood Chair / Courtesy of Room & Board, LED Clock / Courtesy of SFMOMA, Plywood Magazine Stand / Courtesy of Room & Board, Creep Pendant Lamp / Courtesy of Susan Bradley Design, Surge Clock / Courtesy of Umbra+, Wobble Chess Set & Becca Table / Courtesy of SFMOMA, 40, Lobster Corndogs at Arcadia / By Chris Schmauch, Travese Caramel Apples / By Chris Schmauch, 42, Kung Pao Chicken Lollipops / Courtesy of SINO, 50, Temptations Catering / Courtesy of Temptations, 54, Cirque du Soleil performer / Courtesy of Cirque du Soleil , Cirque du Soleil performers / Courtesy of Cirque du Soleil , 56, David Alan Grier / Courtesy of San Jose Improv, Foo Fighters / Courtesy of Ben Watts, Leahy / Courtesy of Campbell Heritage Theatre, Sea Lions / Courtesy of iStock, Seventh Annual 2008 Great Glass Auction / Courtesy of Bay Area Glass Institute, 58, Alicia Keys / By Thierry LeGoues, 61, Ryan Adams / Courtesy of Neal Casal, 62, Sylvester Stallone as Rambo / Courtesy of Lionsgate Films, 64, Copenhagen / Courtesy of Palo Alto Players, 66, True West / Courtesy of the Pear Avenue Theatre, 67, Kronos Quartet / Courtesy of Stanford Lively Arts, Tourism in the American Landscape / Courtesy of Cantor Arts Museum, 68, Seashore Sleepover / Courtesy of Monterey Bay Aquarium, 74, Seanbaby / By Chris Schmauch

ADVERTISER INDEX S A L E S @ T H E W AV E M A G . C O M

A-1 Self Storage . . . . . . . . . . .39

Elevate Prints. . . . . . . . . . . . . .38

Nouveau Riche University. . .70

Academy for Salon Professionals . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10

Emerge MediSpa. . . . . . . . . . .29

Nuderma . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .27

Eternal Beauty. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9

Olive Bar, The. . . . . . . . . . . . . .47

eWomen. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69

Opiates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .32

Alliance Development Group - Park Place . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .37 Alliance Development Group - Stone Crest . . . . . . . . . . . . . .75

Fahrenheit Ultralounge . . . . .51

All World Furniture . . . . . . . . .39

Five Branches Institute . . . . .29

Anise Cafe. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .45

Five Branches Institute . . . . .30

Arya. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .51

Genesis Dentistry . . . . . . . . . . . 9

AVA Spa. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13

Ginger Cafe. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .46

Axis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .76

GoKart Racer . . . . . . . . . . . . . .15

Bangkok Taste . . . . . . . . . . . . .47

Goosetown Lounge . . . . . . . .59

Bay Dental . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12

Gordon Biersch . . . . . . . . . . . .45

Rosie McCann’s . . . . . . . . . . . .53

Bella Mia. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .47

Grand Century Dental . . . . . .13

Sam’s BBQ. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .45

Bella Saratoga. . . . . . . . . . . . .53

Gulliver USA. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6

Sanctuary Salon . . . . . . . . . . .33

BioHealth College. . . . . . . . . .10

Half Moon Bay Brewing Company . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .49

SAP Open . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8

Birk’s Restaurant. . . . . . . . . . .52 Blowfish Sushi. . . . . . . . . . . . .45 Blu Cocoon Med Spa . . . . . . .27 Bob’s Golf & Tennis . . . . . . . . .25 Braces For Pretty Faces . . . . . . 7 Buddha Lounge. . . . . . . . . . . .59 Burger Pit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .52 Camera Cinemas. . . . . . . . . . .63 Cantankerous Fish. . . . . . . . . .51 Caper’s Eat & Drink . . . . . . . . .41 Cascal Restaurant . . . . . . . . . .43 Century Graphics. . . . . . . . . . .15 Children’s Discovery Museum . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69

Chrysalis Aesthetic & Reconstructive Surgery, Inc. . . 9

Quarter Note . . . . . . . . . . . . . .59 Rabbits Foot Meadery . . . . . .59 Radiance Health Solutions . .31 Rambo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .63 Rocco’s Cigar Lounge . . . . . . .59

Scandalous. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .28 High in the Sky . . . . . . . . . . . .35 Hillbarn Theatre . . . . . . . . . . .65 infobayarea.com. . . . . . . . . . .73 Inn at Pasatiempo . . . . . . . . .25

Sent Sovi. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .53 Shokolaat Restaurant. . . . . . .41 Silicon Valley Adult Dating.com . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .59 SINO. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .50

Intel Museum . . . . . . . . . . . . .65 Island Grill . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .47 Itapas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .50 Jane Aesthetic Medicine & Surgery . . . . . . . . . 4 Japantown. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .25 Jersey’s Tavern . . . . . . . . . . . . .51 Jewelsexpression . . . . . . . . . .35

Sole di Paradiso. . . . . . . . . . . .33 Straits Restaurant. . . . . . . . . .42 Tangerine Hair Studio . . . . . .35 Tied House . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .43 Tigelleria. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .49 Trailsloggers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .35

Kosmo Terra . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .31

Treasure Chest Aquarium & Pets. . . . . . . . . . .35

La Jolie Nail Spa . . . . . . . . . . .28

Untraceable . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .63

Loft Bar & Bistro . . . . . . . . . . .41

Up and Running . . . . . . . . . . .25

Magical Moments. . . . . . . . . .35

Cielito Lindo. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .48

Mai Dental Specialists . . . . . .29

CIM Group . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .39

Mai Dental Specialists . . . . . . . 2

Club One. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .27

Mantra Palo Alto. . . . . . . . . . .48

Club One. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11

Marbella Hair Salon . . . . . . . .32

Cosmetic Surgery Information Center. . . . . . . . .33

Maxim’s. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .53

Dr. Hoang K. Do. . . . . . . . . . . .15

Picasso’s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .53

Harvest . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .43

Church of Scientology . . . . . .15

Creekside Inn. . . . . . . . . . . . . .47

Parcel 104. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .46

Melting Pot, The . . . . . . . . . . .49 Menara Moroccan. . . . . . . . . .47

WAMU. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .39 Wave - Dinner & Show . . . . .52 Wave - Pre-Theatre Dining . .74 Wave - San Jose Dining . . . . .44 Wave - Subscribe . . . . . . . . . .25 Westpark Dental. . . . . . . . . . . . 5 West Valley College . . . . . . . .69

Mio Vicino. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .53

Willow Glen Kitchen, Bath, Home Furnishings . . . . . . . . .38

Dr. Tony H. Pham, M.D. . . . . .30

Natural Beauty and Slimming . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .31

Willow Street Pizza. . . . . . . . .42

Dr. Youbert Karalian . . . . . . . .32

Northstar & Sierra-at-Tahoe. . 5

Wine Shop at Home. . . . . . . .10

Dr. Robert Ferguson . . . . . . . .31

THEWAVEMAG.COM JANUARY 16-29, 2008

73

FA MILY & COMMUNIT Y

Chris’ Whale Watching . . . . . .25

Fish Market . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .43


COLUMN: THE FINAL L AST WORD

THE FINAL LAST WORD B Y S E A N B A B Y - S E A N B A B Y @ T H E W AV E M A G . C O M

CUPERTINO Siam Thai Cuisine $$ 1080 S. De Anza Blvd. Ste. A (408) 366-1080 www.siamthaicuisine.com

Cuisine: Thai

Park Place Restaurant $$$

10030 S. De Anza Blvd. (408) 873-1000 www.parkplacecupertino.com

Pizza Chicago $$

SANTA CLARA

Cuisine: Italian

The Fish Market Restaurant $$

Menara Moroccan Restaurant $$

Cuisine: Seafood

155 W. San Fernando Street (408) 283-9400 www.pizzachicago.com

41 E. Gish Road (408) 453-1983 www.menara41.com

Cuisine: Moroccan

Cuisine: Contemporary American Seafood & Steaks

19 Market $$

DOWNTOWN SAN JOSE

Cuisine: Vietnamese

Bella Mia $$

80 N. Market Street (408) 294-8626 www.gumbojumbo.com

58 S. First St. (408) 280-1993 www.bellamia.com

Cuisine: California-Italian

Paragon Restaurant $$ 211 S. First St. (408) 282-8888 www.paragonrestaurant.com

Cuisine: New American

Melting Pot, The $$$ 72 S. First St. (408) 293-6020 www.meltingpot.com

Cuisine: Fondue

Habana Cuba $$$ 238 Race St. (408) 998-CUBA www.998cuba.com

Cuisine: Cuban

19 N. Market Street (408) 280-6111

Gumbo Jumbo Cajun Fusion $$ Cuisine: Cajun Fusion

Cuisine: Japanese

Rosie McCann’s Restaurant & Pub $$ 355 Santana Row #1060, San Jose (408) 247-1706 www.rosiemccanns.com

Cuisine: Irish, American

Cuisine: American

Cuisine: Asian Fusion

Britannia Arms Downtown $$

173 W. Santa Clara St. (408) 278-1400 www.britanniaarms.com/sanjose

Cuisine: British

Cielito Lindo $$ 195 E. Taylor Street (408) 995-3447

Cuisine: Mexican

E & O Trading Co. $$ 96 South First Street (408) 938-4100 www.eotrading.com

Cuisine: Southeast Asian Fusion

L&L Hawaiian Barbeque $ 3890 El Camino Real (650) 858-2878 www.hawaiianbarbeque.com

Cuisine: Asian-American Fusion

Cuisine: Californian & Indian

355 Santana Row Ste. 1010, San Jose (408) 345-3848 www.blowfishsushi.com

1007 Blossom Hill Road (408) 269-3474 (FISH) www.thefishmarket.com

Cuisine: Seafood

632 Emerson Street (650) 322-3500 www.mantrapaloalto.com

Sundance The Steakhouse $$$

1921 El Camino Real (650) 321-6798 www.sundancethesteakhouse.com

Cuisine: Steakhouse

Trader Vic’s at Dinah’s Garden Hotel $$$ 4269 El Camino Real (650) 798-1307 www.tradervicspaloalto.com

Cuisine: Asian Fusion

Thaiphoon Restaurant $$$

543 Emerson Street (650) 323-7700 www.thaiphoonrestaurant.com

Cuisine: Pan-Asian

Britannia Arms Almaden $$

SAN MATEO

Cuisine: British

The Fish Market Restaurant $$

5027 Almaden Expressway. (408) 266-0550 www.britanniaarms.com/almaden

Fratello’s $$

1712 Meridian Ave. #F (408) 269-3801

Cuisine: Italian

MILPITAS Sushi Mamoru $$ 138 S. Main Street (408) 946-5446

Cuisine: Japanese

*Featuring our Top of the Market Restaurant 1855 South Norfolk (650) 349-3474 (FISH) www.thefishmarket.com

Cuisine: Seafood

MOUNTAIN VIEW: Cascal $$

400 Castro St. (650) 940-9500 www.cascalrestaurant.com

Cuisine: Pan-Latin

Vaso Azzurro $$

A.K.A. Blue Vase 108 Castro St. (650) 940-1717 www.vasoazzurro.com

Cuisine: Fine Italian & Provence

F O R T H E AT R E T I C K E T S A N D E V E N T I N F O , L O G O N T O W W W. A R T S O P O L I S . C O M 74

THEWAVEMAG.COM JANUARY 16-29, 2008

L

ike most people who celebrated the birth of our savior with gravy eating contests, I made a New Year’s resolution to lose 210 pounds. Since this is more than I weigh, science may argue that I’d create a negatively charged, but svelte swarm of matter that would pull our universe in upon itself. Which is one more piece of evidence that science doesn’t know anything about weight loss. So, in your face, science – I’m losing 210 pounds.

Cuisine: Seafood

Blowfish Sushi $$$

SAN JOSE

99 E. San Fernando St. (408) 998-9998 www.fultralounge.com

3150 El Camino Real (650) 493-8862 (TUNA) www.thefishmarket.com

Mantra Restaurant & Lounge $$

The Fish Market Restaurant $$

Fahrenheit $$

PALO ALTO The Fish Market Restaurant $$

CAMPBELL/ SANTANA ROW:

Loft Bar & Bistro $$ 90 S. Second St. (408) 291-0677

3775 El Camino Real (408) 246-3474 (FISH) www.thefishmarket.com

New Year’s Resolution: Eat More Lipozene

Since I live in a country controlled by pharmaceutical companies, I knew Step One of my weight loss plan was finding a pill to do it for me. And one commercial that followed me around last year was the one for Lipozene. In it, a person who is almost certainly a doctor explains what body fat is. And that only sounds retarded because I haven’t told you about the CGI wire frame of a fat person on display. The maybe-doctor also explains that of all the weight people lost with Lipozene, 78 percent of it was PURE body fat – which, according to my calculations, is like cutting off a love handle and taking only one rib with it. A great bargain, but their wording made me wonder if anyone hearing this commercial didn’t think that statement was categorically insane. The person in the commercial (who I’m now calling a doctor) insisted that all I need to do is take the pill and continue to lead my everyday lifestyle. Only I went them one better and replaced all my groceries with butter. Lipozene already admitted that 22 percent of what it kills isn’t fat, so I figured with every percent of pure body fat I gained, I lowered the chance of getting a foot melted off. Or something. Then I read the fine print. These figures were based on a study where test subjects lost 3.85 pounds over the course of eight weeks. Three-point-eight-five pounds? In two months?! With all that butter in my mouth, that’s how much weight I lose when I exhale! The only way someone would notice those kinds of results is if it comes with a kit to freeze your friends for several decades while it slowly, slowly, slowly turns your fat (and 22 percent of your nonfat) into nothing. I decided my new New Year’s resolution was to figure out why someone who

invented a nothing pill would make a commercial for it. I first researched the Obesity Research Institute, the clinic behind the drug. What I pictured as a state-of-the-art lab filled with overweight people in cages and running mazes was actually just a group of assholes who rename fiber pills. They also created Fiberthin and Propolene, which, like Lipozene, are fiber pills. Fiber pills, in case you don’t know, can make you feel full and may trick your face into reducing its donut intake. It also increases the regularity of bowel movements, but using bowel movements as a weight loss device is more finite than you may imagine. The body actually stores very little of its body fat inside the colon, and I will certainly wash my hands after typing that sentence. I wish I could say I was the first to notice that Lipozene was a ludicrous exploitation of the insecure, but the Federal Trade Commission has already taken action against them. What scares me about this is that not only was someone stupid enough to buy these magic impossible pills, they had the balls to complain to someone when they didn’t work. Can you imagine taking that call at the FTC? “Ma’am, are you telling me that the nonprescription drug you bought off the TV during Judge Judy did not fix your chronic obesity? Ma’am, stay on the line, I’m going to say a series of crazy things I’ve always wanted someone to believe. In 1989 I was kicked off American Gladiators for gladiating too hard and killing the first Laser. I was unofficially the coolest astronaut to enter orbit, and that’s how I learned to transform into Cougar-Man. Should I continue, ma’am? Woo-ee-oo, I’ve been talking to you from the future this entire time.” My ideas for massive weight loss may have fallen through, but I did take some small satisfaction from discovering that I have the skills to one day make a terrific phone operator for the FTC. TW


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56 16 36 64 14 34 40 58 56 50 WAYS TO LEAVE YOUR SOFA { top events } 3 3 THEWAVEMAG.COM JANUARY 16-29, 2008 36 HOME &amp; DESIGN Feature: Wo...

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