Page 1


CONTENTS F E AT U R E

62

13

CELEBRATE LOS GATOS

62

INTERVIEW REESE WITHERSPOON

40

All of your dining, shopping and reveling needs can be met in Los Gatos this holiday season.

66

72

30

The diminutive actress talks about Santa and the jolly good time she had making Four Christmases with co-star Vince Vaughn.

DEPARTMENTS UPFRONT 06

SPOTLIGHT { local news }

10

HIT LIST { editors’ picks } 14 DAYS

40

50 WAYS TO LEAVE YOUR SOFA { top events }

42

DINING Feature: Mushrooms are blooming all over the Bay Area, allowing chefs to get creative with the magical ingredient. PLUS: Hot Spots restaurant profiles.

56

NIGHTLIFE & MUSIC Feature: Try your luck at one of the area’s many gambling establishments. PLUS: Concert previews, album reviews and more.

64

66

72

LIFESTYLE 28

STYLE & SHOPPING Feature: Add a one-of-a-kind touch to any ensemble with handmade jewelry from local artists.

30

HEALTH & BEAUTY Feature: Local companies bring Gattacaesque technology into the aisles of your local drugstore with genetic testing kits.

78

SPORTS & ADVENTURE Feature: Could brakeless fixed gear cycling be the next skateboarding? We examine this extreme form of bicycling.

82

HOME & DESIGN Feature: Believe it or not, winter is a great time to grow many vegetables and flowers. COLUMNS

MOVIES Reviews and Previews: Frost/Nixon, Cadillac Records, Doubt… and more.

08

TECH SPEAK { with Dean Takahashi }

71

HOT TICKET { arts alert }

ARTS Feature: Painter Mark Bryan’s works are equal parts whimsical and satirical. PLUS: Calendar listings for theatre, dance, classical music, opera, museums and galleries.

85

THE FINAL LAST WORD { opinion with Seanbaby }

FAMILY & COMMUNITY Feature: While celebrities go global, domestic adoption is the more popular option for many American families. PLUS: Calendar listings for family activities, events and more.

78

SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTIONS SV 29 58 58 81

82

42

GUIDES: FASHION WINERIES BARS & CLUBS SPORTS & ADVENTURE

SV MARKETPLACE: 84 WEDDING PLANNING

56 THEWAVEMAG.COM DECEMBER 1-14, 2008

3


MASTHEAD

OUR PEOPLE W R I T E U S @ T H E W AV E M A G . C O M

The Wave Magazine Silicon Valley's Finest Entertainment & Lifestyle Magazine Volume 08, Issue 25 | December 1-14, 2008

THE WAVE MEDIA President/Publisher: B. Peter Brafford Associate Publisher: Chris Rhoads

Vice President, Corporate Relations: Dan Ferguson Vice President, Sales: Bill Hargreaves

EDITORIAL Events Editor: Johnny Brafford Senior Editor: Jo Abbie Associate Editor: Mitchell Alan Parker Copy Editor: Ed Robertson

Contributing Writers: Seanbaby, Dean Takahashi, Tom Lanham, Fred Topel, Michael J. Vaughn, Damon Orion, Alastair Bland, Sharon McKinley, Jenn Katz, Marianne L. Hamilton, Anne Ward Ernst

ART / PRODUCTION Design Director & Photographer: Chris Schmauch Graphic Designer: Jon Sontag

Contributing Designers: Ezra Gordon, Chris John Contributing Photographer: Lauren Sagar

SALES / ADVERTISING Advertising Director: Bill Hargreaves Online Sales / Marketing: Chris Rhoads Traffic Manager: Yvonne Gonzalez

Marketing / Traffic Coordinator: Rebekah Hollister District Sales Managers: Ken Sorensen, Ray Klopp, Janette Deuerling, Carol Zimring, Carrie Vawter-Yousfi

CLIENT SERVICES Account Managers: Yvonne Gonzalez, Rebekah Hollister

ONLINE IT Support: Jenny Phan Design / Code: Chris Schmauch

Online Publishing: Jon Sontag

CIRCULATION Director of Circulation: Matt Smith

Circulation Representatives: Javier Segura, Guillermo Merino, Heather Deveraux, Luis Barreto, Alberto Velarde, Rogelio Galvez, Bertha Fernandez

EMAILS Display Ads: advertising@thewavemag.com Marketplace Ads: marketplace@thewavemag.com Editorial: writeus@thewavemag.com Events: events@thewavemag.com

Design: design@thewavemag.com Employment: jobs@thewavemag.com Distribution: distribution@thewavemag.com

ADVERTISING INFORMATION Bill Hargreaves (408) 467-3260 advertising@thewavemag.com

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Send to writeus@thewavemag.com or use the mailing address below.

P UBLICAT ION INFORMAT ION

SUBSCRIPTIONS to The Wave Magazine run

The Wave Media publishes The Wave Magazine.

$9.95 for 27 issues (one year). For more informa-

All content of this issue is copyright Š2008 by The

tion, call (408) 467-3200 or visit

Wave Media, Inc., and may not be reprinted in

http://subscribe.thewavemag.com

whole or in part without the express written consent of the publisher. The Wave is available throughout

ED IT O RIA L C O N T RIBU T IO N S

the Silicon Valley; one copy of each edition of

Unsolicited manuscripts and story ideas must be

The Wave is available for free. Anyone removing

accompanied by a stamped return envelope.

magazines in bulk will be prosecuted.

The publisher assumes no responsibility for lost artwork, photographs or manuscripts. Submit all

SUBSCRIP T ION INFORMAT ION BACK ISSUES of The Wave Magazine are available for $5. Please submit your request for a back issue to: 1735 Technology Dr., Suite 575, San Jose, CA 95110.

4

THEWAVEMAG.COM DECEMBER 1-14, 2008

manuscripts, artwork and photographs to: The Wave Magazine, 1735 Technology Dr., Suite 575, San Jose, CA 95110

Phone: (408) 467-3200 Fax: (408) 467-3401


MASTHEAD

THEWAVEMAG.COM DECEMBER 1-14, 2008

5


SPOTLIGHT: NOTEWORTHY NEWS

SPOTLIGHT NOTEWORTHY

NEWS

dVa[R`` N

OVT fRN?

S_\Z OVT

W\R

27th Annual San Jose Holiday Parade Sometimes, it’s OK to be a follower.

L

SPOT L IGH T

ast year, 125,000 attended the San Jose Holiday Parade, and for good reason: It’s ranked as one of the top 25 parades in America, undoubtedly for the annual entertainment of marching bands, fire trucks, elaborate floats, dancers and, of course, the real Santa Claus. You’ll find Wave supporters there, too, pulling a larger-than-life Strawberry Shortcake through the streets of San Jose (either that, or sucking the helium out of it to make goofy voices). This year, the party starts well before the parade kicks off. Here are some festive events to get you started.

GET TICKETS NOW TO SEE THE 1ST PLACE SHARKS! TUESDAY, DECEMBER 2 – 7:30PM VS. TORONTO MAPLE LEAFS THURSDAY, DECEMBER 4 – 7:30PM VS. COLUMBUS BLUE JACKETS SATURDAY, DECEMBER 6 – 7:00PM VS. EDMONTON OILERS THURSDAY, DECEMBER 11 – 7:30PM VS. ANAHEIM DUCKS Tickets available at the HP Pavilion ticket ofďŹ ce, online at ticketmaster.com or by phone at 408-998-TIXS, 415-421-TIXS or 510-625-TIXS.

SJSHARKS.COM

6

THEWAVEMAG.COM DECEMBER 1-14, 2008

CHRISTMAS IN THE PARK

Plaza de Cesar Chavez, Market St. between San Carlos & San Fernando www.christmasinthepark.com

Sunday, December 7: After the parade, head over to Plaza de Cesar Chavez for the Wells Fargo Battle of the Bands results; an exclusive meet and greet with special guest; appearances by parade characters; the San Jose Fire Department’s Sharks Fire Engine; musical entertainment; free giveaways and more! 11am-7pm Thru January 1: Plaza de Cesar Chavez has been transformed into a holiday fantasyland, with more than 60 musical and animated exhibits, music, food, a 60-foot tree and the one, the only, SANTA! DOWNTOWN ICE

Circle of Palms, 170 S. Market St. www.sjdowntown.com.

INFLATION CELEBRATION

Thru January 11: As the South Bay’s largest outdoor ice-skating rink, this is a great place to get into the holiday spirit (and to practice your triple lutz).

Saturday, December 6: The night before the big day, watch all the enormous balloons get filled and ready for the parade, plus enjoy live entertainment, children’s activities and giveaways: 3-7pm

Paseo de San Antonio, next to the Fairmont Hotel

Market St. & Park Ave., adjacent to the Tech Museum

MRS. CLAUS BREAKFAST NOOK

Tech Museum of Innovation, 201 S. Market St.

Sunday, December 7: Join Mrs. Claus and her friends for breakfast – you don’t want to attend the Holiday Parade on an empty stomach: 7-8:30am 27th ANNUAL SAN JOSE HOLIDAY PARADE

Downtown San Jose www.sanjoseholidayparade.com

Sunday, December 7: Bring the whole family for a day of clowns, floats, balloons, and over two dozen marching bands: 8:30am

WINTER WONDERLAND

Thru January 1: It’s a holiday artisan fair featuring handmade ornaments, jewelry, candles, knitwear, and let’s not forget the glassblowing demonstrations and fabulous desserts! HOLIDAY TRAIN EXHIBIT

Fairmont Hotel, 170 S. Market St. (408) 998-1900

Saturday, December 6-26: An electric train exhibit featuring model villages depicting locales in the United States, England, the Netherlands, Russia, Germany, Mexico, France, the Philippines, and Switzerland. TW For more information, visit www.sanjoseholidayparade.com.


SPOTLIGHT: NOTEWORTHY NEWS

SPOT L IGH T

THEWAVEMAG.COM DECEMBER 1-14, 2008

7


COLUMN: TECH SPEAK

TECH SPEAK B Y D E A N TA K A H A S H I - W R I T E U S @ T H E W AV E M A G . C O M

Western Digital’s new media player doesn’t need the internet to transfer files to your TV set.

E

verybody has a box that they want to put in your living room – the makers of game consoles, set-top boxes, digital media adapters and so on. But Western Digital (WD) has a simple box that just might earn the right to be there. While many boxes are loading up on features, the new WD TV HD Media Player is simple: It doesn’t connect to the internet; it simply lets you transfer movies, video, pictures and other files from your PC so that you can watch them on a big TV. It also recognizes the fact that most people can’t handle that part of connecting to the internet in the living room all that easily. By removing that from the equation, Western Digital takes out the complexity from looking at your photo albums on the TV.

loaded 1,900 photos onto the box in a fairly short time and then watched my Hawaii vacation pictures in their colorful splendor. The family loved it. I see this as a great transition product as we all wait for better online connected services. Yes, one day we’ll be able to get movies on demand sent directly to the TV so we won’t have to download them to (and then from) a computer. Or we’ll be able to upload photos from cameras and videos from camcorders directly to the TV. But while we’re waiting for that to happen, we can make use of all of the multimedia files that are trapped on our computers. And one of these days, other players will figure out home networking so that we can easily pipe data from the computers directly to the TVs. Then we’ll be able to make use of all of those set-top boxes, such as Apple TV, that need those internet connections. Until then, WD TV will do.

Let’s assume you’ve got digital pictures on your computer. You can plug a Western Digital MyPassport portable backup hard drive (not included) into the computer. You can then drag and drop files from your computer into the hard drive. You don’t have to worry about organizing everything into folders – the box will aggregate them all into a single folder where you can look at all of them. Then you plug the backup drive into the WD TV; connect the WD TV box to your TV via an HDMI high-speed wire or a standard TV cable; then adjust your set to the right HDMI port and turn on the WD TV with a remote control that comes with it. It takes a while to boot up on the screen, and the software interface looks clunky. You have to be patient, as the box has to do a lot of video processing. But it’s not very complex. Just click on the folders with the remote and start a slideshow, then sit back and watch the pictures or movies in full high-definition color. I 8

THEWAVEMAG.COM DECEMBER 1-14, 2008

WD TV solution can play video at 1080p and play slideshows of pictures in just about any format, including H.264, Divx, or MPEG-2, in full 1080p resolution. The box costs just $129, not including the WD MyPassport or WD MyBook backup hard drives. The box has two universal serial bus (USB) connectors so that you can attach two hard drives, flash drives, and even Flip handheld video camcorders. I wish the software would let you do more with the remote control – it would be great if you could create new folders and move pictures around using the remote control. But that’s something you have to do on the computer. WD might fail if it doesn’t properly establish its brand with marketing. Seagate, a rival in backup drives and hard drives, recognizes the problem and has begun a TV ad campaign. But WD isn’t going that far yet. WD TV is on sale at Western Digital’s website and at Best Buy stores. It’s not a bad start, but I’d like to see the company push ahead. TW


COLUMN: TECH SPEAK

THEWAVEMAG.COM DECEMBER 1-14, 2008

9


» FEATURE

HitList

Atomic at the Blank Club 44 S. Almaden Ave., San Jose (408) 29-BLANK www.theblankclub.com Every Thursday night, from 9pm until 2am, DJ Basura rips through sets of the best ’80s, new wave and indie rock tunes around, drawing a crowd that is lively, usually pouring onto the stage later in the night for nonstop dancing. Many patrons dress for the occasion, donning retro fashion that looks straight out of a John Hughes film. The club can get packed pretty quickly, but the high ceilings make it bearable, and the bartenders on hand are always moving fast, so there’s never a long wait for a drink. There’s a large projection screen playing old music videos from The Cure, Morrissey, Depeche Mode and more. It’s by far the best ’80s night in Silicon Valley. Don’t believe us? Then we challenge you to a dance off! Free before 10pm with a one-drink minimum. $5 after 10pm.

Angel & Devil Earphones

HIT L IST

Available online from www.geekstuff4u.com Music delivery devices keep getting smaller and more technologically advanced, boasting so many features that you almost need a degree in sound engineering to understand (and appreciate) the quality of sound they can produce. So we were refreshingly pleased to find this whimsical little set from the folks at Japanese design firm Green House. The adorable angel is always shrouded in innocent white, while her devilish cohort comes in four vibrant colors (red, pink, purple, magenta) and, of course, black. And for all you sound tech geeks out there, besides being so utterly likable, these earphones feature a frequency response of 20Hz-20,000Hz. $32.96 10

THEWAVEMAG.COM DECEMBER 1-14, 2008

» FEATURE

Wooden Tops Design Within Reach, 447 University Ave., Palo Alto (650) 328-2700; Santana Row, 3080 Stevens Creek Blvd., Ste. 1010, San Jose (408) 261-8875 www.dwr.com With a never-ending cavalcade of technological gizmos touting their educational and physical benefits being marketed today, it’s refreshing to see a classic, old-timey toy like these wooden tops from designer Klaus Mader. With their contrary combination of stillness and movement, tops have long been objects of fascination, enthralling onlookers with their perpetual motion. The various shaped tops from Mader range from classic to intriguingly elongated designs, and even come with a difficulty rating, which adds to the allure of these simple, delightful amusements. But the best part? Batteries not required. $10-$60

The Fashion Game Book Anthropologie, 356 Santana Row, San Jose (408) 2490436; 999 Alma St., Palo Alto (650) 322-0435 www. anthropologie.com In what season did Marc Jacobs collaborate with artist Stephen Sprouse on the graffiti-emblazoned Louis Vuitton bags that would become a global phenomenon? Which Parisian designer was the favorite of screen legend Audrey Hepburn? At which fashion house did Karl Lagerfeld cut his style teeth before being chosen to head up design at legendary French fashion house Chanel? Anyone not stumped by these and other couture-related queries will adore The Fashion Game Book, a tome turned game from high-end publishing house Assouline. Compiled by contemporary fashion and fashion history expert Florence Müller, this stylish compendium is overflowing with fashion intrigue, lore, who’s who and what’s what, covering an

37

entire century of designers, couturiers and must-have items. In addition to beautiful photography of collections from classical to controversial, the book features questions and answers, quizzes and matching games with which fashionistas can try and stump their fellow style-obsessed friends. Finally, those thousands of hours poring over glossy fashion magazines will pay off. $34.95

Single in the City, by Terri Hill Viewpoints Gallery, 315 State St., Los Altos (650) 941-5789 www.designerhill.com We became so enamored with the fixed gear bicycle trend this issue [See Sports & Adventure, page 72] that we needed a fix of all things “fixie” related. Enter Terri Hill, a Santa Clara-based watercolor painter who has been painting (images of) bikes for more than six years. She began noticing fixed gear bikes more frequently about a year and a half ago and became fascinated by them – which naturally caused her to pick up a paintbrush. “Fixed gear stuff scares me,” Hill says. “It’s amazing that they have no gears, no brakes. We are in awe of people who do that.” The artist’s paintings are exceptional, using vibrant colors and aesthetically articulate angles, which is why she favors painting bikes. “The angles, the wheels, the motion involved, the high energy of the people who ride, it makes me want to paint them.” $825 TW


HIT L IST

THEWAVEMAG.COM DECEMBER 1-14, 2008

11


12

THEWAVEMAG.COM DECEMBER 1-14, 2008


O

n the first Friday night in December each year, the huge Cedar Deodora tree in the Los Gatos Town Plaza becomes ablaze with lights. The ceremony signals the official beginning of the holiday season, although savvy shoppers have been seen wandering the streets of Los Gatos for weeks already, stocking up on Christmas gifts and goodies. A tourist destination renowned for its aesthetic appeal year round, Los Gatos becomes even more inviting in December. With world-class restaurants, hotels and shops beckoning from every street corner, this town truly has it all. Here’s a roundup of holiday highlights: plan to come early, shop ’til you drop, then round out your day with a marvelous meal at any of the town’s notable eateries. With this many choices, your days (and nights) will be merry and bright indeed.

THEWAVEMAG.COM DECEMBER 1-14, 2008

13


[continued from page 13]

celebrate los gatos

BLACK WATCH

NIGHTLIFE

141 ½ N. Santa Cruz Ave., Los Gatos (408) 354-2200 THE SCENE: A small, friendly

The wildcat spirit still lurks in the many bars and clubs throughout Los Gatos, making it one of the best places for sociable entertainment in Silicon Valley. Whether it be for a

neighborhood bar with plenty of strong drinks, a pinball machine, dice cups and a touch-screen videogame. EXCUSE ME, BARTENDER: One of those pint-sized kamikaze shots.

daytime sports game, a quiet evening cocktail, a bellyful of sugary shots, or an endless night of dancing, Los Gatos is the place to be this holiday season.

NUMBER ONE BROADWAY

180 RESTAURANT & LOUNGE

102B S. Santa Cruz Ave., Los Gatos (408) 354-4303 www.numberonebroadway.com THE SCENE: Boasting the only nightclub

15½ N. Santa Cruz Ave., Los Gatos (408) 399-1804 THE SCENE: Stylish and upscale, a fun

patio in town, patrons are invited to “enjoy cocktails under the stars,” watch live music, play pool or enjoy singles mixers. EXCUSE ME, BARTENDER: This amazing live band deserves a round of drinks on me!

BOULEVARD TAVERN 15043 Los Gatos Blvd., Los Gatos (408) 358-0774 THE SCENE: A unique dive bar with a

comforting fireplace, hardwood floors, a popcorn machine and live music. EXCUSE ME, BARTENDER: This is a dive bar. I’ll take anything cheap, cold and wet.

crowd, cozy couches and sometimes a girl dancing in a glass cage, what more can you ask for in Los Gatos? HEY, DJ: Play something dancey.

C.B. HANNEGAN’S 208 Bachman Ave., Los Gatos (408) 3951233 www.cbhannegans.com THE SCENE: Around for decades,

this restaurant and bar has an overwhelming menu of food, drink and entertainment.

Cheat Sheet: Call a Cab

“Small-town feel with big-town appeal” is what you’ll find throughout December at a number of festive community events: DECEMBER 4-5 – HOME FOR THE HOLIDAYS: Take a tour of three lavishly and festively decorated houses in Los Gatos and Saratoga. The tour benefits the Summit League’s charities. For tickets and information, call (408) 494-9225 or visit www.summit-league.org. NOVEMBER 28-DECEMBER 31 – FANTASY OF LIGHTS: For an instant injection of holiday spirit, load the family into the car and make your way to Vasona Park for this annual electrical extravaganza. Stationary and moving displays welcome you, and you can even tune in to synchronized holiday music during your tour. This year’s fee structure is $10 per car through Dec. 10; $15 per car Dec. 11-31 and more for larger vehicles. Visit www.sccgov.org for full details. Where: 333 Blossom Hill Rd.

CARRIE NATION’S 8 N. Santa Cruz Ave., Los Gatos (408) 354-1771 THE SCENE: A somewhat Irish bar

with plenty of TVs, including a large projection screen, for watching sports. A friendly staff and crowd make this a great laid-back spot in downtown Los Gatos. EXCUSE ME, BARTENDER: I’d like to buy a round for the bar so I can get a plaque on the wall.

DOUBLE D’S SPORTS GRILLE 354 N. Santa Cruz Ave. (408) 395-6882 www.doubleds.com THE SCENE: Voted the Best Sports Bar by

Wave readers, Double D’s has 21 TVs, two videogames, and two pool tables. EXCUSE ME, BARTENDER: Another pitcher

LOS GATOS BREWING COMPANY 130 N. Santa Cruz Ave. (408) 395-9929 www.lgbrewingco.com THE SCENE: Mahogany wood and oak

arches lead the way to an elegant atmosphere of American cuisine and freshly brewed beer. EXCUSE ME, BARTENDER: Since the brewmaster’s name is Kent Wheat, the German-style wheat Hefeweizen has got to be good.

MOUNTAIN CHARLEY’S SALOON 15 N. Santa Cruz Ave. (408) 395-8880 www.mtncharleys.com THE SCENE: An authentic Old West-style

sets the mood for lots of dancing, music and other events, making it a must-visit spot in downtown Los Gatos. EXCUSE ME, BARTENDER: A shot of whatever is in that bottle with the three Xs on it.

before the third quarter starts.

All Star Cabs (408) 977-1111 Checker Cab Company (408) 744-1234

Carriage Rides

EVENTS

EXCUSE ME, BARTENDER: Your selection of 100 single malt scotches arranged by region is making me woozy.

Fantasy of Lights

DECEMBER 5 – TREE-LIGHTING: Bundle up the kiddies and come on down to watch the switch being flipped. After sing-along carols and music starting at 4pm, Los Gatos Mayor Mike Wasserman will lead the countdown at 6pm, and then illuminate the brand new LED lights on the tree. Hot chocolate and munchies will be available to keep you fortified until the big reveal. Where: Town Plaza, corner of Main St. and Santa Cruz Ave. DECEMBER 5 – FIRST DAY OF CARRIAGE RIDES: One of the most popular traditions in Los Gatos, these horse-drawn buggies will take you on a tour beneath the twinkling lights of the downtown district, and through the historic Almond Grove neighborhood. The 15-minute rides will be available through Dec. 23; visit carriagerides.losgatoschamber.com for ticket information and reservations. DECEMBER 6 – CHILDREN’S HOLIDAY PARADE: This is the granddaddy of South Bay community parades, featuring hundreds of handmade floats, marching bands, drill teams and costumed celebrants. Get into town early for this one (it draws thousands each year), set up your lawn chair, and settle in for hours of entertainment, all hosted by the Los Gatos Lions Club

Los Gatos Cab (408) 244-3131 Yellow Cab (408) 245-5222

Mountain Charley’s

and the Los Gatos-Saratoga Recreation Department. The festivities commence at 11am. Where: Up Santa Cruz Ave., down Main St., finishing at Los Gatos High School. DECEMBER 7 – SANTA PAWS DAY: Tie some holly to your pooch’s collar and stroll down to the Town Plaza between 11am and 3pm for a photo op with Santa. The good folks at Los Gatos-Saratoga Recreation and the “Santa in the Plaza” committee are doing the honors; visit www.lgsrecreation.org for more info. DECEMBER 7, 14, 21 – SANTA IN THE PLAZA: Two-legged critters will also have the chance to smile for the camera, perched atop Santa’s lap in the Town Plaza. There’s no charge to bring your tyke (or yourself) down for a photo between 11am and 3pm. DECEMBER 7 – BYINGTON OPEN HOUSE: Usher in the holiday spirit(s) in the wine cave at Byington Vineyard. Local choirs will serenade you with carols as you sip and enjoy tasty seasonal soups. Bring in canned goods for a donation to Martha’s Kitchen and you’ll receive a discount on any wine purchase. Noon-4pm, 21850 Bear Creek Rd. [continued on page 16]

14

THEWAVEMAG.COM DECEMBER 1-14, 2008


g n i c i r P I I e s a h P l Specia Grand Opening Special!

50% OFF offer expires 12/15/2008

$20 OFF

Monthly Dues! Must be 18 Years of age with valid ID offer expires 12/15/2008

see club for rules and details


Bella Rosa

Cheat Sheet: Cheap & Chic

Ursula’s Boutique

In light of the current economic climate, many of the town’s unique shops and personal care facilities are offering some incentives that can’t be beat.

celebrate los gatos

[continued from page 14]

The French Cellar

You’ll find a complete guide to all of the discounts, as well as money-saving coupons in the Los Gatos Chamber of Commerce’s 2008 Los Gatos Holiday Shopping & Event Guide, on their website at www.losgatoschamber.com/pdf/ 08shopping_event_guide.pdf. Most offers are available through the end of December, and may require presentation of a coupon from the guide. A few highlights:

$15 OFF any services at The Spa Los Gatos, 100 S. Santa Cruz Ave. Rouge

Alta

SHOPPING The shopping is always stellar in Los Gatos, even more so during the holidays. From chic boutiques and eco-friendly baby attire to an array of luxurious spas and home and garden stores, Los Gatos is a gift-shopping paradise. Here are just some of the shopping highlights in the city of the cats:

ALTA

BELLA ROSA

130 N. Santa Cruz Ave., Los Gatos (408) 354-0069 www.altaclothing.com

145 N. Santa Cruz Ave., Los Gatos (408) 354-4206 www. bellarosaboutique.com

Offering contemporary clothing that’s stylish without being trendy, Alta also boasts an exceptional range of accessories and superb customer service.

AMY B. BOUTIQUE Corner Stone Shopping Center, 15994 Los Gatos Blvd., Los Gatos (408) 358-8600

Find a unique range of quality men’s and women’s contemporary clothing and accessories from the likes of Ted Baker, Diane Von Furstenberg, Oliver Peoples, James Pearse, Vince, Page Denim and more.

BABY COO 140 W. Main St., Ste. H, Los Gatos (408) 310-5030 www.babycoo.us

Eco conscious parents welcomed the recent addition of Baby Coo, a store that sells all things baby and planet friendly. Find environmentally savvy and safe baby products including an array of organic baby clothing, plus skincare products for mother and child, baby carriers, strollers, furniture and even cleaning products that will not harm those precious bundles.

Following a recent expansion and complete remodel, this contemporary fashion mecca is now even more of a must-visit store for style mavens. Think hip, high-end labels and designers such as Rachel Roy, Rebecca Taylor and Christopher Deane, plus denim from the likes of Notify, Earnest Sewn, True Religion and more.

BETTINA’S 320 N. Santa Cruz Ave., Los Gatos (408) 335-1383

This popular contemporary clothing boutique features style and service in equal portions, and the staff is expert at finding the right outfits to make you look and feel fabulous from head to toe, with clothing, shoes and accessories.

CAMBRIC OF LOS GATOS 10 N. Santa Cruz Ave. (408) 395-4664

Think clothing that’s stylish and sophisticated without being stuffy, with labels such as Nic & Zoe, Brighton, Karen Kane and more.

DOMUS

ROUGE

40 N. Santa Cruz Ave. (408) 354-6630

50 N. Santa Cruz Ave. (408) 395-8995 www.rougegirl.com

The place to go for all things kitchen, home and gifts. Find cookware, crockery, culinary books, every kitchen gadget imaginable and then some.

THE FRENCH CELLAR 32 E. Main St. (408) 354-0993 www.thefrenchcellar.com

Discover rare wines from France’s most famed regions, including Burgundy, Bordeaux, Champagne, Loire, Rhône, and Alsace, and receive expert advice and cellar notes. Also immerse yourself in all things French, including vintage wine posters, magazines and fine Parisian chocolates.

INFINITI 120 W. Main St. (408) 399-7071

This edgy contemporary boutique offers one-of-a-kind men’s and women’s items, including labels from Europe, Japan and some local emerging designers. Think funky, urban attire from designers including 2K, Diesel, Howe, Rex, Rojas and Triple 5 Soul.

You’ll find hip, quality clothing at this friendly boutique, including popular brands like Seven, No Lita, Rebecca Taylor and J Brand for gals, and Ben Sherman, Palombini and James Pearse for guys.

SALT 78 W. Main St. (408) 395-0811 www.shop-salt.com

The winner of the Best Boutique category in our 2008 Readers’ Choice poll, this store carries cutting-edge labels including Rich & Skinny, Alice & Trixie, Kate and Kass, Mint, Park Vogel and many other high-end designers and is renowned for its friendly, style savvy, helpful staff and owners.

SHOE FETISH As the name suggests, this is the place for fashion footwear fetishists, offering a huge range of designer footwear, including Donald J. Pliner and Stuart Weitzman.

URSULA’S BOUTIQUE

216 ½ N. Santa Cruz Ave., Los Gatos (408) 399-6633 www.modernmini.com

140 W. Main St. (408) 395-1400 www.ursulasboutique.com

Find elegant women’s fashions for work and evening, along with handbags, accessories, and more.

ROMANTIQUES 51 University Ave. (408) 395-7749 www.romantiqueslingerie.com

This upscale lingerie boutique offers garments from brands like Cosabella, Wendy Glez, Aubade, La Perla and Chantelle. [continued on page 18]

16

THEWAVEMAG.COM DECEMBER 1-14, 2008

20 PERCENT OFF your entire purchase, Ursula’s Boutique, 140 W. Main St. 20 PERCENT OFF any one item, Cambric of Los Gatos, 10 N. Santa Cruz Ave. 50 PERCENT OFF one item of $50 or less, Happy Dragon Thrift, 245 W. Main St. $10 OFF any purchase of $75 or more, Whole Foods, 15980 Los Gatos Blvd.

216 N. Santa Cruz Ave., Los Gatos (408) 395-2211

MODERNMINI For babies born into modernist families, this store offers everything baby in contemporary styles, from clothing and cribs to cuddly toys and more.

$50 OFF Botox treatments, Ruth Bené Rejuvenation Center, 15055 Los Gatos Blvd.

15 PERCENT OFF all jewelry and services, Belgian Diamond, 15 N. Santa Cruz Ave. 25 PERCENT OFF all cosmetic procedures, Los Gatos Dental Care, 555 Knowles Dr. 25 PERCENT OFF all chocolates, Chocolate Dream Box, 710 Blossom Hill Rd.


&/ #, 2 )0 ' % ! 5 % %3 4 0! 33 

$ ! 9

&2

4(%02%-)%2%(%!,4(#,5"%80%2)%.#%&/2+)$34%%.35.$%2

#,)0#!,,&5:%  &/2!

&2%% $!9

           

   % !

'5%340!33

!&4%2 3#(//,&)4.%33#,!33%3 -%-"%23()03./7%.2/,,).' 9%37%$/!7%3/-%")24($!9 0!24)%3 3/"//+./7 #ALLNOWTO2ESERVEYOUR0ERSONAL3PACEFOR 7INTER BREAK3PORTS#AMP ANDOUR .EW9EARS%VE+IDS"ASH 0ARENTS.IGHT7AY/UT PM AM 2%3%26%./7 SPACEISLIMITED

!- 0- -/. 3!4

,OS'ATOS"LVD ,OS'ATOS #! !CROSSFROM4RADER*OES ,ARK!VE

WWWFUZElTCOMWAVE

THEWAVEMAG.COM DECEMBER 1-14, 2008

17


[from page 16]

celebrate los gatos

Cin-Cin Wine Bar

WINING & DINING In a town known for its high-quality restaurants and wineries, you could easily enjoy a different dining and drinking spot every night between now and New Year’s. From comfy casual to white-table elegance, Los Gatos has a place to suit every palate and pocketbook. Here are just some of the city’s many dining destinations: Dio Deka

CIN-CIN WINE BAR 368 Village Ln. (408) 354-8006 www.cincinwinebar.com

This newcomer to the downtown Los Gatos dining scene was fast to win fans with its sophisticated global cuisine. Think adventurous dishes such as the “Bacon and Eggs” salad, with frisee lettuce, bacon lardons, fried shiitake mushrooms, Yukon gold potatoes and a crispy poached egg. Diners in seasonal celebration mode can sample their new sparkling wine flight, beginning Dec. 6.

CRIMSON 15466 Los Gatos Blvd. (408) 358-0175 www.crimsonrestaurant.com

Chef Diane Rose has won loyal regulars with her delectable and sustainable food, served in a small romantic restaurant that’s tucked away in the Los Gatos Village Square shopping center. Crimson uses organic produce from local farmers, steroidfree meats, and ocean-fresh Hawaiian fish, and recently was awarded a green certification. See the restaurant’s website for great seasonal lunch deals and daily specials.

FLEMING JENKINS VINEYARDS & WINERY 45 W. Main St. (408) 358-4949 www.flemingjenkins.com

Cheat Sheet: More Eats More Los Gatos restaurants to check out this festive season: ALDO’S RISTORANTE & BAR [Italian]

LITTLE LOU’S BBQ [Barbecue] 15466

14109 Winchester Blvd. (408) 3741808 www.aldos-ristorante.com

Los Gatos Blvd., Ste. 111 (408) 3565768 www.littlelousbbq.com

DIO DEKA [Greek] 210 E. Main St.

PEDRO’S RESTAURANT AND CANTINA

(408) 354-7700 www.diodeka.com

[Mexican] 316 N. Santa Cruz Ave. (408) 354-7570 www.pedrosrestaurants.com

DOUBLE D’S SPORTS GRILLE

[American] 354 N. Santa Cruz Ave. (408) 395-6882 www.doubleds.com FORBES MILL STEAKHOUSE

TANDOORI OVEN [Indian] 133 N. Santa Cruz Ave. (408) 395-1784 www.thetandoorioven.com

[Steakhouse] 206 N. Santa Cruz Ave. (408) 395-6434 www.forbesmillsteakhouse.com 18

THEWAVEMAG.COM DECEMBER 1-14, 2008

The tasting room of this popular local winery (their vineyards are nestled in the foothills of the Santa Cruz Mountains) is a great place to sample some of their latest releases. If you stop by this holiday season with some cans or other nonperishable food items for their annual Holiday Food Drive, they’ll honor your charitable nature with a two-for-one tasting thru Dec. 21.

LOS GATOS BREWING COMPANY 130 N. Santa Cruz Ave. (408) 395-9929 www.lgbrewingco.com

With its exclusive brews and upscale menu of modern American fare, the Los Gatos Brewing Company stands apart from your average brew house. Chef Jim Stump’s menu features sophisticated “pub fare” that includes spinach salad and sautéed tiger prawns, or perhaps rock crab cakes with baby fennel, chipollini onions and piquillo. Holiday happy hour specials offer $1 off beer, wine and well drinks.

MANRESA 320 Village Ln. (408) 354-4330 www. manresarestaurant.com

For the ultimate yuletide splurge, enjoy a feast prepared by executive chef David Kinch at the much lauded, Michelin-rated (two stars) dining destination Manresa. Kinch is pulling out all of the stops for his Christmas and New Year’s Eve menus, and his sublime dishes will, as always, be paired with exceptional wines.

RESTAURANT JAMES RANDALL 303 N. Santa Cruz Ave. (408) 395-4441 www.restaurantjamesrandall.com

This popular home of contemporary American comfort food features creative dishes prepared using only the finest, freshest seasonal ingredients. Dine during the holidays and receive a glass of their champagne of the day with your entrée, which could be blackened Angus rib eye with garlic mashed potatoes, caramelized onions, green beans and blue cheese butter.

THREE DEGREES RESTAURANT Toll House Hotel, 140 S. Santa Cruz Ave. (408) 884-1054 www.threedegreesrestaurant.com

Offering Modern American cuisine with a French twist, Three Degrees offers sophisticated fare for any meal. Head there during the holidays and receive specially priced appetizers and beverages during their happy hour.

TREVESE RESTAURANT & LOUNGE 115 N. Santa Cruz Ave. (408) 354-5551 www.trevese.com

The latest Michelin man on the Los Gatos restaurant scene is Trevese executive chef Michael Miller, whose modern American cuisine won the restaurant its first coveted star earlier this year. Try the tasting menu for items such as the chef’s famed duck press, which consists of duck leg confit wrapped around a slice of luxurious foie gras and flavored with a hint of sweet Dijon mustard and curry.

WILLOW STREET PIZZA 20 S. Santa Cruz Ave. (408) 354-5566 www.willowstreet.com

This much loved pizza joint is getting into the holiday spirit by offering patrons one of their signature desserts free with entrées, which include their array of wood fired pizzas (a favorite is the Thin Crust Mediterranean: tomato sauce, mozzarella, roasted red peppers, kalamata olives, caramelized onions, fresh thyme and goat cheese). Nonpizza lovers try their delicious pastas or seafood dishes.

WINE CELLAR 50 University Ave. (408) 354-4808 www.winecellarlosgatos.com

This elegant restaurant serves modern American cuisine. Try unique appetizers such as the honeyapricot barbecue glazed ribs or sautéed abalone to start. Entrées include duck confit and pan-seared chicken breast, grilled Australian lamb chops, soy-glazed wild Alaskan king salmon, and last, but never least, filet mignon. [continued on page 20]


yum!

THEWAVEMAG.COM DECEMBER 1-14, 2008

19


[from page 18]

celebrate los gatos

tktkttkk

ARTS Los Gatans love their art, in all forms. During the holidays, you can choose from a variety of events to amp up your culture quota, including: DECEMBER 11-FEBRUARY 28 – PAINTERLY PAINTING THE NEXT LEVEL: Thirteen internationally acclaimed artists will show their work at the Art Museum of Los Gatos. Don’t miss this chance to get an intimate look at their figurative and expressionistic paintings, all culled from other museums and notable private collections. 4 Tait Ave. at W. Main St. DECEMBER 12 – CONCERT: Los Gatos United Methodist Church presents an evening of Celtic holiday music performed by Golden Bough. Traditional songs and carols will be accented by harp, accordion, fiddle and guitar. 7:30pm, 111 Church St. DECEMBER 16 – DEDICATION CEREMONY, LGHS MEMORY WALL: Four decades of LGHS alumni have united to create an exhibition space tracing the remarkable history of the school. The wall will be dedicated at 5pm in the front entryway of the main build-

20

THEWAVEMAG.COM DECEMBER 1-14, 2008

ing; reception immediately follows. 20 High School Court. ONGOING THRU JANUARY 8 – LOS GATOS ARTISTS: Fine art exhibit by members of the Los Gatos Art Association, on display in the Town Council Chambers, 110 E. Main St., from 9am to 5pm Monday-Friday when meetings are not in session. Call (408) 3546820 to determine availability of Chambers for viewing. TUES, WED, THURS, SUN EACH WEEK: GOT ART?: This former store front has been converted into a spacious art gallery by Los Gatos property owners/art lovers David Stonesifer and Larry Arzie. Stop by and see the latest exhibits by Los Gatos Art Association members, as well as many of the South Bay’s most talented artisans. 24 N. Santa Cruz Ave., open 10am to 5:30pm. TW


Trevese Restaurant and Lounge

2009 One Star Michelin Recipient

For Holiday reservations and Private Dining Events, for parties up to 50 please call

(408) 354-5551 Also inquire about our romantic Chefs Turret table for 2.

115 N. Santa Cruz Ave. Los Gatos THEWAVEMAG.COM DECEMBER 1-14, 2008

21


R]e\b]e\aO\X]aS T]`bVSV]ZWROga´g]c¸`SW\dWbSR 2]e\b]e\7QS        1V`Wab[OaW\bVS>O`Y      EW\bS`E]\RS`ZO\R       4O`[S`a¸;O`YSb6]ZWROg1`OTb4OW`   AO\8]aS6]ZWROg>O`ORS      1V`Wab[OaW\AO\>SR`]A_cO`SAQOdS\US`6c\b 5WTb;O`YSbObEW\bS`E]\RS`ZO\R   

      

<]d"8O\ <]d &8O\ <]d $8O\" 2SQ# ' 2SQ% 2SQ%!  2SQ !

dWaWbaXR]e\b]e\Q][T]`[]`SV]ZWROgTc\

^ZS\bg]T^O`YW\Ub]] With more than 23,000 spaces in public and private facilities, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s easy to find parking in downtown San Jose. Some lots or garages offer validated or free parking. To find out more, visit sjdowntownparking.com


downtown san jose for the holidays â&#x20AC;&#x201C; visit sjdowntown.com for more holiday fun


24

THEWAVEMAG.COM DECEMBER 1-14, 2008


Isn’t this why we live in California? HOLIDAY SALE ON NOW!

TOM’S OUTDOOR FURNITURE Voted #1 “Best On The Peninsula” 1445 Veterans Blvd, Redwood City, 94063

650-366-0411 Open Every Day 10-5

tomsoutdoorfurniture.com

THEWAVEMAG.COM DECEMBER 1-14, 2008

25


26

THEWAVEMAG.COM DECEMBER 1-14, 2008


» FEATURE

Style&Shopping 02

» FEATURE » SVGUIDE: FASHION

28 29

likely to mirror the same Tiffany necklace everyone else is wearing.

01

03

“With handmade jewelry, you get a quality piece that is not cranked out in a sweatshop using questionable labor. Each piece made has soul and is made with quality materials,” adds April Martin (www.aprilmartindesigns.com), who describes her jewelry as “Earthy Luxe” and uses sterling silver, 14k gold fill, handpicked freshwater pearls, gemstones and Swarovski crystals.

04

05

Laurie Elliott, designer of Wearable Toys, makes fun jewelry out of found vintage pieces such as dice, Bakelite and buttons. “Handmade jewelry has much more time invested by the artist and much more personality,” she notes. “When wearing handmade jewelry, the jewelry is the center of attention.”

06

07

Though most jewelry makers are in the business because they love adorning women with their art, Phyllis Martin-Rennie finds it difficult to part with her pieces. So, in addition to selling select handmade jewelry and materials, Martin-Rennie finds pleasure in teaching classes at her local bead shop, Willow Glen’s Sew Beadazzled (www.sewbeadazzled.com). Using her designs as a base, Martin-Rennie offers stringing, wiring and beading classes (among others), and encourages her students to wear their own personalized creations. Whether it’s the sexy, soulful pieces made by Martin, the vintage-inspired jewelry designed by Elliott, the PMC (precious metal clay) designs by Nancy Banks, the chic modern adornments by Rachel Eva, or even your own work crafted with help from MartinRennie, there’s something humble and empowering about wearing stylish, handmade, one-of-a-kind jewelry made right in your own backyard. TW

ST Y L E & SHOPPING

WHERE TO BUY

08

09

10

Artisan Accessories Spice up your outfit with unique, handmade jewelry from South Bay artists. BY JENN KATZ

L

ike a painting hanging in your home, jewelry is meant to make a statement. And because choosing personal declarations in a trendy world of mass-produced designs is often tough, it can be beneficial to skip the mall and go local. There are many incentives to purchasing pieces made

28

THEWAVEMAG.COM DECEMBER 1-14, 2008

by local jewelry makers. For one, while the current economy affects everyone, neighborhood and community artists tend to take a much bigger hit than chains or huge department stores. And just as important, local jewelry makers treat each creation like a work of art. Since the items aren’t mass-produced, they’re more likely to stand out, not to mention less

Barbarella Beauty, 1183 Lincoln Ave., San Jose (408) 947-7255 www.barbarellabeauty.com (Jewelry by Rachel Eva and April Martin Designs) Kitsch Couture, 20490 Saratoga-Los Gatos Rd., Saratoga (408) 872-1104 www.kitschcouture.com (April Martin Designs) Sew Beadazzled, 1068 Lincoln Ave., San Jose (408) 293-2232 www.sewbeadazzled.com (Jewelry and classes by Phyllis Martin-Rennie and Nancy Banks) Toastshop, 381 E. Campbell Ave., Campbell (408) 378-8558 www.toastshop.com (April Martin Designs) Three Sisters, 1393 Lincoln Ave., San Jose (408) 287-3720 (Wearable Toys by Laurie Elliott) 01 Bakelite cat medallion, $18, by Laurie Elliott, Wearable Toys 02 Red Bakelite bracelet, $95, by Laurie Elliott, Wearable Toys 03 Hand-painted clay pendant with Swarovski crystal and clay beads necklace, $75, by Rachel Eva 04 PMC ring, $150, by Nancy Banks 05 Hand-hammered silver links with Swarovski crystal cluster earrings, $40, by Rachel Eva 06 Cubic zirconia and pearl post earrings, $80, by April Martin 07 Black pearl hoops wrapped in 14k gold fill wire, $80, by April Martin 08 Wired frames bracelet, $35, by Phyllis Martin-Rennie 09 PMC pendant, $95, by Nancy Banks 10 Green Bakelite on 20-inch sterling chain, $68 and matching earrings with sterling wires, $29, by Laurie Elliott, Wearable Toys


ST YLE&SHOPPING: FEATURE

» SVGUIDE: FASHION

VIEW SLIDESHOWS & PROFILES: WWW.THEWAVEMAG.COM/FASHION BOUTIQUES

Alta 1342 Lincoln Ave., San Jose (408) 288-5940; 701 Laurel St., San Carlos (650) 596-9599; 779 Santa Cruz Ave., Menlo Park (650) 326-7390; 130 N. Santa Cruz Ave., Los Gatos (408) 354-0069 Alta has been carrying original contemporary clothing and accessories for the past 25 years. Visit any of their four locations and experience the excitement.

Amy B. Boutique Corner Stone Shopping Center, 15994 Los Gatos Blvd., Los Gatos (408) 358-8600 Exceptional men’s and women’s contemporary clothing and accessories from Ted Baker, Diane Von Furstenberg, Oliver Peoples, James Perse, Vince and Paige Denim.

Flobell 14519 Big Basin Way, Saratoga (408) 872-1647, 178 Prospect Ave., Danville (925) 855-1228 www.flobell.com SVSAVER: 15% OFF 1 ITEM FOR FIRST TIME CUSTOMERS Call 888-228-1359 on your cell to instantly receive this TEXT coupon

Shopping promotes self-esteem. Customers emerge from Flobell feeling like a million dollars and inevitably walking the part. A world of attainable luxury, Flobell offers luxury of selection, quality, services and convenience. Complimentary alteration and style management set us apart and attract customers that value personal style and service.

Infiniti Boutique 120 W. Main St., Los Gatos (408) 399-7071 This unique men’s and women’s boutique features contemporary brands, up-and-coming designers mixed with one-of-a-kind items from Europe and Japan. We carry urban, funky, sophisticated and modern styles from such designers as 2K, Diesel, Howe, Rex, Rojas, and Triple 5 Soul.

Kitsch Couture 20490 Saratoga-Los Gatos Rd., Saratoga (408) 872-1104 www.kitschcouture.com Kitsch Couture wants fashion to capture your individuality. We have transformed a quaint historic church into a wonderfully distinct contemporary boutique, featuring an eclectic mix of fashion-forward pieces, unique accessories and gifts. Customers often leave saying, “There truly is something for everyone.” Brands include Free People, T-Bags, Trina Turk, Kensie and Michael Stars.

ST Y L E & SHOPPING

Bella James 1165 Lincoln Ave., San Jose (408) 292-0000 350 E. Campbell Ave., Campbell (408) 866-9000 www.bellajames.com Located in the Garden Theatre in Willow Glen and now in downtown Campbell, Bella James features inspiring and affordable contemporary women’s clothing and accessories, including Michael Stars, Joe’s Jeans, Havaianas, Free People, Hudson, Citizens and more.

IBI Boutique 1231 Franklin Mall, Santa Clara (408) 261-2050 www.ibiboutique.com IBI Boutique is the modern woman’s dream closet! With a large selection of women’s clothing, accessories, footwear, jewelry and handbags. Located right in Franklin Square across from the Santa Clara Post Office.

Signature Lifestyle 519 E. Campbell Ave., Campbell (408) 370-3433 www.myspace.com/signaturelifestyle Features casual clothing for young guys and gals, with a large selection of accessories at very affordable prices. Complimentary gift wrapping is also available.

Ursula’s Boutique 140 W. Main St., Ste. B, Los Gatos (408) 395-1400 The wide range of clothing and styles at Ursula’s Boutique will have you dressed for any event. With an array of jewelry, handbags and accessories, Ursula’s Boutique is all you need to complete your outfit.

ADVERTISE YOUR BUSINESS HERE: (408) 467-3200 THEWAVEMAG.COM DECEMBER 1-14, 2008

29


» FEATURE

Health&Beauty

» FEATURE » PROFILES

30 36

Genetics tests can determine the identity of a child’s father, the amount of alcohol or drugs an individual has ingested within a set time frame, whether or not a woman is pregnant, and potential adverse responses to drugs such as asthma medications. “As human beings, we’re curious,” says Terry Carmichael, vice president of marketing and sales for Consumer Genetics. “We want to understand everything, so we’re diving into our DNA, and we’re trying to understand it. The by-product of understanding it [is that] we’ll be able to fix those things that are broken. Ideally, we could create new biotech drugs; we could grow them up in vats or grow antibodies in cows and rabbits, inject them into people and cure diseases. We can’t do that without understanding more about how our DNA works, and how we could use that to our advantage.”

Climbing the Ladder Local companies lead the way in the direct-to-consumer gene testing boom. BY DAMON ORION

HE A LT H & BE AU T Y

N

ot so long ago, you’d have to go through a healthcare provider if you wanted access to a genetic test – the kind that helps you find out if you are at risk of contracting a particular disease, or to prove the identity of a child’s father. But with the emergence of direct-to-consumer (DTC) gene testing in recent years, it’s possible to get the same information simply by making an online purchase or dropping by the local pharmacy. There are DTC tests for every occasion these days: tests that can determine predispositions for diseases like diabetes, heart disease and prostate cancer; tests for tracing your ancestry; tests for finding out whether or not you have a gluten intolerance; even dating services based on DNA. Not surprisingly, this scenario is provoking a wide range of reactions: While it opens up all kinds of exciting medical possibilities, it also raises important questions of safety, accuracy and allaround usefulness. Consumer Genetics, Inc. in Sunnyvale made a big splash in the DTC testing world in October when it released Pink or Blue, a gene test that allows a pregnant

30

THEWAVEMAG.COM DECEMBER 1-14, 2008

woman to determine the gender of her baby as early as seven weeks after conception by way of fetal DNA in the expectant mother’s blood. The Pink or Blue user simply pricks her finger with a lancet included in the kit, blots a blood sample onto a DNA preservation card and sends it (along with a check or money order) to the company’s Sunnyvale lab. Results are available within three to five days after the samples are received. Various other Consumer

As of now, genetic scientists understand less than one percent of the human genome, a fact that has led detractors of DTC testing to denounce the marketing of these tests to consumers as premature. Carmichael admits that the science is in its infancy, cautioning consumers to make sure that the research on the product they’re considering is based on good populations and that the science behind the product is proven and well-known. “If somebody feels like [a particular gene test] is informative, [the company] can offer that as a service to people to purchase, as long as the people purchasing [it] understand the limitations, [and] understand that this is based on the research: These are the numbers of subjects that were used; this is the ethnicity of the population,” he advises. “In today’s society, we have an extremely highly educated consumer base that these companies are targeting, [so] the consumer should be able to understand and make a decision themselves on whether or not that test is going to be informative for them.” In an attempt to prove the value of these tests, the Scripps Translational Science Institute in San Diego is launching a 20-year study underwritten by Microsoft; Affymetrix, the Santa Clara-based manufacturer of “GeneChip” arrays used for DNA analysis; and Navigenics, a Redwood Shores company that uses newly developed technology and techniques to scan the client’s entire genome for predispositions toward about two dozen different health conditions, ranging from eye disease to various types of cancer. Expected to cost $20 million, the study is designed to determine whether or not knowing the results of DTC testing motivates people to make healthier lifestyle choices.

32


HEALTH&BEAUT Y: FEATURE

HE A LT H & BE AU T Y

THEWAVEMAG.COM DECEMBER 1-14, 2008

31


HEALTH&BEAUT Y: FEATURE

HEALTH&BEAUTY F E AT U R E 30

Navigenics genetic counseling program director Elissa Levin firmly believes that these tests indeed influence the actions of their users. As she observes, making changes to our lifestyles and behavior choices is one of the hardest things to do. “There’s been a lot of question, I think, for many years as to what are the motivating factors to really get people to engage in a healthier lifestyle, whether it’s eating better, exercising, actually going to see their doctor on an annual basis, and complying with medical guidelines,” she says. “All these things, we know we should do, but many people don’t.

HE A LT H & BE AU T Y

“There are some preliminary research studies that have come out over the last few years really showing how genetic information can sort of be that motivating factor where people may not have made any changes previously despite knowing about their family history, despite knowing about risks based on population data,” Levin continues. “Seeing that there’s a genetic predisposition for a certain health condition, which is something that’s so fundamental and such a part of them, actually is that final push for them to implement certain changes.” Levin claims that studies have shown that this principle does not work in reverse: People whose test results show them not to be predisposed to a particular disease

32

THEWAVEMAG.COM DECEMBER 1-14, 2008

[ C O N T. ]

generally do not indulge in riskier behavior as a result. Enthusiastic as she is about the potentials of DTC testing, Levin also advises careful examination of the company whose test you’re considering taking: Check for scientific validity, and make sure there are qualified professionals available to help you understand your test results. With new DTC-related controversies popping up all the time (for instance, as recently as late October, the Laboratory Corporation of America pulled the direct-to-consumer ovarian cancer test OvaSure from the market after receiving a warning letter from the FDA concerning the company’s alleged misbranding of the product as a laboratory-developed test), her warning seems prudent. There is, after all, much left to be learned in this young and controversial science, and it would be wise to arm ourselves with as much information as possible as we plunge into the uncharted realms of our own DNA. TW Affymetrix (888) 362-2447 www.affymetrix.com Consumer Genetics, Inc. (866) 6942878 www.consumergenetics.com Navigenics (866) 522-1585 www.navigenics.com Scripps Health (800) 727-4777 www.scripps.org


HEALTH&BEAUT Y: FEATURE

A

C U P U N C T U R E

• H

E R B S

• E

N E R G E T I C S

Natural Healthcare Chinese Medicine treats over 80% effectively and naturally. Come and see for yourself why it has become America’s fastest growing choice for primary healthcare.

Five BraNches university medical centers Quarter Century of Excellence in Healthcare & Education Santana Row Campus Clinic Beach Harbor Campus Clinic 3031 Tisch Way, San Jose ■ (408) 260-8868 200 7th Avenue, Santa Cruz ■ (831) 476-8211 www.fivebranches.edu Medi-Cal • Health Insurance • Personal Injur y • Visa/MC

F

I E T

• M

A S S A G E

For a quarter century Five Branches University Medical Centers have provided safe, effective medical care for over 80% of your healthcare needs. ■

Colds and Flu

Cardiology

Diabetes

Fertility

Complex Conditions

Digestion

Stress

Pediatrics

Neurology

Endocrinology

HE A LT H & BE AU T Y

of your healthcare needs safely,

• D

FREE TREATMENT! New patients bring in this ad and your second treatment is free. Restrictions apply. Expires December 20, 2008. THEWAVEMAG.COM DECEMBER 1-14, 2008

33


December Special: Prepare for the Holiday Parties Spruce up your look with

25% off all services 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Mon - Thurs Men's Grooming Sets available Holiday Packages available Gift Certificates

Detox/O2 Bar Manicure/Pedicure Teeth Whitening Free Shoe Shines

HE A LT H & BE AU T Y

Call 408.371.CLIPS or Walk-ins are available Foxyavenueclips.com

34

THEWAVEMAG.COM DECEMBER 1-14, 2008


HE A LT H & BE AU T Y

THEWAVEMAG.COM DECEMBER 1-14, 2008

35


HEALTH&BEAUT Y: LISTINGS

HEALTH&BEAUTY » PROFILES

PROFILES = PRINT PROFILES & VIEW SLIDESHOWS ON WWW.THEWAVEMAG.COM/HEALTH

DAY SPAS

AYOMA LIFESPA 355 Santana Row (Fifth floor, Hotel Valencia), San Jose (408) 423-5424 www.ayoma.com

This wellness retreat tucked away inside the Hotel Valencia offers an array of therapies based upon Ayurvedic medicine, the 5,000-year-old healing system from India. Using the holistic approach of Ayurveda, a range of lifestyle and nutrition consultations, skincare and body treatments, and self-care programs are tailored to each client’s individual needs.

HARMONIE SPA 14501 Big Basin Way, Saratoga (408) 741-4997 www.harmoniespa.com

Harmonie has become the spa of choice for discerning Silicon Valley spa-goers who seek high quality services and products in an elegant and tranquil atmosphere. Services include spa essentials such as massage, deep cleansing facials, advanced skin treatments, microdermabrasion and other specialized procedures.

NEW IMAGE DAY SPA 14432 Union Ave., San Jose (408) 371-5974 www.newimagedayspa.com

New Image Day Spa offers its clientele a smaller, more personal European experience with its full range of spa services and a full line of cosmetic products. Services include the full spa roster, including relaxing facials, blissful massage, waxing, electrolysis, manicures and pedicures, plus many more treatments that are both beautifying and pampering.

MASSAGE ENVY 1040 Grant Rd., Ste. 110, Mountain View (650) 961-3689 www.massageenvy.com

Specializing in massage therapy for stress relief, relaxation, posture and circulation improvements, headache relief and more. Styles include trigger point therapy, Swedish, deep tissue, sports, reflexology, cranial sacral and hot stone.

THE MOMMY SPA 413 Monterey Ave., Ste. B (408) 395-2009 www.themommyspa.com

Specializing in massage for moms to be, the Mommy Spa offers a range of therapeutic massage within a soothing, spalike environment, and uses specially formulated products to add to the relaxing experience. Think clinical results and personalized pampering for moms or anyone in need of some therapeutic, nurturing massage.

THE SPA~LOS GATOS

HE A LT H & BE AU T Y

100 S. Santa Cruz Ave., Los Gatos (408) 354-5901 www.thespalosgatos.com

Residing in an 8,000-square-foot facility, The Spa~Los Gatos boasts 15 spacious treatment rooms offering a broad array of facial, massage and body services, plus state-of-the-art medi-spa services. Having won many awards over the years, the spa prides itself on offering a wide variety of services while still maintaining a spa philosophy based on individuality.

DENTISTRY

BAY DENTAL 1180 Blossom Hill Rd., Ste. 4, San Jose (408) 978-2500; 1253 W. El Camino Real, Ste. B, Sunnyvale (408) 732-3000 www.baydental.com

Bay Dental offers comprehensive dental care, including cosmetic services (such as Zoom! Advanced Power 2) and general dental care, dental implants, oral surgery, and orthodontics (including traditional and Invisalign braces). Expect state-ofthe-art offices, highly trained staff and the latest technologies.

BRACES FOR PRETTY FACES 4010 Moorpark Ave., Ste. 105, San Jose (408) 244-4239; 6489 Camden Ave., Ste. 100, San Jose (408) 997-7772 www.beautifulsmile.us

Provides healthy, beautiful and confident smiles for people of all ages, offering clear ceramic braces as well as Invisalign. By using the latest techniques and appliances, orthodontic specialist Dr. Stephen Yao is able to reduce discomfort, decrease the frequency of visits and shorten treatment time.

DR. MICHAEL BOUZID, DDS 10430 S. De Anza Blvd., Ste. 120, Cupertino (408) 253-0153 www.drbouzid.com

Comfort is the main priority at Dr. Bouzid’s office. He specializes in sedation dentistry (in which years of dental treatments can be performed quickly and with little to no discomfort), cosmetic dentistry, gum disease, dental implants, smile design and more. They even speak French!

FERGUSON DENTAL CARE 1198 Meridian Ave., Ste. A, San Jose (408) 266-4242 www.robertfergusondds.com

For 16 years, Dr. Ferguson and his team have been providing quality family dental care. Services include crowns in one visit, periodontal laser therapy, Invisalign braces, bridges, dentures, implants, cosmetic dentistry, teeth whitening and more.

WEST PARK DENTAL 1315 S. Winchester Blvd., San Jose (408) 866-1819 www.westparkdentalcare.com

Providing general and family dentistry services, cosmetic dentistry, orthodontics, implants, gum surgery and more. Specialties include root canals, veneers, crowns and bridges and surgical wisdom tooth extraction.

EYE CARE

VISION INNOVATIONS OPTOMETRY 2063 Camden Ave., San Jose (408) 377-1479 www.vio-eyes.com

VIO’s highly trained staff uses state-of-theart technology to provide comprehensive eye exams for contact lens fittings, laser eye surgery evaluations and more. They carry numerous designer lines, including Armani Exchange, Vogue, Gucci, Nike, Ray Ban, Oakley and many more.

HAIR SALONS

A VISIONARY SALON (408) 979-1195 www.sheleen.com

This appointment-only studio in San Jose specializes in Hairlocs brand hair extensions (a celebrity favorite) and the most current color techniques available. Owner Sheleen has more than 18 years of experience in the industry, including training with more than 20 of the most prestigious hair care companies, working for three major cosmetic companies, plus working for MTV.

FOXY AVENUE CLIPS 1810 S. Bascom Ave., Campbell (408) 371CLIPS www.foxyavenueclips.com

Foxy aims to create a masculine salon environment where men can feel comfortable and confident about receiving high-quality hair care and other grooming services: hair wash and cut, skincare, anti-aging treatments, hand and foot detailing, shoulder and neck massage and more. Clients enjoy men’s magazines, complimentary beverages, and TVs showing sports and business programs.

38

36

THEWAVEMAG.COM DECEMBER 1-14, 2008


HEALTH&BEAUT Y: LISTINGS

HE A LT H & BE AU T Y

THEWAVEMAG.COM DECEMBER 1-14, 2008

37


HEALTH&BEAUT Y: LISTINGS

HEALTH&BEAUTY PROFILES = PRINT PROFILES & VIEW SLIDESHOWS ON WWW.THEWAVEMAG.COM/HEALTH 36

THE HUMAN ENGINE CLINIC

LIMON SALON 3410 Stevens Creek Blvd., Ste. 101, San Jose www.limonsalon.com

This edgy hair salon promises a salon atmosphere like no other – one infused not merely with style, but with cutting-edge art and music. Think creative stylists, exhibitions of the works of local artists, music from local bands and products from leading hair care brands Bumble and Bumble and Redken.

MANE EVENT SALON 1581 W. Campbell Ave., Campbell (408) 866-0208 www.maneeventsalon.net

The Mane Event Salon not only provides unique styling and skin regimens, but shows clients how to replicate these procedures from their own home. Services include color, cut, hair relaxers, hair extensions, skincare, wedding styling and more.

NIRVANA SALON 224-B N. Santa Cruz Ave., Los Gatos (408) 354-7979 www.nirvanasalon.com

Specializing in advanced hair cutting and coloring techniques, bridal and event styling, makeup and hair spa services, Nirvana is also one of the greenest spas in Silicon Valley, recently becoming the first hair color salon in Silicon Valley to be “certified green” by the Bay Area Green Business program (www.greenbiz.ca.gov).

SANCTUARY SALON 790 Lincoln St., Santa Clara (408) 247-7785 www.thesanctuarysalon.com

Providing a relaxing refuge from the fast pace of your daily life, Sanctuary offers a wide range of hair, beauty and wellness services, including haircuts, color, styling and treatments, nail care, massage therapy and spa treatments (facials, skincare treatments such as microdermabrasion, body scrubs and wraps, waxing).

HAIR REPLACEMENT

NEW LOOK INSTITUTE 1190 S. Bascom Ave., Ste. 239, San Jose (408) 279-4247 www.newlookinstitute.com

HE A LT H & BE AU T Y

These hair restoration specialists offer totally undetectable hair replacement hair systems for men and women suffering from hair loss, using state-of-the-art technologies and providing quality care for all clientele. They offer free, confidential hair loss replacement consultations and provide customized hair replacement solutions that look and feel completely natural.

HEALTH & WELLNESS

BAY AREA HEALTH SPA 2055 Grant Rd., Ste. 100, Los Altos (650) 3909727; 6930 Almaden Expwy., San Jose (408) 997-9727

A beauty, health and wellness spa where treatments include a wide range of body wraps (including the inch-reducing Body Wrap™ system, which can slim the body by up to 6-20 inches in one hour), colon hydrotherapy, ionic foot cleansing, infrared sauna sessions and more.

FIVE BRANCHES INSTITUTE 200 Seventh Ave., Santa Cruz (831) 4769424; 3031 Tisch Way, Ste. 5PW, San Jose (408) 2600208 www.fivebranches.edu

Providing safe and effective medical care for 80 percent of all healthcare issues, including colds and flu, diabetes, fertility, digestion, stress, pediatrics, neurology, endocrinology, cardiology and more. Services include acupuncture, herbal treatments, energetics, diet, massage and more.

38

THEWAVEMAG.COM DECEMBER 1-14, 2008

(888) 295-6059

Call for a free consumer guide on information about health programs that drastically cut costs and reduce risks associated with diabetes, high blood pressure and high cholesterol.

INTERNAL SPA REJUVENATION CENTER 2055 Grant Rd., Ste. 100, Los Altos (650) 390-9727 www.bayareahealthspa.com

Provides a comfortable environment to detoxify and reduce stress safely through colonic hydrotherapy, which offers increased vitamin and mineral absorption, a strengthened immune system and increased energy, reversing fatigue, constipation, skin problems, depression and mood swings.

RELAX THE BACK 717 E. El Camino Real, Ste. 10, Sunnyvale (408) 737-2225 www.relaxtheback.com

As America’s largest chain retail store specializing in relief and prevention of back and neck pain, Relax the Back provides a comprehensive selection of products for people suffering from posture and back support problems.

ROZENHART FAMILY CHIROPRACTIC 4620 Meridian Ave., Ste. B, San Jose (408) 979-9999 www.rozenhartchiro.com

During the past 18 years, the Rozenhart family has been helping thousands of people find relief from back and neck pain, headaches, sleep troubles and stress, while working to fully improve the quality of life of their patients. Services include chiropractic adjustments, nutritional supplements, lifestyle coaching, massage therapy and more.

SAN FRANCISCO HERB & NATURAL FOOD COMPANY 47444 Kato Rd., Fremont (510) 770-1215 www.herbspicetea.com

This business boasts one of the largest selections of bulk herbs, teas and spices available in the US today, with more than 1,000 medicinal botanicals, culinary herbs and spices, essential oils, fragrance oils, botanical tinctures and extracts, encapsulated herbs and custom blends, bulk tea bags and a wide variety of other packaged products.

NAIL SALONS

HEALTHIER SKIN & NAIL 480 W. Hamilton Ave., Campbell (408) 370-3930

This nail salon offers a comprehensive menu of pampering and beautifying services for men and women, including body massage and treatments, complete body waxing, European facials, microdermabrasion, spa manicure and pedicures, eyelash and brow tinting, and more.

MAKEUP & HAIR

QUANG LE’S HAIR AND MAKEUP SERVICES Serving the Bay Area (408) 718-3945 lehairandmakeupservices.com

Quang Le’s offers premier specialty hair styling and makeup artistry for weddings, commercial photography, fashion shoots and runway work, specializing in all phases of makeup. The expert team here will create a hairstyle customized to your face shape, and is also renowned for the latest in hair extensions. TW


HEALTH&BEAUT Y: LISTINGS

HE A LT H & BE AU T Y

THEWAVEMAG.COM DECEMBER 1-14, 2008

39


50 Ways 12/5 FRIDAY

6. GILROY GARDENS HOLIDAY LIGHTS FEATURING A CHARLIE BROWN CHRISTMAS

Gilroy Gardens, 3050 Hecker Pass Hwy., Gilroy www.gilroygardens.org

December 5-7, 12-14, 19-23, 26-28: The park is transformed into a winter wonderland, with twinkling lights, themed rides, photos with Santa, arts and crafts workshop and, of course, Charlie Brown! 7. LOS LOBOS

The Fillmore, 1805 Geary Blvd., San Francisco www.livenation.com

December 5-6: Los Lobos has been bringing their Mex/folk/rock sounds to the masses for more than 20 years, and for damn good reason… they ROCK!: 8pm 8. GEORGE LOPEZ

Paramount Theatre, 2025 Broadway St., Oakland www.paramounttheatre.com

December 5: It’s a funathon of hilarity with ultra funnyman George Lopez! 8pm 9. HOLIDAY CARRIAGE RIDES Los Gatos carriagerides. losgatoschamber.com

December 5-23: You can cruise around Los Gatos in an honest-togoodness horse-drawn carriage and visit some of the town’s most beautiful historic homes along downtown’s festively decorated North Santa Cruz Avenue.

12/6

SATURDAY

50 WAYS

10. ART DECO & MODERISM HOLIDAY SALE

36

12/1 MONDAY

1. CHRISTMAS IN THE PARK

Plaza de Cesar Chavez, Market St. between San Carlos & San Fernando, San Jose www.christmasinthepark.com

Thru January 1: Hundreds of wintertime holiday displays, live entertainment, food, and Saint Nick! 2. FANTASY OF LIGHTS

Vasona Lake Park, 333 Blossom Hill Dr., Los Gatos (408) 3552201www.parkhere.org

Thru December 31: Vasona Lake County Park will once again be transformed into a Fantasy of Lights, featuring an evening drive-thru tour of 37 holiday-themed light displays, including an exploding volcano!: 6-10pm

12/2 TUESDAY

3. SAN JOSE SHARKS vs. TORONTO MAPLE LEAFS Shark Tank, 525 W. Santa Clara St., San Jose www.sjsharks.com

of the most glorious voices upon our beloved city for an evening of amazing Celtic music: 8pm

12/3

December 4: All aboard the decorated ole No. 2 steam engine, which will cart you around Vasona Lake Park to view the wonderful Fantasy of Lights display.

WEDNESDAY

History Park, 1650 Senter Rd., San Jose (408) 298-2291 www.historysanjose.org

December 6: You won’t want to miss Santa as he arrives on a vintage fire truck (his sleigh is in the shop) to visit with all the little kiddies, along with holiday carolers, gourmet food, arts & crafts and more!: Noon-6pm 13. AN ARDENWOOD CHRISTMAS Ardenwood Historic Farms, 34600 Ardenwood Blvd., Fremont www.ebparks.org/ activities/events

December 6-7: Celebrate the holiday season in Victorian style. Visit the beautifully decorated Patterson House, sing Christmas carols, search for the Yule log, and visit Father Christmas. The day also includes holiday crafts, music, and cooking demonstrations: 10am-4pm

17. SAN FRANCISCO STATE UNIVERSITY HAND BELL CHOIR

San Mateo County History Museum – Courtroom A, 2200 Broadway, Redwood City (650) 299-0104 www.historysmc.org

December 6: Nothing rocks harder than hand bells. That’s why you won’t want to miss the San Francisco State University Hand Bell Choir performing a variety of European holiday folk tunes: Noon 18. HOLIDAY ANIME FAIRE

Fremont Teen Center, 39770 Paseo Padre Pkwy., Fremont (510) 494-4344 www.holidayanimefaire.com

December 6: Come out and enjoy a full day of anime, with art demonstrations, vendors, music and much, much more!: 10am-3pm 19. HOLIDAY CRAFT FAIRE

Fremont High School’s Gym, 1279 Sunnyvale-Saratoga Rd., Sunnyvale (408) 522-2700

December 6-7: The Sunnyvale Fremont High School Featherettes team invites you to its annual Holiday Craft Faire, featuring more than 60 vendors selling thousands of arts and crafts items.

14. HARPS FOR THE HOLIDAYS

20. SANTA ARRIVES BY HELICOPTER

December 6: Enjoy a special evening of divine music at this year’s eighth annual harp holiday concert: 4pm

December 6: Bring the kids to see Santa come flying in, not by reindeer, but by helicopter! You’ll also enjoy caroling, live music from the San Carlos Community Band, cookies and candy canes.

Los Altos United Methodist Church, 655 Magdalena Ave., Los Altos www.harpeggio.com/ concert.html

15. STATEWIDE WATERCOLOR COMPETITION & EXHIBITION

Triton Museum of Art, 1505 Warburton Ave., Santa Clara

December 6-February 22: Enjoy a wonderful display of 55 paintings from some of California’s most talented watercolor artists.

December 6: You’re all invited to come and help celebrate with live music, carriage rides, food booths, kid zone, tree lighting ceremony and, of course, the parade!: 11am

Downtown Los Gatos www.losgatoschamber.com

Hiller Aviation Museum, 601 Skyway Rd., San Carlos www.hiller.org

21. OPERA EXTRAVAGANZA!

Mexican Heritage Plaza Theatre, 1700 Alum Rock Ave., San Jose (408) 272-9920 www.missionchamber.org

December 6-7: It’s all about the opera with a double bill featuring excerpts from Mozart’s comic romance, The Marriage of Figaro, along with California composer Hector Armienta’s bilingual opera premiere, River of Women.

12/7 SUNDAY

22. SAN JOSE SUPER TOY, COMIC & RECORD SHOW

Santa Clara Fairgrounds, 344 Tully Rd., San Jose (408) 2981709 www.timetunneltoys.com

December 6: Some of the biggest names in toys will be on hand, such as Big Jim, Evel Knievel, Rock ‘Em Sock ‘Em Robots, Sit & Spin, Whirlybird, Easy-Bake Oven, Battleship and a special appearance by Optimus Prime:11am-4pm

Billy Jones Wildcat Railroad, 110 Blossom Hill Rd., Los Gatos (408) 395-7433 www.bjwrr.org

23. CERAMICS SHOW

San Jose City College Ceramics Laboratory, Room 311, 2100 Moorpark Ave., San Jose (408) 298-2181

4. CELTIC THUNDER

December 7-9: What does everyone want more than anything else for Christmas, you ask? Ceramics! So, make your way to this ultimate

HP Pavilion, 525 W. Santa Clara, San Jose www.hppsj.com

December 3: The thunder will be rolling into San Jose, unleashing five

THEWAVEMAG.COM DECEMBER 1-14, 2008

12. HERITAGE HOLIDAY

December 6-7: This is the largest art deco and modernism sale in the country, featuring more than 200 dealers selling art deco, arts and crafts, streamlined modern furniture, vintage clothing, mid-century jewelry and more.

08 40

December 6: Come see the inflation of oversized helium balloons, a showcasing of spectacular floats, activities for the children and special live performances: 3-7pm

16. LOS GATOS HOLIDAY PARADE

12/4

5. FANTASY TRAIN OF LIGHTS

Corner of Market St. & Park Ave., San Jose www.sanjoseholidayparade.com

The Concourse Exhibition Center, Eighth & Brannan, San Francisco (650) 599-3326 www.artdecosale.com

THURSDAY

December 2: Let’s welcome ex-San Jose Sharks coach Ron Wilson back to San Jose by kicking the living crap out of the Toronto Maple Leafs!: 7:30pm

11. NINTH INFLATION CELEBRATION


50 WAYS TO LEAVE YOUR SOFA

12/10

WEDNESDAY 33. A CHRISTMAS CAROL Northside Theatre Company, 848 E. William St., San Jose (408) 288-7820 www.northsidetheatre.com

December 10-24: Join the Northside Theatre’s 26th production of everyone’s ghostly Christmas favorite, Charles Dickens’ A Christmas Carol.

12/11 THURSDAY

34. SAN JOSE STATE UNIVERSITY STUDENT FILM FESTIVAL

14 ceramics show that features handmade vases, dinnerware, sculptures, and more! 24. SAN JOSE HOLIDAY PARADE

Downtown San Jose, Along Santa Clara St. www.sanjoseholidayparade.com

December 7: The San Jose Holiday Parade was voted one of the Top 25 parades in the United States, so load up the family and prepare to be entertained by colorful floats, marching bands and huge inflatables. Keep an eye out for the Wave balloon (Strawberry Shortcake): 8:30am 25. MRS. CLAUS’ BREAKFAST NOOK

The Tech Museum, 201 S. Market St., San Jose www.sanjoseholidayparade.com

December 7: Think of it as a pregame meal as Mrs. Claus and friends invite you to join them for a delicious breakfast before the San Jose Holiday Parade: 7-8:30am 26. CAROLS IN THE CALIFORNIA

California Theatre, 345 S. First St., San Jose (408) 286-2600 x23 www.symphonysiliconvalley.org

27. DICKENS CAROLERS Children’s Discovery Museum, 180 Woz Way, San Jose (408) 298-5437 www.cdm.org

December 7: The whole family is welcome to join the talented young members of the Dickens Carolers, as they treat you to a program of, what else, Dickens-style caroling: 2-2:30pm 28. AN AMERICAN PORTRAIT

McAfee Center, 20300 Herriman Ave., Saratoga www.sjws.org

December 7: San Jose Wind Symphony welcomes Hal Linden, Tony Award-winner and star of Barney Miller, for an afternoon of music and song from George Gershwin to Benny Goodman: 3pm 29. 11TH ANNUAL YULETIDE YUCKFEST

Britannia Arms, 5027 Almaden Expwy., San Jose (415) 595-4555

30. HAYWARD CAMERA SHOW

Centennial Hall – City Center, 22292 Foothill Blvd., Hayward

December 7: Attention, shutterbugs, this is an event you surely will not want to miss. Come and sell or purchase everything from Nikon, Canon, Minolta, Pentax, Fuji, Olympus, Zeiss, Leica, Rollei, large and small format cameras, tripods, studio equipment, darkroom equipment and more.

12/8 MONDAY

31. YOU-SING-ITMESSIAH

California Theatre, 345 S. First St., San Jose (408) 995-3318 www.sanjosesymphonicchoir.org

December 8: The San Jose Symphonic Choir sounds great all on its own, but at this event, the audience is encouraged to sing along. Bring your own score, or purchase one in the lobby: 7:30pm

12/9 TUESDAY

32. A CHANTICLEER CHRISTMAS

Memorial Church – Stanford University www.livelyarts.stanford.edu

December 9-10: This Christmas concert features the Grammywinning Chanticleer Chorus, an all-male, a cappella group who will perform medieval and Renaissance sacred works, traditional carols, African-American spirituals, and many others.

December 11: The San Jose State University’s Film Production Society is hosting a film festival, featuring student shorts from the Bay Area: 7-9pm 35. NOT SO SILENT NIGHT Oracle Arena, Oakland www.livenation.com

December 11: A full night of stupendous music from The Killers, Death Cab for Cutie, Bloc Party, Franz Ferdinand and Jack’s Mannequin. 36. THE NUTCRACKER

San Jose Center for the Performing Arts, 255 Almaden Blvd., San Jose www.balletsanjose.org

December 11-28: The whole family is invited to this holiday classic, as Ballet San Jose presents their spectacular production of The Nutcracker! 37. THE PRETENDERS

Paramount Theatre, 2025 Broadway St., Oakland www.paramounttheatre.com

Gamble Garden, 1431 Waverley St., Palo Alto www.gamblegarden.org

December 13: The whole family is welcome at this super fun puppet show put on by The Puppet Company! 41. 25TH ANNUAL TELEGRAPH AVENUE HOLIDAY STREET FAIR

Dwight Way & Bancroft Way, near the UC Campus in Berkeley www.telegraphfair.com

December 13-14, 20-21, 2324: More than 200 street artists, merchants, community groups, musicians and other entertainers will fill Telegraph Avenue between Dwight and Bancroft Ways for six full days of street fair madness: 11am-6pm 42. NUTCRACKER HIGH TEA

Sainte Claire Hotel, 302 S. Market St., San Jose (408) 2882820 x204 www.balletsanjose.org

December 13, 23: Ballet San Jose invites children to this special one-hour performance, followed by a chance to meet characters from the show, along with face painters, balloon artists and more: 1:30pm 43. HOLIDAY WREATHMAKING WORKSHOP

Guadalupe River Park & Gardens Visitor & Education Center, 438 Coleman Ave., San Jose www.grpg.org

12/14 SUNDAY

December 11: Join special guests The Pretenders and Amos Lee as they help raise funds and toys for the Marines’ Toys for Tots program: 7:30pm

44. DAVE WECKL & BIG BAND IN BENEFIT

38. THIRD ANNUAL NUTCRACKER OPENING NIGHT CELEBRATION

December 14: Join legendary jazz drummer Dave Weckl as he is joined by the West Valley big band jazz orchestra for an evening of fantastic music and fund-raising for music students: 4pm

Hotel Sainte Claire, 320 S. Market St., San Jose (408) 2882820 x204 www.balletsanjose.org

December 11: Ballet San Jose presents their third annual Nutcracker opening night celebration, with local celebrity journalists Leigh Weimers and Ysabel Duron serving as comasters of ceremonies, along with a cocktail party and supper-by-the-bite by some of the Bay Area’s top chefs.

12/13 SATURDAY

39. CAROL OF LIGHTS Downtown Campbell www.campbellchamber.com

December 13: A family holiday celebration with music, carolers, hot chocolate, pony rides, bounce house, and the man of the moment, SANTA!: 2-5pm

03

December 13: Want to add that special touch to your holiday décor? Well, we have the perfect solution: Take part in this year’s holiday wreath-making workshop and learn how to make a beautiful natural wreath for your home!

West Valley College Theater, 14000 Fruitvale Ave., Saratoga (408) 741-2460 www.westvalleyjazz.com

45. THE NEWARK MUSIC SWAP MEET The Newark Pavilion, 6430 Thornton Ave., Newark (408) 263-5127

December 14: Thousands upon thousands of records will be on hand in every genre, size and speed under the sun, including jazz, punk, rock, Latin – even some bossa nova thrown in for good measure: 7am-1pm

12/15 MONDAY

46. CHILDREN’S HOLIDAY PRINCESS TEAS

33 (408) 247-3613

December 15-17: Bring the kids for a day just for them with a magic show, dancing, singing, and storytelling: 4-5:30pm 47. THE BLACK CROWES

The Fillmore, 1805 Geary Blvd., San Francisco www.livenation.com

December 15-16, 18-20: The Robinson brothers would like to invite you to SIX nights of ROCK ’N’ ROLL!

12/17

WEDNESDAY

12/19 FRIDAY

49. OAKLAND INTERFAITH GOSPEL ENSEMBLE HOLIDAY CONCERT

Mountain View Center for the Performing Arts, 500 Castro St., Mountain View (650) 903-6000

December 19: This multiracial, interfaith ensemble brings everyone and anyone together through the power of music and song: 7:30pm 50. DANCING WITH THE STARS: THE TOUR

48. SARAH BRIGHTMAN

HP Pavilion, 525 W. Santa Clara St., San Jose www.hppsj.com

December 17: It’ll be a roller-coaster evening of music as you’ll be enticed by everything from Andrew Lloyd Webber (her ex-hubby) to Enigma: 8pm

December 19: Spend the evening with Lance Bass, Toni Braxton, Maurice Greene, Karina Smirnoff, the Bay Area’s Cheryl Burke and other stars for a full night of, what else, DANCING!: 7:30pm TW

HP Pavilion, 525 W. Santa Clara St., San Jose www.hppsj.com

Lisa’s Tea Treasures, 1145 Olsen Ave., Santana Row

THEWAVEMAG.COM DECEMBER 1-14, 2008

41

50 WAYS

December 7: The Symphony Silicon Valley Chorale presents a festive program of holiday favorites, including traditional carols, Caribbean Mass with samba, salsa and blues rhythms, and much more!: 7:30pm

December 7: Benefit for Toys for Tots, with live music from Chubby’s All-Stars, special guest Viv Savage from Spinal Tap, a band of hilarious comedians, including Larry “Bubbles” Brown, Mike Lee, Tissa Hami, Jeff Applebaum and Nick Leonard and hosted by Hymie Laredo: 7pm

SJSU University Theater, Fifth & San Fernando, San Jose

40. A TIME TO BE JOLLY PUPPET SHOW


» FEATURE

Dining

» FEATURE » HOT SPOTS

Maine lobster salad with golden tapioca pearls, matsutake mushrooms and yuzu brown butter. By Plumed Horse executive chef Peter Armellino

42 46

FUN WITH FUNGI

Mushroom events, and tidbits for fans of the most versatile foodie fungus: The Santa Cruz Fungus Fair takes place Jan. 10-11 at the Louden Nelson Community Center. Visitors will find a feast for the senses in displays and demonstrations featuring edible, hallucinogenics and toxic mushroom varieties. Speakers will lecture, and chefs will cook. Attendees are welcome to bring specimens for identification. Hidden Villa Ranch in Los Altos Hills hosts regular ’shroom related events and workshops in the winter months, including their Mushroom Hike, Dec. 6 from 10am to 1pm. Participants will learn how to identify common families of mushrooms, and Wade Leschyn of the Mycological Society of San Francisco (www.mssf.org) will discuss edible and poisonous varieties. Bring a basket and small knife for collecting specimens. The hike is contingent on weather, and space is limited. Register now at www.hiddenvilla.org. Also mark your calendar for Sent Sovi’s annual multicourse mushroom dinner, featuring matsutakes, porcinis, chanterelles, black trumpets and other varieties. That’ll be coming up in May – just in time for those marvelous morels.

the porcinis, followed by black trumpets in January and February, then morels in the spring.

DINING

’Shrooms in Bloom Local chefs love winter, when the Bay Area’s fertile grounds are full of wild and wonderful mushrooms. BY ALASTAIR BLAND

T

hey come from below, thriving on the decomposing dregs of the forest floor. Few living things have such a potent power to link the rustic and gritty to the decadent and elegant. We’re talking of wild mushrooms, which are prolific in the Bay Area. The local season begins with the rains, when just hours after the first autumn downpour soaks the earth, great tangles of microscopic subsurface filaments called mycelium spring back to life after a dry summer of dormancy. They surge through the soil, drawing up water and minerals, and within days of the rains they send mushrooms – essentially, fruits on a tree – plowing skyward to have a peek at the world above their subterranean birthplace.

42

THEWAVEMAG.COM DECEMBER 1-14, 2008

TIPS FOR THE HOME CHEF While fresh mushrooms tend to tail off locally by April and May, dried mushrooms are readily available year round. Porcini powder is especially effective and versatile. Try coating pieces of fish and meat in the fragrant dust before frying or broiling. You may also simmer porcini powder in oil before adding it to a vinaigrette. Phil Carpenter of the Fungus Federation of Santa Cruz prefers fresh porcinis, and advises any home chef to sauté steaks long and slow, until thoroughly browned. That, he says, is when the nutty, pungent flavor fully unravels. Chanterelles, meanwhile, are far more delicate. Cook them less intensely, perhaps in a cream sauce to be drizzled over grilled wild salmon.

One of the first local edibles to bloom en masse each fall is the worldly porcini, which fruits among pine trees. Chanterelles arrive in oak forests shortly after

Though mushrooms are widely appreciated throughout the world for their culinary virtues (particularly in parts of Europe, Asia and other cultures with deeply bucolic roots), on our shores it’s a different story. Many Americans are downright phobic when it comes to the edible fungi, with good reason: The lethally toxic Amanita phalloides (or “death cap” mushroom) not only was introduced accidentally to North America several decades ago, but remains abundant locally. Just the scantest bite will necessitate a liver transplant, while people die of death cap poisonings almost every year. Fortunately, the vast majority of mushrooms are perfectly benign, and as such provide a favorite ingredient among top chefs around the South Bay. At the French-California bistro Sent Sovi, chef Josiah Slone usually begins receiving crates of local fungi in November. For one of his long-standing fan favorites (a variation of French toast), Slone slices large meaty steaks of porcini mushrooms or matsutakes, a beefy white mushroom from the Pacific Northwest. After dipping them in beaten eggs, he sautés the fat fungus slabs until browned and serves them drizzled with balsamic syrup. Another creation is the mushroom tea that Slone pours with a braised oxtail “marmalade.” The beverage is brewed through a bag filled with dried shiitakes, porcinis and black trumpets. Executive chef Peter Armellino of Plumed Horse will feature multiple mushroom specials all season. Salmon will be served with a warm chanterelle salad, and his signature rib eye for two will come accompanied by sautéed matsutakes from Washington. Matsutakes may sell in Japan for $2,000 per pound, but for Armellino, nothing beats a pile of fresh morels. “They’re smoky, earthy and 44


DINING: FEATURE

DINING F E AT U R E

[ C O N T. ]

42

almondesque,” he says. “Their texture holds up most ways you cook them. They’re just incredible mushrooms.”

DINING

By contrast, Jonathon Hall, chef de cuisine at Parcel 104, has no particular favorite mushroom, noting instead that “each [kind] brings something different to the table.” The porcini is a strong spectacular showpiece and can be grilled like a hunk of beef; the chanterelle is delicate and restrained, while the matsutake is exotic, powerful and brightly aromatic. Other varieties that appear on Hall’s menu are butter boletes, black trumpets, cauliflower mushrooms and lobster mushrooms. (The latter, a bulbous red freak, is born when a species of parasitic fungus infects another mushroom. The host, usually a species of the Russula or Lactarius genera, turns rusty red and its gills clot together. The deformed product takes on a briny flavor to become one of the better edibles in the woods.) There is one remarkable mushroom that’s best suited for desserts: the sugary-brown candy cap. Strongly redolent of maple syrup, the candy cap, says Slone, does well in custards, whipped creams and creme brulée. Candy cap ice cream is available, too, produced by Gelato Massimo (www. gelatomassimo.com) in Watsonville and sold at Foodville Market and Sigona’s Farmers Markets. Those thinking of foraging their own fungi this rainy season must be aware of local regulations and restrictions on the activity and should contact the Fungus Federation of Santa Cruz (www.fungusfed.org). A friendly consortium of hobbyists, scientists, chefs and fanatics, the Fungus Federation 44

THEWAVEMAG.COM DECEMBER 1-14, 2008

leads public forays and gladly offers identification advice. Co-manager Phil Carpenter asserts that mushroom collecting is a rewarding hobby fraught with far less danger than popularly emphasized by the media. Fatal poisonings, however, are not an imagined occurrence. “For crying out loud,” warns Carpenter, “call us before you eat it, not after.” Even the morel and others of its family contain monomethylhydrazine (a fiery constituent of rocket fuel), and must be thoroughly cooked before serving. Lepiota rachodes, also a delicious (if rather obscure) species with no common name, has a toxic lookalike that can kill. The tasty blewit also has a poisonous twin. So seek only in the company of experts – and if in doubt, throw it out. But don’t be afraid. Mushrooms may lurk in dark, dirty places, but they won’t bite. And while the winter months may be dampened by the dark chill of the season, for hobbyists, diners and chefs, mushroom season may just be the most wonderful time of the year. TW WHERE TO DINE Sent Sovi, 14583 Big Basin Way, Saratoga (408) 867-3110 www.sentsovi.com Plumed Horse, 14555 Big Basin Way, Saratoga (408) 867-4711 www.plumedhorse.com Parcel 104, 2700 Mission College Blvd., Santa Clara (408) 970-6104 www.parcel104.com

WHERE TO BUY Foodville Market, 616 Laurel St., San Carlos (650) 592-4701 Sigona’s Farmers Market, 2345 Middlefield Rd., Redwood City (650) 368-6993; 399 Stanford Shopping Center, Palo Alto (650) 329-1340 www.sigonas.com


DINING: FEATURE

Join us for a nightly celebration of food, wine and memorable times.

THE FINEST PRIME STEAK & 100 WINES BY THE GLASS

180 El Camino Real, Palo Alto 650-329-8457 FlemingsSteakhouse.com

Cocktail Lounge s Dining s Retail Market

SIMPLY THE BEST! Monday Night Football HAPPY HOUR TOP.M. DINING

www.thefishmarket.com San JOSEn"LOSSOM(ILL2Ds  

PA L O A LT O s S A N TA C L A R A s S A N M AT E O THEWAVEMAG.COM DECEMBER 1-14, 2008

45


DINING: HOT SPOTS

DINING

» HOT SPOTS

HOT

PRICE GUIDE: $[5-15]

SPOTS

$$[15-25]

$$$[25-40]

$$$$[40+]

= PRINT MENUS & VIEW SLIDESHOWS ON WWW.THEWAVEMAG.COM/MENUS

CAMPBELL

CAPERS EAT & DRINK $$ [American] 1710 W. Campbell Ave. (408) 374-5777 www.caperseatanddrink.com

Sports bar meets fine dining at Capers, the perfect place to watch a game without the regretful unhealthy fare. Capers serves up an eclectic and wholesome menu of pastas, salads, sandwiches and steaks. The appetizer menu offers traditional chicken wings in addition to the upscale tastes of carpaccio and tuna sashimi. Head to the full bar for the extensive wine list and assorted martinis.

GRILL ’EM STEAKHOUSE $$ [American] 2509 S. Bascom Ave. (408) 371-8729 www.ugrillem.com

Grill ’Em is the best way to grill steaks and have fun without the cleanup. Dim lighting, comfy booths and music contribute to the lounge-y atmosphere, while a large communal grill allows patrons to cook rib eye, New York, top sirloin and filet mignon steaks any way they like. Appetizers, burgers, sandwiches and salads are available if you prefer a hands-off dining experience.

now serving affordable and tasty treats and late night dancing has also been Menlo Park’s city hall, police department, jail and public library. A mahogany bar, stained-glass windows, Tiffany lamps and a solid brass chandelier create a historic feel, while a diverse menu of nachos, sandwiches and steaks is served.

MOUNTAIN VIEW

TAQUERIA LA BAMBA $ [Mexican] 2058 Old Middlefield Way (650) 965-2755

Tucked away in this tiny taqueria are some of the biggest burritos this side of Texas. La Bamba’s super burrito comes with all the traditional fixings, such as meat, beans, rice, cheese, sour cream and guacamole, and is big enough to feed two hungry people. La Bamba’s menu also offers a taste of El Salvador with its pupusas, wonderfully crispy tortillas filled with pork, beans, and cheese. These delicacies are not designed to go – gobble them up in-house as they emerge piping hot from the kitchen.

PALO ALTO LOS GATOS

CIN-CIN WINE BAR $$$ [California, Modern American] 368 Village Ln. (408) 354-8006 www.cincinwinebar.com

Cin-Cin, an Italian toast meaning “to your health,” is no joke at this restaurant. In addition to producing its wine and food with sustainable, organic and biodynamic methods, Cin-Cin incorporates natural and recycled items in its décor to create a more eco-friendly environment. The menu offers eclectic flavors from around the globe, as does the wine list.

LITTLE LOU’S BBQ $ [Barbecue] 15466 Los Gatos Blvd., Ste. 111 (408) 356-5768 www.littlelousbbq.com

This tiny place packs a lot of meat and serves a hungry crowd. There are a few items for the light at heart (turkey burger, vegetarian burger, salads), but the majority of the pickins are traditional barbecue choices such as ribs, burgers, pulled pork and combo dinners named “Beef Lovers Feast.” The so-called “HungryMan” lunch (a quarter-chicken, two sides, garlic bread, and soda) is a popular weekday treat.

THREE DEGREES $$$ [Modern American, French] 140 S. Santa Cruz Ave. (408) 884-1054 www.threedegreesrestaurant.com

DINING

Three Degrees is a universal delight and is praised for breakfast, lunch and dinner alike. Because they use fresh, seasonal ingredients from local farms, the menu changes often. Expect a French twist on Modern American cuisine, and do not miss the champagne Sunday brunch, which features delectable dishes like tortellini in a mascarpone crème sauce. For dinner, rendezvous on the patio for a touch of romance.

WINE CELLAR $$$ [Modern American] 50 University Ave. (408) 354-4808 www.winecellarlosgatos.com

Whether dining inside among intimate custom ironwork and mica lighted booths, or on the outside patio with scenes of the Santa Cruz Mountains, it’s certain you’ll be romanced at The Wine Cellar. The restaurant is well known for its wine and fondue (traditional Swiss gruyere and cheddar and ale), but be sure to leave room for the succulent starters, pastas, entrées and, of course, chocolate fondue.

MENLO PARK

FLEMING’S PRIME STEAKHOUSE & WINE BAR $$ [American, Steakhouse] 180 El Camino Real, Palo Alto (650) 329-8457 www.flemingssteakhouse.com

Prime beef reigns supreme at Fleming’s – marbled and aged for up to four weeks, then broiled at an unholy 1,600 degrees to seal in its flavors. Other indulgences include succulent seafood and chicken dishes and decadent desserts. More than 100 wines adorn the extensive list, including boutique wines, and all are available by the glass. A friendly, inviting atmosphere highlights this classic steakhouse experience.

MANTRA RESTAURANT & LOUNGE $$$ [Contemporary Indian] 632 Emerson St. (650) 322-3500 www.mantrapaloalto.com

Mantra is seductive in its display of contemporary art, bright Indian colors, fresh food with bold spices, welcoming staff, and the Daru Lounge – a chic retreat in which to enjoy cocktails and small spicy dishes. Appetizers such as the cinnamon shrimp lollipops appear daring, but they’re guaranteed to tickle the taste buds and keep you on the edge of your seat for the main course.

SUNDANCE THE STEAKHOUSE $$$$ [American] 1921 El Camino Real (650) 321-6798 www.sundancethesteakhouse.com

For more than 30 years, signature steaks and award-winning slow-roasted prime rib has made Sundance the Steakhouse the go-to place for an elegant steak dinner. An array of salads, fresh seafood, shellfish, pasta and poultry also decorate the menu. Linger amongst the mahogany wood, forest-green booths and antique paraphernalia after dinner, and relax with a vintage martini for the ultimate Sundance experience.

THAIPHOON RESTAURANT $ [Thai] 543 Emerson St. (650) 323-7700 www.thaiphoonrestaurant.com

Thaiphoon serves traditional and contemporary Thai dishes with an elegant balance of spicy and sweet. Order the red curry pumpkin beef with pad Thai, stir-fried mango, veggie and cashew served with brown jasmine rice, and enjoy your meal on the tropical outdoor patio by the Buddha fountain with an exotic cocktail: We like the lychee martini or the lemongrass mojito.

BRITISH BANKERS CLUB $ [American] 1090 El Camino Real (650) 327-8769 www.britishbankersclub.com

Initially built as a bank in 1922, the notable building

46

THEWAVEMAG.COM DECEMBER 1-14, 2008

48


DINING: HOT SPOTS

DINING

THEWAVEMAG.COM DECEMBER 1-14, 2008

47


DINING: HOT SPOTS

DINING HOT

SPOTS

[ C O N T. ]

= PRINT MENUS & VIEW SLIDESHOWS ON WWW.THEWAVEMAG.COM/MENUS 46

DOWNTOWN SAN JOSE

19 MARKET $ [California-Vietnamese] 19 N. Market St. (408) 280-6111 www.19market.com

Unlike the bare-bones eat-and-run feel of so many Vietnamese restaurants, 19 Market shines with Zen-inspired earth-tone interiors and an equally agreeable menu. This bar and bistro not only dishes out familiar favorites like beef noodle soup (pho) and imperial rolls, but adds a Singaporean, Chinese, and California twist to Vietnamese fare. Try the shaking beef, or Chilean sea bass, simmered with caramel sauce in a clay pot.

BILLY BERK’S [Modern American] 99 S. First St. (408) 292-4300 www.maxsworld.com

It’s hard to describe the cuisine at Billy Berk’s – they literally have a bit of everything. From rustic flatbreads to seafood (ranging from Thai chili salmon to spicy Louisiana prawns), sliders to sushi rolls, steaks to quesadillas and pasta to chop ’n’ toss salads, this place has all your cravings covered. The brick and timber building with large island bar is an ideal gathering place.

FAHRENHEIT ULTRA LOUNGE & RESTAURANT $$ [Modern American, Asian Fusion] 99 E. San Fernando St. (408) 998-9998 www.fahrenheitultralounge.com

Fahrenheit’s seductive ambience gives way to its equally chic menu of modern global cuisine. Share an assortment of small dishes to taste as much as you can. Try the Mandalay wraps with the green papaya and radicchio salad. And if you must have a plate all to yourself, large plates are available. We recommend any dish with the garlic noodles.

THE GRILL ON THE ALLEY $$$ [American, Steakhouse] 172 S. Market St. (408) 294-2244 www.thegrill.com

A hand-stirred dirty martini is a must-have at The Grill, a place reminiscent of a 1940s dinner club. The meatloaf, a simple American classic served with red skin mashed potatoes and vegetables, will blow you away as it melts in your mouth. Steaks, chops and poultry are also fantastic, and The Grill even manages to make something as down-toearth as fresh strawberries taste like heaven.

GUMBO JUMBO $$

DINING

[Cajun Fusion] 80 N Market St. (408) 294-8626 www.gumbojumbo.net.

Spicy flavors abound at Gumbo Jumbo, where popular menu choices include crawfish and traditional jambalaya (packed with tiger prawns, wild salmon, big eye ahi tuna, free range chicken, spicy sausage and a mix of veggies). The delicious Cajun soups are sure to complement any meal, especially the restaurant’s namesake Gumbo Jumbo or the seafood gumbo.

LOFT BAR & BISTRO $$ [Modern American] 90 S. Second St. (408) 291-0677 www.loftbarandbistro.com

Vibrant interior colors and a long bar, as well as the cozy patio furniture on the second-story patio, make this very metropolitan Loft an inviting place for dinner, drinks, and dancing. Entrées include a selection of pastas, seafood, poultry, steaks and appetizing low-carb entrées (shaved tri-tip, spicy cajun blackened salmon). The lunch menu features a large assortment of salads, sandwiches and wraps.

SAN JOSE

Experience a bit of modern Tokyo at Blowfish Sushi, with DJ music and Japanese anime streaming across multiple video screens. Sushi, Japanese fusion appetizers, exotic entrées and intriguing desserts are sure to flirt with your taste buds. Hang out in the liquor lounge with premium imported sakes and specialty cocktails like the sake cosmo or the lychee sidecar.

CHA CHA SUSHI $ [Sushi, Japanese] 547 W. Capitol Expwy. (408) 265-2416

Cha Cha Sushi is cute, chic and trendy with an extremely friendly wait-staff. You won’t find a sushi boat at this restaurant, but you are guaranteed to find fresh sushi made-to-order. The beef, salmon and chicken teriyaki plates are especially delicious for those who want a hot plate. Start out with Cha Cha’s signature tempura salad and a perfect, nottoo-salty miso soup.

THE FISH MARKET $$ [Seafood, American] 1007 Blossom Hill Rd. (408) 269-3474 www.thefishmarket.com

Seafood aficionados don’t only flock to The Fish Market for fresh shellfish, crab and lobster – they come to enjoy the full-service oyster bar, sushi bar, retail market, romantic dining areas and cocktail bar and lounge. Have your dish served the way you like it: Shellfish can be ordered raw, steamed or baked; fish is smoked, mesquite grilled, pan-fried or skewered.

HOUSE OF GENJI $$$ [Japanese, Steakhouse] 1335 N. First St. (408) 453-8120 www.houseofgenji.com

Tableside knife juggling is an everyday affair at the House of Genji, where your meal is cooked at the table. Upon choosing the combination of condiments, vegetables and meats (the filet mignon and prawns combination is popular), the adventurous chef will grill while spinning and cutting your meal in the air, followed by a final act of tossing it on your plate in artistic fashion.

ISLAND GRILL $$ [Hawaiian, Asian Fusion] 1355 N. Fourth St. (408) 392-2468 www.theislandgrill.com

It’s fitting that this kitschy tiki-adorned restaurant is in the Clarion Hotel – having dinner here is like going on a mini vacation. Entrées include the festive haliakala salmon, mango tango pork chops and frutta del mar. Food is also served in the appropriately named Bamboo Lounge. Share the spicy samosas and ahi maki over tropical mixed drinks and unwind to the luau-esque ambience.

MENARA MOROCCAN RESTAURANT $$$ [Moroccan] 41 E. Gish Rd. (408) 453-1983 www.menara41.com

An exotic Moroccan ambience, belly dancers, pillowed couches, and five-course prix-fixe dinners with names like Le Diner Fantasy and Le Diner Casablanca are sure to enchant any guest of Menara Moroccan Restaurant. The lhram mrhosia (lamb with honey), b’stilla (boneless chicken pastry) and couscous aux legumes (vegetable couscous) are delectable. All dinners are ended with a serving of refreshing mint tea.

PEARL RIVER RESTAURANT $ [Chinese] 414 Blossom Hill Rd. (408) 225-5060; 2281 Lincoln Ave. (408) 265-7066 www.pearlriverchinese.com

Pearl River maintains its good reputation with its fresh ingredients, healthy portions and vast assortment. Many regulars who fall in love on their first visit have been ordering the same dishes for years, though there are more than a dozen types of beef, chicken, seafood, soup and noodles to choose from. Check out the specials for seasonal delights – and don’t forget, you can have dinner delivered.

BLOWFISH SUSHI $$ [Japanese, Sushi, Asian Fusion] 355 Santana Row, Ste. 1010 (408) 345-3848 www.blowfishsushi.com

48

THEWAVEMAG.COM DECEMBER 1-14, 2008

50


DINING: HOT SPOTS

DINING

THEWAVEMAG.COM DECEMBER 1-14, 2008

49


DINING: HOT SPOTS

DINING HOT

SPOTS

[ C O N T. ]

= PRINT MENUS & VIEW SLIDESHOWS ON WWW.THEWAVEMAG.COM/MENUS 48

ROSIE MCCANN’S IRISH PUB AND RESTAURANT $$ [Irish, American] 355 Santana Row, Ste. 1060 (408) 247-1706 www.rosiemccanns.com

It doesn’t have to be St. Patrick’s Day at Rosie McCann’s to have corned beef and cabbage. It’s served all year round as a pub favorite, in addition to wild salmon fish ’n’ chips and shepherd’s pie. A large variety of pastas, soups and salads are also available, not to mention the revered appetizers. Have the Irish nachos with a pint of Guinness – you won’t regret it.

SAM’S BAR-B-QUE $ [Barbecue] 1110 S. Bascom Ave. (408) 297-9151 www.samsbbq.com

It’s hard to believe you’re in California when chowing down on extra meaty, Kansas-style baby back ribs and Carolina-style pulled pork. The meats are marinated and smoked for hours on end, creating a most savory meal, especially when topped with Sam’s homemade sauce and paired with awardwinning chili. And, of course, no meal at Sam’s is complete without a slice of sweet potato pie.

SIAM THAI CUISINE $ [Thai] 1080 S. De Anza Blvd., Ste. A (408) 366-1080 www.siamthaicuisine.com

Lunch combos served with soup, salad, veggie egg roll and choice of pad thai or rice are especially popular at this small Thai house. And the options seem endless with more than two dozen combos to choose from. Can’t decide what to order? The prices are so reasonable, it wouldn’t be insane to order two combos for lunch and take the leftovers home for dinner.

SINO RESTAURANT AND LOUNGE $$$ [Modern Chinese] 377 Santana Row, Ste. 1000 (408) 247-8880 www.sinorestaurant.com

It’s hard not to order tons of the crab Rangoon (cream cheese, scallions, sweet vinegar reduction) appetizers and dim sum selections like the Maine lobster pot stickers. But room must be left for Sino’s entrées, which are stunning, mouthwatering recipes of modern Chinese cuisine. After dining in this chic, contemporary ambience and tasting the ginger beef filet mignon, you’ll never be tempted to order takeout again.

SPENCER’S FOR STEAKS AND CHOPS $$$ [American, Steakhouse] 2050 Gateway Pl. (408) 437-2170 www.spencersforsteaksandchops.com

Why simple, good steaks are so hard to come by, we’ll never know. Veterans of Spencer’s For Steaks and Chops, however, don’t know of that angst. Delivering juicy filet mignons and savory porterhouses is in their blood. The seafood is also to die for, plus all entrées can be accompanied with the likes of fries, green vegetables with hollandaise, and almond rice.

STRAITS CAFE $$ [Asian Fusion] 3295 El Camino Real (650) 494-7168 www.straitspaloalto.com

Straits personifies Asian Fusion cuisine at its finest by blending culinary secrets from Indian, Chinese, Malay and Thai cuisines and presenting it in a warm, inviting environment. The menu is fresh, exotic and exquisite, featuring entrées to the likes of ayam rendang (chicken simmered in an Indonesian style spice galangal, lemongrass and coconut milk sauce) and green curry (seafood and vegetables in a spicy jalapeño-coconut sauce).

SANTA CLARA

BIRK’S RESTAURANT $$$ [Modern American, Steak] 3955 Freedom Cir. (408) 980-6400 www.birksrestaurant.com

You’ll feel like a classic movie star while dining at Birk’s, an upscale eatery decorated with rich textures and brass, glass, marble and oak beams. They’re known for their perfect steaks, chops and seafood, so you really can’t go wrong with anything. Add a salad and the poached jumbo asparagus to your blackened rib eye, grilled Colorado lamb chops or pasta paella, and you’ll be golden.

KOBE SUSHI $$ [Japanese, Sushi] 2086 El Camino Real (408) 984-5623 www.kobesushi.com

Tucked neatly into the Mervyn’s Plaza on El Camino Real, Kobe Sushi offers a lovely atmosphere and a quick and inexpensive sushi fix. A Japanese garden and koi pond add a peaceful, Zen-like tone to the restaurant, which also houses a banquet

DINING

52

50

THEWAVEMAG.COM DECEMBER 1-14, 2008


DINING: HOT SPOTS

DINING

THEWAVEMAG.COM DECEMBER 1-14, 2008

51


DINING: HOT SPOTS

DINING HOT

SPOTS

[ C O N T. ]

= PRINT MENUS & VIEW SLIDESHOWS ON WWW.THEWAVEMAG.COM/MENUS 50

hall, dance floor, and karaoke stage. In addition to the standard sushi fare, the restaurant also has a popular seared ahi tuna, as well as many teriyaki, tempura, and noodle soup dishes.

PEDRO’S RESTAURANT AND CANTINA $$ [Mexican] 3935 Freedom Cir. (408) 496-6777 www.pedrosrestaurants.com

Pedro’s is known for its dynamic happy hour and all-you-can-eat Sunday brunch buffet, but that doesn’t mean the cozy, brick-laden dining room isn’t packed for lunch and dinner on a regular basis. The lively ambience and generous plates make Pedro’s an ideal place for large family gatherings and birthday celebrations. Whether ordering the fajitas or the enchiladas, you’re guaranteed an authentic Mexican meal.

MEXICALI GRILL $ [Mexican] 3149 Mission College Blvd. (408) 588-9865 www.mexicaligrill.com

Good times are to be had at the festive Mexicali Grill, where margarita choices are plentiful and “especiales” include mole rojo (chicken enchiladas covered with rich mole sauce made with 35 different ingredients) and fajitas (sizzling strips of sirloin or chicken breast marinated in tequila, lime juice and spices). No matter what authentic dish you order, be sure to save room for the Mexican fried ice cream.

SUSHI O SUSHI $$

growth hormones. Because they only use fresh and healthy ingredients, Sushi O Sushi’s patrons are hooked on their sashimi, nigiri, maki and temaki. Hot dinner plates of salmon, chicken, beef and tempura are also available, and equally fresh.

SARATOGA

BELLA SARATOGA $$$ [Italian] 14503 Big Basin Way (408) 741-5115 www.bellasaratoga.com

Romantic Italian dinners and family-friendly Sunday brunches are popular at Bella Saratoga, a timeless Victorian home turned restaurant. The dinner menu features award-winning pastas, fresh fish and flatbread pizzas. Brunch (served with music when weather permits) includes frittata, smoked chicken and sweet potato hash and a crab and shrimp melt, and selections include a fruit or house salad and a basket of cinnamon rolls.

LA FONDUE $$$$ [Fondue, French, Swiss] 14550 Big Basin Way (408) 867-3332 www.lafondue.com

La Fondue is an exquisite place to take a date. Fondue combinations – designed for two persons – include an appetizer, salad, chocolate fondue dessert, and entrees dubbed “Wild Thing” (alligator, buffalo, crocodile, ostrich, venison, wild boar) and “Le Freak C’est Chic” (a taste of everything La Fondue has to offer). Any combination of cheese and bourguignonne (meat dipped in hot oil) are offered a la carte.

[Japanese, Sushi] 2789 El Camino Real (408) 241-1677 www.sushiosushi.com

DINING

Sushi neophytes are always more eager to take the plunge knowing the raw fish they’re about to eat has been raised naturally without antibiotics or

52

THEWAVEMAG.COM DECEMBER 1-14, 2008

54


DINING: HOT SPOTS

BUY ONE GET ONE FREE! AT TANDOORI OVEN!*

*Any item. Buy one and get a 2nd of equal or lesser value FREE! with this ad.

www.thetandoorioven.com

365 S. California Ave. Palo Alto s 650.324.2111 1875 S. Bascom Ave., #250 Pruneyard, Campbell s 408.559.3885 133 N. Santa Cruz Ave. Downtown Los Gatos s 408.395.1784 150 S. First Street, Suite 107 San Jose s 408-292-7222

DINING

THEWAVEMAG.COM DECEMBER 1-14, 2008

53


DINING: HOT SPOTS

DINING HOT

SPOTS

[ C O N T. ]

= PRINT MENUS & VIEW SLIDESHOWS ON WWW.THEWAVEMAG.COM/MENUS

SUNNYVALE

52

PLUMED HORSE $$$$ [French, American] 14555 Big Basin Way (408) 867-4711 www.plumedhorse.com

Plumed Horse is contemporary yet incredibly romantic, with chic interiors, an eye-catching fireplace and an amazing transparent glass wine cellar. The French/American menu is impressive and luxurious, so much so that we recommend the tasting menu (offering items like caviar and ahi tuna, seared artisan foie gras and wild Columbia river sturgeon) to make sure you have a chance to savor everything. We’re not the only ones who think this place is top-notch – the Michelin restaurant guide recently awarded them a coveted star.

SENT SOVI $$$$ [French] 14583 Big Basin Way (408) 867-3110 www.sentsovi.com

The food is as tasteful as the charmingly romantic dining room at Sent Sovi, a restaurant whose name means “sweet taste.” The menu changes seasonally and showcases French California cuisine, by way of natural ingredients. Entrées have included smoked paprika dusted scallops (with lemon boy tomato coulis, sunchoke puree, corn relish and brussels sprouts), and desserts such as the nectarine “Inside Out” baked Alaska with dark cherry-chocolate gelato.

FAULTLINE BREWING COMPANY $$ [American] 1235 Oakmead Pkwy. (408) 736-2739 www.faultlinebrewing.com

Faultline Brewing Company, with its warm, fun ambience, spacious architecture and open patio overlooking a lake, is the perfect place to mingle over a wide selection of homemade ales and lagers. Lunch and dinner entrées are just as brilliant as the beer; they include citrus-fired mahi tacos, soy infused prime tri-tip and chicken and prosciutto tortellini.

OCEAN BLUE SUSHI CLUB $$ [Japanese, Sushi] 1010 E. El Camino Real (408) 720-8840

Sleek, modern Asian décor and trendy music make the Ocean Blue Sushi Club a fun place to bring a date. Start out spicy with a firecracker roll (topped with sliced jalapeños and hot sauce) from the specialty sushi menu and share a sashimi platter. Hot Japanese fare, such as teriyaki chicken, tempura and an assortment of bento boxes is also available.

SUNNY BUFFET $ [Chinese] 502 Ross Dr. (408) 747-0803

DINING

Those who normally hesitate to dine at buffets don’t need to think twice about Sunny. The service is friendly, and the food is always fresh, even up to closing time, and the assortment isendless. Traditional Chinese (chow mein, fried rice, orange chicken, etc.), sushi, crab legs, shrimp, prime rib, oysters, vegetables, fruit, desserts and more are displayed in heaping amounts. TW

54

THEWAVEMAG.COM DECEMBER 1-14, 2008


DINING: HOT SPOTS

DRY MARTINIS • PRIME CERTIFIED ANGUS BEEF • COLD WATER LOBSTER FRESH SEAFOOD • CANDLELIT MAHOGANY ATMOSPHERE • AWARD-WINNING WINE LIST

1921 EL CAMINO REAL PALO ALTO • 650.321.6798 SUNDANCETHESTEAKHOUSE.COM

DINING

THEWAVEMAG.COM DECEMBER 1-14, 2008

55


» FEATURE

Nightlife&Music Garden City Casino

» » » » »

FEATURE CONCERT PREVIEWS SVGUIDE: WINE TASTING SVGUIDE: BARS & CLUBS ALBUM REVIEWS

DEALER SCHOOL

We asked Tom Thelen, owner of Casino College in Mountain View, for advice on how to pursue our dream of being professional casino dealers:

Deal or No Deal Where to ante up and get your gamble on at Bay Area casinos and card clubs. BY MITCHELL ALAN PARKER

G

NIGH T L IFE & MUSIC

ambling has piqued society’s interest since the dawn of civilization. Whether it’s the gamble of life during a hunt for food, or the rush of adrenalin reached after eight hours of no-limit Texas Hold ’Em, the desire to take a chance, to test fate, has never faltered. In recent years, televised poker tournaments have sparked an increased interest in card games. Gone are the days of nickel bet poker tourneys held in smoky garages, while “Go Fish” has been put on hold for decades to come (much to our disappointment). So, jumping on the gamblin’ bandwagon, we’ve compiled a list of hot spots in and around the Bay Area that offer endless entertainment and, of course, card games galore. Now, shuffle up and deal.

360 Saratoga Ave., San Jose (408) 244-4443 www.gardencitycasino.com THE ANTE: Recently voted runner-up by Wave

readers for best casino; 40 tables, food service, breakfast served 24 hours in the casino; nonsmoking; parking for 1,000 cars; mountain-chalet décor; a six-table high-roller lounge; more than 20 poker tables; World Series of Poker qualifying tournaments and events that give away 15-20 seats to the WSOP; Web-based software that tracks details on all tables, allowing for quicker seating due to electronic wait lists that monitor all games; open 24/7. GAMES: Seven-card stud hi/low split; Omaha hi/low split; Texas Hold ’Em; Three-card poker; baccarat gold; Double-hand poker; Pai Gow tiles; Pure 21.5 Blackjack.

BAY 101 CASINO 1801 Bering Dr., San Jose (408) 451-8888 www.bay101.com

56

THEWAVEMAG.COM DECEMBER 1-14, 2008

ARTICHOKE JOE’S CASINO 659 Huntington Ave., San Bruno (650) 589-3145 www.artichokejoes.com

THE ANTE: Recently voted Best Casino by Wave readers; 72,000 square feet; 40 gaming tables; a sports bar and restaurant; a deli and beauty salon; extensive food menu served at your gaming table; venue for the World Poker Tour; daily tournaments. GAMES: Three-card poker; baccarat; spread limit Hold ’Em tournaments; limit Hold ’Em; Texas Hold ’Em.

THE ANTE: Weekly and daily tournaments; 24-hour dining; full bar; monthly jackpots; 20,000-squarefoot casino; 38 gaming tables; open 24/7/365; arcade; around since 1921. GAMES: 21st Century Baccarat (game of choice for high rollers across the globe); Cal Blackjack; Pai Gow Poker; Pai Gow Tiles; Texas Hold ’Em; Seven-card stud; Omaha hi/low split; Lightning poker (electronic touch screen tables).

GARLIC CITY CLUB

LUCKY CHANCES CASINO

40 Hornlein Ct., Gilroy (408) 847-7074 www.garliccityclub.com

1700 Hillside Blvd., Colma (650) 758-2237 www.lchances.com

THE ANTE: Open 5pm to as long as last game is

going; daily tournaments; bad beat jackpots; royal flush, straight flush, four-of-a-kind high-hand bonuses. GAMES: No limit Hold ’Em; Hold ’Em poker; Seven-stud hi/low split; Seven-stud poker; Crazy Pineapple Poker; Hold ’Em hi/low split; Omaha hi/ low split; Omaha poker; Pan; Pineapple/Hi poker.

CACHE CREEK CASINO RESORT 14455 Highway 16, Brooks (888) 77-CACHE www.cachecreek.com THE ANTE: Voted third place for best casino

GARDEN CITY CASINO

85,000 square feet of gaming floor; high limit gaming with private bars, dining rooms, plasma screens, butler service and private limousine drop-off; five restaurants. GAMES: Blackjack; baccarat; three- and four-card poker; Ultimate Texas Hold ’Em; Fortune Pai Gow Poker; and more.

by Wave readers; music concerts; seemingly endless slot machines; 142 gaming tables (“all comparable to the Las Vegas strip”); a recently added 28-table poker room; 200-room luxury hotel; health and beauty spa; Yocha-De-He golf club; eight restaurants; 415,000-square-foot property; owned by the Rumsey Band of Wintun Indians. GAMES: Blackjack; Pai Gow; mini baccarat; Texas Hold ’Em; Fortune Pai Gow; Triple-Bet Let It Ride; Casino War; three-card poker; four-card poker; No Limit Texas Hold ’Em tournaments; weekly poker tournaments; high stakes table area (up to $5,000 per hand available) for baccarat, blackjack; Super Slotto and Slingo; more than 700 progressive slot games, totaling more than 2,900 machines.

THUNDER VALLEY CASINO 1200 Athens Ave., Lincoln (916) 408-7777 www.thundervalleyresort.com THE ANTE: Picturesque entryway; Falls Bar; 3,300

parking spaces; more than 2,600 state-of-theart slot machines; more than 98 gaming tables;

THE ANTE: Open 24/7; 43-table card room; 600 employees; newest card club in the Bay Area; state-of-the-art equipment; free valet parking; daily tournaments; two restaurants; 2009 World Series of Poker Freeroll Event. GAMES: Pai Gow; Double-Hand poker; Super Pan 9; Three-card poker; Vegas-style Blackjack; Omaha hi/low; Pot limit Omaha hi/low; Texas Hold ’Em; Spread Limit Hold ’Em; Seven-card stud; Seven-Card Stud hi/low; Gold Rush.

OCEAN VIEW CARD ROOM 709 Pacific Ave., Santa Cruz (831) 423-6257 www.oceanviewcardroom.com THE ANTE: Texas Hold ’Em tournaments held

Saturdays, Sundays and Mondays; weekly tournaments. Open weekdays from 3pm until last game breaks; Weekends from 11:30am until last game breaks. GAMES: Texas Hold ’Em; Crazy Pineapple high and hi/low split; Omaha high and hi/low split.

1 Choose a game. The most popular game right now is Texas Hold ’Em, which is offered at Casino College along with Omaha and seven-card stud. In the Bay Area, however, so-called Asian games are popular as well: Pai Gow and Mini baccarat. 2 Forget what you know. Thelen says that when beginning dealer training, it’s important to start fresh, as there is a standardized way of dealing that casinos require. (What, no David Blaine sleight of hand?) 3 Learn. Hand skills, card placement, shuffling, dealing and fanning all must be mastered. 4 Practice. Thelen suggests that prior to even showing up to class, you should warm up with drills for one hour. Clumsiness is unprofessional and will cost you a casino job. 5 Get certified. Thelen says that for poker games, 60 to 80 hours of training are needed before getting certified. 6 Audition. To gain a dealer job, you must control a game in front of a casino’s many pit bosses, demonstrating your skill and making it fun at the same time. 7 Rake in the dough. Thelen says dealers lead happy lives, although the job is busy. Beginners can expect to make about $25 an hour. Mountain View National Bartenders School & Casino College, 1398 W. El Camino Real, Ste. C-D, Mountain View (650) 968-9933, 1-800-556-6499 www.casinoandbarschool.com

PALACE POKER CASINO 22821 Mission Blvd., Hayward (510) 582-1166 www.thepalacepokercasino.com THE ANTE: Open 24/7/365; $100,000 bad beat

jackpot; free shuttle to and from the municipal parking garage; Six brand new Plasma HD TVs for sporting events; new chairs and carpet; café; daily tournaments. GAMES: Double-Hand poker; “No Bust” Blackjack; Limit Hold ’Em; No Limit Hold ’Em; Omaha hi/low.

LIVERMORE CASINO CARD ROOM 3571 First St., Livermore (909) 674-3101 www.livermorecasino.net THE ANTE: Open weekdays from 9am-2am; open

24hrs. on weekends; daily tournaments; sports bar/food; cocktails. GAMES: Texas Hold ’Em; Omaha; Condition Pan.

OAKS CARD CLUB

LUCKY BUCK CARD CLUB

4097 San Pablo Ave., Emeryville (510) 653-4456 www.oakscardclub.com

1620 Railroad Ave., Livermore (925) 455-6144 www.theluckybuck.com

THE ANTE: One of Northern California’s oldest and largest card clubs; around since 1895; 40 tables; open 24/7; watch sporting events on large screen TVs; within an hour’s drive from anywhere in the Bay Area. Does not participate in the games; collects rental fees from customers in the form of per hand drop or time rental collection; weekly tournaments. GAMES: Texas Hold ’Em; Omaha hi/low; Stud poker; Lowball; and Pan; Double-Hand poker; 21st Century Blackjack and Pai Gow.

THE ANTE: Open 24hrs. on weekends; 10am-

2am on weekdays; large jackpots; daily prizes; celebrity tournaments; 10 tables of Texas Hold ’Em and Omaha; daily, weekly, monthly tournaments; no playing or wagering against Lucky Buck Card Club. GAMES: Texas Hold ’Em; Omaha; Omaha hi/low Split (Eight or better). TW

For help on gambling related issues, contact 1-800-GAMBLER or visit www.problemgambling.ca.gov.

56 58 58 58 60


NIGHTLIFE&MUSIC: ALBUM REVIEWS

NIGH T L IFE & MUSIC

THEWAVEMAG.COM DECEMBER 1-14, 2008

57


» CONCERT PREVIEWS

NIGHTLIFE&MUSIC CONCERT

PREVIEWS

A clan gets back together, a heavy piece of metal and a wintry soprano come to the South Bay, and a killer named Ferdinand hails a cab to a bloc party. BY MITCHELL ALAN PARKER

WU-TANG CLAN

and film stars, clothing manufacturers, videogame characters, and even music scorers for Hollywood movies. The stage can get pretty crowded at their live performances, as the “clan” consists of eight current members: Method Man, RZA, GZA, Raekwon, U-God, Ghostface Killah, Inspectah Deck and Masta Killa (former member Ol’ Dirty Bastard died in 2004). With its members always busy with side projects, there’s no telling when Wu-Tang will be rapping together again in the Bay Area.

D E C E MB E R 3, T HE GR AND B A LLROOM AT T H E R E GE NCY CE NTE R , SA N F R AN C I SC O W W W. T I C K E T MASTE R . C O M

Anybody who saw the recent documentary Wu: The Story of the Wu-Tang Clan can attest to the validity of talent that surrounds one of the most successful hip-hop groups of all time. The group’s reach is unmatched, with members assuming numerous positions of authority in the entertainment industry: multiplatinum selling artists, record producers, TV

VIEW SLIDESHOWS & PROFILES: WWW.THEWAVEMAG.COM/WINE WINERIES

14612 Big Basin Way, Saratoga (408) 867-1010 www.cinnabarwine.com We invite you to visit our beautiful tasting room. Located in the quaint, historical village of Saratoga, flanked by the magnificent Santa Cruz Mountains.

NIGH T L IFE & MUSIC

Fleming Jenkins Vineyards & Winery 45 W. Main St., Los Gatos (408) 358-4949 www.flemingjenkins.com Wine Tasting: Tue-Sun Noon-6pm.

Pedrizzetti Winery 1645 San Pedro Ave., Morgan Hill (408) 779-7389 www.pedrizzettiwinery.com Open Tue-Sun 10am-5pm (closed most holidays).

Rabbit’s Foot Meadery 1246 Birchwood Dr.,Sunnyvale (408) 261-1603 www.rabbitsfootmeadery.com Our famous cider is available at Whole Foods Markets and Oliver’s Markets.

Roudon-Smith Winery 2364 Bean Creek Rd., Scotts Valley (831) 438-1244 www.roudonsmith.com Wine Tasting: Sat Noon-4:30pm.

Thomas Fogarty Vineyards 19501 Skyline Blvd., Woodside (650) 851-6777 www.fogartywinery.com Wine Tasting: Thu-Sun 11am-5pm.

WINE SHOPS

Savvy Cellar Wines 2048 Broadway St., Redwood City (650) 363-8737 www.savvycellar.com Experience top quality wines without having to spend an arm and a leg. Savvy Cellar Wine Bar & Wine Shop features wines from all the great wine producing regions of the world – all wines rated 90 points or higher and retail for $39/bottle or less. Check website for details on: wine classes, wine clubs, private events, tasting specials, live jazz and online sales (including gift certificates).

Vino Locale

Every once in a great while a show comes along that sees some of the best bands in the world playing together all in one night. Live 105’s Not So Silent Night provides just that. The Killers will be jamming out their new album, Day and Age; Death Cab will mix old favorites with their new Narrow Stairs repertoire; Franz Ferdinand will be previewing new tracks from their upcoming Tonight: Franz Ferdinand album, while Bloc Party will croon with performances from their new, chaotic album, Intimacy. And somehow, the organizers of this monumental concert decided that a Thursday night would be the best night for such an event, forcing die-hard fans to use one of their many reserved emergency excuses to call in sick to work on Friday. Some suggestions: “My son/daughter/niece has got the chicken pox and needs to be taken care of,” or “I fell asleep and my bonehead roommate wrote an expletive on my face with a permanent marker.”

HIGH ON FIRE DECEMBER 12, THE BLANK CLUB, SAN JOSE WWW.THEBLANKCLUB.COM

Attention: If you want your head kicked in by a wall of heavy metal sound, go to The Blank Club on Friday, Dec. 12. This Oakland-based band has supported big-name acts such as Megadeth and Children of Bodom, but will be headlining this show in San Jose, with support from Black Cobra and Vultures Await. High on Fire released Death Is This Communion back in 2007, so while on tour they are reportedly showcasing new tracks for an upcoming album. Get there early and brace yourself.

SARAH BRIGHTMAN D E C E M B E R 1 7 , H P PAV I L I O N , S A N J O S E W W W. H P P S J . C O M

This classical crossover soprano is one of the best vocalists of all time. She’s cut her teeth performing in all the musical classics: Cats, The Pirates of Penzance, The Phantom of the Opera, and more recently, Repo! The Genetic Opera. For those wanting some holiday cheer, this is the concert to attend. Brightman will be supporting her recently released Christmas album, A Winter Symphony, featuring renditions of “Silent Night,” “Amazing Grace” and “I Wish It Could Be Christmas Everyday.” TW

» SVGUIDE: BARS & CLUBS

431 Kipling St., Palo Alto (650) 328-0450 www.vinolocale.com Vino Locale is the perfect place to host a business or social event in an elegant and private setting. Open Tue-Sat 11am-9pm, Sun Noon-5pm.

Vintage Wine Merchants 377 Santana Row #1135, San Jose (408) 260-1115 www.vintagewinemerchants.com Open Mon-Wed 10am-9pm, Thu-Sat 10am-10pm, Sun Noon-8pm.

The Wine Room 520 Ramona St., Palo Alto (650) 322-1292 www.thepawineroom.com The Wine Room is located in the deLemos art & crafts building in the historic section of beautiful downtown Palo Alto. We serve up an eclectic variety of wines from around the world. Come in and sample a flight, have a glass, or share a bottle and a cheese plate off of our light fare menu with friends, family or clients. Whether before the show, after dinner, or an exciting first date, come and enjoy our comfortable, friendly ambience. Open until midnight or later seven days a week, it’s the perfect late night spot for an evening stroll or sinfully delicious dessert. We also host corporate events and private functions.

ADVERTISE YOUR BUSINESS HERE: (408) 467-3200 58

THE KILLERS, DEATH CAB FOR CUTIE, FRANZ FERDINAND, BLOC PARTY D EC EMBER 1 1 , ORACL E ARENA, OAK L AND W W W.ORACL EARENA.COM

» SVGUIDE: WINE TASTING

Cinnabar Winery Tasting Room

High on Fire

THEWAVEMAG.COM DECEMBER 1-14, 2008

VIEW SLIDESHOWS & PROFILES: WWW.SILICONVALLEYNIGHTLIFE.COM

The Bank 14421 Big Basin Way, Saratoga (408) 867-5155 www.myspace.com/thebanklivemusic Monday-Friday: Happy Hour $1 off all drinks 5-6:30pm Thursday: Karaoke/Happy Hour $1 off all drinks 5-6:30pm

Court’s Lounge 2425 S. Bascom Ave., Campbell (408) 559-9880 www.courtslounge.com Monday-Friday, Sunday: Dart League Monday: Pool League Monday-Sunday: Nightly Drink Specials

Shoreline Billiards 1400 N. Shoreline Blvd., Ste. C1, Mountain View (650) 964-0780 www.shorelinebilliards.com Monday-Thursday, Sunday: Pool League

Zen Lounge 251 Castro St., Mountain View (650) 964-0780 www.vipzen.com Wednesday-Friday: The Ultimate Happy Hour till 10pm – $1 Beer, $2 Champagne, $3 Martinis, $4 Don Julio Shots

ADVERTISE YOUR BUSINESS HERE: (408) 467-3200


NIGHTLIFE&MUSIC: CONCERT PREVIEWS

NIGH T L IFE & MUSIC

THEWAVEMAG.COM DECEMBER 1-14, 2008

59


NIGHTLIFE&MUSIC: ALBUM REVIEWS » ALBUM REVIEWS

NIGHTLIFE&MUSIC ALBUM REVIEWS

DIDO

BY TOM LANHAM

Safe Trip Home  

( A R I S TA )

How you receive this latest offering from UK trip-hop/pop diva Dido depends on how you already view her voice. If it drips like warm syrup from your stereo, you’re in for a great listen. But if it feels flat, shallow and lifeless, it’s more of the sterile same. The singer truly shines in quiet moments (as in “Look No Further” and the nine-minute, heartbeat-tempoed processional, “Northern Skies”), showing a talent on which all can safely agree. A skeletal “The Day Before the Day” is also a gentle winner, wafting by on the faintest whiff of orchestration. True, her depth may be wading-pool level, while the emotional dead calm on such amour-themed tranquilizers as “Never” and “Don’t Believe in Love” can prove difficult, even tedious. Aside from the bitter “Grafton Street” (a Celtic-vibed creeper backed by Brian Eno, Mick Fleetwood and stringmeister David Campbell, in which she mourns that “Nothing could bring us the peace we had on Grafton Street”), Dido rarely lets on about the cards she’s holding. Again, either you like that poker-faced approach to songwriting, or you don’t.

GUNS N’ ROSES

Chinese Democracy  

(GEFFEN)

NIGH T L IFE & MUSIC

First of all, there’s the issue of grammar. Thanks to the long-absent apostrophe in Guns N’ Roses, a generation of metalheads has grown up thinking the word “and” is abbreviated as N’, not ‘N’. So you should be aware that with bandleader (and sole surviving original member) Axl Rose, you aren’t necessarily dealing with the sharpest tool in the shed. But that still doesn’t explain why this long-awaited new GNR set has been 17 years and millions of dollars in the making. Or why, after so many false post-Slash starts and so much meticulous studio parsing, it arrives like some dusty old anachronism, a spoiled-rotten, uninspired record that passed its sell-by date roughly a decade ago. To understand why, you have to return to the band’s halcyon Appetite for Destruction days, circa ‘87, back when its post-Hanoi Rocks take on glam was still fresh and untested. Long before the hair-metal movement would cheapen, then kill, the sound, Appetite not only put a spunky punk topspin on traditional rock decadence, but had attitude and hooks to spare (apostrophe be damned). When you start out on such a lofty stylistic pinnacle, there’s nowhere to go but down. This, then, is the descent, and you can hear the clock ticking, the wind rushing past, as Rose struggles to understand his own place in the pop world. So many movements have eluded Rose since Appetite: emo, nu-metal, industrial, even a couple of punk rebirths. Ergo, the 14-track Chinese Democracy dabbles in some of these genres (a la the Reznor-ish “Shackler’s Revenge” and the faux Queen-operatic emoter “Scraped”) with no real sense of self or success. “There Was a Time” even taps into an Eagles/”Hotel California” vein, while “Street of Dreams” and “This I Love” revolve around Manilow-campy grand piano. There are mid-tempo rockers (“Better,” “Sorry”) and, of course, the requisite apostrophe screw-up (“Riad N’ the Bedouins”), yet no Appetite-memorable hooks to speak of. You come away from the album humming only one stick-in-your-craw cut, the subtly orchestrated “Madagascar,” with its ominous line “I can’t find my way back, my way anymore.” Perhaps there’s no better assessment of this scattered, over-rationalized collection than Rose’s own on “Better,” where he wails: “This melody inside of me still searches for solution.” Maybe he’ll find it someday… along with that missing apostrophe.

THE KILLERS

Day & Age 

(ISLAND)

One thing you have to say about Killers front man Brandon Flowers: the guy’s a star. A real rock star, in the classic mold, all quirky, uncertain quaver on record and a bundle of jittery nerves on video. Truly, there’s no one else in modern rock quite like him. And unlike Axl Rose, he just keeps growing and getting better, honing his songwriting skills from the brief Springsteen flirtation of the previous album, Sam’s Town, into the more adventurous genre-jumping heard here, most notably on the tropical shuffle “I Can’t Stay” and the reggae-hued “This Is Your Life,” which almost feels like some long-lost Lion King outtake. The faith-questioning synth-popper “Human” is already in nonstop MTV/VH-1 rotation, but there are plenty more equally addictive potential hits percolating herein, like the huge canyon-echoey ballad “Neon Tiger,” the propulsive new waver “Spaceman,” and the Broadway-campy “The World We Live In.” The album punches out with a nearly seven-minute Pink Floydian processional, “Goodnight, Travel Well,” which might wind up closing their live sets as well. And in the horn-punched opener, “Losing Touch,” Flowers seems to preface what follows by wondering if he’s lost his own Midas touch. He needn’t worry. The Killers are still golden. TW 60

THEWAVEMAG.COM DECEMBER 1-14, 2008


NIGHTLIFE&MUSIC: ALBUM REVIEWS

NIGH T L IFE & MUSIC

THEWAVEMAG.COM DECEMBER 1-14, 2008

61


» INTERVIEW

Movies&TV

» » » »

INTERVIEW MOVIE REVIEWS & PREVIEWS DVD RELEASES CINEMA DIRECTORY

62 64 64 64

of a movie that at least grown-ups and teenagers can see. My kids are looking forward to a lot of movies, mainly Bolt. And Wall-E is playing on DVD at my house on a loop every day. TW: Vince Vaughn is a giant. How did you deal with the height difference? RW: Well, they couldn’t make Vince smaller. We tried. We tried to get him to take his shoes off. He’s 6 foot 5 and I’m 5 foot 2. We had a really funny scene, I don’t know if it’s in the film anymore, where he rolls over onto me. We were in bed and then at the very end he rolls over and goes on to sleep, but he rolls over and lays on top of me. It was like a tree trunk had just landed on me. I kept going, “Tim-berrrrr!” It was really funny. I stood on a lot of boxes and they had to build ramps that were about the same size as where I should be. It was a challenge, especially the kissing scenes. It was hard to get up there to kiss him, but we worked it out. And he had to pick me up for half the dancing. He’s actually holding me in the air so we can stay in the same frame. He’s a fantastic dancer, which you’d probably figure from Swingers. They were teaching us dance moves – I just couldn’t keep up and he was like, “Oh, it’s a one, two cha cha cha.”

Christmas with Reese Reese Witherspoon shares some holiday secrets while chatting up Four Christmases. BY FRED TOPEL

MOVIE: Four Christmases DIRECTED BY: Seth Gordon STARRING: Reese Witherspoon , Vince Vaughn

MOVIES & T V

STUDIO: New Line Cinema

R

eese Witherspoon is such a pro. She knows just how to have fun with an interview and give enough to make it interesting. She never gives anything more attention than it needs, though, and that deflects anything invasive. Her latest comedy, Four Christmases (co-starring Vince Vaughn), forces a couple to visit four sets of divorced parents, all on the same holiday. That provides plenty of funny disaster for the Oscar winner to discuss. The Wave: Which of the four Christmases in the movie did you relate to the most? Reese Witherspoon: Probably the one where you have to go to church. We always had to go to church and nativity plays and all that kind of stuff growing up. I did a lot of that. TW: One of the families has a $10 spending cap. How would your family feel about that?

62

THEWAVEMAG.COM DECEMBER 1-14, 2008

RW: Oh, wouldn’t that be great? Wouldn’t it be great to record the look on their faces? No, my family always had a thing where everybody always got one thing, whether it was like chocolates or flowers. It would be the nicest little chocolates you could get or the one really nice toy that was beautifully made. It was always about the quality of things, not the quantity. TW: How do you prepare for the holidays? RW: There are many stages. First, there’s panic. I walked into Starbucks and they were playing Christmas music last week and I had an absolute panic attack: “Turn it off, I’m not ready.” I think I have to get through Thanksgiving first, then it starts with the parties, then the family – that’s when the family starts trickling in. Then you finally get to get rid of the family and sleep for a few days, then it’s New Year’s, then it’s all over. TW: This is sort of an edgy Christmas movie. RW: Yes, this is not for your children. TW: What’s your idea of a good family holiday movie? RW: My family always went to movies on Christmas Day, so whatever movie was coming out: The Godfather, Elephant Man – your typical cheerful holiday fare. It’s fun to go to a movie on the holidays and it’s nice to be part

TW: Did you both improvise a lot during filming? RW: We knew every day what we were shooting. We worked on the script for four months for five or six hours a day before we ever went on set. We broke it down, threw scenes away, started over. By the time we got to shooting, we really knew what we were doing, and Seth [Gordon, the director] was there the whole time, and Vince. That kind of gave me a taste of what the improv situation was going to be, because Vince is so smart and funny. Off the top of his head, the funniest person I’ve ever worked with in my entire life. It was a challenge for me to stay there and keep up with him. He taught me a lot about improv and ad-libbing, and I feel I’m really a better actor for that experience. TW: There’s a great scene where Vince accidentally blows the news about Santa to his nephews. How did you find out that Santa wasn’t real, and was it traumatizing? RW: That for me was in the second grade, when MaryBeth decided to get up and for show-and-tell told everyone there was no Santa Claus. The whole class burst into tears and she got into a lot of trouble and got sent home. TW: And you believed her? RW: Well, no, because she had to come back the next day and say it wasn’t really true. She was just really lying to hurt people’s feelings. Poor thing. It was a psychological mess. TW: How would you feel if some relative told your kids there was no Santa Claus? RW: What? Are you suggesting there’s not a Santa Claus? Is that what you’re saying? I don’t know what you’re talking about. I don’t want to hear that anymore. TW Four Christmases is currently screening in cinemas everywhere. For tickets, go to www.cameracinemas.com or www.cineluxtheatres.com.


MOVIES & TV: INTERVIEW

Get fit this winter at the JCC! Join in December and get 1 month free!

14855 Oka Road Los Gatos, CA 95032 408.356.4973 membership@svjcc.org

THE HOTTEST MOVIES, AT THE COOLEST CINEMAS

Offer available to 1st time members ages 18 & older when purchasing a Center membership by 12/31/08. Certain conditions & restrictions apply.

“THE

FUNNIEST MOVIE OF THE YEAR!

VINCE VAUGHN AND REESE WITHERSPOON ARE TERRIFIC. THE PERFECT HOLIDAY TREAT!” Shawn Edwards, FOX-TV

“‘FOUR CHRISTMASES’ IS A HILARIOUS COMEDY.” Elizabeth Olubodun, OK! MAGAZINE

MILK Opens December 5: Camera 7

DAY THE EARTH STOOD STILL

SLUMDOG MILLIONAIRE

Opens December 12: Camera 12

Opens in December

Camera 7

Los Gatos

Camera 12

Camera 3

Pruneyard in Campbell

Downtown Los Gatos

Downtown San Jose

Downtown San Jose

408.559.6900

408.395.0203

408.998.3300

408.998.3300

Great Opera and Ballet Coming to Camera 7!

NOW SHOWING - CHECK DIRECTORIES FOR LISTINGS

An exclusive series begins on Dec 7 & 10 with “Aida” from La Scala. On Dec 13-14, enjoy the Kirov’s jubilant holiday production of “The Nutcracker”. In HD Digital Projection with Dolby Digital sound.

Avoid the lines. Online tickets now available

FREE PARKING

THEWAVEMAG.COM DECEMBER 1-14, 2008

63

MOVIES & T V

AUSTRALIA Now Showing: Camera 7, Camera 12


» MOVIE REVIEWS & PREVIEWS

MOVIES&TV MOVIE

REVIEWS

REVIEWS E

C

E

M

B

E

R

Ray Charles and Johnny Cash weren’t the only singers with problems – apparently Muddy Waters, Chuck Berry and Etta James were just as troubled. This story of producer Leonard Chess (Brody) and his discovery of those music greats has double the action, triple the adultery. Plus, Chess himself embezzles from his artists. Cadillac is a fine (albeit superficial) portrait of great musicians, more along the lines of a highlight reel than a real exploration. Still, the actors do a great job playing their rockin’ characters.

PREVIEWS D

B

E

R

1

MOVIES & T V

S TA R R I N G : M E R Y L S T R E E P, P H I L I P SEYMOUR HOFFMAN, AMY ADAMS D I R E C T E D B Y: J O H N PAT R I C K SHANLEY

If Meryl Streep and Philip Seymour Hoffman weren’t in this movie about molestation accusa-

Cadillac Records

tions in a Catholic parish, no one would bother to see it. However, Doubt is interesting and will have an audience, no doubt (sorry!) on the strength of its two Oscar-winning leads. It is a powerhouse performance piece (Adams is also good as the optimistic young nun, as is Viola Davis as the boy’s mother), with a surprising point of view.

DVD RELEASES

MOVIES DEC. 2 The Chronicles of Narnia: Prince Caspian The Day the Earth Stood Still (1951): Special Edition – Blu-ray Step Brothers The X Files: I Want to Believe

TV DEC. 2 Cannon – Season One, Vol. 2 Law & Order – Season Six MythBusters: Big Blast Collection Saturday Night Live – Season Four

MOVIES DEC. 9 The Dark Knight Horton Hears a Who! The Mask – Blu-ray Sex and the City: The Movie – Wedding Collection Ultimate Collectors Edition 64

B

E

R

» CINEMA DIRECTORY

C

E

M

B

E

R

1

2

5

S TA R R I N G : K E A N U R E E V E S , J E N N I F E R C O N N E L LY, K AT H Y B AT E S D I R E C T E D B Y: S C O T T D E R R I C K S O N

“Klaatu barada nikto, dude!” Keanu Reeves stars as the alien Klaatu in this remake of the 1951 sci-fi classic. The original was an actionless philosophical treatise on mankind’s xenophobia and unwillingness to correct our own actions. Guess we didn’t listen, so now Keanu has to blow us up. Klaatu comes to Earth to warn humans that the superior robot, Gort, can destroy them if they don’t mellow out and reform their warmongering ways. This time, Gort won’t just be some guy in a robot suit, and all the explosions in the trailer make it look like the humans need some tough love to learn their lesson. Whoa!

THE READER S TA R R I N G : K AT E W I N S L E T, R A L P H FIENNES, BRUNO GANZ D I R E C T E D B Y: S T E P H E N D A L D R Y

CINEMA

This movie is still the secret of the holiday season, with no advertising or media presence in the press. It looks like an Oscar hopeful, with Winslet and Fiennes in a post World War II drama. She’s on trial for war crimes, and he’s her former lover, and they are reunited during this tumultuous and morally questionable time. Actually, it sounds happier than The Hours, so Daldry may be on a hopeful beat this time. The talent is solid, so if they just get the word out, they might just have something here. Any behind-the-scenes drama with feuding producers shouldn’t affect the quality of the art itself. TW

DIRECTORY

2

DOUBT  

» DVD RELEASES

M

What, they couldn’t get Bruce Willis? Rickman plays a Nobel Prize winner whose son (Greenberg) is kidnapped by a chemistry student (Hatosy). Sounds like John McClane’s revenge, but there won’t be as many buildings blowing up. The premise is fascinating, showing just how useless book smarts are in a real life crisis situation. Of course, if it were really all that, wouldn’t it be coming out on 3,000 screens? Miller and Rickman’s previous collaboration, Bottle Shock, was sweet enough for a TV movie, so this should make a killer straight-to-video thriller. Either that, or it’s so smart, they just can’t release it to the masses.

Frank Langella is so good as Tricky Dick in Frost/ Nixon, he could carry the entire movie. But he doesn’t have to, because this is great political drama. The story of David Frost’s (Sheen) postresignation interview with President Nixon becomes even more compelling when you see what it took to make it happen behind the scenes, and all the intellectual manipulation. It’s a real thrill to see how a journalist can get any meaningful answer out of the ultimate politician. Even when he’s disgraced on record, Nixon won’t admit to anything. Watching Langella act is like a master’s course in the subtle nuances of the craft, while Sheen and the team of Frost’s researchers make up a full bodied cast. M

E

S TA R R I N G : A L A N R I C K M A N , B R YA N G R E E N B E R G , S H AW N H AT O S Y D I R E C T E D B Y: R A N D A L L M I L L E R

S TA R R I N G : F R A N K L A N G E L L A , MICHAEL SHEEN, KEVIN BACON D I R E C T E D B Y: R O N H O WA R D

E

C

NOBEL SON

FROST/NIXON 

C

E

E

THE DAY THE EARTH STOOD STILL

Isn’t it funny how families fight with each other? At least, this film hopes so, because that’s what it’s all about. The Rodriguez family reunites for Christmas, only to find Mom demanding grandchildren and divorcing Dad, little brother coming back from Iraq with posttraumatic stress and sister waiting on a callback from a TV show. Nothing has pretty much the same jokes as every other dysfunctional family comedy, though it is perhaps a tad more heartfelt when it gets sentimental.

S TA R R I N G : A D R I E N B R O D Y, J E F F R E Y W R I G H T, B E Y O N C É KNOWLES D I R E C T E D B Y: D A R N E L L M A R T I N

E

D

S TA R R I N G : J O H N L E G U I Z A M O , FREDDY RODRIGUEZ, DEBRA MESSING D I R E C T E D B Y: A L F R E D O D E V I L L A

5

CADILLAC RECORDS  

D

PREVIEWS

NOTHING LIKE THE HOLIDAYS 

REVIEWS & PREVIEWS BY FRED TOPEL

D

&

TV DEC. 9 Happy Days – Season Four Lost – Complete Fourth Season: Expanded Experience Swingtown – Season One The Wire – The Complete Series

THEWAVEMAG.COM DECEMBER 1-14, 2008

CAMPBELL Camera 7 Cinema, 1875 S. Bascom Ave. (408) 559-6900 CineLux Plaza Theatre, 2501 S. Winchester Blvd. (408) 378-2425

M O U N TA I N V I E W Century Cinema 16 1500 N. Shoreline Blvd. (650) 960-0970

GILROY Platinum Theatres, 6851 Monterey St. (408) 84-MOVIE

PA L O A LT O Aquarius, 430 Emerson St. (650) 266-9260 Stanford Theatre, 221 University Ave. (650) 324-3700 Century CineArts at Palo Alto Square, 3000 El Camino Real, Bldg. #6 (650) 493-3456

HOLLISTER Premiere Cinemas 5, 581A McCray St. (831) 638-1800

REDWOOD CITY Century Park 12, 557 E. Bayshore Blvd. (650) 365-9000

M E N L O PA R K Guild, 949 El Camino Real (650) 266-9260

S A N TA C L A R A AMC Mercado 20, 3111 Mission College Blvd. (408) 871-2AMC

M I L P I TA S Century 20 Great Mall, 1010 Great Mall Dr. (408) 942-5550

SAN JOSE AMC Saratoga 14 Theatre, 700 El Paseo de Saratoga (408) 871-2AMC Cinelux Almaden Cinema 2306 Almaden Rd. (408) 265-7373 Camera 12, 201 S. Second St. (408) 978-2787

L O S G AT O S Los Gatos Cinema, 41 N. Santa Cruz Ave. (408) 395-0203

MORGAN HILL CineLux Tennant Station Stadium 11 750 Tennant Way (408) 778-6500

Century 20, Oakridge, 925 Blossom Hill Rd. (408) 225-2200 Century 21, 3161 Olsen Dr. (408) 984-5610 Century 22, 3162 Olsen Dr. (408) 984-5610 Century 23, 3164 Olsen Dr. (408) 984-5610 Century 24, 741 Winchester Blvd. (408) 984-5610 Century 25, 1694 Saratoga Ave. (408) 984-5610 Century Berryessa 10 1171 N. Capitol Ave. (408) 926-7091 Century Capitol 16 San Jose 3690 Hillcap Ave. (408) 972-9276 Century Capitol Drive-In Capitol Expwy. and Snell Ave. (408) 226-2251 CineArts@Santana Row 3088 Olsen Dr. www.cinearts.com Hackworth IMAX Dome 201 S. Market St. (408) 294-TECH India Movie Center 6 1433 The Alameda (408) 830-9999


MOVIES & TV: REVIEWS & PREVIEWS

in theaters anytime Monday â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Thursday. Limit one pass per person. Passes will be distributed on a first-come, first-serve basis. Passes will be valid Monday - Thursday excluding all holidays beginning Monday, December 8.

Log onto www.thewavemag.com for your chance to win a free pass to see

MOVIES & T V

Log onto www.thewavemag.com for your chance to win a free pass to see

in theaters anytime Monday â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Thursday. Limit one pass per person. Passes will be distributed on a first-come, first-serve basis. Passes will be valid Monday - Thursday excluding all holidays beginning Monday, December 1.

This film is rated R. Run-of-engagement passes received through this promotion do not guarantee admission to the theatre. Seating is on a first come, first served basis. Theatre is open to paying customers. All federal, state and local regulations apply. A recipient of tickets assumes any and all risks related to use of ticket and accepts any restrictions required by ticket provider. Lionsgate, Terry Hines & Associates, The Wave Magazine and their affiliates accept no responsibility or liability in connection with any loss or accident incurred in connection with use of a prize. Tickets cannot be exchanged, transferred or redeemed for cash, in whole or in part. We are not responsible if, for any reason, winner is unable to use his/her ticket in whole or in part. Not responsible for lost, delayed or misdirected entries. All federal and local taxes are the responsibility of the winner. Void where prohibited by law. No purchase necessary. Participating sponsors their employees & family members and their agencies are not eligible. NO PHONE CALLS!

This film is rated PG-13. Run-of-engagement passes received through this promotion do not guarantee admission to the theatre. Seating is on a first come, first served basis. Theatre is open to paying customers. All federal, state and local regulations apply. A recipient of tickets assumes any and all risks related to use of ticket and accepts any restrictions required by ticket provider. Lionsgate, Terry Hines & Associates, The Wave Magazine and their affiliates accept no responsibility or liability in connection with any loss or accident incurred in connection with use of a prize. Tickets cannot be exchanged, transferred or redeemed for cash, in whole or in part. We are not responsible if, for any reason, winner is unable to use his/her ticket in whole or in part. Not responsible for lost, delayed or misdirected entries. All federal and local taxes are the responsibility of the winner. Void where prohibited by law. No purchase necessary. Participating sponsors their employees & family members and their agencies are not eligible. NO PHONE CALLS!

IN THEATERS DECEMBER 5!

N O W P L AY I N G ! THEWAVEMAG.COM DECEMBER 1-14, 2008

65


» FEATURE

Arts

Pandemonium, Theatre on San Pedro Square

» » » »

FEATURE EVENT LISTINGS EVENT LISTINGS COLUMN: HOT TICK ET

66 68 70 71

The Mad Tea Party, by Mark Bryan

A Three-Slice Circus Artist Mark Bryan’s paintings reflect his playfully satirical view of the world at large. ARTS

BY MICHAEL J. VAUGHN

ainter Mark Bryan has a hit on his hands in the form of his 2005 The Mad Tea Party, a 4-footby-7-foot oil on canvas portraying members of the Bush administration at Lewis Carroll’s iconic, nonsensical gathering. With help from the internet, the painting has become a hot item – so hot, in fact, that it is hanging at San Jose’s Art Object Gallery thru Jan. 15.

P

ful touches: Donald Rumsfeld’s ghastly green complexion as he pours a cup of oil from a pot shaped like a Sherman tank; the exultant touchdown pose of a preacher, his grin threatening to split his face; Condoleezza Rice’s intriguing white-woman suit (the antithesis of blackface); and perhaps the most cutting comment of all, a blank-faced sheep at tableside, holding in its mouth a tiny American flag.

Just the very notion of the painting (in which Cheney and Bush slice up a world cake as rabid industrialists, generals and televangelists cheer them on) seems inevitable, as though somebody had to do it. Bryan says that he gets this reaction all the time. “They come up and say, ‘Thanks for making a picture about the way I feel,’” he says. “People seem strangely happy to see it.”

Bryan says that he has had many offers for his star player, but “I never sold it. It’s going to be a slice of history.” He uses the work as a centerpiece for many of his exhibits, and also offers T-shirts emblazoned with its image. Bryan says that Tea Party (along with individual portraits of Bush and Cheney) is the exception rather than the rule. His work is not usually so specific, as a look at the other paintings in his Art Object exhibit bears out.

Anyone can have the idea, of course – success is in the details, and Bryan’s work is awash with beauti66

THEWAVEMAG.COM DECEMBER 1-14, 2008

What they do have in common with the Bush works are a narrative approach and a viciously funny sense for satire. Pie in the Sky portrays a flock of sheep purchasing fake-looking wings from a clerical figure, heading off to chew on perfect-looking grass next to a church and then hurtling themselves off an adjacent cliff (with great downward speed). Evening in the Valley shows a family escaping a nuclear holocaust, big-screen TVs strapped to their backs (And what image flashes from the TV screens? A nuclear holocaust!). “A lot of my work is symbolic, not specifically political,” says Bryan. “A lot of it is whimsical. For me, it’s about the only way that you can deal with this stuff, to use humor. It seduces people into the painting.” Another element that draws in the viewer, and further softens the blow of the message, is the sheer beauty of Bryan’s renderings. The intricate play of light and shadow within the underlying landscapes would, by themselves, make worthwhile paintings. The secret to these landscapes, which are often inspired by Bryan’s home territory in San Luis Obispo, is work, work and more work. “I’ll spend a month on a painting,” he says. “A few times, I’ve spent two weeks on a painting 68


» EVENT LISTINGS

ARTS EVENT

LISTINGS THOROUGHLY MODERN MILLIE

help puts her work in jeopardy. Performed by the Peninsula Youth Theatre: 12/12-13.

Lincoln High School Black Box Theatre, 555 Dana Ave., San Jose (408) 535-6300

PLAID TIDINGS

Saratoga Civic Theater, 13777 Fruitvale Ave., Saratoga

A Christmas rendition of the popular musical Forever Plaid, featuring characters from the original: four male singers who were killed in a 1950s auto accident, who come down from heaven to perform one more show: Thru 12/6. RAPUNZEL OR HAIR TODAY, GONE TOMORROW & HOLIDAY VAUDEVILLE REVUE

City Lights Theater, 529 S. Second St., San Jose (408) 295-4200 www.cltc.org

A CHRISTMAS SPECTACULAR!

Smith Center – Ohlone College, 43600 Mission Blvd., Fremont (510) 659-6031 www2.ohlone. edu/org/smith_ctr/box/box.html

Typical of any holiday family gettogether, this Christmas celebration quickly degenerates into three days of slapstick holiday angst: Thru 12/20.

The baton of Tom Clements will lead the Ohlone Wind Orchestra, Ohlone Community Band and the Ohlone Tuba Ensemble in this holiday offering: 12/13.

AROUND THE WORLD IN 80 DAYS San Jose Repertory Theatre, 101 Paseo de San Antonio, San Jose (408) 367-7255 www.sjrep.com

An epic globe-trotting yarn rife with fast-tempo adventure when Phineas Fogg agrees to an outrageous wager to circle the world in just 80 days: Thru 12/21. BETHLEHEM – CHRISTMAS STORY WALKTHROUGH

ARTS

Santa Clara First Baptist Church, 3111 Benton St., Santa Clara www.scfbc.org

South Bay’s largest performance of the Christmas story – and it’s free! 12/11-15. A CHRISTMAS CAROL

Black Box Theatre, 848 E. William St., San Jose

Ebenezer Scrooge’s redemption by the ghosts of Christmas Past, Present and Future: 12/10-24. A CHRISTMAS CAROL – THE MUSICAL

Palo Alto Children’s Theatre, 1305 Middlefield Rd., Palo Alto (650) 463-4970

A dazzling musical adaptation of Charles Dickens’ timeless classic, with scores by Tony Award-winner Lynn Ahrens and Oscar winner Alan Menken: 12/5-20. CHARLES DICKENS’ A CHRISTMAS CAROL

Cubberley Theatre, 4000 Middlefield Road, Palo Alto (408) 646-9583 www. easystreettheatre.com

A must-see adaptation of Charles Dickens’ timeless classic, presented by the Easy Street Theatre Company: 12/8-23.

68

West Valley College, 14000 Fruitvale Ave., Saratoga (408) 741-2058 www.westvalley.edu/fa/theatre/

This timeless Tony Award-winning Arthur Miller drama follows the 1692 Puritan purge of witchcraft in Salem, Mass.: Thru 12/7. THE ELVES & THE SHOEMAKER

Sunnyvale Community Center Theatre, 550 E. Remington Ave., Sunnyvale (408) 245-2978

A pair of merry elves assists a poor village shoemaker, causing delightful chaos amidst a lesson in the joy in giving: 12/5-6. EVERY CHRISTMAS STORY EVER TOLD

San Jose Stage Company, 490 S. First St., San Jose (408) 2837142 www.sanjosestage.com

In just 90 minutes, three actors blaze through every Christmas story ever told, with creative nods to Rudolph, the Grinch, Frosty the Snowman, Charlie Brown and more: Thru 12/14. HOT ‘N’ COLE

Theatre on San Pedro Square, 29 N. San Pedro St., Ste. 200, San Jose (408) 679-2330 www.tabardtheatre.org

Offering fresh arrangements of 48 familiar Cole Porter songs, such as “You’re the Top” and “It’s DeLovely,” this is sure to be an unforgettable evening: Thru 12/6. INCORRUPTIBLE

Broadway West Theatre, 4000-B Bay St., Fremont (510) 683-9218 www.broadwaywest.org

Set in a dilapidated French monastery during the Dark Ages, monks get desperate as their saint’s relics haven’t produced a miracle in 13 years, causing them to seek the advice of a less than reputable character:12/20.

THEWAVEMAG.COM DECEMBER 1-14, 2008

JACK AND THE BEANSTALK

Palo Alto Children’s Theatre, 1305 Middlefield Rd., Palo Alto (650) 463-4970

An interactive performance of Jack’s adventures as he climbs the magical beanstalk looming miles high into the clouds: 12/13. THE LION, THE WITCH AND THE WARDROBE

Smithwick Theatre – Foothill College, 12345 El Monte Rd., Los Altos Hills (650) 949-7360 www.foothill.edu/fa/theatre/

The classic chronicles of the four Pevensie siblings and their adventures in the land of Narnia, found through the doors of their mysterious wardrobe: 12/4-7. LONG STORY SHORT

Lucie Stern Theatre, 1305 Middlefield Rd., Palo Alto (650) 903-6000 www.theatreworks.org

Two seemingly polar opposites, one a socially inept East Coast Jew, the other a Los Angeles Asian-American, are taken along a roller-coaster romance in this new romantic comedy from TheatreWorks: 12/3-28. MADELINE’S CHRISTMAS

Sunnyvale Community Center Theatre, 550 E. Remington Ave., Sunnyvale (408) 245-2978

It’s Christmas in the “old house in Paris all covered in vines,” and everybody’s in bed with the flu – except Madeline, who feels just fine. A musical adaptation of Ludwig Bemelman’s children’s classic: 12/6-20. MERRY CHRISTMAS, STREGA NONA

Mountain View Center for the Performing Arts, 500 Castro St., Mountain View (650) 903-6000 www.ci.mtnview.ca.us/mvcpa/

Strega Nona prepares her yearly Christmas feast, but Big Anthony’s

Hal Linden, Tony Award-winner and star of TV’s Barney Miller, leads a journey through America’s musical landscape, from George Gershwin to Benny Goodman: 12/7. BEYOND THE SCORE, CLASSICAL MUSIC EXPOSED – TCHAIKOVSKY’S FOURTH

California Theatre, 345 S. First St., San Jose (408) 286-2600

A creative multimedia presentation in the first half cultivates the anticipation for the second half’s grand symphonic drama: 12/6-7. A CHANTICLEER CHRISTMAS

Mission Santa Clara, Santa Clara University (800) 407-1400 www.chanticleer.org

The internationally renowned 12-man singing ensemble takes its annual holiday concert to the stage at SCU, with performances at 6pm and 8:30pm: 12/15. FESTIVAL OF LIGHTS

Mission Santa Clara, 500 El Camino Real, Santa Clara (408) 554-4015 70

IF YOU HAVE AN IDEA FOR A LISTING, OR KNOW OF SOMETHING HAPPENING THAT YOU'RE AFRAID WE'LL OVERLOOK, PLEASE EMAIL YOUR ARTS EVENT TO EVENTS@THEWAVEMAG.COM.

THE CRUCIBLE

Peter Pan guides Wendy Darling and her siblings through adventures in Neverland, a land of endless childhood: 12/5-14.

SEASON’S GREETINGS

Bus Barn Theatre, 97 Hillview Ave., Los Altos (650) 941-0551 www.busbarn.org

THEATRE

PETER PAN

Montgomery Theatre, 271 S. Market St., San Jose (408) 453-1570 www.montgomerytheatre.org

CLASSICAL MUSIC & OPERA

A hilarious and irreverent “fractured fairy tale” take on a classic story, followed by the first ever Holiday Music Revue: Thru 12/21.

Peter Pan, Montgomery Theatre, 12/5-14

Based on the popular movie, with a full score of new songs and dance numbers: 12/4-13.

AN AMERICAN PORTRAIT

McAfee Center, 20300 Herriman Ave., Saratoga (408) 927-7597 www.sjws.org

F E AT U R E 66

and then basically painted it completely over. I’ve always said, ‘If you want to make money, don’t become an artist.’” Bryan doesn’t work plein air, preferring to let bits of his Central California surroundings assemble themselves into imagined landscapes. “Some of my paintings, in fact, are jokes about that,” he says (referring to two works titled Plein Air Incident, pastoral scenes interrupted by the appearance of killer bunny robots). “I make fun of the area I live in because there are like 500 plein air painters around here – some of them very good.” Another local target is the wine industry. The Last Merlot (not included in the Art Object exhibit) features a lovingly spread table of wine glasses set against rolling, vine-covered hills – only, one of the glasses has been spilled, and giant robots are storming the vineyards, terrorizing the locals with laser death rays. “The last 10 years or so, San Luis Obispo has turned into a little Napa,” says Bryan. “That particular valley [in the painting] is just a few miles from my house. I did that just to make fun

[CONT’D]

of the wine thing – if beings from outer space come in to ‘correct things.’” Although Bryan admires the work of abstract artists, he is firmly devoted to the illustrative, narrative tradition of Grant Wood, Edward Hopper and George Bellows, along with the Chicano muralists that he grew up with in ’70s-era Los Angeles. “I think that’s my personality,” he says. “I like to communicate. I relate abstract art to jazz – it takes some time and vocabulary to understand it. With narrative work, it’s all right there. Anyone can walk in and understand it.” At times, he does wander into a middle space, saying that about 10 percent of his work “comes from a dreamy, nonhuman place.” And these “nondefinable” paintings, as he calls them, are usually the first ones to sell, more popular than his attention-garnering political satire artworks. “People like to put their own stories into them,” he says. “Hey, I don’t want to look at Bush every morning in my house.” TW Bread and Circus: Art of Democracy, paintings by Mark Bryan, 10am-4pm, Mon-Fri, through Jan. 15, Free admission, Art Object Gallery, 592 N. Fifth St., San Jose (408) 288-9305 www.artobjectgallery.com, www.artofmarkbryan.com


» EVENT LISTINGS

ARTS EVENT

LISTINGS Upper House of Hakone Gardens, one of the oldest Japanese estates in the Western Hemisphere, is now showcasing a display of ornamental dolls representing the Emperor and other historical figures in the traditional dress of the Heian period: Ongoing.

68

HISTORY SAN JOSE

1650 Senter Rd., San Jose (408) 287-2290 www.historysanjose.org

Speed City: From Civil Rights to Black Power: An “in-depth examination of American sport in an era that spans the aftermath of World War II through America’s tumultuous involvement in Vietnam”: Thru 3/27/09. She Made It!: An exhibit celebrating women’s craft making, with displays of artifacts of embroidery, needlework and quilting: Thru 3/1/2009. JAPANESE AMERICAN MUSEUM OF SAN JOSE

Every Christmas Story Ever Told, San Jose Stage Company, Thru 12/14 Santa Clara University’s Concert Choir and Chamber Singers, conducted by Thomas Colohan: 12/5. GALBRAITH HONOR STRINGS WITH CHAMBER PLAYERS, EL CAMINO WIND AND CAMERATA ORCHESTRA

Cubberley Community Center, 4000 Middlefield Rd., Palo Alto (650) 213-7111

Four of the El Camino Youth Symphonies in one fall concert: 12/7 METROPOLIS

Stanford University - Memorial Auditorium, Serra St. at Galvez, livelyarts.stanford.edu

Enjoy a showing of Fritz Lang’s futuristic film, Metropolis accompanied by the Santa Rosa Symphony: 12/6. [See Hot Ticket, page 71] OPERA EXTRAVAGANZA – RIVER OF WOMEN

ARTS

Mexican Heritage Plaza Theatre, 1700 Alum Rock Ave., San Jose

Excerpts of Mozart’s comic romance Marriage of Figaro are paired with California composer Hector Armienta’s tale of a 1940s Texas woman’s struggle with cultural tradition and the spirit of the river: 12/6-7. PALO ALTO PHILHARMONIC CONCERT

Cubberley Community Center Theatre, 4000 Middlefield Rd., Palo Alto

The concert will begin with RimskyKorsakov’s Russian Easter Overture, followed by Ottorino Respighi’s Pines of Rome, along with Tchaikovsky’s Romeo and Juliet, and finishing with Beethoven’s Ninth Symphony: 12/6. PETER AND THE WOLF

Flint Center for the Performing Arts, 21250 Stevens Creek Blvd., Cupertino (415) 864-6000 www.flintcenter.com

The San Francisco Youth Symphony presents a traditional holiday favorite, along with Christmas carols and traditional sing-alongs: 12/13. SPLENDORS OF THE ITALIAN BAROQUE

First Congregational Church – Palo Alto, 1985 Louis Rd. Palo Alto www.fccpa.org

The Ragazzi Boys Chorus recreates 70

the works of Monteverdi and Allegri. Join along for the sing-along finale of classic Christmas carols. 12/6.

DANCE THE CHRISTMAS BALLET

Mountain View Center for the Performing Arts, 500 Castro St., Mountain View (650) 903-6000 www.ci.mtnview.ca.us/mvcpa/

Smuin Ballet presents their yearly classic, presenting both classic and contemporary music and dance: 12/3-7. THE NUTCRACKER

San Jose Center for the Performing Arts, 255 Almaden Blvd. San Josewww.balletsanjose.org

This treasured holiday classic returns for an extended run. Don’t forget about the Opening Night Celebration on Dec. 11: 12/11-28. TCHAIKOVSKY’S THE NUTCRACKER

Smith Center – Ohlone College, 43600 Mission Blvd., Fremont (510) 659-6031 www2.ohlone. edu/org/smith_ctr/box/box.html

Choreographed by Yoko Young and performed by the Fremont Symphony. Children are invited to attend the Sugar Plum Party after the performance: 12/5-7. WINTER DANCE SHOWCASE

Smith Center – Ohlone College, 43600 Mission Blvd., Fremont (510) 659-6031 www2.ohlone. edu/org/smith_ctr/box/box.html

Ohlone College’s Dance Department showcases their semester’s work: 12/4-6. WINTER HOLIDAYS IN THE MAGICAL FOREST

Cubberley Community Center, 4000 Middlefield Rd., Palo Alto (650) 213-7111

Meet Santa, Snegurochka the Snow Maiden, and their forest friends in this Russian ballet performance: 12/7.

MUSEUMS CANTOR ARTS CENTER

Palm Dr. at Museum Way, Stanford University (650) 7234177 www.museum.stanford.edu

THEWAVEMAG.COM DECEMBER 1-14, 2008

th

A New 19 Century: The reinstalled Mondavi Family Gallery features newly acquisitioned works by Monet, Renoir, Sargent and more: Ongoing. Auguste Rodin Collection: The largest collection of Rodin bronzes outside of Paris: Ongoing. African Art in Context: Photography, dress and other artifacts: Ongoing. Papua New Guinea Sculpture Garden: Wood and stone carvings of people, animals and mythical beings: Ongoing. Living Traditions: Arts of the Americas: A collection of work from diverse Native American peoples and times: Ongoing. Explore Outdoor Sculpture: Enjoy beautiful weather and the works of Auguste Rodin, Maya Lin, Beverly Pepper, Richard Serra and Andy Goldsworthy: Third Sunday of each month. Dürer to Picasso: Featuring 100 works from the Renaissance to WWII, from such European and American artists as Goya, Max Ernst, Joan Miro, Edvard Munch and more: Thru 2/15/2009. CHILDREN’S DISCOVERY MUSEUM

180 Woz Way, San Jose (408) 298-5437 www.cdm.org

Exciting interactive displays, galleries and activities for the whole family to enjoy: Ongoing. DE SAISSET MUSEUM

500 El Camino Real, Santa Clara (408) 554-4528 www.scu.edu/desaisset

Eye on the Sixties: Vision, Body & Soul: Focusing on one of the most vibrant and dynamic decades in modern history, this exhibit includes painting, sculpture, drawings and prints by artists ranging from Frank Stella to Claes Oldenberg: Ongoing. Just Pretend Everything is OK: An exhibit by San Francisco-based painter and printmaker Evri Kwong, who uses his crisp, colorful style to draw attention to shocking, intense messages: Thru 12/13. Winter in America: Stop-animation video and still photographs from collaborators Hank Willis Thomas and Kambui Olujimi: Thru 12/13. The Hapa Project: A portrait collection of multiracial heritage by photographer Kip Fulbeck: Thru 12/13. HAKONE GARDENS

21000 Big Basin Way, Saratoga (408) 741-4994 www.hakone.com

Hina Doll and Kimono Exhibition: The

535 N. Fifth St., San Jose (408) 294-3138 www.jamsj.org

Jack Matsuoka’s Cartoons: Making the Best of Poston: Documenting the incarceration of Japanese Americans during the 1940s: Ongoing. LOS ALTOS HISTORY MUSEUM

51 S. San Antonio Rd., Los Altos (650) 948-9427 www.losaltoshistory.org

Trains Mean Business: The Southern Pacific Railroad put Los Altos on the map in 1908. The exhibit covers the railroad’s impact on the city throughout the early 20th century: Ongoing. MUSEUM OF AMERICAN HERITAGE

351 Homer Ave., Palo Alto (650) 321-1004 www.moah.org

Music in the Home, Band and Orchestra: Explore the basics of music making, technology, and techniques over the ages. Your time will be a sound investment: Thru 1/18/2009. ROSICRUCIAN EGYPTIAN MUSEUM

1660 Park Ave., San Jose (408) 947-3636 www.egyptianmuseum.org

History of the Rosicrucian Egyptian Museum Exhibit: This exhibit shows the museum’s transformation from one artifact in an office to a museum with more than 4,000 artifacts: Ongoing. SAN JOSE MUSEUM OF ART

110 S. Market St., San Jose (408) 271-6840 www.sjmusart.org

Road Trip: An exhibition examining travel experience through photography, video, sculpture and more: Thru 1/25/2009. Frida Kahlo – Portraits of an Icon: An exhibition of nearly 40 photographic portraits of the legendary Mexican artist: Thru 3/22/2009. The Great Monkey Project: James Grashow displays 100 unique cardboard monkeys: Thru 1/4. This End Up: The Art of Cardboard: A multiartist exhibit of cardboard art, including works by Frank Gehry: Thru 2/15/2009. SAN JOSE MUSEUM OF QUILTS & TEXTILES

520 S. First St., San Jose (408) 971-0323 www.sjquiltmuseum.org

Four Contemporary Fiber Arts Masters: Four solo exhibits by contemporary fiber artists Polly Barton, Eleanor McCain, Mary Anne Jordan and Mary Zicafoose: Thru 1/25/2009.

TECH MUSEUM OF INNOVATION

201 S. Market St., San Jose (408) 294-TECH www.thetech.org

IDEA House: An interactive program space encourages you to formulate and synthesize like never before: Ongoing. Green by Design: Designs with a green approach, aiming to prevent environmental problems and improve lives: Ongoing. View from Space: Science made visible in an exhibit that displays weather, aircraft and daily patterns from space: Ongoing. Leonardo: 500 Years Into the Future: The largest and most comprehensive collection of da Vinci artifacts ever assembled, featuring more than 200 items from da Vinci and his contemporaries, including hands-on working models, interactive machines, multimedia presentations and more: Thru 1/4/2009. HISTORY PARK

1650 Senter Rd., San Jose (408) 298-8044 www.historysanjose.org

African American Heritage House: San Jose’s first museum dedicated to African American history has now been established at the historic Zanker House in History Park: Ongoing

GALLERIES ANNO DOMINI

366 S. First St., San Jose (408) 271-5155 www.galleryad.com

Fresh Produce: There’s nowhere better to find unique holiday gifts than at Gallery A.D.’s Fresh Produce sale and exhibit, featuring hundreds of small affordable works of art by national and international emerging artists: Dec. 5, 8pm till late. ART OBJECT GALLERY

592 N. Fifth St., San Jose (408) 288-9305 wwwartobjectgallery.com

Four Two-n-Two Four: An exhibit of Mark Bryan’s satirically political yet poignant paintings [See Arts, page 66], sculptures by Mattie Leeds and dazzling stone and glass sculptures by Ken Matsumoto: Thru 1/15. INSTITUTE FOR THE STUDY OF WESTERN CIVILIZATION

10060 Bubb Rd., Cupertino (408) 569-5494 www.thevirginartists.com

The Virgin Artists Sixth Annual Art Show and Sale: Support local artists and prepare for the holiday season with handmade fiber art, jewelry, ceramics, home décor and more: 12/6-7. LOUIE MEAGER ART GALLERY

Smith Center, Ohlone College, 43600 Mission Blvd., Fremont (510) 979-7916 dev2.ohlone.edu/ org/artgallery/index.html

The Plumed Serpent: An installation by David Tomb, featuring his large mixed media works of exotic Mexican birds, complemented by an installation of plants and sound: Thru 12/20. THE MAIN GALLERY

1018 Main St., Redwood City (650) 701-1018 www.themaingallery.org

Merry Art at Main: The eighth annual holiday exhibit by 24 local artists, including works done in ceramics, photographs, mixed media, paintings, prints and sculptures: Thru 12/21.

MODERNBOOK GALLERY

494 University Ave., Palo Alto (650) 327-6325 www.modernbook.com

Brigitte Carnochan: Still Life: An exhibit of Carnochan’s internationally renowned hand painted gelatin silver photographs of fruits and flowers: Thru 1/2/2009. MUSEUM OF AMERICAN HERITAGE

351 Homer Ave., Palo Alto (650) 321-1004 www.moah.org

Music to One’s Ears: Musical Instruments in the Home, Band and Orchestra: Explore the basic principles of music making, technology and technique over the ages, from the hollow log to the electronic harmony: Thru 1/18/2009. PALO ALTO ART CENTER

1313 Newell Rd., Palo Alto (650) 329-2366 www.cityofpaloalto.org/artcenter

In the Bigger Picture: Richard Misrach: An exhibit of large format landscape photography: Thru 12/21. PEABODY FINE ART GALLERY

11 N. Santa Cruz Ave., Los Gatos (408) 395-3440 www.riki-arts. com/angelatthebar.html 603 Santa Cruz Ave., Menlo Park (650) 622-2200 www.peabodygallery.com

Dr. Seuss for President: An exhibition featuring the release of the first-ever political print editions of Dr. Seuss: Ongoing (Menlo Park). SAN JOSE INSTITUTE OF CONTEMPORARY ART 560 S. First St., San Jose (408) 283-8155 www.sjica.org

The Figure in Relief: An exhibit by famed figurative sculptor Manuel Neri, highlighting relief sculptures and related drawings: Thru 1/10. The Painted Room: Chris Dorosz displays a life-size installation of a living room made of dots of paint suspended on hanging wire, a take on the pixilation of digital imagery: Thru 1/10. Eureka!: Featuring the works of the 2005-07 winners of the prestigious Eureka prize: Ongoing. Medusa: Timothy Horn’s ornate chandelier, based on illustrations by Ernest Haecker: Ongoing. SAN JOSE PUBLIC LIBRARY SYSTEM

2635 Aborn Rd., San Jose (408) 808-3060 www.sjlibrary.org

Growing Up Asian in America 2008 Exhibit: A showcasing of the works of Bay Area art students, and the winners of last month’s art contest: 12/1-31. STANFORD ART SPACES

CIS, 420 Via Palou, Stanford University, Stanford (650) 7253622 cis.stanford.edu/~marigros/

An exhibit featuring stitched monotypes on silk by Katherine K. Allen, sculptures by Feng Jin, mixed media by Kay Kang, and paintings by Chunming Yu: Thru 1/8. VIEWPOINTS GALLERY

315 State St., Los Altos (650) 941-5789 www.viewpointsgallery.com

A duo exhibit featuring pottery by Jean Prophet and watercolor by Nancy Calhoun: 12/1-1/1. TW


ARTS: HOT TICK ET » COLUMN: HOT TICKET

ARTS

ON SALE NOW! TICKETS MAKE GREAT GIFTS! HOT

NATIONAL TOURING PRODUCTION! ONLY SOUTH BAY ENGAGEMENT!

TICKET

Electronic Orchestration An experimental score takes center stage for Stanford Lively Arts’ screening of Metropolis. BY MICHAEL J. VAUGHN

A

big-screen showing of Fritz Lang’s futuristic 1927 film, Metropolis? Cool. The Santa Rosa Symphony playing a live soundtrack? Cooler still. Martin Matalon’s modern soundtrack, blending recorded electronic sounds with the live orchestra using geeky high-tech gadgetry? Dude! Perhaps the most intriguing element of the Dec. 6 screening of Metropolis at Stanford Lively Arts is the software developed by the Paris-based experimental-music research center IRCAM, which allows passages of recorded music to be synchronized to a live acoustic trigger (say, a high A played by a trumpet). “It’s a very elaborate acoustic score, and an elaborate electronic score,” says Santa Rosa conductor Bruno Ferrandis. “But the electronic score is ‘alive,’ because it is triggered by us.”

Even when applying traditional techniques, as in the tying of characters to leitmotifs, Matalon handles things differently, says Ferrandis, connecting

TICKET INFO

JANUARY 7 & 8 • 7:30PM FLINT CENTER - CUPERTINO • 408-998-8497 VISIT THE BOX OFFICE •

• TICKETMASTER.COM

SUBSCRIBER AND GROUP DISCOUNTS AVAILABLE CALL 408-864-5885

a presentation

Stanford Lively Arts, Fritz Lang’s Metropolis, with the Santa Rosa Symphony, $13-$25, 8pm, Dec. 6, Stanford Memorial Auditorium (650) 725-ARTS www.livelyarts.stanford.edu characters not to repeated melodies (a la Wagner), but to individual instruments. The protagonist, Freder Fredersen, is connected to the fretless bass, whereas the female lead, Maria, is tied to the electric guitar, which turns to more modern, distorted sounds at the appearance of her evil robot double. For Ferrandis, who is a friend of the composer, soundtrack concerts are not just a chance to “popularize the music, to get it out in the world, but to take down that wall between traditional and contemporary players.” He takes pride that his Santa Rosa orchestra, “which is absolutely not an experimental orchestra,” is taking on such a modern work.

ARTS

Of course, the real innovation comes from the score itself, which includes fretless electric bass, electric guitar with effects box, and a four-person corps handling a menagerie of international percussion instruments. The 1994 work, just now receiving its West Coast premiere, also focuses on the film in some unexpected ways, becoming less of an accompaniment and more of a counterpoint. “I heard the original Gottfried Huppertz soundtrack,” says Ferrandis, “and, of course, you have the classic approach: major chords for happy moments, ominous double-bass scratchings for suspense. Matalon doesn’t take the expected route. It doesn’t play moment to moment. It follows the way the movie has been mounted and edited. He tries to detach himself from the little things and create an atmosphere. It’s never literally to the picture.”

Bruno Ferrandis

And they may be back soon. Just this July, a rare uncut copy of Lang’s film was discovered in a museum archive in Matalon’s native Argentina. A release of this complete version – not seen since 1927 – is forthcoming after restoration work. “They discovered 30 minutes of cuts that were supposed to have been lost,” says Ferrandis. “Matalon told me, ‘Well, now I have to write another 30 minutes of music.’” TW

THEWAVEMAG.COM DECEMBER 1-14, 2008

71


» feature

Family&Community

» FEATURE 72 » EVENT LISTINGS 74 » FARMERS MARK ETS 74

THE ADOPTION OPTION

Seven facts on adopted children and birth mothers: 1. Approximately two percent of all children in the US are adopted. 2. Single mothers who choose adoption are more likely to have higher educational aspirations, finish school and be in full-time employment within 12 months of giving birth than those who choose to become a single parent. 3. Single mothers who choose adoption are less likely to live in poverty and receive public assistance than those who decide to become a single parent. 4. Single mothers who choose adoption are just as likely to suffer negative psychological consequences, such as depression, as those who raise their children as single parents.

Hit film Juno tackled the topics of teen pregnancy and domestic adoption

Bringing Up Baby Domestic adoption is thriving in America, and bringing new arrivals to expectant families. BY SHARON MCKINLEY

FA MILY & COMMUNIT Y

T

he topic of adoption has never been hotter. Barely a day goes by without another celebrity making headlines by announcing a “new arrival.” But adoption is hardly a new phenomenon, even in celebrity circles. Actress Mia Farrow has adopted 10 children since the early 1970s (five when she was a single mother), while Star Wars creator George Lucas adopted three children in the 1980s, raising them all as a single parent.

In the past few years, however, public interest in domestic adoption has been revived with the likes of Brad Pitt and Angelina Jolie (who seem to add to their multicultural brood on a daily basis), not to mention its presence in the plotlines of last year’s Oscar-winning indie hit Juno, as well as the Tina Fey film Baby Mama and TV series, 30 Rock. Away from the media spotlight, adoption is an emotional journey undertaken by thousands of families in America each year. Despite rumors that domestic adoptions have taken a downturn in favor of celebrityinspired international adoptions, statistics suggest that domestic adoption is thriving here in the US. In fact, more than 25,000 infants were adopted domestically in 2007, more than all international adoptions combined.

72

THEWAVEMAG.COM DECEMBER 1-14, 2008

So where do you start on the road to a successful domestic adoption? Wade Morris, director of community resources at American Adoptions (www.americanadoptions.com), one of America’s largest full-service licensed child placing agencies, has educated thousands of expectant mothers and adoptive families on the adoption process. “We complete over 300 successful domestic adoptions each year and we coordinate every step of those adoptions. From first contact with birth mothers and adoptive families, we seek to counsel and educate all parties on the road ahead. At this point, the birth mother is very much in the driver’s seat, and we make a plan around what’s important for her and her child. We then try to match her needs with a family.” The options in question are extensive, but perhaps the most important decision for both the birth mother and the adoptive family is which of the three types of adoption available will work best for them. Morris explains the options: “An open adoption is one whereby the birth mother will have an ongoing relationship with the adoptive family before and after placement; a closed adoption [is] where the identity of the birth mother and adoptive family remain confidential throughout the process, with no contact before or after the placement; and a semi-open adoption lies somewhere between these two. Ninety percent of our adoptions are semi-open, which means the birth

5. Adopted adolescents score higher than children of single parents on self-esteem, confidence in their own judgment, selfdirectedness, positive view of others and feelings of security within their families. 6. Compared with the general child population, children placed with adoptive couples are better off economically. 7. Adopted children enjoy a quality of home environment superior to all other groups and do better in educational attainment. Source: Research according to the Guttmacher Institute of Washington, DC and a 1994 study by public policy research organization The Search Institute.

mother and adoptive family will know some basic information about each other prior to the adoption, and they may speak on the phone. After the adoption, the adoptive family will send pictures and correspondence to the birth mother via our agency every six months or so, until the child is 18.” In addition, the adoptive family will undergo what is called a home study, which will prepare them for the adoptive process, gather information to help a social worker match them to a birth mother, and to evaluate their fitness as an adoptive family. The home study will include interviews with a social worker, a home visit, health checks, background checks and income statements. When the home study has been completed, the adoptive family will complete a profile, and then the process of matching them with a prospective birth mother begins. “On average, our adoptive families will take between one month and 18 months to find a birth mother,” Morris explains. “While we cannot say anything is guaranteed, it’s extremely rare not to find a match for a family.” So what sorts of costs are involved in domestic adoption, and what exactly do they cover? “Our average costs range from $15,000 to around $36,000, but it depends on so many factors,” says Morris. “It’s difficult to put an exact figure on it. Costs are incurred through 77


FAMILY & COMMUNIT Y: FEATURE

Get fit this winter at the JCC! Join in December and get 1 month free!

14855 Oka Road Los Gatos, CA 95032 408.356.4973 membership@svjcc.org

• Fitness • Aquatics • Tennis • Group Exercise • Personal Training • Classes for All Ages

Offer available to 1st time members ages 18 & older when purchasing a Center membership by 12/31/08. Certain conditions & restrictions apply.

FA MILY & COMMUNIT Y

THEWAVEMAG.COM DECEMBER 1-14, 2008

73


» EVENT LISTINGS

FAMILY&COMMUNITY EVENT San Jose Holiday Parade, 12/7

LISTINGS www.forpetessakestudios.com

Jewelry, soaps and lotions, pottery, fabric arts, and more: 10am-6pm HOLIDAY TREE FESTIVAL: 12/6-7

Roaring Camp Railroads, Graham Hill & Mt. Herman Rds., Felton www.roaringcamp.com

Ride the steam train to Bear Mountain and view beautifully decorated holiday trees. SAN JOSE STATE UNIVERSITY STUDENT FILM FESTIVAL: 12/11

SJSU University Theater, Fifth & San Fernando, San Jose

The San Jose State University’s Film Production Society is hosting a film festival, featuring student shorts from the Bay Area: 7-9pm NILES HOLIDAY ART WALK: 12/13

Maps are available at 37683 Niles Blvd., Fremont (510) 793-8782

Stroll through the historic Niles District’s galleries and cafes and be entertained by live music, culinary delights, art demonstrations and, of course, art: Noon-4pm

FAMILY ACTIVITIES FIFTH ANNUAL GINGERBREAD HOUSE CONTEST AND SILENT AUCTION: 12/2-7

Ritz-Carlton, One Miramontes Point Rd., Half Moon Bay (650) 712-7696

Children, amateur chefs and culinary professionals are all invited to compete in this gingerbread house contest. Let the baking begin! FANTASY TRAIN OF LIGHTS: 12/4

Billy Jones Wildcat Railroad, 110 Blossom Hill Rd., Los Gatos (408) 395-7433 www.bjwrr.org IF YOU HAVE AN IDEA FOR A LISTING, OR KNOW OF SOMETHING HAPPENING THAT YOU'RE AFRAID WE'LL OVERLOOK, PLEASE EMAIL YOUR COMMUNIT Y EVENT TO EVENTS@THEWAVEMAG.COM.

FA MILY & COMMUNIT Y

BUSINESS EWOMEN ACCELERATED NETWORKING DINNER: 12/3

Villa Ragusa, 35 S. Second St., Campbell www.ewomennetwork.com

Enjoy a delicious dinner and network with fellow businesswomen: 5-8:15pm EXPLORE FRANCHISING SEMINAR: 12/15

Connect, 420 S. Pastoria Ave., Sunnyvale (408) 773-2365

Explore the pros and cons of owning and operating a franchise: 1-2:30pm

CLUB MEETINGS FUN TIME SINGERS: WEDNESDAYS

Prince of Peace Lutheran Church, 12770 Saratoga Ave., Saratoga www.funtimesingers.org

A lively and diverse community choir invites men and women to join their group: 7:15-9:30pm

FESTIVALS & EXPOS FIRST ANNUAL GLASS ORNAMENT SHOW: 12/1-31

Kaleid Gallery, 88 S. Fourth St., San Jose (408) 947-1785 www.sjgaa.org

If you want a mind-blowing tree this year, there is only one way to get there, and it’s with hand-blown ornaments. Kaleid will be showcasing the works from more than 30 glass artists from the San Jose Glass Artist Alliance, along with jewelry, vases and more: Noon-7pm FRESH PRODUCE: 12/5

Gallery A.D., 366 S. First St., San Jose (408) 271-5155 www.galleryad.com

There’s nowhere swankier to get your holiday gifts than at Gallery A.D.’s Fresh Produce sale and exhibit, featuring hundreds of small affordable works of art by national and international emerging artists: 8pm till late 2008 SANTA CLARA HISTORIC HOME TOUR: 12/5-6 Santa Clara Old Quad

74

THEWAVEMAG.COM DECEMBER 1-14, 2008

Neighborhood, Madison & Harrison Sts., Santa Clara (408) 249-7905 www.sc-hometour.com

Attention, all you lovers of historic homes: It’s time to bundle up and stroll through Santa Clara, visiting a handful of beautiful (and we do mean BEAUTFUL) homes. SAN JOSE SUPER TOY, COMIC & RECORD SHOW: 12/6 Santa Clara Fairgrounds, 344 Tully Rd., San Jose (408) 2981709 www.timetunneltoys.com

Some of the biggest names in toys will be on hand, such as Big Jim, Evel Knievel, Rock ‘Em Sock ‘Em Robots, Sit & Spin, Whirlybird, Easy-Bake Oven, Battleship and a special appearance by Optimus Prime: 11am-4pm GREENHOUSE HOLIDAY BOUTIQUE: 12/6

Greenhouse I Pool House, 777 San Antonio Rd., Palo Alto (650) 305-0462

Great gifts ideas for the holidays: Soaps and lotions, fabric arts, pottery, and much, much more: 10am-4pm HOLIDAY CRAFT SHOW AND SALE: 12/6-7, 13-14

For Pete’s Sake Studios, 4188 Jarvis Ave., San Jose (408) 269-1210

All aboard the decorated ole No. 2 steam engine that will cart you around Vasona Lake Park to view the wonderful Fantasy Lights display. GILROY GARDENS HOLIDAY LIGHTS FEATURING A CHARLIE BROWN CHRISTMAS: 12/5-7, 12-14, 19-23, 26-28

Gilroy Gardens, 3050 Hecker Pass Hwy., Gilroy www.gilroygardens.org

The park is transformed into a winter wonderland, with twinkling lights, themed rides, photos with Santa, arts » FARMERS MARK ETS

and crafts workshop and, of course, Charlie Brown! HOLIDAY CARRIAGE RIDES: 12/5-23

Los Gatos carriagerides. losgatoschamber.com

You can cruise around Los Gatos in an honest-to-goodness horse-drawn carriage and visit some of the town’s most beautiful historic homes along downtown’s festively decorated North Santa Cruz Avenue. NINTH INFLATION CELEBRATION: 12/6

Corner of Market St. & Park Ave., San Jose www.sanjoseholidayparade.com

Come see the inflation of oversized helium balloons, a showcasing of spectacular floats, activities for the children and special live performances: 3-7pm HOMETOWN HOLIDAYS: 12/6

Downtown Redwood City, Along Broadway St. (650) 307-4064

Friends and families are invited to celebrate the holidays Redwood City style with fabulous fun and activities that include a children’s snow play area, ice sculpting demonstrations, live entertainment, holiday parade, tree lighting and Santa. HOLIDAY TRAIN EXHIBIT: 12/6-26

Fairmont Hotel, 170 S. Market St., San Jose (408) 998-3916

This, without a doubt, is the season’s greatest electric train exhibit, featuring model villages depicting locales in the United States, England, the Netherlands, Russia, Germany, Mexico, France, the Philippines and Switzerland. HOLIDAY TRADITIONS AROUND THE WORLD: 12/6

History Museum, 2200 Broadway, Redwood City (650) 299-0104 www.historysmc.org

Ever wonder how other countries celebrate the holidays? Well, then you won’t want to miss this. Visitors can make an Italian La Befana doll, English party favor, Filipino star lantern, German Christmas tree ornament and much more: 10am-4pm LOS GATOS HOLIDAY PARADE: 12/6

Downtown Los Gatos www.losgatoschamber.com

You’re all invited to come and help celebrate with live music, carriage rides, food booths, kid zone, tree lighting ceremony and, of course, the parade!: 11am

FARMERS

Campbell: Sunday 9am – 1pm (year round) Campbell Ave. at Central & First Sts. (510) 745-7100 Cupertino: Friday 9am – 1pm (year round) Vallco Fashion Park Parking Lot, 10123 Wolfe Rd. (800) 949-FARM Los Gatos: Sunday 8am – 12:30pm (year round) Montebello Way & Broadway Extension (408) 353-5355 Mountain View: Sunday 9am – 1pm (year round) Hope & Evelyn (800) 806-FARM Palo Alto: Sunday 9am – 1pm (year round) California Ave. & El Camino Real (800) 806-FARM

BREAKFAST WITH SANTA: 12/6

Milpitas Community Center, 457 E. Calaveras Blvd., Milpitas (408) 586-3210

Enjoy a fabulous pancake breakfast with Santa!: 8:30-10:30am HERITAGE HOLIDAY: 12/6

History Park, 1650 Senter Rd., San Jose (408) 298-2291 www.historysanjose.org

You won’t want to miss Santa as he arrives on a vintage fire truck (his sleigh is in the shop) to visit with all the little kiddies, along with holiday carolers, gourmet food, arts & crafts and more!: Noon-6pm AN ARDENWOOD CHRISTMAS: 12/6-7

Ardenwood Historic Farms, 34600 Ardenwood Blvd., Fremont www.ebparks.org/ activities/events

Celebrate the holiday season in Victorian style. Visit the beautifully decorated Patterson House, sing Christmas carols, search for the Yule log, and visit Father Christmas. The day also includes holiday crafts, music, and cooking demonstrations: 10am-4pm HOLIDAY ANIME FAIRE: 12/6 Fremont Teen Center, 39770 Paseo Padre Pkwy., Fremont (510) 494-4344 www.holidayanimefaire.com

Come out and enjoy a full day of anime, with art demonstrations, vendors, music and much, much more!: 10am-3pm SUNNYVALE ANNUAL TREE LIGHTING: 12/6

Downtown Sunnyvale, Murphy St. between Evelyn & Washington

Bring the whole family for live entertainment, tasty food and drinks, photos with Santa and, of course, the tree lighting!: 4:30-8:30pm HOLIDAY CRAFT FAIRE: 12/6-7 Fremont High School’s Gym, 1279 Sunnyvale-Saratoga Rd., Sunnyvale (408) 522-2700

The Sunnyvale Fremont High School Featherettes team invites you to its annual Holiday Craft Faire, featuring more than 60 vendors selling thousands of arts and crafts items. SANTA ARRIVES BY HELICOPTER: 12/6

Hiller Aviation Museum, 601 Skyway Rd., San Carlos www.hiller.org

Bring the kids to see Santa come

MARKETS

San Jose: Sunday 10am – 3pm (year round) Stevens Creek & Winchester (800) 949-FARM San Jose: Friday 10am – 2pm (year round) Kaiser Santa Teresa Parking Lot (800) 949-FARM San Jose: Friday 10am – 2pm (May 2 - Dec. 19) San Pedro St. between Santa Clara & St. John Sts. (408) 279-1775 San Jose: Sunday 8:30am – Noon (year round) Japantown, Jackson between Sixth & Seventh Sts. (408) 298-4303 San Jose: Sunday 10am – 2pm (year round) Princeton Plaza, Kooser & Meridian (800) 806-FARM

Santa Clara: Thursday 10am – 2pm (year round) Santa Clara Kaiser Parking Lot (800) 949-FARM Santa Clara: Saturday 9am – 1pm (year round) Jackson St. between Homestead & Benton (510) 745-7100 Saratoga: Saturday 9am – 1pm (year round) Saratoga West Valley College, Fruitvale & Allendale Aves. (800) 806-FARM Sunnyvale: Saturday 9am – 1pm (year round) S. Murphy Ave. at Washington and Evelyn (510) 745-7100


FAMILY & COMMUNIT Y: EVENT LISTINGS

EVENT flying in, not by reindeer, but by helicopter! You’ll also enjoy caroling, live music from the San Carlos Community Band, cookies and candy canes. SAN JOSE HOLIDAY PARADE: 12/7

Downtown San Jose, along Santa Clara St. www.sanjoseholidayparade.com

The San Jose Holiday Parade was voted one of the Top 25 parades in the United States, so load up the family and prepare to be entertained by colorful floats, marching bands and huge inflatables. Keep an eye out for the Wave balloon (Strawberry Shortcake): 8:30am RITZ-CARLTON ANNUAL TREE LIGHTING CELEBRATION: 12/7

Ritz-Carlton, One Miramontes Point Rd., Half Moon Bay (650) 712-7696

Bring the whole family for a full day of holiday fun with Dickensera costumed carolers, live choral music, tree lighting and the announcement of the winner of the gingerbread house building competition: 5-7pm SANTA PAWS: 12/7

Park Valencia – Santana Row, San Jose (408) 551-4611 www.santanarow.com

Bring your dogs, cats, bunny rabbits and guinea pigs to get their photo taken with old Saint Nick: 11am-3pm MRS. CLAUS’ BREAKFAST NOOK: 12/7

The Tech Museum, 201 S. Market St., San Jose www.sanjoseholidayparade.com

LISTINGS

Redwood City (650) 299-0104 www.hisotrysmc.org

A preschool story time featuring Gary Soto’s story, Too Many Tamales, followed by craft time, where you’ll get to make your own tamale out of clay and corn husks: 11am & 2pm A TIME TO BE JOLLY PUPPET SHOW: 12/13

Gamble Garden, 1431 Waverley St., Palo Alto www.gamblegarden.org

The whole family is welcome at this super fun puppet show put on by The Puppet Company! FRIENDS OF THE PEARL AVENUE LIBRARY BOOK SALE: 12/13

San Jose Library Pearl Avenue Branch, 4270 Pearl Ave., San Jose (408) 808-8035

Come to the book sale at our new facility! Fiction, nonfiction, children’s, DVDs, CDs. Take a tour of the new building: 11am-5pm CHILDREN’S HOLIDAY PRINCESS TEAS: 12/15-17

Vasona Lake County Park will once again be transformed into a Fantasy of Lights, featuring an evening drive-thru tour of 37 holidaythemed light displays, including an exploding volcano!: 6-10pm

FUNDRAISERS & DONTIONS TOYS FOR TOTS FUNDRAISER: 12/6

Britannia Arms, Cupertino

Enjoy live music from 3D and Soul Intention while collecting needed toys for the little tots: 7pm OPEN HOUSE AND BLOOD DRIVE: 12/6

Silver Creek Sportsplex, 800 Embedded Way, San Jose (408) 225-1709

Lisa’s Tea Treasures, 1145 Olsen Ave., Santana Row (408) 247-3613

Visit the Silver Creek Sportsplex, play some soccer or roller hockey and give some blood!

Bring the kids for a day just for them with a magic show, dancing, singing, and storytelling: 4-5:30pm

11TH ANNUAL YULETIDE YUCKFEST: 12/7

SANTA CRUZ HOLIDAY LIGHTS TRAIN: THRU 12/22 Santa Cruz Boardwalk www.roaringcamp.com

Ride a beautifully lit holiday train through the streets of Santa Cruz while sipping hot-spiced cider and listening to carolers. You’ll even get to hang out with Santa Claus. Reservations strongly recommended. CHRISTMAS IN THE PARK: THRU 1/1

Think of it as a pregame meal as Mrs. Claus and friends invite you to join them for a delicious breakfast before the San Jose Holiday Parade: 7-8:30am

Plaza de Cesar Chavez, Market St. between San Carlos & San Fernando, San Jose www.christmasinthepark.com

STORIES FROM THE PAST: 12/12

Hundreds of wintertime holiday displays, live entertainment, food, and Saint Nick!

San Mateo County History Museum, 2200 Broadway,

FANTASY OF LIGHTS: THRU 12/31

Vasona Lake Park, 333 Blossom Hill Dr., Los Gatos (408) 3552201 www.parkhere.org

Britannia Arms, 5027 Almaden Expwy., San Jose (415) 595-4555

Benefit for Toys for Tots, with live music from Chubby’s All-Stars, special guest Viv Savage from Spinal Tap, a band of hilarious comedians, including Larry “Bubbles” Brown, Mike Lee, Tissa Hami, Jeff Applebaum and Nick Leonard and hosted by Hymie Laredo: 7pm ONE WARM COAT: THRU 1/31

Drop-off barrels throughout Santana Row, San Jose (408) 551-4611 www.santanarow.com

Attention! If you have any coats that you know you’re not going to wear, visit Santana Row and donate them to One Warm Coat, a 76

FA MILY & COMMUNIT Y

THEWAVEMAG.COM DECEMBER 1-14, 2008

75


FAMILY & COMMUNIT Y: EVENT LISTINGS

FAMILY&COMMUNITY EVENT

LISTINGS

75

AC U P RE S S U RE â&#x20AC;˘ T U I NA â&#x20AC;˘ M ED I CA L Q I G O N G 200 H OUR ASIAN BODY WORK

A

Five Branches University presents

Asian Bodywork CEU & Certification Programs

Realize the Healing in Your Hands Five BraNches university Graduate School of Traditional Chinese Medicine 3031 Tisch Way, ste 507, San Jose, CA 95128 â&#x2013; www.fivebranches.edu For more information, please contact Mimi Latno (408) 260-0208, sjextension@fivebranches.edu

Turning Wheels for Kids, 12/13 national nonprofit that distributes coats to people who need them. Donation bins located throughout the shopping center. BEARDS FOR TEARS: THRU 4/6/09

Hav e dur a part ing y win on Fri d ter bre ay or SAV ak and (See

E!

FA MILY & COMMUNIT Y

web site for d etai ls)

The party place that has it ALL! )BWFZPVSFWFOUBUUIFQBSUZ EFTUJOBUJPOFWFSZPOFTUBMLJOH BCPVU+VNQPOHJBOUPCTUBDMF DPVSTFTBOEJOĂłBUBCMFT BOE QMBZTPDDFS EPEHFCBMM PSPUIFS ĂąFMEHBNFT*OWJUBUJPOT QBSUZ DPBDIFT BOEQSJWBUFQBSUZSPPNT XFUBLFDBSFPGJUBMM"TLBCPVU GPPEPQUJPOT GSPNQJ[[BUPBGVMM DBUFSFECVĂ­FU(SFBUGPSLJET UFFOT  HSPXOVQTUPP BU4JMWFS$SFFL4QPSUTQMFYr&NCFEEFE8BZr4BO+PTF rJOGP!-0-QBSUJFTDPN

w w w.LOLpar ties.com 76

THEWAVEMAG.COM DECEMBER 1-14, 2008

Visit www.beardsfortears.com for info and donations

Help Greg Miller and Jon Sontag with your weekly pledges and donations and help them raise have enough money to build a water well in Africa. And what part are they playing? They have committed to stop shaving for seven months! Hence, beards. Log on to check out their growth and make a donation.

GARDENING GARDEN SALE: 12/13

Gamble Garden, 1431 Waverly St., Palo Alto (650) 329-1356 x201, Palo Alto www.gamblegarden.org

Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t miss the annual garden sale featuring, fresh holiday greens, plants, bulbs, unique gifts and custom flower arrangements: 9am-Noon

LECTURES MAKE A WORLD OF DIFFERENCE: COMMUNITY NONVIOLENCE CONFERENCE: 12/13

Santa Clara University, 500 El Camino Real, Santa Clara www.carrythevision.org

A conference with information on how one can build peace through nonviolent education.

READINGS & BOOK SIGNINGS PALO ALTO WEEKLY SHORT STORY CONTEST RECEPTION: 12/8

Keplerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, 1010 El Camino Real, Menlo Park (650) 324-4321 www.keplers.com

A reception in honor of this yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s winners: 7-9pm BOOK SIGNING WITH WONA MINIATI: 12/14

Keplerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, 1010 El Camino Real, Menlo Park (650) 324-4321 www.keplers.com

Ms. Miniati signs copies of her new work, Cooking with All Things Trader Joeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s: 11am

VOLUNTEER TURNING WHEELS FOR KIDS: 12/13

McEnry Convention Center, South Hall, 435 S. Market St., San Jose www. turningwheelsforkids.org

Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve all dreamed about being one of Santaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s elves, so hereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s your big chance. Join Turning Wheels for Kids as they spend the evening assembling more than 2,000 bicycles, which will be given to needy children. BECOME A BIG BROTHER OR BIG SISTER

(408) 876-4193 www.emp.org

Become a mentor and be a positive influence on a childâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s life and itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll only cost you two hours a week! VOLUNTEERS NEEDED FOR THE AMGEN TOUR OF CALIFORNIA BICYCLE RACE

Apply online at www.amgentourofcalifornia.com

WORKSHOPS & CLASSES SNOWCAMPING ESSENTIALS: 12/4

REI, 400 El Paseo de Saratoga, San Jose (408) 871-8765

Join Albert Pastine from the Sierra Clubâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Snow Camping Section as he discusses everything you need to know to have a safe and enjoyable camping trip during the winter months: 7pm HOLIDAY WREATHMAKING WORKSHOP: 12/13 Guadalupe River Park & Gardens Visitor & Education Center, 438 Coleman Ave., San Jose (408) 298-7657 www.grpg.org

Want to add that special touch to your holiday dĂŠcor? Well, we have the perfect solution: Take part in this yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s holiday wreath-making workshop and learn how to make a beautiful natural wreath for your home! MUSICAL HOLIDAY CARD WORKSHOP: 12/13

Intel Museum, 2200 Mission College Blvd., Santa Clara (408) 765-0889 www.intel.com/museum

Mom and Dad, bring out the little ones ages seven and up, and theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll learn how to make their very own musical card while learning all about computer chips and other nerdy stuff: 10:30am TW


FAMILY & COMMUNIT Y: FEATURE

FAMILY&COMMUNITY F E AT U R E 72

legal fees, medical bills, counseling and advertising, travel, and often the birth mother will need living expenses during her pregnancy. We work on the basis that the birth mother should incur no costs whatsoever through placing her child with an adoptive family. But it very much depends on the individual situation.” It’s clear that the road to a successful domestic adoption is a complicated one that can take time and patience. It may also seem expensive, but when compared to other options (such as international adoption or fertility treatments), it’s easy to see why domestic adoption is still so popular. “Adopting a child from another country brings its own set of issues such as visas, traveling costs and paperwork,” Morris notes. “In America, we also have excellent prenatal care, and we can ensure all the relevant background checks are done to ensure newborns are healthy and ready for a new home.

[ C O N T. ]

“It’s important to remember that domestic adoption serves a real purpose in America,” Morris continues. “We receive calls from thousands of birth mothers every year, and maybe 20 percent of those mothers go on to place their child in adoptive care, which takes enormous courage and strength as well as a huge heart. Likewise, we work with around 180 adoptive families at any one time, each of whom has a wonderful, loving home to offer. It’s incredibly satisfying to see all the pieces come together to create something as perfect as a family.” TW American Adoptions operates across the nation and is a fully licensed, nonprofit agency. For information regarding adoption or to request an information kit, call 1-800-ADOPTION or email adoptions@americanadoptions.com. Adoption Services for Santa Clara County, 373 W. Julian St., San Jose (408) 299-5437 www.299-kids.org

FA MILY & COMMUNIT Y

THEWAVEMAG.COM DECEMBER 1-14, 2008

77


» FEATURE

Sports&Adventure SJFixed member Matt Montoya shows off his brakeless skill

» FEATURE 78 » SVGUIDE: SPORTS & ADVENTURE 81

Terrence Shaw, owner of Shaw’s Lightweight Cycles in Santa Clara, was a professional road bike racer in the ’70s and a track bike racer in the ’80s. He says that the resurgence in fixed gear popularity came about three or four years ago, when bike messengers in New York and other big cities began riding brakeless. Many companies still use bike messengers for their ability to weave efficiently and quickly through traffic, allowing for important documents and parcels to arrive at destinations in the same day. “I think it was a rebellion against technology,” Shaw says. “And the idea that it’s a pure bike.” The very notion of a “pure” bike is why riders choose to strip the bikes of brakes. A simple, sleek, uncluttered bike is considered aesthetically superior. “It’s totally a fashion statement,” Shaw adds. “That’s fine. But there’s a safety issue.” That would appear to be a no-brainer. But talk to the members of SJFixed.org, an online fixed gear community forum with about 300 members (most ride brakeless) that plans group rides and meet-ups all over town, and their response to safety concerns seems perplexing. When Matt Montoya, a member of SJFixed, is asked why he doesn’t have a brake on his bike, just for emergency purposes, his response is, “I never thought about that. I never thought of using one.”

SPOR T S & A DVEN T URE

Fixated on Fixies

g crew The SJFixed.or

Fixed gear bikes may be “pure,” but they also pose safety questions. BY MITCHELL ALAN PARKER

E

very decade or so, a pariah sport emerges as a trend with little to no explanation. Typically embraced by a younger generation, the movement brings with it a unique style, often gleaned from a previous era. Proponents embrace the new and redefine the old by creating and maintaining the outward fashion of the trend, which spreads like wildfire. In almost all cases, the trend-setting sport is dangerous, reflected by broken bones, hospital visits, and, in some cases, tragic deaths. Skateboarding, rollerblading, BMX racing – all were activities in which boundaries were pushed by impassioned youths. Now they’re practiced worldwide on highly competitive professional levels. Blossoming on streets in cities all over the country is another one of these uncharted ventures: fixed gear 78

THEWAVEMAG.COM DECEMBER 1-14, 2008

bicycling, a trend that has many followers stripping the vehicle of its brakes and gears. A fixed gear bike means that its chain is “fixed” to the rear wheel, so that when a rider pedals forward, the bike moves forward; when a rider pedals backward, the bike moves backward. (In other words, there is no ability to coast.) The result is a super lightweight, brakeless bike that is used for tricks, but more often to ride through crowded, heavily trafficked city streets. And while the chosen outfit of most fixed gear bike aficionados is tight, rolled-up jeans and giant messenger bags, the trend dictates that helmets not be worn – something that would seem counterintuitive on a brakeless bicycle.

Isaac Pallib, another member of SJFixed, offers a bit more. “It just feels better,” he says of riding brakeless. “Every emergency I’ve been in, I have avoided collision.” When pressed on the lingering “what if ” situation, where a lack of brakes could result in tragic consequences, Pallib’s reasoning shifts, but his principles remain unchanged. “I have no arg ument for that. It makes sense to have a safety brake. But I don’t use one. It’s a personal preference.” But make no mistake – the members of SJFixed are not stereotypical bonehead extremists. They are a fun, friendly group of bicycle enthusiasts who have found a common bond in an enjoyable activity. Mark Cosio, the creator of SJFixed and its de facto leader, says that while accidents do occur, he and his riders take what they do very seriously, and don’t treat riding brakeless as something of a goof-off activity. Much like the negative connotations surrounding 80


SPORTS&ADVENTURE: FEATURE

offer expires 12/31/08

SPOR T S & A DV EN T URE

THEWAVEMAG.COM DECEMBER 1-14, 2008

79


SPORTS&ADVENTURE: FEATURE

Affordable Sports & Recreation for the whole family... all under one roof!

Open Hou se & Blood Dri ve Sat., Dec. 6

SOCCER MARTIAL ARTS LACROSSE ROLLER HOCKEY DANCE FITNESS SWIMMING & MORE! 4BWFPOHBT TQFOEMFTTUJNFSVOOJOH BSPVOE TUBZXBSNBOEESZ BOEFOKPZ GSFFXJSFMFTTBOEBHSFBUSFTUBVSBOU 8FIBWFTPNFUIJOHGPSFWFSZPOFJO UIFGBNJMZ GSPNUPUTUPUFFOTUPBEVMUT :PVIBWFUPTFFFJUUPCFMJFWFJU TP DPNFDIFDLJUPVU 800 Embedded Way, San Jose 95138 rJOGP!4JMWFS$SFFL4QPSUTQMFYDPN

w w w.SilverCreekSpor tsplex.com

SPORTS&ADVENTURE F E AT U R E 78

skateboarding in its early stages, the current fixed gear trend is indeed unknown territory, making it exciting and thrilling to not only witness, but be a part of. When Montoya rides backward, pulls up onto his rear wheel, and spins around a few times before landing and pedaling forward, one can see the potential of this sport and the inevitable lasting impact it will have. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not difficult to imagine a Tony Hawk figure emerging from the fixed gear realm, waving to the crowd at an X Games competition before dropping backward into a half-pipe. Then, at least, helmets would be a requirement. But fixed gear, brakeless bikes arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t anything new. Shaw, who is somewhat of a track bike-racing historian, with a collection of artifacts and memorabilia from bygone eras, says that from 1880 to the 1930s, track bike racing was the largest spectator sport in the world. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Riding fixed gear pre-existed the fad,â&#x20AC;? he says. Track bikes, such as the ones ridden at the Hellyer Velodrome, donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have brakes, either â&#x20AC;&#x201C; which is the image fixie riders try to emulate. In order to stop, riders control their speed with their legs and use the banks of the track to slow down. But on a track, when going in a circle, there is little concern for cars and other dangerous obstacles.

SPOR T S & A DV EN T URE

While fixed gear street riders can use their legs to slow down, they also use a skidding skill. A rider can perform

80

THEWAVEMAG.COM DECEMBER 1-14, 2008

[ C O N T. ]

a skid by shifting their weight to the front of the bike and locking the feet on the pedals, causing the back tire to lock up. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Skidding is very inefficient, because the front brake is the primary braking system,â&#x20AC;? Shaw says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s where all the momentum is being stored.â&#x20AC;? While brakeless riding is illegal on the streets under the California Vehicle Code, the law is quite vague when it comes to the issue of skidding and whether it is considered a braking mechanism. Even so, a skid still requires plenty of forethought and surface area to bring a bike to a complete stop, which is unlikely to be possible if a car pops out of a side street when speeding down a hill. At any rate, Pallib offers some sagelike advice for those brakeless fixie riders who come face to face with an emergency braking scenario: â&#x20AC;&#x153;You better grow some wings.â&#x20AC;? TW For a multimedia slideshow and a video of fixed gear riding, visit www.thewavemag.com.

BIKE SHOPS Shawâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Lightweight Cycles, 45 Washington St., Santa Clara (408) 246-7881 www.shawscycles.com Palo Alto Bicycles, 171 University Ave., Palo Alto (650) 328-7411 www.paloaltobicycles.com Mikeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Bikes, 3001 El Camino Real, Palo Alto (650) 855-9521 www.mikesbikes.com BICI Bikes, 5715 Cottle Rd., San Jose (408) 225-0599 The Off Ramp, 2369 El Camino Real, Santa Clara (408) 249-2848 www.offrampbikes.com Calmar Cycles, 2236 El Camino Real, Santa Clara (408) 249-6907 www.calmarcycles.com


SPORTS&ADVENTURE: FEATURE

Great Deals On Holiday Gifts! Gear - Apparel - Equipment VIEW SLIDESHOWS & PROFILES: WWW.THEWAVEMAG.COM/FITNESS DANCE STUDIOS

Western Ballet 914 Rengstorff Ave., Unit A, Mountain View (650) 968-4455 www.westernballet.org Western Ballet provides an atmosphere of care and dedication for all levels, from absolute beginner to professional dancers. Students range in age from four to 95. FITNESS CENTERS

Addison-Penzak Jewish Community Center 14855 Oka Rd., Ste. 201, Los Gatos (408) 356-4973 www.svjcc.org The Addison-Penzak Jewish Community Center is open to all faiths and backgrounds. You’ll love our 20,000-square-foot fitness center, heated swimming pool, lighted tennis courts, more than 60 group exercise classes each week, personal training, massage, full gymnasium with indoor basketball, quality childcare and preschool, sports leagues, after-school programs and so much more!

American Kickboxing Academy 1830 Hillsdale Ave., Ste. 2, San Jose (408) 371-4235, 168 E. Fremont Ave., Sunnyvale www.akakickbox. com The American Kickboxing Academy offers top-level

public instruction for men, women, and children. In addition, AKA provides private professional training.

AlaVie Fitness 120 W. Campbell Ave., Ste. D, Campbell www.alaviefitness.com Cutting-edge outdoor fitness boot camps for all ages and fitness levels. Ten Bay Area locations. 5K/10K training and other fitness events and services. Women’s, coed and corporate programs.

LA Boxing San Jose 3469 E. McKee Rd., San Jose (408) 729-5269 www.laboxing.com/sanjose LA Boxing San Jose offers cardio boxing and kickboxing classes, jiujitsu, and mixed martial arts training for men, women and children.

Sports Basement carries over 100 top brands! Sunnyvale

1177 Kern Avenue (At Lawrence Expwy. Between Central Expwy. and Hwy 101)

All Purchases Enter You In For A Chance To Win A Free Bear Valley Lift Ticket!*

Mon - Fri 10am - 9pm Sat - Sun 9am -7pm (408)-732-0300

(*Sunnyvale Location Only, Mon-Fri, Non-Holiday lift ticket.)

Silver Creek Sportsplex 800 Embedded Way, San Jose (408) 225-1843 www.silvercreeksportsplex.com The 240,000-sq.ft. facility is the largest under one roof in North America — a truly unique, state of-the-art complex catering to today’s active families and individuals.

South Bay Athletic Club 271 Houret Dr., Milpitas (408) 946-0600 www.southbayathleticclub.net South Bay Athletic Club has always been a leader with innovative fitness programs, and yet we always keep the old favorites around – like racquetball and swimming!

ADVERTISE YOUR BUSINESS HERE: (408) 467-3200

*Gifts for Kids! *Everyday Low Prices! *Sale/Sample Area with Items Under $25!

Find Our Other Locations and Shop Online At: www.sportsbasement.com

20%* OFF TOTAL PURCHASE COUPON

sb reg info NCWAV3 or RWAV3 exp: 12/25/08

*One time offer. One per customer. No repeats or copies. Cannot be combined with any other offer or lift tickets.

SKI - BOARD - SNOW - Full Ski & Board Service/Repair Shops


» FEATURE

Home&Design gardeners from following their flagstone path. In fact, some gardeners say they find even more joy in their horticultural endeavors this time of year. “I love my winter garden best,” says Ferne Watt, who manages the vegetable section at Almaden Valley Nursery. A devoted gardener in her spare time, Watt says everything about a winter garden is easier: Less effort is needed to pull weeds because the ground is softer from moisture and roots let go easier; lower numbers on the thermometer create less stress on plants compared to summer’s heat; and plants don’t have to work as hard to find moisture because they are getting water from Mother Nature, not just a sprinkler. While some vegetables and ornamentals fall dormant or don’t grow as well during winter, others thrive in the cooler temperatures. Radishes, for one, not only flourish in winter, but actually taste better now than when grown during summer (their peppery spice flavor kicks it up a notch when harvested in chillier climes). Radishes also grow fairly fast, adds Patricia Becker of Common Ground in Palo Alto, so if planted now they could be ready to harvest in as little as one month.

HOME & DESIGN

Some leafy green veggies also taste better in winter. “Spinach and kale are the sweetest in January and February,” says Becker. “They love the cold, so if you harvest them when it’s a little cold, they’re really delicious.” Other vegetables that do well during Super Bowl month include broccoli, arugula, beets, Brussels sprouts, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, celery, endive, lettuce, mustard, onion, peas, sorrel and turnips. And since root vegetables (carrots, onions, turnips and such) are plants that grow their fruit underground, they can also have more flavor in winter. “Carrots tend to get woody in the summer, and sometimes not have a lot of flavor,” adds Watt.

Winter Green Vegetables and pretty blooms can thrive in your garden when the temperature dips. BY ANNE WARD ERNST

F

or most of us, the winter months are a time for staying indoors and warming ourselves by the fire. If we do go outdoors, it’s usually for recreational purposes, such as skiing or skating. Yet remarkably enough, the cool temps outside can also provide an opportune time to break a sweat in one’s garden. The days may be shorter, and the air and ground much colder, but that doesn’t detract avid

82

THEWAVEMAG.COM DECEMBER 1-14, 2008

Some lettuces can be harvested all season by picking off only the outer leaves as you need them, leaving the smaller, inner leaves to grow. Head lettuce will regrow if an inch or so is left on the stem when harvesting. The difference in freshness and flavor between garden-grown lettuce and the store-bought variety is noticeable, adds Becker. Same goes for organically yard-grown vegetables, which are not only healthier and more nutritious, but better for the environment. Growing one’s own produce means eliminating gasoline consumption that would be used to transport food from some place else. Plus it allows the health of the soil in which it grows to be monitored, which makes the ground as fresh as it can be. Winter gardening isn’t just about veggies, though. Many ornamental or flowering plants, including pansy, viola, calendula, snapdragon, nasturtium and primrose, also grow well even with a chill in the air. (Be sure to check with your local nursery for plants appropriate for the climate in your neighborhood.)

The pleasing faces of pansies come in snow white, eye-popping purple, vivacious yellow and more, while happy primroses will stretch out their necks to show bright fuchsia-pink, grape-jelly purple, or sunny-side-up yellow. Not only are they readily available, they offer a quick and easy way to enliven a dreary walkway. Jim Citta, the native plant specialist at Almaden Valley Nursery, says it’s always a good time to consider planting California natives. To stay in line with a plant’s natural cycle, some may do better if set in the ground in mid-to-late fall, but many can be planted any season. Don’t ignore moisture levels in the ground and pots just because we’re in our rainy season, he says. The sun and wind can dry out the soil, so regular inspections are still necessary. During those inspections, also check for slugs, snails and other pests. Winter is also a great time to beef up nutrients in the soil, advises Don Larson, assistant manager of Common Ground. Water can leach out nutrients, leaving behind salt that can burn roots, and water can also wash away soil. Cover crops, which are also known as “green manure,” are useful for replenishing nutrients and helping to reduce erosion. Common Ground recommends red winter wheat, fava beans, cereal rye and vetch as composting crops that not only look pretty, but help return nutrients such as the ever-important nitrogen to the soil as they grow, and again when they decompose in the compost pile. Experts also recommend using the winter season as a time to clean everything: Rid the yard of debris and spent plants, prune only plants that are not frostsensitive, and spiff up those garden tools. So just because it’s cold outside, be sure not to snub your garden. It’ll reward you if you continue to give it some love. TW WHERE TO GROW

Check out these locations for your native plant purchases: Collector’s Corner of Almaden Valley Nursery, 15800 Almaden Expwy., San Jose (408) 997-1234 www.almadenvalleynursery.com Middlebrook Gardens, 76 Race St., San Jose (408) 292-9993 www.middlebrook-gardens.com Common Ground, 559 College Ave., Palo Alto (650) 493-6072 www.commongroundinpaloalto.org Common Ground Organic Garden Supply and Education Center offers classes year round in everything from designing a sustainable landscape to rose pruning. Classes fill fast, but management says they’ll open another section as one class fills. It’s best to call to register. Upcoming classes of interest include: Edible Garden Series: From Design to Harvest: Learn garden design and planning, composting, soil testing and preparation, seed propagation and transplanting, watering, and how to nurture healthy edible crops. Master harvesting techniques and learn what to plant after harvest. Five week series begins Sat. Jan 17, $295. Rose Pruning and Care: Encourage beautiful, profuse flowering with winter pruning and proper care; learn about the best care for healthy, happy roses. The class will go to a nearby garden for a demonstration and some hands-on pruning. Sat., Jan. 10, $37, call (650) 493-6072 to register.


CUSTOM WALL UNITS FOR EVERY ROOM

OUR WALL UNITS CAN BE CUSTOMIZED FOR ABOUT 1/2 THE PRICE OF CABINET MAKERS

The Home Theater Furniture Specialist! We have the perfect home theater furniture for your new Plasma, DLP or LCD TV. We have everything from monitor stands to complete custom wall systems. Choose from hundreds of sizes, types of wood, finishes, styles and hardware options!

www.TownSquareFurniture.com

295 E. Hamilton Ave. Campbell (between Hwy 17 & Winchester) (408) 378-0501

ATTENTION FIRST TIME HOME BUYERS! Join us for an Orientation Class to learn about Madrone Plaza in Morgan Hill!

December 3rd, 2008 6:00pm OR January 7, 2009 6:00pm Madrone Plaza Clubhouse 18510 Opal Lane, Morgan Hill, Ca 95037

Down Payment Assistance Available up to $150,000* 1 - 3 Bedroom Homes Available Monthly payments as low as $1,300/Month! Priced from the High $200,000’s Space is Limited! Sign up for the free class today!

408-843-9271

*Restrictions apply. Must be a first time home buyer to be eligible. Price, terms, conditions subject to change without notice. THEWAVEMAG.COM DECEMBER 1-14, 2008

83

HOME & DESIGN

Opportunities Include:


SVMARKETPLACE » COLUMN: HOME WORK

WEDDING

VIEW SLIDESHOWS & PROFILES: WWW.THEWAVEMAG.COM/WEDDINGS

PLANNER is exclusive to our boutique for all of Northern California. Our philosophy is to offer a wide variety of high quality gowns in a no-pressure environment so that every bride may enjoy her personal experience of finding her dream wedding gown. BELLA MIA BRIDE Westgate Mall, 1600 Saratoga Ave., Ste. 407, San Jose (408) 374-0400 www.bellamiabride.com Bella Mia Bride is truly a full service boutique offering everything a client needs to look perfect for her special event! Our specialty boutique offers on-location hair and makeup services, in addition to wedding, Quinceañera and evening gowns, shoes, veils, tiaras, hair pins, purses, jewelry and more! HONEYMOON PLANNING CRUISE PLANNERS 308 E. Main St., Los Gatos (408) 354-9308 www.parlour308salon.com Professional, comfortable and discreet. Your tan is applied by hand, using an airbrush. The solution is customized for every client to create a natural sun-kissed tan. INSURANCE

Photo by GoodEye Photography + Design

TO ADVERTISE IN SVMARKETPLACE WEDDING PLANNER, CALL: (408) 467-3200 B AC H E L O R E T T E PA R T I E S

FLORIST

JEWELSEXPRESSION 1445 Foxworthy Ave., San Jose www.jewelsexpression. com Jewelsexpression offers exotic dancing classes with a softer touch. Designed for women of all shapes, sizes and ages, you’ll learn the art of the “walk,” floor performing, and faux pole and chair dancing. Great for bridal showers and bachelorette parties.

PHOTOGRAPHERS

FLOWER DIVAS 3283 De La Cruz Blvd., Studio F, Santa Clara (408) 7274416 www.flowerdivas.com Each wedding is distinctive; we can only provide a general price sheet. Each wedding is designed and orchestrated by your floral artist, no two are ever alike. We can only give you an approximate cost before we meet with you. You can request a price sheet by email or by phone to get you started.

R E N TA L S LYNN’S WEDDING SERVICES Milpitas (408) 398-2199 www.lynnweddingservices.com Full service chair cover rental and much more! Chair cover and linen rental, wedding flowers, candelabras, party rentals, hall and stage decorations, hair and makeup.

SHANGRI-LA LOTUS 413-A Monterey Avenue, Los Gatos (408) 354-5901 www.jennysbeauty.com Look your very best for your day. We provide the perfect makeup for your entire wedding party – bride, attendants and both mothers. Flawless makeup complements your dress and location, allowing your photographer/videographer to provide you with the best memories. Whether you come to us or we come to you, everything will be done to your satisfaction. T R A N S P O R TAT I O N

AMBASSADOR’S ROLLS 674 Picasso Terrace, Sunnyvale (888) 989-0185 www.ambassadorsrolls.com With service throughout the Bay Area, the fleet here includes a variety of antique classics, ranging from a 1953 “Gatsby Style” Tuxedo Two Tone Wraith Rolls-Royce with flat-floor design doors engineered for graceful entries and exits, to a 14-passenger convertible limousine. VENUES

S A L O N S , S PA S & M A K E U P

GOWNS & TUXEDOS

E N T E R TA I N M E N T THORO-BREAD ENTERTAINMENT (650) 248-3803 We provide DJ services for all occasions, and offer a wide range of music, including today’s greatest hits, hiphop, reggae, dancehall, soul, oldies, Spanish music and much more. So next time you’re thinking about having a party, give us a call and leave the music to us!

NICOLETTE COUTURE BRIDAL BOUTIQUE 15 El Toro Ave., Morgan Hill (408) 779-6146 www.nicolettecouture.com Nicolette Couture Bridal boutique is located in charming downtown Morgan Hill. It is owned by mother and daughter partners Nicole and Sue Castro. We are currently offering four gorgeous designers, one of which THEWAVEMAG.COM DECEMBER 1-14, 2008

PROFESSIONAL MAKE-UP BY TIFFANY (408) 242-8154 www.beautyexperttiffany.com Camera-ready bridal and wedding makeup service specializing in customized color matching foundation and mineral powder just for you. We’ll make sure you have a flawless complexion and the perfect makeup for your special day.

GOODEYE PHOTOGRAPHY + DESIGN Serving the Bay Area and Beyond (408) 431-4808 www.goodeyephotography.com Specializing in a candid style, GoodEye will not only leave you with a wedding album that will be the envy of your friends, but make the whole experience effortless and enjoyable. GoodEye’s photojournalistic approach will connect with you and your guests in a way that makes every shot look natural. What makes GoodEye stand out from the rest? Genuine talent and a passion to perfectly capture your momentous day.

HOTEL LOS GATOS & SPA 210 E. Main St., Los Gatos (408) 335-1700 www.hotellosgatos.com Offering Mediterranean ambience and luxurious banquet facilities for events and weddings to accommodate up to 130 guests in our Indoor Monte Sereno Ballroom, and Outdoor Courtyard & Pool Terrace. ABERCROMBIE FLOWERS 120 S. Sunnyvale Ave., Sunnyvale (408) 245-0130 www.abercrombieflowers.com Luscious wedding bouquets, distinctive reception and exotic centerpieces for your luxurious and lavish soiree. Corporate gifts, funerals, and events are other areas of our expertise!

84

NIRVANA AVEDA CONCEPT SALON 224-B N. Santa Cruz Ave., Los Gatos (408) 354-7979 www.nirvanasalon.com Nirvana is an award-winning Aveda Concept Salon located in the heart of beautiful downtown Los Gatos. We specialize in advanced hair cutting and coloring, bridal and event styling, makeup and hair spa services. All services include our signature aromatherapy scalp massage featuring Aveda Singular Note essential oils.

RECEPTIONS

C AT E R I N G

PARSLEY, SAGE, ROSEMARY & THYME 795 S. Second St., San Jose (800) 798-8388 www.psrt. com While we cover all aspects of event planning, the essence of PSRT is and always shall remain the food. We are always working in the kitchen, creating new flavors, old tastes with new twists, and innovative combinations. The food is always the most memorable aspect of our events, and we intend to keep it that way. Don’t look to us for “run-of-the-mill caterer’s fare”; you won’t find it on our menus.

VALERIE VEDDA 181 Metro Dr., Ste. 290, San Jose (408) 930-1290 Learn about the value of your insurance coverage through a friendly review of your current policies and benefit from our multiline discounts for home, auto and life insurance. CA License 0F86939

makeup artistry for weddings, commercial photography, fashion shoots, runway and all phases of makeup for stage, motion pictures and television.

AYOMA LIFESPA 355 Santana Row, Fifth Floor, San Jose (408) 423-5424 www.ayomalifespa.com This restful haven inside the Hotel Valencia is the only Ayurvedic (a 5,000-year-old healing system from India) wellness spa in the Bay Area. Using this holistic healthcare system, the staff here assesses each client’s mindbody constitution, and treatments are tailored accordingly. The spa’s inviting lounge makes it a great place to head with a group of friends for a day of prewedding rejuvenation. LE HAIR & MAKE-UP SERVICES Serving the Bay Area (408) 718-3945 www.lehairandmakeupservices.com Quang Le’s Hair and Makeup Services offer premier specialty hair styling and

DOLCE HAYES MANSION 200 Edenvale Ave., San Jose (408) 226-3200 www.hayesmansion.dolce.com Dolce Hayes Mansion offers both indoor and outdoor ceremony and reception venues, fabulous menus, vendor referrals, guest rooms, spa services, and can accommodate spectacular events from 20-400 guests. Surrounded by lush emerald green lawns, gardens of vibrant, colorful flowers and wonderful towering palm trees, the 100year-old estate has been renovated, upgraded and transformed into a luxurious resort and spa, an amazing wedding venue. HOTEL LOS GATOS 210 E. Main St., Los Gatos (866) 335-1700 www.jdvhotels. com/los_gatos A vibrant hybrid of Mediterranean elegance and California flair, Hotel Los Gatos is located at the base of the Santa Cruz Mountains and is walking distance from the charming galleries, restaurants, and boutiques of downtown Los Gatos. Take advantage of the 372-square-foot, grandiose Vasona Room with adjoining outdoor balconies, and the on-site Preston Wynne Spa.


THE FINAL LAST WORD B Y S E A N B A B Y - S E A N B A B Y @ T H E W AV E M A G . C O M

Tips on Holiday Tips

N

ow that we’re in December, almost everything you see, hear, and read will be holidays, holidays and more holidays. I am no exception. Mouths that once told you of celebrity gossip or local news will now speak nothing but holiday tips. How to outsmart wily shopping crowds, what Christmas fashions are hot, how to blast your holiday bulge... it’s a lot to deal with, and may be a jarring departure from your nonholiday lifestyle. That’s why I’ve written this extremely complicated guide to help you deal with it all.

Keep Your Expectations Low

We’ve come to rely on the news media to provide us with new information, and years of this reliance has gone to their heads. They think we need their wisdom about everything. But they’re not idiots themselves, so after they decide that viewers would like a segment called “Tips on Keeping Your Holiday Heating Bill Down,” no one wants to do it and they assign it to the crappiest producer on the crew. So don’t be surprised if by the time these informative heating bill tips get to your TV, three or four of them are “wear a sweater.” This can be a real letdown for someone who isn’t fighting a tragic mental condition.

Try Some of Your Own As soon as you see the teaser for “Staying Slim Over the Holidays,” try to come up with some tips of your own during the commercial break. Like maybe releasing an exercising wolf into the dining room, or stapling your family’s stomachs. For those of you who are more advanced, try creating subtips for your tips. For example, stomach stapling is expensive, but all it really does is prevent fat people from eating everything. You can do the same thing at home by dipping the bottom half of all your food in the toilet. Attack the problem from several angles. Maybe fat people could trick themselves into eating less by putting moustaches on their foods and balancing them on headless mannequins. See how easy it is?

Listen, and Take Proper Notes If you knew how to buy the perfect gift, you wouldn’t be watching a segment on buying the perfect gift. So pay attention. Take notes and make them clear and concise. Don’t just write down “Panasonic Close Curves Lady Shaver”

and circle it – use stickers or rubber stamps to indicate whether it’s a good or bad stocking stuffer, and for whom. Otherwise, you’ll find yourself at the drug store, confused and running a lady shaver through your chest hair. Also, penmanship is so important. Last year I was thrown out of Best Buy for having sex with Guitar Hero because I couldn’t read my own handwriting – which meant that my nephew got a 33-year-old nurse’s assistant I met on Facebook.

Use Your TiVo Through complications in cultural sensitivity, a lot of airtime will be given to crappy non-Christmas Christmases. Your brain only has a certain amount of storage space, so fast forward these parts. It’s not your responsibility if someone was so stupid that they picked a religion that didn’t have a Christmas in it.

Compare and Apply Look back on what you did in Step 2. It’s a quick way to check whether you’re smarter than the dumbest person on the local ABC news team. If you’re not, good. That means you haven’t been wasting your time. Take whatever wisdom you’ve gained, like going to the mall during times when no one else would be there, and have a great holiday! Also, you should note that commercials do not count as holiday advice. If a Zales national ad campaign tells you that a butterfly pendant signifies true love, it doesn’t. Women watch TV, too, and they’ll know where your lazy ass got that idea.

Forget Hard Remember, by next year the advicegivers will have forgotten they told you all this, and they’ll do it all over again. You have to forget, and forget hard. If you want to have any prayer of enjoying magazines and TV next holiday, it will have to be as if it never happened. Unfortunately, no news affiliate in my area has ever put together a package on achieving sudden and complete memory loss – but it did have a traditional recipe for eggnog. It’s a step in the right direction. TW THEWAVEMAG.COM DECEMBER 1-14, 2008

85


PHOTO CREDITS D E S I G N @ T H E W AV E M A G . C O M

1, Cover / Courtesy of 20th Century Fox, 3, Fixed Gear / By Chris Schmauch, Garden City Casino / Courtesy of Dan Orloff, Juno talks to couple wanting to adopt / Courtesy of 20th Century Fox, Ken Benjamin Photos / Courtesy of Ken Benjamin, Plumed Horse / By Chris Schmauch, Reese on the phone / By John P. Johnson, San Jose Ballet Nutcracker / Courtesy ofJohn Gerbetz, Scientists in Lab / Courtesy of iStock, The Mad Tea Party / By Mark Bryan, Young woman tending garden / Courtesy of iStock, 6, 2008 Thanksgiving dedication of AAHH / Courtesy of AAHH, 7, Strong Neighborhood Initiative / Courtesy of SJ Redevelopment Agency, 8, SJ Holidsay Parade / Courtesy of SJ Holiday Parade, 10, Angel and Devil earphones / Courtesy of Geek Stuff 4 U, Wooden Tops / Courtesy of Design Within Reach, Fashion Game Book / Courtesy of Anthropologie, Single in the City / By Terri Hill, The Blank Club / By Lauren Sagar, 12, Dean Takahashi / By Chris Schmauch, WDTV / Courtesy of Western Digital, 30, Jewelry / All jewelry images shot by Chris Schmauch, 32, Pregnancy Box Horizontal / Courtesy of Consumer Genetics, Scientists in Lab / Courtesy of iStock, 42, George Lopez / Courtesy of George Lopez, San Jose Ballet Nutcracker / Courtesy of John Gerbetz, 43, 20 Harps for the Holidays / Courtesy of 20 Harps for the Holidays, A Christmas Carol / Courtesy of NTC, 44, Plumed Horse - Mushroom Dish / By Chris Schmauch, 60, Garden City Casino / Courtesy of Dan Orloff, 62, High on Fire / Courtesy of High on Fire, 66, Reese on Phone / By John P. Johnson, 68, Beyonce in Cadillac Records / Courtesy of Sony Pictures, 70, The Mad Tea Party / By Mark Bryan, 72, Peter Pan / Courtesy of Chris Ayers Photography, 73, Composer Bruno Ferrandis / Courtesy of Santa Rosa Symphony, 74, Every Christmas Story Ever Told / Courtesy of Dave Lepori, 76, Juno Talks to couple / Courtesy of 20th Century Fox, 78, SJ Holiday Parade / Courtesy of SJ Holiday Parade, 80, Turning Wheels for kids / Courtesy of iStock, 82, SJFixed / By Chris Schmauch, Matt Montoya of SJFixed / By Chris Schmauch, Anthony of SJFixed / By Chris Schmauch, 86, Young woman tending garden / Courtesy of iStock, 88, Wedding Dress / By Chris Schmauch, 89, Seanbaby / By Chris Schmauch

86

THEWAVEMAG.COM DECEMBER 1-14, 2008

ADVERTISER INDEX S A L E S @ T H E W AV E M A G . C O M 19 Market. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 23 Skidoo. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 A-1 Self Storage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86 a.c.t. Energy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .45 Accent on Aesthetics. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .35 Addison-Penzak. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63 Addison-Penzak. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73 Amerturk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11 Any Water Sports. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80 Art-n-Fun. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .24 AVA Spa . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9 A Visionary Salon. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .37 Ayoma Life Spa. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 Babycoo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .21 Ballet San Jose . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 Bank, The. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50 Bay Dental. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 Beauty Redefined . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 Bella Rosa . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12 Bella Saratoga . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .53 Bettina’s. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17 Billy Berk’s. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57 Birk’s Restaurant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .49 Blondie’s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77 Blowfish Sushi . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54 Braces For Pretty Faces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .31 Branham Lounge. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .59 Britannia Arms. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60 British Bankers Club . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .52 Cafe Hair Salon & Spa . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .35 Camera Cinemas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63 Caper’s Eat & Drink . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48 Cardiff Lounge . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60 Century Graphics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86 Cha Cha Sushi . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50 Chardonnay II Santa Cruz . . . . . . . . . . . . .79 Chatanoga Persian Cuisine . . . . . . . . . . . .53 Chrysalis Aesthetic & Reconstructive Surgery Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7 Cielito Lindo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50 Cin-Cin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .21 Cinelux Theatres . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65 City of Milpitas. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77 City of Milpitas. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73 CJ Olsen’s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .26 Club Savoy. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .59 Cookies by Design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7 Court’s Lounge. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .61 Current Moves . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 Dave & Busters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .47 Debbie Lyn’s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .26 Designers Ltd.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9 Diva Sharon’s Divine Vintage . . . . . . . . . .24 Dive Bar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .59 Dr. Hoang K. Do . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8 Dr. Michael Bouzid . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 Dr. Tony H. Pham, M.D.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .37 Dr. Youbert Karalian . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .37 Emerge MediSpa . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .35 Emerge MediSpa . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Eternal Beauty . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11 eWomen. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .75 Fahrenheit / Eight Group Inc. . . . . . . . . . 57 Faultline Brewing Company . . . . . . . . . . .53 Faz Restaurant and Catering . . . . . . . . . .49

Fish Market . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .45 Five Branches Institute . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .33 Five Branches Institute . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .76 Fleming’s Prime Steakhouse . . . . . . . . . .45 Flobell Boutique . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 Four Christmases. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63 Foxy Avenue Clips . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 Fujitsu Planetarium at De Anza . . . . . . . 73 Fuze Fit For a Kid!. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17 Goosetown Lounge. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60 Grill ‘Em Steakhouse. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .52 Grill on the Alley, The . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54 Gumbo Jumbo Cajun Cuisine . . . . . . . . . 23 Harmonie European Day Spa . . . . . . . . . 25 Healthier Skin & Nail. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .35 Healthy Ways . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .26 HillbarnTheatre . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69 House of Gengi. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .45 iFlySFBay . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .79 iFlySFBay . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .26 infobayarea.com . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .61 Insignificant Others . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71 Internal Spa Rejuvenation Center . . . . . .32 Island Grill . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .51 iSwing. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .81 Jam Theatricals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71 Jane Aesthetic Medicine & Surgery . . . . .4 Japantown. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77 Jelly Belly. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 Justina Azcueta . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .39 Kane Company, The. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .26 Kawczynski & Associates. . . . . . . . . . . . . 77 Kobe Sushi. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .47 Kushlani Hall Fine Jewelry . . . . . . . . . . . .24 Le Hair & Makeup Services . . . . . . . . . . . .35 Limon Salon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 Lisa’s Tea Treasures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .45 Little Lou’s BBQ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .51 LJM Legal. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73 Loft Bar & Bistro. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48 Lone Star Tree Farm . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .75 Los Gatos / Willow Glen Meats. . . . . . . . .24 Los Gatos Health & Fitness . . . . . . . . . . . .15 Los Gatos Lodge Bar & Grill. . . . . . . . . . . 20 Los Gatos Motor Inn . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .21 Los Gatos Pilates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .18 Maceio . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .51 Magic Tan. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9 Mane Event Salon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 Mantra Palo Alto . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46 Marketplace - Wedding Services. . . . . . 84 Menara Moroccan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .53 New Image European Skin Care & Day Spa. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .39 New Image European Skin Care & Day Spa. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .26 New Look Institute . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8 Nirvana. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 Nothing Bundt Cakes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .19 Ocean Blue Restaurant. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46 Off Ramp, The. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80 Pearl River . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .55 Pedro’s Restaurant & Cantina. . . . . . . . . .49 Pinn Brothers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88 Pleasures from the Heart. . . . . . . . . . . . . 29

Psychic Readings by Lila . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 Punisher: War Zone. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65 Quarter Note. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .61 Ray’s Ultimate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9 Rejuve Medical. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 Relax the Back, Sunnyvale . . . . . . . . . . . 25 Restaurant James Randall. . . . . . . . . . . . .21 Riley’s Ride . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .33 Rosie McCann’s. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .47 Sam’s BBQ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54 Sanctuary Salon. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 San Francisco Herb & Natural Foods. . . .39 San Jose Camera . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 San Jose Downtown Association. . . . . . 22 San Jose Holiday Parade . . . . . . . . . . . . . .27 San Jose Repertory Theatre . . . . . . . . . . 23 San Jose Repertory Theatre . . . . . . . . . . .67 San Jose Saberkittens. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87 San Jose Sharks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 Santa Cruz Big Trees . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73 San Vitum . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .39 Satura Cakes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50 SCVURPPP / Watershed Watch. . . . . . . . 77 Shangri La Lotus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 Shoe Fetish . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 Shoreline Billiards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .59 Shougun House . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .52 Signature Lifestyle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .24 Silvercreek Sportsplex . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .76 Silvercreek Sportsplex . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80 SINO. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44 Sky High Sports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .81 Sol Tan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .24 South County Housing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83 South First Billiards. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .61 South First Billiards. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 Spencer’s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .43 Sports Basement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .81 Straits Restaurant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44 Stroller Power! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17 Sundance, The Steakhouse . . . . . . . . . . . .55 Sunny Buffet. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .51 SuperSlow Zone. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .32 Sushi O Sushi. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .55 Tandoori Oven . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .53 Tech Museum of Innovation . . . . . . . . . . 23 The Spa of Los Gatos . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .19 Tom’s Outdoor Furniture Style. . . . . . . . 25 Town Square Furniture. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83 Trailsloggers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .79 Transporter 3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65 Trash Sack . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 Trevese . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .21 Umbrella Salon. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .37 University Art . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85 University Mission Medical Clinic . . . . . 34 Vena’s Skin & Body Treatments . . . . . . . .26 Venture Christian Church. . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 Vision Innovations Optometry. . . . . . . . .39 Westpark Dental . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7 Westwood Family Chiropractic . . . . . . . .26 Wet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57 Zombie Runner. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .26


THEWAVEMAG.COM DECEMBER 1-14, 2008

87


The Wave Magazine - Volume 08, Issue 25: November 19 - December 2, 2008  

Celebrate Los Gatos: All of your dining, shopping and reveling needs can be met in Los Gatos this holiday season. Reese Witherspoon: The dim...

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you